The East Carolinian, January 21, 1997







TUESDAY
JANUARY 21.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNrVERSTTY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA I
December robbery investigation closes
Joe Horst
ECU POLICE DEPARTMENT
Days before students took their last final
exams, ECU Police arrested a 20-year-old
Greenville man, along with two accomplices,
for allegedly robbing an ECU student with a
handgun and assaulting another student by
pointing a gun.
Abdul James Rouse, 20, of 421 W. 4th
Street, was arrested at the ECU Police
department on Dec. 9, 1996. Rouse was
charged with one count of robbery with a dan-
gerous weapon and one count of assault by
pointing a gun. Troy Hennighan and Kaylon
Williams, from New York and Greenville
respectively, were each charged with felony
accessory after the fact.
Hennighan was also arrested on a fugitive
warrant from the state of New York for a dan-
gerous drug violation. Extradition proceed-
ings are pending.
ECU Police Assistant Chief Thomas
Younce said that the arrests resulted from an
intensive investigation.
"The arrests were the culmination of
many long hours and good old fashioned
police work by members of the ECU Police
department Younce said.
On Dec. 5, a resident of Scott Hall was
approached by a black male wearing a ski
mask. According to police reports, the
assailant pointed a medium-sized handgun at
the student and demanded the student's wal-
let. The suspect fled the scene in a white
vehicle with the victim's checkbook and wal-
let.
A resident of Jones Hall reported that he
witnessed the robbery and that the assailant
also pursued him and pointed a handgun at
him. This victim was able to flee the area in
his vehicle before the assailant could reach
him.
"I am proud of the great work done by
members of the ECU Police department in
quickly making these arrests Younce said.
"Maybe our quick work will deter others from
coming to our campus to commit crimes
The police department suggests that stu-
dents should be aware of their surrounding!
and take necessary precautions, such as walk'
ing in groups or utilizing the police escort sys-
tem.
"I think that these crimes demonstrate
that the university is not immune to what is
going on around us and in our communities
and it is incumbent upon each of us to take
crime prevention seriously Younce said.
foculty and
staff may
need own
health unit
Student health turns
away faculty
ANGELA KOENIG AND
NICOLE MCMULLEN
HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
ECU's Student Health Center is available in
case students get sick while on campus or
need medical attention. This service, howev-
er, is not available to the faculty and staff
mem' :rs who work here.
Students pay $65 from their fees each
semester to use the center. The health center
budget and the salaries of the people working
there are based on this money.
Because the faculty members do not con-
tribute to this budget they cannot benefit
from the services, faculty and staff members
are not allowed to pay the $65 fee each semes-
ter to have the option of being treated 'on
campus because this would cause an over-
crowding problem at the health center.
According to Gwcn leaden, secretary to
the director of the Student Health Center, to
treat faculty and staff would mean doubling
the staff and the space in the center.
If a student is injured on campus and can
not make it to the center a nurse can be sent
to help the individual. However, if the same
accident were to occur to a faculty or staff
member, the same service does not have to be
provided.
Only in an emergency situation can help be
provided.
"We wouldn't turn down another human
being Teaden said.
If a non-student is cut or severely injured
they can be brought to the health center to
receive attention. According to Student
Health Center Director Kay VfcnNortwick the
center is usually not contacted in these cases
and instead 911 is called.
The workers can do as much as possible to
get help for an injured person even if they can
not help them.
VanNortwick said that in one case an ECU
police officer had chest pains while walking
outside the health center. He was taken
inside, hooked up to an electrocardiogram and
was stabilized by the doctors. The center then
contacted 911 to take him to the hospital.
When English Professor Dr. Douglas
McMillan fell outside of the General
Classroom Building last semester, he could
not be treated at the health center but did
receive assistance getting aid. He was able to
get up but could not walk.
"A colleague found me and went to the
center to get help. A nurse came with a wheel-
chair and helped get me to the infirmary
where they made arrangements to get me to
my personal physician McMillan said.
He was pleased with the center's response
although they could not directly help him.
"They didn't have the facilities to do what
I needed anyway. They were very helpful and
in fact made follow-up calls to check on me
McMillain said.
SEE HEALTH. PAGE 4
TUESDAY
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First guest view columnist� WEDNESDAY:
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sports11 � �� v3 ni9n 45
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GREENVILLE. NC 27858328-2000 advertising
across from Joyner library328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutec�ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
UNC schools consider
smoking ban
Residence halls may
become smoke-free
ERIKA SWARTS
HOUSINGCONSUMATORY SERVICES ISSUES
Since the fatal fraternity house fire at the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
last May, housing directors have considered a
smoking ban in residence halls and campus
apartments.
The fraternity fire, which resulted in five
student deaths, was caused by several smol-
dering cigarette butts left in a trash can.
In November there were concerns raised at
a UNC-CH meeting. They decided to start
looking into banning smoking in all residence
halls and campus apartments. According to an
article in the News and Observer, UNC-CH
Housing Services realizes that the response
from students will be unfavorable because
other such attempts to control student behav-
ior, such as drinking and overnight quests, have
been unpopular.
"The students should have the right to
choose whether they smoke or not Tom
Carrol a business major and UNC-CH hall res-
ident said.
A survey of East Carolina hall residence
found that our students agree with Carrol.
Several ECU students agreed if smoking was
banned in residence halls it would only hurt
the school. They believe it would force smok-
ing residents to move off campus. This of
course would cause the university to lose
money in student rent. However, there are
also a few students who would not oppose such
a ban.
"I feel good about it (a ban on smoking)
freshman art major Jenn Novakoski said.
Especially in my dorm, Corten, because we
can not get rid of the smell of cigarette
smoke
Although Novakoski did add that more
non-smoking floors would be a better alterna-
tive. Most students surveyed believed the
smoking policy now in effect at ECU should
not go through many major changes. The idea
of creating more non-smoking floors andor
entire residence halls seems to be the most
popular choice.
According to an article in the Daily
Reflector, the University of North Carolina at
Wilmington's Housing Services also has con-
cerns about smoking in residence halls last
year. UNCWs Housing Director Bill Harris
said that a non-smoker having a smoking room-
mate was the number 1 complaint his office
received from residents. The problem of con-
flicting roommates has effectively changed
UNC-Ws policy. Since then the top floors of
most residence halls are now designated as
smoking areas.
According to the same article, only a few
selected colleges and universities have chosen
Campus vigil celebrates
King legacy
Corey algood
MINORITY STUDENT ISSUES
MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
NEWS EDITOR
Editor's note: Fbgrettabfr, TEC's coverage ofthefollovmg
firms couldnot bemorem-depth dueto the factthatour pro-
duction schedule for this issue cometled'mth last night's activities
"MLK Remembered: A Celebration of Life,
Work and Achievement of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr was this year's theme to honor the
birthday of the renown social activist Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Last night, the university observed the
legacy accomplishments of King with a march
and candlelight vigil that began in front of
Belk Hall on College Hill Drive. The march
proceeded to Mendenhall Student Center
where the platform guest registry included the
ECU Gospel Choir who was invited perform
several musical selections followed by a fea-
ture address from North Carolina's Industrial
Commissioner
Bernadine
Ballance.
Ballance, the wife
of N.C. Senator
Frank Ballance, Jr
has recieved sever-
al degrees at vari-
ous North Carolina
universities
including a BS in
Elementary
��- SffiBU
The King celebration will continue in the
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room oh
Wednesday Jan. 22, at 7 p.m. Guest speaker
Juanita Moore, executive director of the
National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis
Term will give an original presentation on
human rights.
Moore recieved both her bachelor's degree
and master's degree at North Carolina Central
University. Moore is a well-known and accom-
plished speaker whose presentation hisory
SEE VIGIL. PAGE 4
N.C. SCHOOLS RESTRICTIONS
�S)North Carolina Universities' policies regarding cigarette smoking in residence halls and
Duke Universityon-campus housing.
No restrictions; smoking is allowed in residence halls.
Meredith CollegeSmoking is allowed only on certain floors.
N.C. CentralSmoking is allowed in students' rooms but
Universitynot in common areas.
N.C. State UniversitySmoking is allowed in seven of nine residence halls; there are smoke-free halls in every dorm.
UNC-Chapel HillNo restrictions; smoking is allowed in residence halls and campus apartments.
to ban smoking. One of which is the
University of Vermont. They will ban all
smoking inside of indoor facilities in May of
this year. They have even gone as far as ban-
ning smoking outside of open windows.
Jill Carnaghi, Unviersity of Vcrmonts' direc-
tor of residence life led the charge. Through
her own personal investigation she found that
there were a number of students who suffered
from allergies, asthma and other respiratory ill-
nesses that are aggravated by smoke.
"I found that smoking was a really high
health concern in our student population
Carnaghi said.
As of right now nothing has been decided at
the University of North Carolina or at any
other North Carolina school. UNC-CH hous-
ing directors will be meeting at the end of this
month to decided on whether or not to enforce
the ban. As for ECU, the outcome of this
months meeting could be what sparks an idea
in the mind of our Housing Director.
Haney presents art in glass in Mendenhall
Exihibit in Mendenhall
Student Center through
Wednesday
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ARTS AND STUDIES ISSUES
Fiowers with fish swimming close and endan-
gered species, including zebras, elephants,
and even the Energizer Bunny are among the
topics of glass works by Art Haney currently
being shown in Mendenhall. The exhibit
includes 12 works of glass mosaics and six
works of fused glass with glass enamels.
Haney is an Associate Dean in the School
of Art who teaches ceramics in addition to
working on his own pieces in glass.
"All of us in the art department, all of the
professors, we all stay professionally active,
and this just happens to be what I do�glass-
work Haney said.
The exhibit currently being displayed uses
mostly endangered species and other environ-
mental issues as its subject matter. Haney said
that finding inspiration for his work is an ongo-
ing process, often leading from one set of
works to the next.
"Oftentimes my work is done in series. For
example, I did a whole series once on just
bridges�all kinds of bridges. Physical bridges,
psychological bridges, emotional bridges; the
whole series was based on the concept of join-
ing different things Haney said.
Haney said that the bridge series suggest-
ed the topic of water to him, and he did a
series on boats, based on his experiences as a
novice sailor.
"In doing that. 1 became more aware of the
ecology, and the wetlands, and the environ-
ment, so that led to a series on environmental
issues, which led to a series on endangered
species Haney said.
Oftentimes, Haney said, the glass itself will
suggest a motif.
"While I was working on these flowers, I
found that a lot of the patterns in the glass
suggested fish. So I started incorporting fish
into the flowers Haney said.
The quality of the glass is extremely impor-
tant to the type of work that Haney does, so
much so that he made a special trip to South
Carolina to handpick the glass for this series.
Both the fused glass and the glass mosaics
are mounted and framed when completed, but
the processes to create the works are entirely
different.
"(With the fused glass) what I do is I layer
different colors of pieces of glass. They're
stacked on top of each other, put in an electric
kiln and melted, so they fuse. And then I go
back into them with paints and glass enamels
and I fuse that into the surface of the glass
Haney said.
The glass mosaics are somewhat like a work
of stained glass.
"Each individual piece is cut and glued to a
piece of glass, and then the space between
them is filled with grout Haney said.
But as the mosaics are mounted instead of
being placed against light, the characteristics
desired of the glass are different.
"It's not meant to be looked through. It's
totally dependent on the reflective qualities of
the glass Haney said.
Haney received his undergraduate degree
in fine art at Syracuse University, and his;
Masters of Fine Arts in ceramics at the New
Yotk State College of Ceramics at Alfred
University. He began teaching at ECU soon
after and has been here ever since.
Haney says he initially continued his work
in ceramics while teaching, but switched to
glasswork out of practicality, when he discov-
ered that his schedule did not allow for
enough studio time to maintain his ceramic
works. He is unsure what direction his work
will go next.
"I'm still in the process of working through
this series. Right now it hasn't suggested a
new series. The new series may be in stained
glass, it may be in glass casting, which I plan to
get into, or it may be more mosaics Haney
said.
Although he is not sure of exactly what his
next project will be, Haney says he definitely
plans to continue working with glass.
"I love it now, because of the colon The col-
ors are really great, and I love working with
that





news
The East Carolinian
Thousands gather, march and remember King
Unprecedented forest fires
BURGAW N C (AP) - Las year's hurricanes could lead to another form of
natural disaster that has North Carolina officials so worried that the state
may spend $14.5 million to try to some preemptive measures.
Fierce, unprecedented forest fires could ravage eastern North Carolina
woodlands because of the many trees left dead and damaged by Hurricanes
Fran and Bertha, fire officials say. J . a u
State Forestry Service officials say the dead and damaged trees, which
will be dried out by the spring, are a tinderbox that could explode without
warning, The Daily News of Jacksonville reported.
The real Captain America
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) - The real Captain America doesn't dress in
red, white and blue and carry a star-spangled shield.
But he's still as patriotic as the flag, impeccably polite and powerful, too.
He just wears camouflage fatigues. . �
Capt. John F America, 30, of the United States Manne Corps, was an
artillery officer promoted earlier this month to the rank of captain, making
his name synonymous with the "Captain America" of comic book fame.
America is currently serving aboard Camp Lejeune as the assistant opera-
(AP)�Thirty-seven years ago, Eddye
Bexley and dozens of other blacks sat
in silent protest at the lunch counter
of the old Wwlworth building in
Tampa, Fla enduring the curses of
angry whites.
The goal was not hot dogs or ham-
burgers, recalls the Rev. Leon Lowry,
now 83: "It was dignity, respect, con-
sideration - to be recognized as
human beings
Because the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. did so much to advance those
values, Ms. Bexley and about 60 oth-
ers gathered at the site Saturday to
recall the groundbreaking demonstra-
tion of 1960, part of commemorations
across the country in honor of the
slain civil rights leader's birthday.
"It took all I could do to come
down here today Ms. Bexley said.
"When someone stands in front of
you and says, 'Nigger, get out of the
building you get a bad feeling
In New York, Brazilian, harmonica
and youth choirs sang tributes to King
at a gala tribute Sunday night at
Harlem's Apollo Theater. Earlier,
dozens of people
marched silently
through Manhattan,
the day before the
national holiday
observing King's birth.
Luis Maldonado,
39, of New York, who
attended the march
and prayer, said King's
life and struggle had
influenced his own
life.
"It's because of
him that Latinos today
have a lot more freedom, opportuni-
ties and social acceptance
Maldonado said.
Even so, some of King's associates
say the civil rights leader's ("ream has-
n't yet been realized.
"In black robes they assault our
voting rights by day, and in white
sheets they bum our churches by
"Our country is
currently embroiled in
a backlash against
hardwon gains made
during the civil rights
movement.
Martin Luther King. Ill
night the Rev. Joseph Lowery told
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for
today's editions.
"They even deviously
use Martin's words out
of context to eviscerate
the national commit-
ment to remedy racial
inequities - affirmative
action
In California, Kn�s old-
est son is forming a
group to fight for affir-
mative action in
response to the state's
efforts to do away with
such programs around
the country.
Martin Luther King III will head
the new Atlanta-based Americans
United for Affirmative Action.
"Our couatry is currently
embroiled in a backlash against hard-
won gains made during the civil rights
movement - namely, affirmative
action King said near a memorial to
his father in San Francisco on
Saturday.
King was born Jan. 15, 1929, and
was stain April 4,1968. The national
holiday commemorating his birthday
is on the third Monday in January, but
many communities chose to honor
him with special events over the
weekend because of today's inaugura-
tion festivities.
In Ohio, several hundred people
at Cuyahoga Community College lis-
tened Sunday to the Cleveland
Philharmonic Orchestra, a gospel
singing group and the comments of
civil rights activist Walter E. Fauntroy.
In Arkansas, a spokesman for Gov.
Mike Huckabee defended the state's
practice of honoring King and
Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on
the same day.
"They're both heroes. Their
birthdays come the same week and
you know the government likes to
have holidays at the start of the
week spokesman Rex Nelson said.
College applicants use gimmicks to apply
Abortion clinics attacked
TULSA, Okla (AP) - The director of an abortion clinic firebombed twice
this month is worried the blasts may foreshadow more violence as the 24th
anniversary of legalized abortion approaches.
The clinic, which closed down when two Molotov cocktails exploded
there New Year's Day, was bombed again Sunday afternoon. Both explosions
caused minor damage but no injuries.
On Thursday in Atlanta, two bomb blasts an hour apart rocked a building
housing an abortion clinic, injuring six people who had rushed to the scene
of the first explosion, including federal agents, rescue workers and a TV cam-
eraman.
Silent films theater owner fatally gunned down
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Silent films have lost their best friend.
Laurence Austin, the owner of the only theater in America devoted sole-
ly to silent films, was robbed and fatally gunned down at his Silent Movie
Showcase before the start of the night's main feature. The beloved owner
had renovated the theater and reopened it about five years ago, delighting
legions of pre-talkie fans. itfc
After the shooting Friday, the killer fled through the theater full of fright-
ened moviegoers and escaped out the back exit. Police have no suspects.
DURHAM (AP) - This is the time
of year when admission applica-
tions begin rolling into colleges,
and with them come a steady
stream of gimmicks designed to
grab admissions officers attention.
Usually they work - in grabbing
attention, that it. But admission
officers say they are no help at all in
getting into school.
But they are amusing.
There was the little pill bottle
Christoph Guttentag, Duke
University's admissions director,
received in the mail, his name
typed neatly across the label.
Other gimmicky admission
applications to Duke and other
North Carolina colleges include
everything from sweets and home
videos to a Duke Barbie that
recently arrived in Durham.
Despite widespread admonish-
ment from advisers and college
guides, hundreds of students still
try to gain an edge in the college
admissions process with such gim-
micks, The News & Observer of
Raleigh reported.
In fact, such ploys can backfire.
Some admissions officials say they
often signal an application that
lacks substance.
"In many cases, students are
trying to cover up academic short-
comings says Martha Allman,
associate director ot admissions at
Wake Forest University. "And that
doesn't work
Allman remembers the kid on
the waiting list who sent a size 13
gold and black shoe "to get his
other foot in the door and the girl
who sent apoem on a postcard for
each of the 12 days of Christmas.
(Refrain: "the Demon Deacons
gave to me)
George Dixon, director of
admissions at N.C. State
University, says a tenet of the pro-
fession is that the best applicants -
knowing their academic record will
stand on its own - send the least
supplemental material.
"The extras really do not give
them an advantage Dixon says.
Home videos are the most com-
mon appeal for attention, officials
say. And most universities - not
counting those that require video-
tapes, for special programs such as
dance - slide them into the garbage
rather than the VCR.
"We have boxes and boxes of
videos says Jim Walters, director
of undergraduate admissions at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. "With more than
16,000 applications to
read, we just don't have
time to view them
Allman says she's
received videos logging
everything from a fami-
ly trip to India to a vale-
dictorian's speech - but
she doesn't watch
them.
Walters says that
when videos first start-
ed coming in, the staff
checked them out for
curiosity's sake and found them
most of them were awful. His office
now keeps the videos around for a
year or so, then they arc tossed in
the trash � along with all the other
gimmicks.
Except for those that taste good.
"Sure, if we get something edi-
ble, we eat it Walters says. "Why
waste it?"
He notes that food is separated go for overkill.
from its application so no one
knows whose cookies they're eat-
ing.
Admissions officers are con-
founded that the gimmicks keep
coming although high school stu-
dents are clearly
warned against
them. In this year's
"How to Get into
College" guide by
Kaplan, University of
Illinois admissions
director Martha
Moore says students
should avoid any-
thing cute.
"Let's see, this year
we received orchids,
candy and a loaf of
bread with a note saying "I won't
loaf around if I come to Illinois "
Moore says. "This shouldn't have
any bearing on whether a student is
admitted. It won't move them from
a no-admit to an admit
Dixon, the NCSU admissions
director, says, "Kids are just so con-
cerned with putting every possible
good foot forward, they sometimes
"In many cases, stu-
dents are trying to
cover up academic
shortcomings.
Martha Allman
WMtc Forest Universiiy associate
director of admissions
ri
11
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11
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Authorities blamed for plane crash
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) - The defense and aviation minister has blamed
authorities at New Delhi airport for last November's collision of a Saudi
Arabian jumbo jet and a plane from Kazakstan, newspapers reported SunJay.
The crash between the Saudi passenger plane and a Kazakstan Airlines
cargo jet killed all 349 people aboard, making it the deadliest midair collision
in history. . �.
Speculation about what caused the accident has centered on equipment
or communications failure.
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Jhe Department of
Athletics, Office of
Student Development
is currently hiring full-time
ECU students and graduate students to tutor
student-athletes in all subject ureas.
Minimum 2.5 GPA required.
Call 3284550
History Professor Dr. David E.
Long is leading an effort by the
newly formed Lincoln forum of
the Civil War Education
Association to restore the cot
tags in Washngton, D.C
Constructed in the 1840's,
the Anderson Cottage, site of
an assassination attempt on
President Lincoln as well as the
site of some of Lincoln's most
important writing, needs major
restoration. The building is at
the United States Soldiers'and
Airmen's Home, about four
miles north of the capital.
Long is a member of the Lincoln rbum Advisory Board and
the Anderson Cottage Restoration Project.
nnro mutest � the wthukt
was recently named chairman of a committee for
Doctoral student research presented today
Dr. J. Craig Venter, founder and director of The Institute of Genome
Research and a leading researcher of genomes and gene products, wiB be
the keynote speaker today at the Fifth Annual ECU School of Medicine
Doctoral Student Research Day.
The day will begin with registration at 9 a.m. at the Greenville Hilton.
Doctoral students will give oral and poster presentations of their medical
research beginning at 10 a.m.
Venter will present his lecture, "Genome Research: from Microbes to
Man at 4 p.m. The event is open to anyone with an interest in learning
more about medical research or cancers in the field.
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�Ammmmm �Lanuage Acquisition � Innovative Strategic � Interactive Participa-
tion � Cultural Awareness � Certificate of Completion
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. � Saturday February 8,1997 ECU�
Willis Building
Registration Mandatory
Call Pangea Associates� 800-706-6715 or 919-933-0399
lpangea@nisn.com
And now a racist
remark from God
?
from the Bible
John 3:16
"I love them all.

Jesus Christ died on the cross for the sins of all people�every person in the whole world. That's because God
loves all people. He likes variety. But regardless of race there arc only two kinds of people acceptable to God:
; perfect people (and have you ever met one of those?) and forgiven people (and don't we all need a lot mote of
them). People forgiven by God have changed hearts, the kind necessary to end racism. In honor of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jrs birthday and Black History Month we're offering the article "Give the Dream New Life For
your free copy call 1-800-236-9238.
The Dream Begins With God.
fitryour ftre article call
1-800-236-9238
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
WOMEN'S BOWLING CHESS

TABLE Tl
M3
lffl�
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at James Madision University in Harrisonburg, Va the weekend of
February 14-16,1997, all expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Wednesday, January 22
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center-Rooms 8 A-E
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, January 23
- 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Rooms 8 A-E
All-Campus Women's Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, January 29
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Table Tennis Tournament (Men's & Women's Divisions)
Q Thursday, January 30
A M k 6:00 p.m.
Ik m I Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
rf Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information.





4 Taasdiy, January 21, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
I
4
a
3


I
i
i
Belmont uses Chapel Hill
as model city
BELMONT, N.C. (AP) - This
Gaston County town has a new
vision for its downtown - a vision of
Chapel Hill.
The old railroad and textile
community and home of Belmont
Ahbey College is spending $1.1
million to renovate downtown. City
leaders want to give Belmont the
same pedestrian- and shopping-
friendly feel of the town surround-
ing the University of North
Carolina's flagship campus.
"A lot of what we've done is
modeled on Chapel Hill said
Kevin Loftin, the mayor of the
town of 8,500 residents across the
Catawba River from Charlotte.
Belmont streets have been
repaved, new lights have been
installed and sidewalks have been
widened. Stowe Park has been
HEALTH
continued from pigs 1
VanNortwick would like to have
the center available to faculty and
staff. When the professors get sick
they are forced to cancel classes so
they may go to their doctors as
opposed co being treated on cam-
pus.
"If we had the time, space, and
personnel then we would love to
expand the service Vu Nortwick
said.
VanNortwick would also like to
see a wellness center established for
faculty and staff. They could then
receive tetanus shots if they cut
rheir fingers on metal for example.
newly landscaped and can be used
for summer concerts and children's
programs.
And this summer, tourism will
get a boost when the first phase of
the $150 million Stowe Botanical
Garden opens nearby, The News &
Observer of Raleigh reported
Monday.
Belmont city leaders have been
working to recruit specialty retail
stores for downtown. A Belk's
department store, a bridal boutique
and other quaint shops have
opened along Main Street.
There's also Cherubs Craft and
Coffee Shop, an old-fashioned ice
cream parlor, gourmet coffeehouse,
deli-style sandwich spot and angel-
theme gift store staffed by nuns at
the nearby Sisters of Mercy con-
vent and mentally retarded adults.
"We started off as a crafts store,
but it evolved into all these other
things because there was nothing
like them in downtown Belmont
said Sister Nancy Nance, the coffee
shop manager.
A local developer is renovating
old mill houses and turning them
into an upscale subdivision called
Adams Bluff. The city council also
has banned billboards, established
tree-protecting ordinances and
ordered all developers to leave
open green spaces in their subdivi-
sions.
Chapel Hill Mayor Rosemary
Waldorf takes Belmont's efforts as a
compliment and says they make a
lot of sense.
'Wc are certainly the town in
North Carolina that has the liveliest
downtown, day or night she said.
Summer �Wntation Assistants
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 203 Erwin Building � 328-4173
I NOW HIRING
Orientation Assistants for Summer 1997
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session on January 21 at 4:00 p.m in Room 212 in
the Mendenhall Student Center.
Applications are NOW available in 203 Erwin Building
(Orientation Office). Deadline for completed applications
is January 24, 1997 at 5:00 p.m.
VIGIL
continued from page 1
includes "Civil Rights Museums" at
the Association for the Study of
Afro-American Life and History
Annual Meeting in 1994 and pre-
senterOat the Annual Meetig of the
American Association of State and
Local History last year, to name a
few.
In her delivery Wednesday
night, Moore will discuss the
importance of preserving the
Lorraine Motel which is now a
museum safeguarding the murder
scene of the famous civil rights
leader.
Monday night's program and
the events planned for tomorrow
are sponsored by the Student
Union Cultural Awareness
Committee, the National ftin-
Hellenic Council, the Ledonia
Wright African-American Cultural
Center, Allied Blacks For
Leadership and Equality and the
Chancellor's MLK Observance
Committee.
All public is invited to come and
be a part of the fest ivies to mark the
end of this triumphant occasion.
John M. Savage
� Criminal Trial Practice
� Civil Trial Practice
830-4950
( i r 111 n. i '� ; . i �,
iTsfin.il IniikV
507 N. Green St.
757-0265
Coming
Jan. (31st)
Don Cox
And
Xanadu
3 Clubs In 1
2 Dance Floors
ill
s
jg to Mendenhall Student Center g
YOUR CENTE R OF ACTIVITY �
The Incomparable
"I moved off campus last year. I
thought it would be great to live in
an apartment. What a mistake!
No one told me what a drag it is
to eat my own cooking, dean the
bathroom, and pay rent and
utilities every month
�Lisa the Loser
Each year, students gamble with their Irving situation by
moving off campus. They take a chance on finding an
apartment and paying their way each month. They make
big investments in security depoiltt and utility hook-up
fees, in grocery bills, and in gas and transportation costs. It
never pays off. But you don't have to make the same
mistake. Don't fold and be taken In by stories of off-campus
glamour. Don't take a chance. Play your hand and go with
a sure thing�campus living! Watch for your Housing and
Dining Sweepstakes packet that will include mvortxt
documents explaining how you can be a winner with
campus living. When your packet arrives, open it at once
to find out If you are an instant winner in the first phase of
the Housing and Dining Sweepstakes. This could be your
lucky day!
K
g
W
Vienna Choir Boys. A Special Added Attraction to the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series. Sunday, Feb. 2 at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
Student tickets are $7 in advance at the Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31. All tickets are $15 at the door.
��
3Uumlna '97
Student Art Competition and Exhibition
Call for Entries: Friday, Jan. 24 Mendenhall Auditorium 244
Over $1000 in prizes awarded. $3 per entry. Limit 3 entries per person.
Exhibition: Jan. 27-Feb. 23 in the Mendenhall Gallery. Closing Reception
and Awards Presentation: Tuesday, Feb. 18,7-9 p.m.
C
mwM,
s
trtrvK
First Wives Club (R) Jan. 23-25 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID
4U-V-C4N-WI
Bowl the night away at the Mendenhall Bowling Center every 2nd and 4th
Saturday of each month from 8-11 p.m.
$5 admission includes shoe rental and all the games you can bowl, plus
pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
Monday Viadness
Come down to the Mendenhall Bowling Center and bowl for 50 cents a
game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
university Ko!3ir. an dixi services
js!tor,s? call Q,cu-homQ (32B-4663)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
� Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of discounted
Kl bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from
K 1 p.m. until 6 p.m Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
��
Works in Glass by Art Haney
In the Mendenhall Gallery Jan. 13-24
i
wHOURS:Mon-Thurs.8a.mHp.m, Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. lpm-11 pm
fef E:f IZ M!fc: 75 2f K.NS KIKif ffi fcMte





opinion
Tht East CaraHaiaa
r
OUWICW
Rules, regulations, policies they all have their place in every organization and for good
reason. Rules serve to keep order within a society and to show a standard by which the
members of a said society must live. Overall, the policies of a given organization serve
one general purpose: to protect and provide for the organization and its members. Still,
there are occasions where exceptions need to be made in order to better serve the
members of an organization.
In campus news today is one such occasion. The story "Student Health turns facul-
ty away" tells of an incident in which a policy was taken to the extreme. While we can
surely understand that certain departments and offices on campus are funded by stu-
dent fees and are in existence for students, there are times when faculty and staff mem-
bers should be allowed to use these services. We also understand the concept of Good
Samaritan liability: if you stick your neck out to help someone and your efforts cause
him or her further damage, then you are at fault. Whereas, if you just stand by, watch-
ing a struggle and not offering to help, then ou are free and clear of any blame.
Or �e you? fo the ease of the Student Health employee who refused to offer assis-
tance to an ECU professor who had been seriously injured, we somewhat understfwi
their reluctance, But there is also something we want to know: shwrfdn't an exception
have been made m this instance? Even strangers reach out to offer fwst aid until trained
emergency medical personnel arrive on the scene. Not that everyone should reach out
and try to play hero whenever there's a problem, but sometimes it is better to rely on
one's better judgment than to blindly adhere to company or organizational policy
No matter how angry they make us at times, even we as students acknowledge fac-
ulty and staff members as part.pf our immediate community and we contend everyone
is responsibk to reach out and help the members of one's community. Weren't want
anyone to mlstake'the tone of our view as sounding preachy or negKgcncly mindless of
the purpose of rules and policies, but when such policies are made to protect the mem-
bers of an organization, they should do just that, whether or not a member of that orga-
nization has paid $64.
Now that is not to say that faculty and staff members are not expected to pay for the
services �hey use, but this is clearly a case of an emergency with special rircunwtances.
Certain services, Hke the Student Recreation Center, should require faculty and staff
members to pay. It's obvious no one is going to die or suffer any serious injury if he or
she is denied access to the swimming pool or the basketball court, but common sense
Guest columnist application for Campus View j
I
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian j
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print. j
I
Name
FrdSophn JrO Sr
Phone number.
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
s fontiitf me for a poation aa guest columnist for TEC Iagree to allow TECa staff to
mission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those chart I wiB be r
changes mat may affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves
sion. If I am selected, TEC wiH notify me two weeks in advance of pufeSkatkm; at that I
submission will be assigned by the editor.
The East Carolinian needs students
that have well knowledge as well as
graphic design knowledge.
We are looking for someone to fill our
on-line editors position.
( responsibilities include keeping the
student media web page updated.
lb the Editor,
welcome back to ECU, a new recre-
ation center and all die plague that
goes with rJmt tm. What do these
�UrarvemctwSwd
- Smdenr �� At aa0r,amml
who are at sittttftfcaeiaur. A
Messing because they are such mar-
velous, enthusiastic folk at times and a
curse because a limited few succeed in
spoiling it for everyone. I met a man
yesterday (Jan. 15, 197) who as at
the recreation center two days old to
replace a stolen showerhead, Hello a
m4� hows someone has stofcn ar
showerhead.
lb the Editor,
What else can we expect from the fol-
lowers of Jesus Christ whose mean-spir-
fted interpretation of the seventh com-
fiiendment against adultery is stagger-
ing: Whosoever tookerh on a woman to
lust after her hath comrnitwd adultery
With her already in his heart" (Matthew
3:28). His proposed solution to this
problem of lust in the verses which fol-
kiw is even more staggering
Before Dibla ihumneis imaiam thr
sexual mores of President
they should read more closely about the
profligacies of David and the
debaucheries of Sotoman also found the
Bible
King David had an affair with
Bathseba and even arraged to have her
husband die (2 Samuel 18:1-4,20:41-41
and 2: Samuel 1:25-26.
King Solomon had a harem of 700
wives and 300 concubines (1 King
11:3). He also wrote frankly erotic poet-
ry in the Song of Solomon.
This may paruagy plain the fact that
the "book of taw" was discovered in 621
BC under the reign of Jonah (2 Kings
ECU, like many universities, is a
place to team and grow and there are a
limited few of you who really have
your worn cut out for you. sic
Jeffrey J.McGrath
Serdnr
Nursing
22:8) more than 300 years after the
Golden Age of Hebrew civilization in
980 BC under King David. The taws
were unknown to David and Solomon
but were added hundreds of years later
as an afterthought.
Sanctimonious prudes should not
hold President Bill Clinton to sexual
moral standards which even the great-
est biblical rulers did not follow. The
� Bible itself exposes their religious
hypocrisy as a fraud.
JimSenyszyn
Charlotte, NC
Apply at our office on th� second floor of the Student Publications BeiWiaa,
or call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
(across from joyner library).
-0 MAoUv rnm
We-





6 TuMdav. January 21,1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
W I Iff
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL7S2-286S
male RboMMATfcfeEbEb. close
to campus. $202.50 per monthhalf utili-
ties. ECU bus access. Call anytime 752-
4387 and ask for Brandon.
NEEDED, FEMALE NONSMOKER to
share two bedroom, 112 bath townhouse on
Charles St across from campus! Rent is
$225, and 12 bills. Please call 757-3789.
PRIVAE ROOMS AVAILABLE iMME-
DIATELY. Walking distance from campus
and downtown. Large room 15x15) Private
phone linecable in room. Washerdryer in-
cluded. $175 per month utilities. Call
Mike: 752-2879.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMATE needed
as soon as possible. Spacious 5 bedroom
house has only 3 occupants and a Dalma-
tian. Close to campus. We're cool. Really.
757-9683
chill female rosffwrrg
NEEDED! Large room in fatty 6 bedroom
house 1 block from campus, 3 blocks from
down town. Call 754-2524.
NON-SMOKJNG FEMALE
ROOMMATE wanted. Fully furnished.
Would have own bath. Located in Dockside
$300 per month 12 of utilities. Call 752-
1074. Available Now!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY to share two bedroom du-
plex. $207month. Located behind Papa
Johns on Brownlea Drive. Free cable! Call
Misty 754-2169 leave message.
NFlVfeRBFOtetAVAtLABLEiSHOkl
walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next to
AOTT house. 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths - mint
condition. 5th Street Square - uptown, above
BW3, 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Also available a 2 bedroom above
BW3 and above Uppercrust Bakery available
Jan. 1st for $475.00 - $500month. Luxury
Apartments. Available now! Will ease for
December or January (6 mo. or year leases
available) Also available - "The Beauty Sa-
lon" - 3 bedroom apartment. If you see it
ou'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
OOMMATE NEEDED MOVE tl
NOW or sub-lease for summer Four bed-
room house on 406 Rotary Avenue. 2 houses
from center of campus. Call Jason or Jamie
at 752-3552.
ROOMMATE WANTED: NON
SMOKER TO share 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouse. $206.25 plus 12 utilities ?
phone. Call Rachael at 355-9563.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
TWO bedroom townhouse, 2 12 bath, pool,
on ECU bus line. Please call 752-0813.
WANtED: GRADUATE S?UDENT
SEEKING 1 male housemate $l70mo. In-
cludes utilities. Close to campus. Call Kevin
752-5557.
NEAR ECU, NICE ROOM, private en-
trance, access kitchen, bath, washer, dryer,
suntan, sauna, playground. Pets okay. Se-
cure. Cable, utilities, rent $75 weekly 752-
8533 any time.
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE two
bedroom duplex, wd with neat, serious an-
thropology student. $27512 utilities.
Please call Virginia at 756-5340 or 758-9437
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP. Twin Oaks Townhouse. On ECU's
bus line, $230 rent and 13 of utilities. Single
bed included. Move in now Call 758-
9486.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
to share 2 bedroom apt. Very affordable and
on ECU bus route, Please call or leave mes-
sage 551-3702.
LARGE 2 BEDROOM 1 12 BATH cen-
tral hac fireplace all appliances wd hook-
ups private patio ECU bus route $400 month
ilus deposit call 830-6068
KENWOOD KA-894 INTEGRATEd 250w
amplifier wkenwood kt-594 digital tuner w
teac eqa-10 graphic 10 band equalizer and 2
harmonkarmon s250p 4way 250w spkrs. w
I7in. sub-woofers. All yours for $250. Call
Mike 9 757-0346 or 355-1800.
IAPTOPCOMPUTER! lOOMHZpentium
with 10.4" active matrix, 810mb hard drive,
16mb ram, 4X cd-rom, 1 44mb drive, sound
card, modem, much more! Amazing ma-
chine !$2350,rall321:p389
SEVN BLACK AN6 BROWNl Pitbull
Rottweiler puppies with white feet and
chest. $100. 1st shots and are wormed.
Ready to go January 22. Call Brian 758-3931 �
KLtecW CUiT AR AMP $150 scuba BC
medium $70 portable pioneer CD player
$100 call 752-0550.
DINING ROOM WrYH 4 CHAIRS $20.00,
daybed frame $10.00, waterbed, coffee table,
desk, VCR Care make an offer. Call 321-
0083 after 6:30 pm.
ROCK &HOX OUADRA 5: $50,2 orion xtr
15' subwoofers $150, Iquana with cage and
all accessories $100, electric guitar with amp
$150. Call 551-6754.
FbfcMAL 6AHFiNtSHfcb DINNING
room table with leaf and 6 hardwood
presaback chairs! Great condition. Will de-
liver and setup! Only $325, call 321-0389.
AkC GERMAN ROTTWEILERS 9
weeks. $250 and up. Champion bloodline.
Call 919-353-7174.
FURNITURE ANb bj EQUIPMENT:
Wrap-around sofa $75, black glass table $40,
pair of JBL concert speakers 1200 watts $790,
800 watt peavy amp $400, Call Lee at 758-
Help
Wanted
&.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer PROGRAM. APPLICANTS
MUST POSSESS SOME knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3 pm
to 7 pm with some night and weekend coach-
ing. Flexible with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run from the
first of March to the first of May. Salary rates
sun at $4.75 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550.
PART TIME HELP NEEDED at
Szechuan Express at the Food Court, the
Plaza Mall. 15-20 hrs. a week. Cashier ex-
perience preferred. No phone calls please.
Apply in person Monday thru Saturday be-
tween 10:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
WARREN'S 'HOT' DOGS NOW AC-
CEPTING applications. Part-time third
shift J2:00 am - 8:00 am. Very flexible.
Plcasecontact Jan at 752-3647.
msc.ovi u t'Aito
SPRING
Travel I Announcements! IAnnouncements
Services
Offered
766W MICROWAVE OVEN So. gutterless
ski rack $20, mountain bike parts cooks
skewers, manitou suspension fork, girvin
suspension fork, specialized cranks, control
tech stem, hershcy pulleys. Call 551-6754.
ilteys.
TRT
TALL DORM SiZE FRIG. $75.00. Call
758-6567.
NfcW YEAR RESOLUTION TO GEi
FIT? Take" over membership at Pulse Fit-
ness Club $33month not long term. Con-
tract only through Sept. 97. Call Nicole 758-
5833;
PYf HON FOR SALE WlH CUSTOM
built cage. Must see. Taking best offer. Call
752-3390, ask for Korey. Serious inquires
only.
FREE FOR ECU STUDENTS! WOULD
you like to put your resume or a classified
ad on the internet for free? We offer ser-
vices including resume designing and
internet access. If you are interested in any
of these, visit our Website at HTTP:
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call 754-
2171 for more information.
Nifefeb TO GET IN SHAPE? look better?
Feel Healthier? Guaranteed results - certi-
fied personal trainer. Call for free consulta-
tion 752-0550.
Other
m
Help
wanted
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EX-
TRA cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Midwest
Distributors, P.O. Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051
Immediate response.
need iiiirtxcfeLLENt Income
potential working from home. For free in-
formation send long SASE to Regional Suc-
cess, P.O. Box 3950, Greenville, NC 27836-
1950.
EXPERIENCED, bEPENDABLE, AND
MATURE babysitter needed immediately
for two small boys, ages 2 and 5. M.W.F af-
ternoons, 12-5:30pm. References required.
Please call 756-8262 after 5:00pm.
DIETARY AiDSNEEDEDATCYPRKSS
GLEN Retirement Homes. Flexible hours.
Great pay. Excellent for students. Please
call or stop in to fill out application. 830-
0036 Cypress Glen 100 Hickory Street.
FREE T-SHIRT$1000 Credit Card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can raise
up to $1000 by earning a whopping $5.00
VISA application. Call 1-800-932-0528 exr,
65 Qualified callers receive Free T-Shirt.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS!
GRANTS. Scholarships, aid available from
sponsors! No repayments, ever!$$$Cash for
college $$$� For info: 1-800-400-0209.
JNtERRESTtD IN NURTITION?
COME see what were all about. Student
dietetic association will be meeting Thurs-
day, January 23rd at 5:00 pm in H ESC Room
248! All Majors Welcome!

Travel
36Cypre
)MW?
9
U3 UfJ �1 Vail uv-jwnj.
ANTED: CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE
TO share a fully furnished townhouse. Ac-
cess to swimming pool, tennis courts, and
basketball court. Call 353-4294.
TAKE OVER LEASE AT DOCKSIDE. 3
bedroom 2 bath duplex with wd, beginning
21. Call 752-5628 Richie or Rodney.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (N
LOCAL retail business. Strengths: Math-
ematical, Bright, Prompt, Computer Liter-
ate, Energetic. 15 or more hours per week.
Call 931-6904 leave message.
ECU STUbENTS, WELCOME BACK!
Begin the new year and the spring semester
with a part-time position with Brody's and
Brady's Mens Store. Work with the hottest
and newest styles for the spring season. Part-
time hours available in Men's, Children's,
Ladies and Fuller Figure departments.
Flexible morning, afternoon, or evening
hours. All positions include weekends.
Applications accepted Wednesday, 2-5 pm,
Brody's The Plaza and Carolina East loca-
tions.
do you riAVE What if takes? The
Drive? The desire, to work with America's
fastest growing company? If you think you
have what we're looking for call 353-7106
ing ft
!iTRi
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
mhf 0mmmm
I and 2 Mree- Ranaa. RafrWaarator,
Vtarnr, Dryer Hookupi. Daeks and Pattos
In most units, laundry FadBty.
Sand VoHaybaN Court
Locatad S Wocki from campus.
FREE WATER. SEWER
2 BEDROOMS
StoWR�fridtr�torDiihw��h�r
Washar. Dryar Hookupi
Patios on First Floor
Locatad S ttocks from Campus
Jkmf&to PA
2 badroom, ippilancas. wacar, basic caWa. S
blocks from campus. N�w ownarsfdp.
Naw landscaping.
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
PITT mOWIiTY
MANAGEMENT
IMA BROWNLEA DRIVE
rst-mi
CRMERSTCHviE CrftlsT'lAW CHILD
DAYCARE center has the following job
openings for part-time teachers MonFri.
Toddlers - 12:00-2:30, Two's - 3:30-6:00,
Three's-9:00-12:30, Four's -3:30-6:00, van
driver - 7:00-8:30 and 2:00-3:30. All inter-
ested applicants should have at least 1 year
experience in child care or working toward
a degree in child care related. Please apply
in person at CCCDC, 1095 Alter. Road,
Greenville, NC. Absolutely no phone calls.
saLes reps - Immediate opening
AT your University. Offering exceptional
pay and very flexible hours. Call Accent
Screen Printing 1-800-243-7941.
HELP NEEDED FOR LOCAL BUSI-
NESS. For free details, send a self-addressed
stamped envelope to: S.P.E.L Dept. D3,
106 Dogwood Drive, Washington, NC 27889
ib Snowboard
unmcouicmn in wins 94
l9MggWK
i� Pt "P Sr
SZECHUAN GARDEN -CHINESE RES-
TAURANT wait staff wanted part-time or
full-time. No phone calls. Apply in person.
909 South Evans Street.
WANTED: A FEW GOOD PIRATES -
The ECU Telefund is looking for students
to contact Alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.00 hour. Make your own sched-
ule. If interested, come by Rawl Annex
Room 5, M-TH between the hours of 2-6
pm.
BUSINESSMARKETING STUDENTS.
NATIONAL Communications Company is
coming to Greenville, Part-time job oppor-
tunities. Get paid for excellent experience
in your field while attending East Carolina
University. Call 888-605-0906.
5
c-n-aoo-fT-rAYS-TOT
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
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Florida '119
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Iptf Mk taMl - 0-r m Ytor
ECU COUNSELING CENTER OFFERS
students counseling & workshops for career,
academic & personal issues. 316 Wright
Auditorium Bldg 328-6661.
ELEM ED CLUB IF YOU haven't joined
yet, now is your chance! 1st meeting of se-
mester is Wed Jan. 22, at 4.00pm Room 211
in Speight Building. Fun, Food, Prizes!
ADULT STUDENTS (25 AND OLDER):
Are you interested in the establishment of
an adult student honor society at ECU? If
so, please contact Adult Student Services,
211 Whichard, 328-6881.
THrt CAREE'R SERVICES OFFICE will
hold orientation meetings in the Career Ser-
vices building for seniors and graduate stu-
dents on the following dates: Wed. Jan 22
at 10:00 a.m and Thur. Jan. 23 at 4:00 p.m.
Students will receive instructions on regis-
tering with Career Services, establishing a
credentials file, and the procedures for cam-
pus interviews.
DO YOU PLAY ORGAN or piano? If you
are willing to volunteer your talents at St.
Gabriel's 8:30 am Sunday Masses, call Fa-
ther Tom 758-1504.
OUR NEXT MEETING WILL be held or
Tuesday, January 21st at 5:15 pm in Ragsdalc
room 218A. Come by and help the new of
ficers plan a successful year, full of events-
and fun. Open to all interested majors.
COMMUTER STUDENTS: IF YOU
COMMUTE ro ECU and would like some-
one to share the ride andor driving respon-
sibilities check out the ride board in The-
Wright Place. If you have any questions or
concerns, contact Commuter Student Ser-
vices, 211 Whichard, 328-6881
11 a
k)
fc J I-H00-999-SKI-9
vr Personals
SHE WAS BEAUTIFUL. THE kind of
beauty that makes you forget who you are.
And 1 met her at the Beanbag Coffee Shop
on 3rd and Jarvis over a mocha. Coffee is
where it is at.
M
Greek
Personals
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Includes lodging,
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CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI Soccer champions on defeating
Alpha Xi Delta to win the tournament. Way
to end your 1996-97 undefeated season.
Love your sisters.
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to congratu-
late all new elected officers: Julie Smith,
President. Amber Haire, VP of Member
Recruitment; Kelly Joyce, VP of Program
Development; Anne Newton, VP of Chap-
ter Operations; Carrie Peters, VP of Market-
ing; Laurie Godfrey, Director of Formal
Rush; Kathryn Dengier, Director of Mem-
ber Development; Laura Ruge, Director of
Finance; Jen Mock, Director of COB; Ashley
Phillips, Director of Member Education;
Koryn Newill, Director of MAP; Carmen
Land. Panheltenic Delegate
RUSH DELTA ZETA THE Delta Zeta
Sorority is holding an Informal Rush on Janu-
ary 27, 28 & 29 from 8-10 pm. For more
information or if a ride is needed, please call:
758-6362 or 328-8068. Come and bring a
friend!
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA ON A
successful guest speaker. She was inspira-
tional! Love the sisters of Alpha Omicron
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919)
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info Packet I 1-800-426-7710
tated by o&er cottsider-
ations.
B-GLAD BISEXUALS GAYS LESBIANS ;
and allies for Diversity Welcome Back meet
ing on January 23rd, 1997 at 7:30 pm atf
Mendenhall room 244. Come and enjoy a
safe and good time! Upcoming events will
be discussed so don't miss it! Bring a friend!
See you there! '
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN for the ,
19th Annual Bryan Adrian Summer Basket- '
ball Camp. Boys and girls ages 5-18 are eli-
gible. Included on the 1997 Summer Camp "
Staff are: Tim Duncan (WF), Jerry 1
Suckhouse (PRO), Dante Calabria (PRO)
Serge Zwikker (UNO, Larry Davis (USC).J
There are several locations including, "
Greensboro, NQ Concord, NC; Winston!
Satem,NlWilmingKm,NQGastonia,NC;( "
Spartanburg, SC. For a free brochure call
anytime (704) 372-3236.
1
OPEN LINE RATE
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Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.
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,i
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tea
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OPEN RATE$6.00 per column inch
A classified display ad cannot be wider thanb two
(2) columns or deeper than five (5) inches or exceed
ten (10) total column inches
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ust be a local advertiser. Must agree to run 50 or
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No cash refunds are given for classified display ads.
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i.
-1,11
'��If
w





7 Tuesday. January 21, 1997
i It 'style
The East Carolinian
Writers Reading Series
sets spring schedule
CD
reviews
DALE WILLIAMSON
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLES EDITOR
Attention, literary fans! The Writers Reading
Scries for the Spring '97 semester is set to
blast off on Monday, Jan. 27. Starting the new
stretch will be Michael Collier, who will be
sharing his life's work of poetry (and possibly a
sampling of prose) with the Greenville com-
munity.
Thus far, Collier has published three poet-
ry collections (The Clasp and Other Poems, 1986;
The Folded Heart, 1989; and most recently The
Snghbor, 1995). He has also edited The Weslryan
Tradition: Four Decades of American Poetry (1993)
and is currently working on a prose piece enti-
tled The Dream of Water.
Collier's publishing history extends far
beyond this, though. He has been published
steadily since 1980 in such journals as New
England Review, Boston Review and Southern
Review.
As a result of his creative efforts, Collier has
earned several honorary recognitions that have
helped support his writing. He was a 1984
recipient of the National Endowment for the
Arts Creative Writing Fellowship, won the
Margaret Bridgcman Scholar in Poetry in 1981
at the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference (an
organization which he currently directs), and
received the John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 1995.
Since earning his B.A. at Connecticut
College in 1976 and his M.F.A. at the
University of Arizona in 1979, Collier has kept
busy. He has worked on several literary panels,
given lectures at several colleges, and has vol-
unteered his services to many professional
organizations, including working as a panelist
for the National Endowment for the Arts.
Collier is currently a professor of English at
the University of Maryland, College Park.
The Writers Reading Series strives to bring
professional writers who are very active in their
profession and who have much to offer to other
aspiring writers to Greenville. Other planned
writers for the scries include Allan Gurganus
on Feb. 13 and Sue Standing on March 24.
Take part in this worthwhile effort and
come hear Michael Collier read on Monday,
Jan. 27. There will be a Meet the Writer pro-
gram at 3 p.m. in the Greenville Museum of
Art, located at 802 South Evans Street. The
actual reading will be at 7 p.m. in the Willis
Building, located at 300 1st Street. The read-
ing will be followed by a reception and book
sale.
For further information, contact Julie Fay at
328-6578.
The Backsliders
Throwing Rocks at
the Moon
Uncle Mingo
Little Baby Brother
Poet Michael Collier visits Greenville on Mon Jan. 27.
PHOTO COURTESY OF WRITERS READIN6 SERIES
Local music scene rejuvenated by
Squirrel Nut Zippers
Jay Myers
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Ladies and gentlemen of the
Emerald City, your attention please.
If you were not in attendance for the
performances given at the Attic last
Thursday night, then you should
bemoan the fact. The Squirrel Nut
Zippers were assuredly the best act
to entertain Greenville in quite some
time. And who knows? We may never
see their like again.
OK, let's drop the fancy talk. The
Squirrel Nut Zippers took the Attic
by storm Thursday, plain and simple.
The show opened with The Blue
Rags from Boone, NC, an outfit that
plays an interesting array of blue-
grass, ragtime, and Appalachian folk.
They even covered an old tune called
"Salty Dog" that was made popular
by the Darling family on The Andy
Griffith Show (definitely a North
Carolina band). Although their set
was festive and got the crowd danc-
ing, they still have some fine-tuning
to do. Maybe their new album on Sub
Pop records will allow them the time
to find their direction.
Now on to the real reason I went
the show. I've never seen such a large
and enthusiastic crowd show up for
the Squirrel Nut Zippers. The crowd
was �o tightly packed that there was
hardly any room to dance. Yet, the
The Squirrel Nut Zippers filled the Attic to capacity last Thursday night, proving that musical diversity is desired in the Emerald City.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MAMMOTH RECORDING COMPANY
audience was so into the music that
they found a way to make room for
dancing. The Squirrel Nut Zippers'll
make ya wanna shake yer booty every
time, guaranteed.
At first, the wiry and demonic
vocalistguitarist James Mathus
dissed the crowd by shouting "Hello,
Greensboro but the mistake was
quickly corrected by Katharine
Whalen. Of course she knew because
as Whalen, the sultry and sexy vocal-
ist and banjo player, told me after the
show, "I was born in Greenville. You
can put that in your article But
more on that later.
Whalen, Maxwell and Mathus, as
well as Ken Mosher (vocals & saxo-
phone), Chris Phillips (drums), and
newcomer Stu Cole (bass), ripped
through their repertoire without
stopping qnce in a set that lasted
over 2 hours. In lightning succession,
the band sped through most of their
"hot jazz" tunes, such as "Good
Enough for Granddad "Wash
review
Jones "Got My Own Thing Now
and "Bad Businessman (They even
came back for a pretty long encore.)
Interspersed between these
jumping ditties were other, slower
songs like the beautiful "Twilight"
and "It .Ain't You which allowed
Whalen to show off her vocal talents
to their utmost. I simply can't say
enough about Whalen. She was mar-
SEE ZIPPERS. PAGE 10
Travolta keeps Michael flying
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLES EDITOR
Angels were hot last Christmas. These heav-
enly beings spread their wings not only
throughout most holiday decorations but
also across Hollywood's silver screens.
Tinsel Town's producers must have seen the
Christmas season as the golden opportunity
to exploit interests in angels since two high-
ly publicized Christmas films featured two
of Hollywood's most bankable leading actors
as God's messengers.
Denzel Washington portrayed an angel in
Penny Marshall's big-budget film The
Preachers Wife, but lukewarm reviews and
less-than-spectacular box office returns
forced this production to quickly fly away
from theaters.
The other angelic film, however, man-
aged to wow audiences and become a certi-
fied hit, despite mixed reviews from the
critical community. Michael, which stars John
Travolta as the archangel Michael, still
thrives at the box office, including our local
theaters. Unfortunately, unless you are a die-
hard Travolta junkie (as 1 am), Michael may
be best left for a quiet night's viewing on
video as opposed to a more expensive trip to
the theater.
Michael does have several strong ele-
ments, making it a film worth seeing. The
basic premise, for instance, carries much
potential. A down-on-his-luck tabloid
reporter (admirably played by William Hurt)
receives a strange letter from a woman who
claims that she has an angel living with her.
Seeing this as an opportunity to get a catchy
story that will sell papers, Hurt and his part-
ner (Robert Pastorelli) plan to catch an
angel. But boss man Bob Hoskins insists
that Andie MacDowell tag along because
she is an "angel expert Thus the trip
begins.
When these reporters reach their desti-
nation, they discover (to their shocked
amazement) a real angel, wings and all, but
not the kind of angel one sees on Christmas
cards. Michael turns out to be a portly,
dishevelled, and slightly dirty being who
constantly smokes cigarettes and indulges in
such earthly pleasures as eating without
much (if any) discipline. Yet, Michael has an
irresistible charm that hypnotizes those
around him, especially women.
No matter, though. He's an angel, and
that's good enough for a story. Hurt and
company convince Michael to accompany
them back to Chicago so the paper can start
a series of stories on him.
Michael, of course, insists on driving
SEE MICHAEL PAGE 10
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
In a world that made sense, Billy
Ray Cyrus would only be wigglin'
his ass for Milli Vanilli in a special
prison reserved for no-talent,
money-grubbing, devil whores. In a
world that made sense, the
Backsliders would rule the charts
and take names in Nashville.
But the world doesn't make
sense.
You know, though, even if it is
just for 11 songs, the Backsliders'
debut full-length album, Throwin'
Rocks at the Moon, makes the world
make sense.
The album, produced by Pete
Anderson (Dwight Yoakam, Meat
Puppets), shows off the band's var-
ied influences, ranging from Johnny
Cash to Johnny Thunders to
Johnnie Walker.
With Throwin' Rocks at the Moon,
the Backsliders continue the hard-
core honky-tonkin' that dominated
last fall's six-song EP, From Raleigh,
North Carolina. The new album,
however, also serves up several
heartaching, four-in-the-morning,
my-baby-done-me-wrong-again-
and-again songs ("Lonesome
Teardrops "Crazy Wind "Broken
Wings").
Guitarist Steve Howell and
frontman Chip Robinson serve as
chief songwriters on the album and
prove themselves a dynamic duo.
All 11 songs are memorable for their
lyrical and musical content. It's
horse-turd free.
The fast songs keep the train
rollin' that Sun Records started.
The album starts with "My Baby's
Gone which features a chunk-a-
chunk choo-choo beat that even the
Man in Black would be proud of.
The band continues its mission to
convince you to replace your Doc
Martens with cowboy boots on the
title track "Throwin Rocks at the
Moon" and the more obvious
"Cowboy Boots where Robinson
asks the age old question, "Where
in the hell are my cowboy boots?"
Hungover and shoeless, it's a damn
shame.
SEE BACKSLIDERS. PAGE 10
Derek T. Halle
SENIOR WRITER
Well Uncle Bingo, I mean Uncle
Mingo, is on the scene with their
third release to date, Little Baby
Brother. After being played on a series
of radio stations all across the east
coast, the quartet from Charleston,
S.C. feels as if their sound is better
than ever. Let's see if that's true.
The album starts off with a song
called "Friends Isn't that precious. A
song simply about surviving "with the
ones we leave behind How the hell
do you do that? Live in the past there,
buddy. And drown in it.
The album then proceeds to take
a turn in the same direction (i.e. no
turn whatsoever). "Super Stupid
Things" is the second song of the
album. "When did you slip away?" You
lost me guys after the first chorus.
Maybe this could have been a great
title track for the record.
The song "Better Days (A Song
For Sydney)" has made Sydney proud
I'm sure, whoever she is. With lyrics
like "Sydney's mother takes her hand,
says Sydney now I understand.
Things shouldn't be this way. Things
shouldn't be this hard. Things
shouldn't get you down, the way it
does to some. The best days of your
life have yet to come Sydney's sure
to be smitten. Watch out, somebody's
not sleepin' alone tonight. Yeah, right.
The name Uncle Mingo apparent-
ly comes from a blues man named
Uncle Mingo that came to .America in
1855 and departed in 1930. Not much
to say about why the band would
choose a name such as this, but I'm
sure old Uncle Mingo is just as proud
as can be.
Byron Moore plays bass and sings
lead on the record. This gives them
that Winger twist. Jason Moore plays
alto saxophone and keys, Scott
Quattlebaum plays guitar, and Robert
Thom jams out on the drums. The
band plays under the genre of funk
and punk, a title which certainly has
absolutely nothing to do with the
sound of this album. The band has its
moments, but they're all in the live
show, which is the premiere problem
for most roots rock bands these days.
These bands are incredible and work
SEE MINGO. PAGE 9
h �
Run Away Cant evm honnloog ftp K from a friend Buy it Und Pay FuH Pwa
Opinions don't matter

WALL
There is nothing more useless than scream-
ing at a nail. It's just spittle and bricks,
bricks and spoilt. Homevtr, if you put
enough voices together, that wall might just
be bomm over. So join in another futile
attempt to change the status quo and
Bsten to a "Scream at the Wall
John Davis
Staff Writer
A Junior Theatre Education major
from Wilmington, NC. she
someday hopes to
be a thoroughly
useless member
of society.
h x WL
John Travolta lights up the screen as an indulgent angel in Michael.
PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW LINE CINEMA
Run Away
Saa it for Fraa
Rani it on Video
See a Matinee
Pay Full Price
I think it was sometime late last night when I
decided that there was something fundamen-
tally wrong with our society. OK, you're say-
ing, I knew there was something fundamen-
tally wrong with our society. All right then.
What I really meant was I found something
else fundamentally wrong, and as a writer and
a critic, I found it disturbing and unpleasant.
' I was having a conversation with a few
friends, and we began talking about recent
movies. I brought up Jerry Maguire, which I
had seen, and 1 commented that it was a "hor-
rible" movie. My friends all looked at me
strangely and began to argue with me, declar-
ing that, no, it wasn't a horrible movie. After
all, millions of people have paid to see it. How
can it be horrible? As I began to support my
assertion with relevant facts from the movie
(weak character development, lack of focus in
the screenplay, wooden acting by Tom Cruise)
I was told to "shut up and then was again
reminded that millions of people had gone to
see it, therefore it must ue a good movie.
Now, the evidence supports the fact that it
is a good ticket-seller, but a good ticket seller
is not always a good movie, and as the millions
of New Kids on the Block fans revealed to us
all, large masses of people can actually pay
money for crap. I pointed out the fact that
people regularly like bad movies and I was
then told that I had uttered "the stupidest
thing I have ever said Which is, J suppose, a
compliment, because what I said was true,
and most people don't get to have something
true as their stupidest comment.
The discussion quickly degenerated, and
the last word said in the conversation came
from somewhere near Mars, and it went
something like this: one friend said, "you gave
your opinion, and 1 gave mine, and when you
wouldn't quit giving your opinion, I had to
leave" (which wasn't entirely true: he had to
leave to drive someone home).
This was about the time that 1 began to
SEE SCREAM PAGE 8





8 Tuesday. January 21. 1997
lilt style
The East Carolinian
Colder seasons are nothing to sneeze at
(AP) - More than 35 million
.Americans are bothered by allergens.
.�Mlergens are associated with the out-
doors. But if you think coming inside
during the fall and winter months will
help you escape from allergens, think
again.
Without adequate air circulation,
allergens such as pollen, mold, animal
hair and dander, as well as airborne
bacteria, can build to high levels in
your living space. Even a substance as
seemingly harmless as house dust con-
SCREAM
continued from page 7
realize that something was funda-
mentally wrong. You see, of the peo-
ple discussing the film, I was the
only one who had actually watched
it. The fact that I had seen the
movie and no one else had did not
seem to make a difference in the
value of our statements. And then I
realized it went a bit deeper,
because I had never once brought
my opinion of the movie into it.
I then realized that something
was wrong. At least once a week, I
write a review of something, be it
music or a movie, or a book, for the
readers of this publication. Never
once in my writing have I allowed
my opinion to enter into the writing.
Nobody cares about my subjective
emotional likes or dislikes. They
want to know if the product is good,
not if I like it.
Opinions are subjective, and I
could have any number of strange
reasons for liking something. To
allow my opinion to cloud my assess-
ment of something I am reviewing
would be highly unprofessional and
unethical. Beavis and Butthead offer
their opinions all the time. They
sound like this: "uhhhh, this sucks
What disturbs me is that for some
reason, a thesis, well-informed and
supported by research and evidence
has no more weight or bearing in our
society than some drooling moron
saying "uhhhh. this rocks
The fact that three peopie who
have never seen a movie can tell me
I am wrong for asserting that the
movie was bad solely on their opin-
ions, rather than on a well-devel-
oped argument based on evidence,
tains a major allergen. The source of
the allergen is the dust mite, a micro-
scopic, insect-like creature that lives
in the dust found in mattresses, pil-
lows, carpets and upholstered furni-
ture. Their waste product is an aller-
gen that affects many people.
The good news is that there are
many steps you can take to rid your
home of these contaminants. Here are
some important steps you can take to
reduce your exposure to allergens.
� Avoid deep plush fabrics that can
collect allergens including mold
strikes me as a little weird. The fact
that they didn't even understand the
difference between opinion and
skilled debate is somehow beyond
me, but it suddenly brings into focus
why it is that O.J. Simpson is not in
jail, why millions of voters do not
demand better candidates, and why,
in spite of all good sense, millions of
people are smoking crack right now.
Who cares about justice? After all,
my opinion of justice is different from
yours. End of discussion. Who cares
about political integrity? In my opin-
ion, a man who sexually harasses
women, dodges the draft, embezzles
money, and lies to his constituents is
a good man for President. Who cares
about health? In my opinion, crack
makes me feel good. And who cares
� Encase pillows and mattresses in
allergy-proof covers
� Keep windows closed when
pollen counts are high
� Vacuum daily and dust with
damp cloth
� Avoid use of fans that may just
recirculate dust-filled air
� Ventilate dryers to outdoors to
keep dust from circulating in the
house
� Install a dehumidifier in damp
areas of the house to prevent the
growth of mold spores and dust mites.
whether or not a movie is good? Who
cares if you've seen it? All I know is,
everybody else likes it. It must be
good.
Well fine. Waste your money.
Follow the crowd, right off that
bridge your mother is always talking
about, right off the cliff with all of
those lemmings. But don't come cry-
ing to me when O.J. kills his new girl-
friend. Don't come crying to me
when every politician in Washington
cheats you out of your last dime.
Don't come crying to me when you
suffer brain damage from all the
cocaine in your system. Never mind
that I've actually seen the movie, and
you haven't. Or maybe I should
change my style: "Uhhhh, this
sucks
I-800-999-SKI-9
GOLDEN
KEY
NATIONAL HONOR
SPRING SEMESTER
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Refreshments
will be served
January 21, 1997
General Classroom Building
Room 1001 5:00p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
N.C's Legendary
Rock N' Roll
Nightclub
now in its
25th year in
downtown
Greenville
Friday Knocked Down Smilin'
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Catalog NAfcirehouse
Otfc
Discount Art Supply
Oil, Acrylic, and Abtercolor Fair-its & Brushes, Mediums, Brush
Care & Storage. Falettes, Canvas, Pencils, Erasers, Charcoal,
Fastels, Drawing Inks, Markers & Fens, All Sorts of Fdper and
Sketch Books, Acetate, Bristol Board, Foam Board, Mat Cutters,
X-acto Knives, Field Easels, Easels, Clay, A'rbrushes, Light
Boxes, Fbrtfolios, and So Mjch More!
FOR A FRE1 OTT'S CATALOG
CALL 756-9565
Wslk-ln Orders Accepted
Mon-Fri, 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
102 Hungate Drive, Greenville
HenoRiKFiLeis
�� y
Thursday, January 23
Thirsty Thursday! Redeem Your TicKef Stub
at The Spot For a Free 16oz Fpuntain Drii
with any purchase. Compliments of
ARAMARK DINING SERVICES.
Friday, January 24
�Saturday, January 25 r
AH films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE 10 Students, faculty, and Staff-
Cone guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
JAZZ
FIRST
WIVES
�C?lat�
Qiontjpet mad.
ffet eoerututa.
Carroll Dashiell and Students
irom the School or Music
hriday, January 24, 1997 � MSC Social Room
8:00 PM 1 1:00 PM � Mendennall Student Center
AT
1
FREEH!
Sponsored by the student Union
Special Event? Committee C hCl Scoooi or Music
�j3 �
wm, t 1 V l I r W j
1
2 Lr'jA�Bvr
Works In Glass
by Art Haney
January 6 - 24, 1997
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery-
East Carolina University
Sponsored By:
The Visual Arts Forum
.yjDfJy,
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html






9 Tuesday, January 21. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
WINTER
COATS
up to
y
PRICE
Ladies and Mens
JEANS
EmB NOW O 3
LEATHER
BAGS
Regular $125
Ladies and Mens
BLAZERS
lip to
PRICE
210 E. 5th St. � 758-8612 � M-Sat. 10-6 Sun 1-5
Immediate openings are
available for the following
magazine staff positions:
Assistant Editor
Advertising Director
Advertising Sales Reps
Staff Illustrator
To apply, come by the Student Media
Board office on the second floor
of the Student Publications Bldg. or
call 328-6009 for information.
TRAVEL AND
ADVENTURE FILM
SERIES
This statue is just one of the many tan-
talizing features of CzechSlovakia:
Land of Beauty and Change. The film
will be shown in Hendrix Theatre at 4
p.m. and 7:30 p.m. today. A theme din-
ner including Haluski (sauteed noodles
and cabbage) will be served at 6 p.m.
PHOTO COURTESY Of STUDENT UNION
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
MINGO
continued fiom page 7
$129 PER PERSON PER WEEK
2 OUTDOOR POOLS � 1 INDOOR HEATED POOL
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well together, but when the time
comes to record a track in the studio,
the essence flows away. It's almost
like taking a picture of a ghost. It's
there when the flash comes up, but.
when the final print is developed,
something's missing. ��
Although it appears the band
doesn't have any members who shine
out above the rest, they do compen
sate well for each other's mishaps. For
example, when Byron is singing those
cheesy lyrics, Scott Quattlebaum just'
picks up his guitar and jams. Wow, I. H
hope everyone feels as comfortable ,
with their band as these guys do.
Anyway, the album isn't all that
great. If you want to check this band
out, seek an older representation,
such as Fat MookieMo'Bootie. It's sure
to rock vour socks off.
INTR
t ft
UCTORY OFFER
I SCHOOL
2col x?"
IT CAN KILL YOU IF YOU
DON'T RECOGNIZE IT.
Depression strikes millions indiscriminately.
Depression is MOST dangerous when it goes
unrecognized. Always be aware of the threat,
and don't always believe everything you feel.
UNTREATED
DEPRESSION
i SA VE iSuici?
http:www.save.org
SUPPLIES
Sale runs Tuesday, January 21 through Friday, January 24.
� Rental kits, computer accessories & supplies, and sundries excluded from sale. No other discounts apply.
Why are we making an INTRODUCTORY offer? We want to introduce you to two mem-
bers of the Student Stores team!
Come in and meet our General Merchandise Manager Sue Brown, and our Art Department
Sales Clerk Linda Chamberlain. While you're there, check out the variety of supply merchan-
dise available. And if there's something you need for a class that we don't have in stock,
PLEASE LET US KNOW! We are here to support the educational mission of the university, and
will do whatever it takes to serve the needs of our customers!
A Brief Introduction
ft �ft�
�fi
Sue Brown (left) was a
bookkeeper for the ECU Student
Stores from 1985 until 1994. She
recently returned as the new
General Merchandise Manaser
Jl after workins as Mana3er of Nova
fe- Books, Nova Southeastern
University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.
Sue will manase the art and
school supplies, and sift depart-
ments for the ECU Student Stores.
l I Linda Chamberlain (right) is a
familiar face in the ECU Student
Stores! Before becoming the full-
"Sft time Art Department Sales Clerk,
Linda worked in various depart-
ments of the Store for over 12
years. Linda is an ECU graduate
and wife of Professor Chuck
Chamberlain of the School of Art.
Fall & Spring Semester Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
QGMm
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building 398-6731
http:www.studcntstores.ecu.edu
Plaza Mall 756-9148





10 Tuesday. January 21. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
ZIPPERS
continued from page 7
velous, from her oriental dress that
called up visions of the sexy "Miss
Scarlet" from the old Clue
boardgame, to her voice which
evoked divas long dead.
During a short chat I had with
Whalen after the show, she informed
me that they would be putting out a
new album this summer (June or
July) with approximately 12 new
tracks, but they don't have a title for
it yet. Judging by the fresh, inviting
sound of the few latest songs they
chose to play during their set, the
new album should be a knockout.
Their show certainly was.
And I'm not exaggerating when I
say that it was the best show I've ever
seen in Greenville. Period. No if's,
and's or but's.
Admittedly, I haven't gone to that
many shows here. Mostly I travel to
Chapel Hill or Raleigh to fulfill my
live musical needs. Why? Because
Greenville's live music scene, for the
most pan, sucks. Every place down-
town books the same kind of musical
choice - roots rock, beach music, clas-
sic rock, or Grateful Dead wannabes.
Enough already! How many times
can you listen to the same crap over
and over again without throwing up?
Personally, my stomach churned up
all it could long ago.
If the turnout at the Squirrel Nut
Zippers show is any indication of how
responsive Greenville is and will be
to new musical choices, then I rec-
ommend that the local club owners
take notice: Greenville is ready for a
change in the status quo and you
stand to make a great deal of money
if you take the risk. Otherwise, that
money will find its way into the
hands of the owners of The Cat's
Cradle and The Ritz, who book
eclectic musicians on a regular basis.
Believe me, if things don't change,
that's where my hard-earned money
(and respect) will be.
BACKSLIDERS
continued from page 7
MICHAEL
continued from page 7
instead of flying (he wants to see the
world's biggest ball of yarn), so the
film becomes a soul-searching road
picture. Like I said earlier, the
premise has potential, and maybe in
different hands these potentials
could have been fully realized. But
writerdirector Nora Ephron has the
story meander about without any
strong sense of direction and she lay-
ers much of the film with the same
sappiness that drowned her other hit
film. Sleepless m Seattle. The romance
between Hun and MacDowell, for
instance, seems forced and cliched.
There never is a sense of true love
between these two characters.
Instead, their relationship is strung
together by thin, cheesy one-liners
that work better on Hallmark greet-
ing cards.
A central problem with Michael is
the fact that Hurt's character is
underdeveloped. One of the reasons
Michael is on Earth is to help Hurt
once again become a trusting, loving
human being, but not enough back-
ground information is established on
Hun's character. As a result, one is
left with a vague understanding of
the character and little sympathy for
his situation.
Making matters worse.
MacDowell's performance is so
bland that she doesn't make for an
appealing romantic interest. A char-
acter who secretly desires to be
countrywestern songwriter could be
fun to play, but watching MacDowell
sing such lyrics as "My tire was flat
and so was our love" is simply
painful.
But all is not lost. The thrusting
force of the film revolves around the
character of Michael, and only an
actor with Travolta's charisma and
charm could pull it off. As Michael,
Travolta is the clown, the sex symbol,
the icon and the embodiment of
human compassion. Michael loves
the Eanh and everything the Earth
has to offer. He feels and hears the
Earth breathe, and the thought tak-
ing such a joy for granted deeply dis-
turbs him.
That is why Michael indulges in
such trivialities as seeing the world's
largest non-stick frying pan and eat-
ing pie. He is an angel who has bat-
tled Satan during the greatest war in
heaven, yet he is also an angel who
enjoys simple things in life, such as
sugar, laughter and dancing.
Travolta imbues his character
with such vibrant energy that the
screen is almost empty when he isn't
on it. I don't know if that is a tribute
to Travolta or a weakness of the film.
All I know is that this film is lucky to
have Travolta in it.
I clearly can see why Mkhael is a
hit at the box office. The film is
innocent, fun and filled with hope.
And, as a Travolta fan, I'm glad
Johnny Boy tackled the part of an
angel. Still, any film that relies so
heavily on a single player is lacking.
My advice to all interested is see
Michael when it hits the video mar-
ket. Video won't diminish all that's
good in this film, and maybe the bad
elements won't seem so glaring on
the small screen.
Producer Pete Anderson's west
coast connection is shown on the
Buck-Owens-is-back-in-town influ-
enced number, "If You Talk to My
Baby Anderson does a wonderful
job of preserving the atmosphere
that the Backsliders deliver live.
"Hey Sheriff" is the only
holdover from From Raleigh, North
Carolina. This tale of shooting the
sheriff if he doesn't get the hell off
the damn porch is still as menacing
as the swamp bucket version that
appears on the ER
If the world did make sense, and
the Backsliders ruled the world,
what do you think would happen?
The band answers this question
themselves on "If I was King "If I
was king and ruled the world, I'd
order you to be my girlGirl I'd even
marry you I'd get a job and keep it,
too
Girl you know it's true with that
achy-brcaky heart of yours and all.
Does that make sense?
Brotherhood.
as it was meant to be.
m
o& I
Payers Club as for "Swifigersi
r
Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 2T8S8
RUSH
DELTA ZETA
Xi
Meet our sisterhood
and find out what being Greek is all about!
Dates: January 27,28, and 29
Times: 8-10 p.m.
Place: The Delta Zeta House, 801 E. Fifth St.
Come as you are and bring a friend!
For more information or rides call:
758-6362 or 328-8068.
SIGMA NU
Eta Beta chapter
501 E. 11th Street 830-5439
W-U.
mlmf
GET MONEY FROM YOUR UNCLE INSTEAD.
Your Uncle Sam. Every fees. They even pay a flat rate
year Army ROTC awards for textbooks and supplies,
scholarships to hundreds of You can also receive an aliow-
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DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE - ALL ABC PERMITS - 757-1666





11 Tuesday, January 21, 1997
s
The East Carolinian
Falcons announce new haed coach
ATLANTA (AP) - Dan Reeves will be introduced as the coach of the Atlanta
Falcons today. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported today.
The newspaper said Reeves, fired by the New York Giants following a 6-
10 season, will sign a five-yeat contract worth $7.5 million-$8 million, and
will have the titles of coach and director of football operations.
Reeves, also a former coach of the Denver Broncos, has been believed to
be the favorite for the job since former San Diego coach Bobby Ross turned
it down. Ross, also a former Georgia Tech coach, accepted the job with the
Detroit Lions last week after interviewing with the Falcons.
Atlanta fired June Jones after a 3-13 season.
De La Hoya Keeps Title
LAS VEGAS (AP) - Oscar De La Hoya, using a punishing left jab to set the
tone for the fight, dominated formerly unbeaten Miguel Angel Gonzalez for
12 rounds Saturday night to keep the 140-pound title he won from Julio
Cesar Chavez.
De La Hoya never could put the game challenger down, but turned in a
masterful boxing performance using mainly his left hand to win a lopsided
12-round decision in his first fight since beating Chavez seven months ago.
Only in the late rounds was Gonzalez, who had never lost in 41 previous
fights, able to do anything against De La Hoya, who seemed to coast after
building a huge early lead.
In winning, De La Hoya finished off the last of a quartet of Mexican
champions and set up a planned April 12 fight with WBC welterweight
champion Pernell Whitaker.
"Now I can concentrate on Whitaker De La Hoya said.
Unlike Chavez and the others, however, Gonzalez was able to finish the
fight, taking De La Hoya the distance for only the third time in 23 pro fights
despite taking a beating nearly every round.
New Coach offensively minded
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Kevin Gilbride's reputation for offensive ingenuity pre-
ceded him to San Diego.
With Gilbride as the new head coach. Chargers fans - and players - can
finally look beyond the sputtering, even boring offense that dragged the club
to an 8-8 record last season.
"After watching all the things in Houston and everything he did in
Jacksonville, it looks like it's going to be kind of a wide-open, exciting kind
of offense quarterback Stan Humphries said Sunday.
Gilbride, 45, was Jacksonville's offensive coordinator the last two seasons,
and was a big reason the Jaguars reached the AFC championship game in just
their second season. Prior to that he was offensive coordinator of the
Houston Oilers for four seasons, then assistant head coach-offense for two
vears.
Gilbride's hiring was announced in San Diego on Saturday, and he spoke
with reporters via conference call from Jacksonville. Gilbride flew to Palm
Springs on Sunday to meet owner Alex Spanos and son Dean, the club's pres-
ident, for the first time, then headed to San Diego. Gilbride will spend this
week assembling his staff.
Could Super Bowl be it for Parcells in New England?
BOSTON (AP) - The Bill Parcells era with the New England Patriots, a four-
year reign in which he took the team from a 2-14 record to the Super Bowl,
will end after Sunday's title game, according to a published report.
In a story citing unidentified sources, Boston Globe writer Will
McDonough said the situation between Parcells and Patriots owner Bob
Kraft could end up in court.
Parcells reportedly is being targeted by the New York Jets for their coach-
ing opening.
Before this season, Parcells asked to have the final year deleted from his
five-year contract. Kraft agreed.
Parcells has refused consistently to discuss his future, saying he and Kraft
would talk about it after the season. At a news conference Sunday night after
the Patriots arrived in New Orleans, Parcells said his decision would not
depend on the outcome of the Super Bowl.
Parcells would command a very lucrative salary if he left the Patriots.
"In the free agent market, timing is everything, so he'll be the high guy
on everybody's wish list" if he leaves. Patriots offensive captain Bruce
Armstrong said. "Whatever the top guy is getting, (Parcells) will be the new
top guy
Robert Irsay laid to rest
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - For all his gruffness, Robert Irsay could still manage
a joke when things looked darkest for his Indianapolis Colts.
As the NFL team slid toward a disastrous 1-15 season in 1991, Irsay, a life-
long Roman Catholic, told team chaplain Patrick J. Kelly, "If we don't start
to win, I'm going to become a Presbyterian
When the Colts finally turned into winners in the 1995 season, Irsay was
too ill to sit in the owners box. Disabled by a stroke in November 1995, he
struggled 14 months before dving Tuesday of heart and kidney failure at age
73.
At his funeral Saturday, a display of white and blue-dyed carnations - the
colors of the Indianapolis Colts - arranged in the team's horseshoe logo stood
before the pulpit at St. Luke Catholic Church, a reminder to mourners of
Irsav's florid devotion to football.
Negura tested positive for steroids
BUCHAREST. Romania (AP) - Romanian lulia Negura tested positive for
steroids after winning the European women's cross country title last month,
officials said today.
Negura has been suspended pending an investigation, and if the positive
result is confirmed, she would be stripped of her title and banned for four
years.
The Romanian Athletics Federation said Negura tested positive twice in
December, both times for the steroid stanozolol - the same drug that got
Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson kicked out of the 1988 Olympics.
Super Bowl Advertisers
Perfect home record stands
Amanda Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
The men's basketball team (11-3,
4-1 in the CAA) kept alive its home
unbeaten streak (8-0) Saturday
afternoon, after handing Richmond
a 69-64 loss in Minges Coliseum.
ECU got off to a slow start and
for almost six minutes their only
points recorded on the board were
from a Raphael Edwards basket
underneath. With 14:22 left Morris
Grooms ended the drought with a
lay up.
Edwards started his first game
this season against the Spiders in
the place of Grooms. But don't
think there is any bad blood
between the two. They each learn
from each other.
"Mo and I think we play very-
similar Edwards said. "I like play-
ing with him. We make each other
better in practice
Grooms agrees and says the two
are always helping each other out.
"We work together just like one
whether we're in the game or out
Grooms said.
Head Coach Joe Dooley was
pleased with the intensity Grooms
put out on the court despite not
getting the start.
"Morris played very hard and
very smart. He played with a lot of
enthusiasm Dooley said.
Offensively the Pirates moved
the ball around better midway
through the first and began to get
their shots 'o fall. But from outside
of the three point arc the Pirates'
shooting was cold. In the first half,
ECU went 1-8 from three point
land. Tim Basham had the only
three of the half with 1:15 left.
Overall the Pirates shot .438
percent in the first and went 7-13
from the free throw line.
Richmond's numbers were bet-
NEWYORK (AP) - Coca-Cola is back, advertising on television for the Super
Bowl for the first time since the Persian Gulf War. McDonald's, however, is
sitting out this year's game.
Even at a record $40,000 per second, the nation's biggest soft drink and
fast-food companies have wallets fat enough to afford Super Bowl commer-
cial time any year they want.
But their split decision shows that price isn't the only factor when adver-
tisers decide whether to climb aboard a program that typically draws televi-
sion's biggest audience of the year.
Timing is also important.
Advertisers who have something new to sell or an inventive new way to
make their case say that justifies paying the steep price. So do companies
TRIVIAtime
�:?��
Question - Who was named the most
outstanding player from last year's
NCAA tournament?
rtwym swtiu m moiduwtf.)
ter than ECU's in the first. .481
field goal percentage, .500 from
three range and .600 from the line,
but the Spiders were still down
three at the half, 36-33.
Grooms and Peters led the way
with eight poinrs each and
Jonathan Kerner contributed six.
Richmond coach Bill Dooley.
knew this game would be a chal-
lenge for his squad.
"They're a tough team and
you've got to be tough when you
play them Dooley said.
The Pirates proved that tough-
ness in the second half jumping on
their lead when Edwards, Grooms
and Othello Meadows hit three
straight jumpers to give ECU a 42-
35 lead.
Richmond battled back and
evened up the score with 14:19 left
at 47 a piece, but that was the clos-
est the Spiders would come as
ECU continued to find the bottom
of the net, and recorded another
victory, 69-64.
ECU again outrebounded its
opponent 41-36. Kerner pulled
down 10 of those boards, while
Grooms and Peters grabbed six
each.
Kerner, who hasn't recorded
double digits in the points category
for the past six games, added 13
points to go along with his
rebounds.
"I'm glad to come out and have
a good game tonight Kerner said.
His teammates agreed.
"Jonathan played excellent
tonight Grooms said. "He played
well both offensively and defen-
sively
Other top scorers were Peters
with 12, Grooms with 11 and
Meadows with 10.
The Pirates will hit the floor
tonight in another CAA matchup
when James Madison, (9-5, 3-2 in
the CAA) comes to town.
Tip off is set for 7 p.m. in
Minges.
Raphael Edwards takes a shot against the Richmond defense. Edwards is currently
the leading scorer on the team averaging over 13 points a game.
PHOTO BY DAVID FINCH
REMINDER TO ALL ECU BASKETBALL EANS
THE MEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM WILL HOST JAMES MADISON TONIGHT AT 7 P.M. GET
YOUR FREE TICKETS WITH YOUR STUDENT ID AT THE TICKET WINDOW OUTSIDE OF
MINGES. COME SUPPORT YOUR PIRATES WHO ARE ATOP THE CAA IN FIRST PLACE.
Swimmers continue season undefeated
In the final event of the Richmond swim meet. Pirate swimmers tag for
the final leg of the freestyle relay.
PHOTO BY DAVID FINCH
TRACY LMBACH
SKNIOR WRITER
This weekend was a busy one for
the ECU Swim team as they hosted
Richmond on Saturday and the
College of Charleston on Sunday.
The Pirates came away from both
meets with victories that leave the
men and women alike with an 8-0
overall record.
Finishing only two and a half
points ahead of Richmond,
Saturday's match-up was a close
one. Just minutes after the meet
began, ECU was disqualified due to
a false start, which gave Richmond
the first place points.
Sandra Ossman, a junior from
Charlotte says that determination
was the key to coming out on top in
what was considered bv most to be
one of the toughest meetings of the
season.
"Everyone swam with a big heart
on Saturday Ossman said. "You
could tell just by watching everyone
swim that this was a meet that was
really important to us and that we
were determined to win
On Sunday, the Pirates came
back once again to claim victory in a
sprint meet against the College of
Charleston. Sprint meets are held
once or twice a year and are held to
prepare the swimmers for the con-
ference championship, where both
100's and 200's are swam.
In the 100-meter backstroke,
Melanie Mackwood came out on
top with a time of 1:02.2. She also
won the 50-meter freestyle race
with a time of 25.2. Coming in sec-
, ond in the 100-meter backstroke
with a time of 1:03.7 was teammate
SEE SWIM. PAGE 12
Runners set to get back on winning track
ZlNA BRILEY
STAFF WRITER
When the Lady Pirate Track and
Field team opened the season on
Dec. 14 at George Mason
University, proving they could be a
definite threat for competition this
season.
The Lady Pirates started the
season by capturing four ECAC
qualifying marks and breaking three
school records. The veterans led
the way with .Amanda Johnson qual-
ifying for ECAC's and obtaining a
personal record in the women's 55-
meter dash and she also placed
sixth in the women's long jump.
Johnson was joined by two other
Lady Pirates, Lave Wilson and
Michelle Clayton. Wilson placed
third in the women's triple jump
with a ECAC qualifying mark of
39'01 and placed third in the
women's long jump, jumping 18' 03.
Clayton had a stunning perfor-
mance for the I-ady Pirates by set-
ting a personal record in the
women's shotput, placing third
with a throw of 42'11 and she also
broke a school record, had a person-
al best and qualified for ECAC's
when she threw 50'04 in the
women's 20 pound weight throw.
"Overall this was one of the best
openers as a team that we have ever
had Coach "Choo" Justice said.
It is no doubt these ladies are no
strangers to competition and their
next steps are to qualify for NCAA'S
in each of their events, taking with
them some of the outstanding new
freshmen who have made a positive
addition to the team.
Some of those new freshman
who have helped with the Lady
Pirates successful season opener
were Carmen Weldon, Rasheka
Barrow, Nicki Goins and Shauntae
Hill, who make up the women's
4x400 meter relay team. They too
set a school record in the December
opener, with a time of 3:57.12. plac-
ing second in that event.
Barrow and Weldon were also
top finishers in the women's 200-
meter dash, placing fourth and
fifth. Hill set a school record in the
women's 400-meter dash with a
time of 58.97. Another freshman
sensation was Kai Eason, who also
qualified for ECAC's along with A.
Johnson placing fifth in the
women's 55-meter dash with her
time of 7.17.
Other top finishers for the Lady
Pirates were, Emmanuelle Quenum
in the women's 500-meter dash
(1:23.70). Erin Cottos in me
women's i0()0-meter run (3:10.82)
and Leana Anding in the women's
triple (35'10).
The Lady Pirates didn't stop
there: they continued their impres-
sive performances this past week-
end at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
On Friday, the distance runners
and the sprinters took to the track
against teams like nationally ranked
Carolina and powerhouses like St.
Augustine's, who placed fifth in
Division II competition.
"1 wasn't excepting a lot this
weekend: we just wanted to find
out some of the other areas we
needed to work on and improve
from there Justice said.
Then on Saturday, the field
events took place. Junior Leigh
Branon set a personal record when
she threw 38'9 in the women's shot-
put and Clayton continued to hit
the mark, placing third with a throw
of42'9.
Clayton also finished strong for
the Lady Pirates in the women's
weight throw, placing second. In
the women's triple jump. Wilson
continued on her quest finishing on
a positive note to round out the
weekend.
"It was s a good meet for us this
weekend. We will continue to work
hard, improving on the trouble
spots and continue to make this
one of the best seasons ever
Justice said.
The next stop for the Lady
Pirate track and field team will be
this weekend at the USAir
Invitational at East Tennessee for a
two dav meet.
staff reports
BASKETBALL
CAA STANDINGS
Justine Allpress scored 25 points against George Mason Friday night, but it
wasn't' enough as the l,ady Pirates lost 60-83. Allpress' 25 points put her
past the 1,000 career points mark with 1,016. Also leading the way with dou-
ble digits was Tracey Kelley with 13 and Jen Cox with 10 points. Kelley also
pulled down eight boards.
On Sunday the Lady Pirates traveled to American I University where they
suffered a 89-52 loss. This loss drops the Lady Pirates to 1-5 in conference
play and 5-10 overall.
Cox led the way with 13 points while Melanie Gillem added eight
points. Kelley crashed the boards and pulled down nine boards for ECU.
The Iidv Pirates will return home on Friday to host James Madison at 7 p.m.
TEAM
CAA OVERALL
East Carolina5-112-3
Old Dominion5-1144
James Madison3-29-5
UNC- Wilmington3-38-10
Richmond2-36-7
Va. Commonwealth2-36-8
American245-10
George Mason2-58-8
William & Mary1-34-10






Tuesday, January 21, 1997
SWIM
continued from page 11
Lynsey Bullington.
According to Mackwood, the
highlight of Sunday's meet was that
every single women's event swam
was won by an ECU swimmer.
Next weekend, the Pirates will
face UNC Wilmington. As the
biggest and perhaps most important
meeting of the season, the team is
out for revenge. In last year's
match-up, Wilmington came out
ahead of ECU by only one point.
"I think that the most exciting
event will be the sprint freestyles
Mackwood said. "Lots of points are
awarded for these events, and we
have been very strong in this area so
far this season
Mackwood encourages the stu-
dents and faculty of ECU to keep
their eyes open and focused on the
swimmers.
"What we are doing is something
really great that says a lot for ECU
Mackwood said. "Our program is
growing because athletes and coach-
es alike all put in everything they
have got. No one relies on anyone
else, and that is how our goals are
achieved
After spending most of
Christmas break training in Florida,
each member of the team has devel-
oped great endurance and the men-
tal toughness that is going to be
needed to finish their season as the
conference champions. The cham-
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
SUNMONTtifSWEDTHURSFRISAT 25
211222324
Men's bas-Women'sMen's bas-
ketball vs.basketballketball at
Jamesvs. JamesUNC-
MadisonMadisonWilmingtor
7 p.m.7p.m.7p.m.
(home)(home)(away)
Trask coli-
2628293031seum
Women'sWomen'sMen's bas-Women's
basketballbasketballketball vs.basketballal�
atVCUvs. CoastalOldvs. Coastal
2 p.m.CarolinaDominionCarolinaMen'sWo
(away)7p.m.7p.m.7p.m.men's
(home)(home)swimming vs. Wilmingtor 2p.m. (home)
RIGGAN
SHOE REPAIR
Rivergale East Shopping Center
3193A East 10th St.
Phone 758-0204
Our Specialty ia Sole & Heel Repair
All Rockport Soles - $25.00
Men's Rubber Heels - $6.00
Bring thia coupon with your shoes
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza
The East Carolinian
ALFREDO'S
SPORTS
Mon-Frt 7:30 �.m. - 6 p.m.
Sat ftOO a-m. - 2 p.m.
2 ONE

ToppingONE large
SlicesTopping
and a DrinkNY-fV.i
$2.95S5.95 �
til 4pm daily4 'tpm tily
Monday -I
Black &Tan
BAR
Tuesday -I
Rile Ale Nite
ONE
Topping
Small
ONE Slice
one topping
Drink
$1.25
til 9pm daily
On Sunday,
Monday, &
Tuesday, from
9pm til midnight
one small top-
ping NY Pizza
Calzone
Vtednesday-$l
ftemium Imports Nite
Thursday -I
Micro Brew Nite
Friday -Saturday's
Bartender Specials
Downtown E. 5th st.
752-0022
Donald Stroud
STROUD & STROUD
Attorneys At Law
311 S.Evans St. Mall
Greenville, NC 27858
Office 919-752-5475
Home 919-946-5226
1987 ECU Graduate
Civil � Criminal �
Traffic �DWI
Personal Injury
Be a part of the action!
Travel with the student Pirate Club and watch
the Pirates take on UNC- Wilmington
When: Saturday, January 25, 1997 at 7:30 p.m.
Where: Trask Coliseum, Wilmington, NC
Cost: $25.00 Includes round trip transportation,
Pre-game social and game ticket.
Pre-game social from 5:30 to 7:00.
Includes fun and games, dinner and drinks at Jungle Rapids.
Bus will leave Minges Coliseum at approximately 2:45 p.m. and return
directly following the game.
Seating is limited, so sign up early.
Sponsored by the ECU Student Pirate Club-
"The Team Behind the Teams"
Local Address:
Make checks payable to ECU Educational Foundation. Remit to Student Pirate Club,
Ward Sports Medicine Building, Greenville, NC 27858. For more Information call Mark Wharton 328-4540.
ATTENTION
Student Organizations!
WE WANT YOU!
Register Your Student Group NOW
� Qualify for Student Leadership
Development programs and services
� Utilize Campus Meeting Facilities
� Make your Group Accessible to
Interested Students
Only Registered Groups will be listed in the
1997 Leadership Catalog and
1997-98 Clue Book
You must be
to be recognized!
Registration forms available in the Student
Leadership Programs Office.
STUDENT LEADERS MEETING
Hit the Ground Running!
Topic: Making the "Same Old Thing
a "Whole New Ball Game"
Wednesday, January 22
at 4:30 p.m.
Great Room 3,
Mendenhall Student Center
All organization officers
are encouraged to attend.
ff
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
109 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
328-4796


Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1181
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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