The East Carolinian, January 30, 1996







Ml
TUEft
January 30,1996
Vol 71, No. 34
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
10 pases

Briefs
Around the State
CHARLOTTE (AP) - North
Carolina farmers who are par-
ticipating in a program that
brings field workers from
Mexico to harvest crops, have
used a variety of tactics to keep
from paying workers' compen-
sation claims, critics said.
A complaint filed recently
with the Mexican embassy in
Washington, D.C by lawyers
from Farmworkers Legal Ser-
vices of North Carolina, alleges
that some foreign workers have
been harassed, blacklisted and
denied treatment after report-
ing job injuries.
HIGH POINT (AP) - U.S.
Rep. Charles Taylor likes his sal-
vage-timber law so much that
he wants to produce a sequel.
But environmentalists said
the law already has gone too far
in allowing harvesting of tim-
ber that otherwise would re-
main in the forests.
Last year, Taylor attached
a rider to a budget bill that al-
lowed unregulated salvage-tim-
ber harvesting in U.S. forests
for two years.
Around the Country
LAUREL, Md. (AP) - Inves-
tigators are trying to piece to-
gether the final movements of
three slain District of Columbia
women whose bodies were
Tound lined in a row on a rural
road.
U.S. Park Police say
Mishann Chinn, 23, Tanji Jack-
son, 21, and Tamika Black, 19,
were last seen about 11 p.m.
Friday, five hours before their
bodies were discovered by a
passing motorist near the
Patuxent National Wildlife Ref-
uge.
Each of the victims had
been shot, and at least two ap-
peared to have been run over
by a car, police said.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -
The city's Board of Supervisors
was scheduled to vote yesterday
on a proposal that would allow
the city to perform symbolic do-
mestic partnership marriages.
The union, which could be per-
formed for homosexual or het-
erosexual couples, would carry
no legal weight.
Around the World
JERUSALEM (AP) - Police
fired tear gas, rubber bullets
and water cannons at thou-
sands of Ethiopian Jews who
stormed the prime minister's
office Sunday to protest a na-
tional policy of rejecting their
blood donations.
The anger over the dis-
carded blood donations reflects
years of simmering frustration
in Israel's Ethiopian commu-
nity, which has remained a sub-
ordinate class since Ethiopians
first immigrated to Israel a de-
cade ago in dramatic airlifts.
Review eliminates
13 degree programs
ECU opts to cut
additional five
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
A recent system-wide review of
programs done by the UNC Board of
Governors
tern-wide review of programs that had
few students or duplicated other pro-
grams at the universities.
Of the 26 programs identified for
review at ECU, only 13 have been dis-
continued. The university has chosen
to cut an additional five due to en-
rollment concerns. ECU still maintains
nearly 100 undergraduate programs.
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough, interim
UNC-System recommended
resulted in a
dBoortneticn
of 143 pro-
grams
throughout
the Univer-
sity of North
Carolina
System.
The
General As-
sembly was
concerned
with the uni-
versities in
the system
that were
not graduat-
ing a suffi-
cient number of students in certain
programs. The Board of Governors
were then ordered to conduct a sys-
Discontinued Programs
�B.A. Community Arts Management
�B.A. Music (Liberal Arts Program)
�M.A.Ed. Business Education
�M.S. Home Economics Education
�M.A. Physics
�M.A. Political Science
�C.A.S. Elementary Education
�'C.A.S. Reading Education
�C.A.S. Science Education
�C AS. Business and Office Education
�C.A.S.Marketing Education for Teachers
�C.A.S.English, Secondary Education and
Two-Year College Teaching
�C.A.S. History Education
ECU recommended
6-year program
vice chancellor
for academic af-
fairs does not
think that this
will have a nega-
tive effect on
the university or on its enrollment
"Not a single faculty member is
being eliminated, no unit is being
eliminated, there have only been cuts
within particular schools and depart-
ments Yarbrough said. "There are
still similar programs to those cut, in
operation
ECU is not the only university to
receive cuts. Mimi Cunningham, ex-
ecutive director of university relations
at UNC-Wilmington, said that only
their bachelor of social studies pro-
gram has been
eliminated.
There was no
separate bud-
get for this pro-
gram, so there
was no cut in
faculty.
"We have
only one or
two students
in this pro-
gram who will be allowed to finish
Cunningham said. "The cut has had
minimal impact on the university
Craig Bizzell. director of finan-
cial services at UNC-Charlotte, said
only four program cuts were made as-
sociated with six-year advanced cer-
tificate degrees.
"The cut impacted two students
See PROGRAMS page 3
�B.S. Technical Education, teaching
�B.S. Industrial and Technical Education,
teaching
�B.A. Industrial Technology
� B.S. B.A. Banking
�B.S. B.A. Real Estate
Resident advisor arrested
for weapon, drug possession
Concerned student
alerts police about
illegal activities
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Witter
Shock waves were felt among the
residents of Fleming Hall as one of their
Resident Advisors (RAs) was arrested
on Jan. 16.
Alan Mark Newton was arrested
after officers from the ECU police de-
partment found weapons, drugs and
drug paraphernalia in his room.
According to the ECU police re-
port officers responded to a call at
Fleming Hall when a resident smelled
marijuana coming from Newton's room.
When the officers arrived, they also
smelled marijuana coming from
Newton's room. Upon entering the
room, the officers detected an even
stronger scent of marijuana.
After receiving consent from New-
ton to check his room, officers found a
12 gauge Remington shotgun, 7mm
mag Rifle bolt action, shells for the rifle
and the shotgun, a hunting knife, a sheaf
in a bag under his bed, 24.25 grams of
marijuana in his desk, rolling papers and
two burnt joints in a camera can on the
top of his desk.
The ECU police immediately placed
Newton under arrest and charged him
with felonious possession of weapons
on campus, aggravated possession of
marijuana and possession of drug para-
phernalia. Both drug charges were cited
under state citations. A campus ticket
was also issued.
According to the police report,
Newton was very cooperative through-
out the entire incident and informed
officers where they could find the mari-
juana in his room.
The Fleming resident who in-
formed the officers of the marijuana
feels that all RA's need to be account-
Alumnus challenges incumbent
Sharon Franklin
StaffWriter
Round one in November's battle for the Ninth District
House seat begins this evening when the ECU College Demo-
crats bring their candidate to campus.
ECU alumnus, Dr. Charles Ward, will be the guest
speaker at the College Democrats meeting tonight at 8
p.m. in room 1001 in the General Classroom building.
Dr. Ward holds three degrees from ECU and received
his Doctor of Education Degree from the University of Vir-
ginia. Formerly an assistant professor of sociology at ECU,
he currently serves as the Director of Correctional Educa-
tion at Eastern Correctional Institution at Maury, NC.
"I'm very happy that students, faculty and staff will be
in a position to vote for me Ward said. "I understand how
it feels to be both a student and instructor on this campus.
These experiences have helped me form the concepts 1 plan
to carry to Raleigh
Dr. Ward has filed in NC district 9 which encompasses
all of campus and is currently represented by conservative
Dr. Henry Aldridge. Representative Aldridge received na-
tional attention last year when his argument opposing
the state abortion fund included the statement "the facts
show that people who are raped - truly raped - the
juices don't flow, the body functions don't work and
they don't get pregnant Aldridge later explained that
his statement was taken out of context
Dr. Sean Kelly, assistant professor of political sci-
ence at ECU and specialist in congressional matters,
believes local congressional races are important to stu-
dents as university funding and policy decisions, made
at the state level, directly impact campus life.
"ECU is the third largest school in the university
system and we do not receive our share of funding
Kelly said. "The latest budget cuts threaten two posi-
tions in the political science department alone and that
affects the program we offer. Our lives are affected by
the people who represent us
According to Kelly, Representative Aldridge was
elected to office in 1994 on the wave of conservative
votes that brought many new faces to state and national
legislatures. Aldridge has well supported the budget man-
See WARD page 3
able for their actions.
"It is impossible for an RA to up-
hold the rules if they are breaking the
rules themselves the resident said. "No
one is above the law. if someone thinks
becoming an RA gives him or her a right
to break the law, he or she is going in it
for the wrong reasons
No one connected or involved with
this incident in University Housing Ser-
vices could comment about it because
it is a civil matter. Because it is a civil
matter, it prohibits persons involved
from talking about the incident until
the case has gone to trial and the mat-
ter is settled. ,
"Any student who is in possession
of weapons on campus is suspended
immediately, and when drugs are in-
volved there are more serious implica-
tions said Dr. Ronald Speier, dean of
students, when asked what would hap-
pen to any student if caught with drugs
and weapons on campus.
See RA page 3
on the
Street
ptm pfwrncK metAH
university
check
employe
cords more
carefull
Mark Shaw, senior '
"No, your criminal history
has nothing to do with
the way you do your job
Myron Rouse, sophomore
"No, I don't think so,
because people learn
from their mistakes and
they shouldn't be judged
on their past
Marln Moradel, junior
"Yes, I think they should
check if the matter
concerns the job they are
doing
Lynette Sherrlll, freshman
"Yes, I think they should
check everyone that
works for ECU
New student hotline
tops SGA meeting
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
The Student Government Association (SCA) introduced a student hotline
telephone number and a packet of funding information for campus organiza-
tions in their first meeting of the semester onJan. 22.
The student hotline was brought to the ECU campus as an informative
and suggestive phone line for the student body. It is now available for use and
students are encouraged to take advantage of all that it offers. The telephone
extension is 3284720.
The funding packet for campus organizations is now available in the SGA
main office located on the second floor, room 255, of Mendenhall Student
Center.
"It the packet is a step by step guide with every detail on funding for
student groups said Angie Nixx, SGA treasurer, in an interview following the
meeting. "People get frustrated when they don't know what's going on
Nix said the annual appropriations deadline is April. Campus organiza-
tions are encouraged to plan their expenditures for the year because SGA
technically car.not fund any money to an organization that has not met the
main deadline.
"We have done our jobs and done them very well said Ian Eastman,
SGA president, in conclusion to funding topics. "We can appropriate five to
ten percent more with our remaining budget, which means we can bring some
groups back
The appropriations committee asked for a vote in suspension of rules for
the Interfraternity Council (IFC). Panheilenic and American Chemical Society
or Chemistry Club. The reason is because the organizations need their money
now and SGA fell behind in their work.
In suspending the rules, IFC immediately receives $1,636, Panheilenic
receives $1,300 and the Chemistry Club receives $1,261. The amounts that
were passed by the suspension had a two-thirds vote.
The financial report reveals a total amount of $82,041 available.
'SGA's biggest thing is appropriating money Nix said.
Thrills To Die For at Hendrixpage 5
Campus labs have no purposepage 4
Mens' basketball on a rollpage O
Tuesday i Wednesday
Partly cloudy Moderate
fc
High 55
Low 35
A
High 57
Low 30
?W fo leacA tu
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
UUTEC@ECUVM.CIS.ECU.EDU
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg.
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner
i





2
Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
Qrganizational
Profile
Sherri Parrish
SteftWriter
The Pitt County Chapter of the American Cancer Society is currently plan-
ning its annual Relay for Life fund-raiser.
The 24-hour event is scheduled for April 19-20 and will take place at the
ECU track. Starting time is 7p.m.
During the event, participating teams of eight to 10 people take turns
walking around the track for 24-hours.
Flat donations are required for team members to walk, with each member
raising a minimum of $100.
The purpose of the relay is to fight cancer using a team effort
"While 24-hour participation is strongly encouraged, it is not required
said Kristine Burt, chairperson of the event "If a team or individual supporter
is not able to walk, they may assist with a contribution or in other ways
However, the 24-hour stretch is a collective effort of each team For
example, one member may walk for two hours, then allowing another member
to take over.
Due to the duration of the event individuals may become tired. Partici-
pants may camp out in the middle of the track to rest during the event
Bathroom facilities will be available by the baseball field located next to the
track.
According to Burt, the event will also include a survivors' walk, where
luminaries are lit in memory of those who have survived and died in the battle
against cancer.
The luminaries also provide an additional means of raising money. They
may be purchased for a minimum donation of $5.
In addition, those who have won in their personal fight against cancer will
walk the first lap together.
"It's about cancer survival, not death Burt said. "Thaf s why it's called
Relay for Life
In the past the relay has proved to be a successful and enjoyable way
to raise funds for the American Cancer Society.
The relay provides an opportunity for people to join together to build
awareness and raise money for the on-going fight against the nation's second
leading cause of death.
"The relay is now a signature event of the society from coast to coast" Burt
said. "Last year, relays raised over $1 million across North Carolina
Burt said the proceeds raised from relays help fund the continuation of
cancer research and education.
The proceeds also fund programs and services that are provided by
the society free of charge.
The programs available to patients are designed to help them and their
families to understand and cope with the disease.
" 'I Can Cope' and 'Road to Recovery' are two examples of the services
offered in Pitt County Burt said. "They help to make coping with the disease a
little easier
Early registration for teams is Feb. 14. Those who register by this date are
allowed to pick their campsite. Otherwise, teams may register until April 16 at
the American Red Cross' Greenville office.
If you would like more information about Relay for Life and registration,
call Kristine Burt at 321-2836.
AIDS speakers
educate students
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
Alpha Omicron Pi is sponsoring
two speakers who will give a presen-
tation concerning HIV in the college
community.
The presentation is tonight at
7p.m. in Wright Auditorium. All stu-
dents and faculty are invited and there
is no charge for admission.
Joel Goldman, who is HIV posi-
tive, and his friend TJ. Sullivan be-
gan touring the United States in 1993
teaching college students about the
realities of HIV. Visiting over 100 cam-
puses, the pair has reached more than
90,000 students.
According to Saysha Raper, pub-
lic relations person for Alpha Omicron
Pi, Goldman and Sullivan spoke at the
sorority's national convention in July
1995. Alpha Omicron Pi is sponsor-
ing the speakers with the hope that
all of ECU's students could benefit
from the presentation.
"I think what Goldman and
Sullivan have to say is important be-
cause a lot of people have the mental-
ity that HIV can't happen to them
Raper said. "This presentation is proof
that it can. Goldman was a college stu-
dent and a fraternity brother and he
has HIV
Raper said Goldman and Sullivan
were fraternity brothers at Indiana
State University. The presentation
centers around Goldman's collegiate
lifestyle of mixing alcohol and unpro-
tected sex.
Raper said they will also address
the stereotypes of HIV and the chal-
lenges of living with the disease. The
overall goal of the presentation is to
teach students how to decrease their
risk of contracting HIV.
"It's a very realistic story Raper
said. "It's not going to be so much an
information session as it is an eye
opening experience. They are funny
but at the same time their story is
heart wrenching
Aside from lecturing on HIV,
Goldman is the vice president of a real-
estate management firm in Columbus,
Ohio. Sullivan is an independent con-
sultant based in Denver Colorado.
Everyone attending the presen-
tation is invited to a reception at the
Alpha Omicron Pi house, located at
805 Johnston St, immediately follow-
ing the presentation. Goldman and
Sullivan will be available for questions
after the presentation and at the re-
ception.
Anyone with questions can con-
tact Saysha Raper at 757-0769.
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Perfect Valentine's Day

Participating sponsors:
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�ou can complete an entry form by coming to The East Carolinian office. N�-�urchase necessary.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 30,1996
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PROGRAMS from
who are being allowed to finish the
program Bizzell said.
Dr. Alan Boyette, associate pro-
vost for academic administration, said
a total of 26 programs have already
been reviewed or are currently under
review at UNC- Greensboro. Six of
those have been recommended for
discontinuation and the remaining 20
programs are under various stages of
review.
The only program recommended
for discontinuation at the undergradu-
ate level is a B.A. in Latin, Secondary
Education. The others were at the
Intermediate (6th year) Level.
Students currently enrolled in the
discontinued programs throughout
the system will be allowed to finish
their degrees. The programs must be
phased out by July 1, 1998. The uni-
versities are not accepting any more
students into these cut programs.
Despite the loss of programs,
ECU will soon gain two others. At the
last Board of Governors meeting, ECU
pagel
had a Physician's Assistant Bachelor
Degree Program approved as well as
a Ph.D in Communication Disorders.
"There is a very high interest for
those particular programs
Yarbrough said.
There have been some recent
misunderstandings due to these pro-
gram eliminations. Yarbrough said
that this is understandable and ex-
pected.
"If you see that this particular
bachelor degree in music is being
eliminated, you may assume that it is
the only degree program we have in
music, so we must be closing down
our undergraduate program in it
Yarbrough said. "Of course, that is not
the case, we have a huge school of
music with a large enrollment"
"These program eliminations are
not something that has created any
problem here at the university at all.
We had very low enrollment in those
programs, and they are just being
taken off the books
RA
from page 1
d&
An emergency hall meeting was
called to explain to the residents that
Newton would no longer be an RA.
Many residents in Fleming are dis-
appointed in Newton.
"It is sad said Pamela McLemore,
a sophomore elementary education
major. "An RA is supposed to be some-
one you can turn to with your prob-
lems
McLemore does not feel screening
RAs better would be a guarantee that
incidents like this would not happen
again.
"I don't think this problem could
have been prevented McLemore said.
"I would not think that Allen would be
the type to do something like this
Jason Dees, a sophomore middle
grade education major who was a resi-
dent under the supervision of Newton,
also feels that Newton disappointed resi-
dents.
"Allen let us down Dees said. "
He was supposed to be a positive role
model. He was supposed to set the stan-
dard for other students to look up to
Newton was released under $1,500
and $500 secured bonds by Magistrate
Pruitt Newton's first appearance in
court was Jan. 16.
WARD from page 1
date that brought him to office but
his votes have helped eliminate abor-
tion funding arrl removed 48 million
dollars from university coffers.
'There is an uneasy feeling
among some people here at the uni-
versity that Dr. Aldridge, extremely
loyal to his constituents, may not view
the college as an important element
of his district said Dr. Kelly and
student populations are traditionally
easy to ignore because of their low
voting turnout Dr. Aldridge was
unavailable for comment
The College Democrats hope this
event will stimulate participation in
the political process on campus by pro-
viding a forum for the students, fac-
ulty and staff to meet the candidate
in a question and answer session.
"The 1996 elections are doubly
important for students said Larry
Freeman, vice-president of the College
Democrats. "We have congressmen
who want to cut student loans and
faculty positions. We encourage every-
one to come by and listen to what Dr.
Ward has to say. Ask the tough ques-
tions and make your own decisions.
And most importantly-vote this year
for the candidate of your choice
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M
Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
Our View
Slip-ups happen,
but the university
may need to
keep a closer
eye on the
people they hire
to roam our
residence halls
In last Thursday's issue of TEC (Jan. 25), we reported that
a university employee working as a maintenance mechanic
resigned after being arrested for taking indecent liberties with
a child.
Ronald Finnegan, 31, who had been working at ECU for
about a year, allegedly committed the offense in July of 1995
against a child under 16 years of age. Finnegan was indicted
on Jan. 16, and included no reason for his leaving ECU in his
letter of resignation.
What takes the cake is that Finnegan, according to the
Criminal Department at the Pitt County Courthouse, had a
felony fugitive warrant in another state dismissed on Nov. 15,
1991.
Shouldn't have somebody checked up on this? The guy is
a criminal twice over. We've heard of society giving you a
second chance, but this is ridiculous.
Director of Housing Manny Amaro said that Finnegan was
interviewed and his references were checked out before he
was hired, but the university only checks in-state criminal
records.
Information on criminal records from around the country
is now available in a centralized computer, and Amaro, as well
as us at TEC, believe that the ECU Department of Human
Resources needs to come up with a new policy on the hiring
of employees. With all of the technology at the university's
disposal, there is no excuse for this kind of thing happening.
It just gives ECU a black eye.
Amaro cited Finnegan as a "model employee" and was
disturbed to hear of his criminal behavior. Finnegan's fellow
employees viewed him as a hard worker going beyond the call
of duty and are "heart-stricken" that all of this has happened.
Little did anyone know about what kind of person they
were working with, and little did the people living in the resi-
dence halls know who was repairing their living quarters.
Finnegan worked in the residence halls doing general
maintenance, carpentry and working on door and window
hardware. His job description included "good communication
skills due to the position's involvement with students
How would you know if a criminal was "involved" with
you? Not a pleasant thought is it? Just imagine that the guy
who came to fix your window was a pervert Needless to say,
you would be concerned for your safety.
Many girls who stay in all-girl residence halls do so be-
cause they donjt want just anybody walking down the hall
when they go to take a shower. No one wants to feel threat-
ened while using the bathroom, either.
As much money as we pay to attend this fine institution,
the university's Department of Human Reaources should go
that extra step to check out perspective employees.
We all want and deserve to feel safe.
HhHhHhWHMx
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The East Carolinian
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The East Carolinian
Tambra Zioa, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Roontree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Craig Perrott, Assistant Sports Editor
Paul Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Cristie Farley, Production Assistant
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Hlnson, Conv Editor
Rhonda Crumpton, Copy Editor
Panl D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial In each
edition Is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Labs bore students
The yapping of the television in
the background grew louder as the
deadline grew closer. Slowly the
perch that he had taken on the couch
became a hole in the couch and his
intellect began to dull. Flip the chan-
nel and get a glass of tea.
What could put this energetic
writer into the ultimate walking
sleep? No, it's not the deadline creep-
ing into the picture. It's not the quiet
tint of evening flowing through the
blinds. There are only a few things
that can cause utter brain death in
less than an hour. Excluding natural
disasters and accidents, what we are
talking about affects many students
on this campus.
We are talking about the lan-
guage lab.
If there were a way to get ail of
the students, required or not, who
attend foreign language classes at
this university to give a collective
show of hands affirming how much
that they have learned in the lab,
there might be one or two people,
most likely children of language pro-
fessors, who would swing their arm
feverishly.
The importance of students be-
coming familiar with the native ac-
cents of the languages they are learn-
ing has been shoved down our
throats like a quarter sized heart
worm pill into the mouth of a minia-
ture poodle. We fight but to no avail.
I will, at this point, between
am
Patrick Ware
Opinion Columnist
Your ability
t
lanj
certat
based on
ability to
play T
seemingly bitter snaps at the admin-
istration, concede that there is some
necessity in the auditory learning of
languages but this can be done in
the classroom. Everyone knows that
lab time is nap time and it is because
of this attitude, that I admit to hav-
ing, that this program is simply a
waste of tirrie and money. Students
only go because the have to. Because
of so many short cuts and be. ing pro-
grams they get nothing out of it
Think about it this way. You walk
into a room with terminals. This fact
alone can send a person into sheer
excitement There is nothing like ter-
minals to make a person feel good.
Other locations that maintain termi-
nal-like individual space allotments
include bathrooms, parking lots, and
dorms.
You sit down after getting the
tape from the lab attendant and then
you sit in a chair for 60 to 90 min-
utes and then you leave. You leave
with no greater knowledge about
Spanish or French, What you do
leave with is a tired body and a sour
taste in your mouth for the language
that you have chosen.
In my case, class is hard enough
with all of the tenses you have to
learn and the vocabulary. Your abil-
ity to learn the language is certainly
not based on your ability to press play
like a chimp, listen to the sounds
these tapes make for an hour, and
then press stop, also like a chimp. .
I will probably get a response
from some head of some language
committee that will read something
like this: "The necessity of laboratory
work for the up and coming language
student has been proven over many
years of research. Just because you
think that it is boring does not give
you the right to bash the entire pro-
gram
I am not bashing the language
program, and I am especially not
bashing the intent of educators. I am
simply voicing an opinion, which I
believe to be commonly held not only
among students, but among some
faculty, that the lab is boring. It is
hard enough to learn a language as
it is, this is why good teachers are
such a blessing. Lose the lab - it
takes up too much space.

Employers need honesty
T
I
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I
I
I
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I
J
"I need a job Have you or any
of your friends said that recently? I
know I hear it around my apartment
all the time. It seems that this semes-
ter more than ever, students are find-
ing it difficult to find a job.
I always thought that in a college
town, a student could always find a
job. You know what, yes I admit it, 1
WAS WRONG! Yes, me, the guy who
in his articles is always right, actually
made a mistake.
Getting a job used to be so
simple. At any time, I could walk
through the mall or open up TEC and
see tons of offers that did not require
me to stuff envelopes or work abroad.
There was actually work here in
Greenville for a student like myself.
Nowadays, however, is an entirely
different story. With an increase in the
number of students at ECU over the
past few years, the task of finding a
job has gotten to the point where the
stress level begins to rise.
What I don't understand, is with
the increase in fast-food restaurants
around here and the new stores that
are opening up, where are all the jobs?
What bothers me the most is how
often a perspective employee fills out
an application for a job and the re-
sponse from the person receiving the
application is that, "You should hear
from us in a few days, if not, try giv-
ing us a call back How often do these
people actually take the time to call
people back? If I go to a store or res-
taurant and apply for a position there,
the least they can do is make a simple
phone call letting me know that they
Brian Lewis, Burns
Opinion Columnist
A simple phone
call telling an
applicant that
their services are
not needed at
this time is not
too much to ask,
are not interested in my being an em-
ployee there.
Yes, making phone calls takes
time. That is what is so difficult about
the hiring process. However, it also
takes time for a person to go to that
store and apply for a job. A simple
phone call telling the applicant that
their services are not needed at this
time is not too much to ask. Other-
wise, the people who apply are left in
limbo thinking about whether they
should call or not.
This is a problem that is part of
Modern Business America. If we con-
tinue to do this now, then the genera-
tions following us will continue to do
so. When a manager or employer tells
an applicant that they will call them
back, take my word, it means we're
not interested. I'll tell you this much,
I am still waiting from Belk's and Rec
Services, and it has been three years.
I don't think 1 am going to hear
from them. Rec Services simpl)
throws the applications away aftci
awhile and has people come by anc
fill more out Sure they keep the ap
plications for a while, but eventuaih
they find themselves in the circula
file with yesterday's coffee-stainec
styrofoam cup.
This is the way that businesse:
act They don't actually care about u:
little people out here. Why do the;
need to lie and say they will call mi
back when they can simply say tha
they are not interested in me? Is tha
so difficult? It would actually tak
more effort to do that than to acti
ally make those phone calls they ar
promising.
See, that is one thing I am a slkY
ler for. If you tell me you are going ti
do something, then I expect you t
do it. I don't expect you to think abou
doing it or if you get a chance thei
do it Don't make a promise you can'
keep. That's something we all learne
in first grade. Are we so far gone fror
that idea? Has the sense of commi
ment left our consciences? If so, the
this country is in for a hard fall.
Here is my suggestion to the mai
agers and the personnel directors qi
there. Next time an applicant come
in to apply for a job, take a momer
and tell the truth. If you need moi.
time to review their application an
resume, then tell them just that If yo
are not interested, tell them, don
make them wait and then never he
from you. -
Most importantly, never use tr
phrase, "Don't call us, we'll call you
"Television is an invention whereby you can be
entertained in your living room by people you
wouldn't have in your house
David Frost, British columnist, television produce
rat
IL
�-





Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
Fleck discovers the
Wright atmosphere
Jazzy bluegrass
outfit pleases
campus audience
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
It was 10 til eight when my date
and I gently swept through the doors
of East Carolina's Wright Auditorium.
Anxious to find a good seat we rushed
into the masses of people that were
already comfortable and ready for the
show.
To get a good overview of the
show, I sat as far from the stage as
possible. As 8 p.m. hit, Bela Fleck and
the Flecktones took the stage. The
audience gave a polite cheer and qui-
eted down. After the introduction, the
band started to heat things up.
After a great introduction, bass-
ist Victor Lemont took control of the
energy presented and let the audience
know they were in for the ride of their
jives.
Gently, as the sound changed
from bluegrass to jazz, the spotlight
glided along to shine on whoever may
have had the lead at the time. After
the explosive thunder had calmed
from Lemont's mind, Future Man took
time to shine.
Claiming to hail from the year
2050, Future Man plays an instrument
of his own creation called the Synthax
Drumitar. With this strange device, he
shows people the music of tomorrow
by playing the songs of yesterday.
With a wide range vocally and instru-
mentally, Future Man appears to be a
descendant of Hendrix, Marley and
Prince all rolled up into one. He
proved to be an artist of communica-
tion as he tested his limits on the
Greenville scene.
On another bright note, Paul
McCandless of the band Oregon,
stepped in for the night to jam with
the band. His variety of wind instru-
ments took the sound to a whole new
level. Never overplaying and always
knowing when to play, McCandless
complimented Bela Fleck with respect
and a smile.
Shouts of "Black Gold! Texas
Tea came up from the audience dur-
ing the performance of the theme
from the "Beverly Hillbillies which
Fleck reconstructed for last year's
movie remake.
The crowd silenced as Fleck and
his bandmates came to unbelievable
peaks in performance with yet another
series of showdowns between one an-
other. No one musician ever upstaged
the the others; the band members
complimented each other well and
gave the audience a spectacular per-
formance.
The intensity growing by the sec-
ond, Bela Fleck began to walk into
the crowd. Only playing for a few min-
utes, Fleck walked around to get the
feel of the crowd.
"The audience was wonderful and
really made us feel like playing Fleck
said when the show came to a close.
A close that consisted of solos from
all band members, on banjo, bass, sax
and drums.
It was great to see musicians
come to an abrupt peak at the same'
time. Bela Fleck and the Flecktones
are one of the tightest bands East
Carolina will have the pleasure of ex-
periencing in Wright Auditorium this
year.
The most amazing quality that
Bela Fleck presents is his ability to
keep control of the audience without
ever losing focus of why he is there.
He doesn't play up to anyone. He is
true to himself and his music, a qual-
ity I wish all of us could possess.
JtttUAte coccca
Kidman knocks 'em dead
r
U
Dale Williamson
Senior Wrltor
In its continuing mission to
bring fine cinema to ECU, Hendrix
Theater showed Gus Van Sant's
highly praised To Die For last
weekend. The event was a small
blessing since this film, like most
notable films being made today,
seemed to miss our local theaters.
Perhaps the film's quirky na-
ture or its dark subject matter
made To Die For seem unsuitable
fpr Greenville, but Hendrix's Fri-
day night audience proved other-
wise. Though it's probably too late
to see this film on the big screen,
its impending video release will be
well-worth looking for.
Nicole Kidman plays the TV-
obsessed Suzanne Stone, who has
dreams of being the next big thing
on television. In her mind, you're
nobody if you're not on TV. In an
effort to realize her dreams,
Suzanne lands a job at a local TV
station. Here,
she works her
way up to local
weather per-
son and even
gets the okay
to work on a
documentary
about "real-
life" teen-agers
and their prob-
lems.
B u t
Suzanne has a
problem of her m��,M
own. Her hus-
band (played perfectly by the al-
ways underrated Matt Dillon)
wants her to focus her energies on
his and his father's restaurant.
Perhaps the film's
quirky nature or
its dark subject
matter made To
Die For seem
unsuitable for
Greenville
And he wants to start a family,
which would only ruin Suzanne's
TV options.
So, Suzanne decides to be-
come evil and
solve all her prob-
lems. If she can
figure out a way
to have her hus-
band murdered,
then she can go
on with her ca-
reer. Enter three
disturbed and
confused teenag-
ers: Russell Hines
(who suffers
physical abuse
tammmmmmmmMm from adults),
Lydia Mertz (who
suffers a slight weight problem and
a history of sexual harassment)
See DEAD page 6
Baltic
Ceramics
Pictured here is
"Hands, Triangle and
Egg" by Viive Valjaots of
Estonia, part of the
Baltic Ceramics: 1996
exhibition currently on
display at ECU'S Gray
Art Gallery. '
. -f �, � ' � - Mki � �������.
tmatmm.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Sm4 Review
Explore An
Unquiet Mind
Manic depressive
doctor reveals her
life in new book
Ronda Cranford
Staff Writer
Nowadays, mental disorders are
getting a lot of media attention. On
talk shows and in magazines, we find
all kinds of information about what-
ever disorder is currently in the spot-
light. We've all heard about attention
deficit disorder and bi-polar disorder
and various eating disorders.
Usually, when these problems
are talked about, a victim of the dis-
ease is either described or inter-
viewed in order to give us an idea of
what it is like to live with it, then an
expert in the field is consulted for a
scientific perspective. In An Unquiet
Mind, you get both in the same pack-
age.
Kay Redfield Jamison is a widely
published and highly accomplished
professor of psychiatry at Johns
Hopkins University School of Medi-
cine. Ironically, she achieved most of
her professional status during the
period of her life when her fiercest
struggles with manic depression were
taking place. She has written a very
informative book about her experi-
ences.
Jamison begins by describing her
�childhood growing up in a military
family with a father who was also
prone to extremes of mood. Her own
disposition remained fairly stable un-
til she reached the age of 17, when
she first began having manic depres-
sive episodes. From then on, her life
became a struggle to manage the
highs of mania and the lows of de-
CD. Reviews
Tori Amos
Boys For Pele
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
Tori Amos should be considered
a national treasure. She performs
music of such beauty and substance
that it elevates most listeners to an-
other place. No mere pop performer,
she is an artist of true merit id if
songs could be placed in a museum,
I have no doubt that Amos would
find her work on display with
Lichtenstein, Pollack and Warhol. If
she were a filmmaker she would be
leagues past Tarantino of Woo,
she'd be up there with the big boys
like Scorcese or Coppola.
Unfortunately, Amos has picked
pop music for her medium and that,
in and of itself, dooms her to be con-
sidered a sideline artist. This is much
like her good friend, Neil Caiman,
who, although recognized and
awarded for his unique artistic vi-
sion, picked comic books as the
medium for his spectacular Sand-
man writings. No matter how many
critics sing the praises of Amos and
Caiman, they will be forever con-
strained by their choice of creative
medium.
She also will not sell to the
masses because she's too controver-
sial. We're not talking controversy
of the Michael JacksonMadonna
type, the kind that is schlocky and
sensational and appeals to people
on a tabloid level of interest. Her
controversy is much more subtle
than that.
Look at her song lyrics, for ex-
ample. In "Father Lucifer" she sings,
"how's your Jesus Christ been hang-
ing" and in "Muhammad my Friend"
she continues her sacrilege by stat-
ing, "it's time to tell the world we
both know it was a girl back in
Bethlehem and on that fateful day
when she was crucified she wore
Shiseido Red and we drank tea by
her side This disdain for organized
religion and its subjection of women
is refreshing.
Each and every one of her lyr-
ics, just like the lines of a good poet,
lead the listener into their own in-
dividual interpretations. She speaks
to people. She doesn't speak at
them. That, I suppose, is the reason
she can have such power and yet still
be so soft-spoken.
Boys For Pele is a welcome ad-
dition to the Amos catalogue. Al-
though it is softer and darker than
her previous records, Little Earth-
quakes and Under the Pink, it also
seems more confident and relaxed.
Do yourself a favor and give this
record a listen. Tori may not be for
everyone, but I don't think she
wants to be. She has no marketing
agenda. But that's not to say that
she doesn't care about her art be-
ing heard.
Listening to her sing and play,
you get the feeling that nothing will
stop Tori Amos.
As she says in "Talula "say
goodbye to the old wo-ld ran into
the Henchman who severed Anne
Boleyn he did it right quickly a
merciful man she said 1 1 is 2
but Henry said that it was 3 so it
was here I am
Goodbye, old world, here is Tori
Amos. You can try to dismiss her
and her opinions, but there are oth-
ers who are listening.
pression.
Throughout her psychiatric
training, Jamison managed to over-
look the fact that she, herself was a
textbook case of something she of-
ten treated in others. Once she did
begin seeing a psychiatrist herself
and got her diagnosis, she found it
hard to deal with the reality that she
needed medication in order to func-
tion.
She also found it hard to give
up the highs of mania. As a result,
she would often stop taking her
lithium prescription in defiance. This
assertion of independence always led
to disaster, and once to a suicide at-
tempt
Having a doctor and patient in
one to talk about this affliction works
well in some regards. Jamison's per-
spective allows for exploration of
some interesting issues. Is a victim
of manic depression a better or worse
doctor for having the disorder? In
light of genetic research, which
shows that the disease has a biologi-
cal and genetic basis, should we ad-
vise sufferers to avoid having chil-
dren? Has the medical community
sugar-coated the manic depressive
image by renaming it "bi-polar disor-
der?"
Do the turbulent personalities
that result from the disorder have
more to offer society because of their
affliction? Many great minds through-
out history have been manic depres-
sive. Perhaps these personalities are
ultimately more productive because
they have the disease. Jamison her-
self, admits that she's glad she has
medication, but she wouldn't want
to give up the manic depressive part
of her identity.
While it is true that Jamison is
See MIND page 6
This week's Topic:
Superman
1. Name Superman's
parents.
2. Why does Lex Luthor
hate the Man of Steel?
3. What effect does
Gold Kryptonite have
on Superman?
4. Who were Krypto,
Comet, Beppo and
Streaky?
5. What was the final
fate of the evil
Kryptonians from the
Phantom Zone?
Answers in Thursday's issue
ADrop
Bucket
A printing error omitted
a significant chunk of last
week's "Drop in the Bucket"
column on America's obses-
sion with sports. To correct
that error, and in honor of
Sunday's Super Bowl game,
we present the column again,
in a slightly revised form.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
I've got a confession to
make. It's the kind of confes-
sion that garner hard stares
in this country, if not outright
disdain. But, damn it,
somebody's got to say it
I really hate sports.
Well, okay, that's not en-
tirely accurate. I can appreci-
ate the talent and ability of
athletes and the subtle com-
plexities of coaching strate-
gies. I also understand the
important role sports play in
many people's lives. For a lot
of kids, it's a ticket out of the
ghetto and into a college edu-
cation. For a select few of
those kids, it's also a ticket to
million-dollar salaries and a
life their parents never
dreamed of.
So it's not sports I have a
problem with, per se. It's all
the stuff that goes with sports
that I hate.
The fans, for instance.
I'm not talking about the
casual fan, who occasionally
tunes in to an NBA game on
his day off. I'm talking about
the people who live for sports.
They spend as many of their
off hours as possible watching
sports. They talk sports, they
breathe sports, they eat
sports. Hell, they'd probably
have sex with sports if they
were equipped with the proper
genitalia.
But then again, maybe
they've found a way. There's a
frightening number of these
people out there, and they're
multiplying. There's so many
of them that 1 sometimes think
they must be holding big or-
gies every weekend at our
nation's sports bars. Helmets
and shin guards provided, no
condoms allowed.
What's especially scary
about all this is that there's
nothing more obnoxious than
a room full of sports fans. It's
all spilled beer and hooting,
the latest "important" game
sand-blasting away brain cells
with the soothing glow of tele-
vision.
Why do people care so
much? It's not like they're per
sonally involved. I mean, if
somebody's actually playing in
a game, I can understand get-
ting all moist about it. But if
you're just watching it on TV?
I don't feel the need to give
my buddies the high five when
See DROP page 7





Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
MIND from page 5 DEAD from page 5
uniquely well qualified to write about
this subject her storytelling ability sells
her short Instead of putting readers
in her shoes and showing them what
her experiences were like, she does a
whole lot of simply telling, which less-
ens the impact of her story.
For example, she paints important
characters by constructing long, listy
sentences full of general, descriptive
terms instead of showing us the per-
son through actions and dialog. In
addition, she includes a lot of extrane-
ous information, which is distracting.
She describes the man she eventually
married as a "handsome, unassuming,
quietly charming man Even though
he's pretty important, he reads just like
many other minor male characters.
How could she tell he was any of the
things she describes him as?
She does go on to describe him
in more detail, however. "He couldn't
abide poetry and was genuinely
amazed that 1 seemed to spend so
much of my day just wandering around,
rather aimlessly, going to the zoo, vis-
iting art galleries, walking my dog - a
sweet, wholly independent morbidly
shy Basset Hound named Pumpkin -
or meeting friends for lunch and break-
fast"
I don't think the injected informa-
tion about Pumpkin is at all necessary
and it makes the writing seem like ran-
dom thoughts, since Pumpkin is never
mentioned again and the space used
to escribe him could have gone to
: show an example of her husband's be-
havior. Because Jamison neglects to
draw more detailed, showing descrip-
, tions of her life, the reader becomes
! baffled in places.
For example, if the staggering
dose of lithium she was taking at the
beginning of her career impaired her
ability to read, how did she co-author
textbooks, publish articles and in gen-
eral, function as a doctor and teacher?
An Unquiet Mind is thought-pro-
voking and informative, so if you have
an interest in this subject it is worth
checking out However, if you're look-
ing for a well-executed story to go with
your information, you might want to
look somewhere else.
HENDRIX
FILMS
Thursday, February 1
Friday, February 2
Saturday, February 3
and Jimmy Emmett (who suffers
from being in love with Suzanne).
With the help of these three kids,
Suzanne can knock off her hus-
band and concentrate on her fu-
ture in TV.
Buck Henry's script, which is
based on Joyce Maynard's novel,
is filled with wonderfully disturbed
characters and bizarre twists. With
Van Sant's darkly comic vision and
Danny Elfman's haunting musical
score added to the recipe, To Die
For walks the fine line between
being perversely funny and just un-
nerving. When Suzanne seduces
Jimmy in order to use him for her
own evil purposes, a dirty sensa-
tion runs throughout the film.
Suzanne, who was once a beauti-
ful woman with a desire to achieve
her dreams, transforms into an
ugly monster who will sacrifice
anyone and anything for her own
good.
The overall cast wonderfully
handles these distasteful charac-
ters. As Suzanne, Kidman com-
bines seductive beauty, naivete,
obsession and insanity to reveal a
much more complex character
than anything she's played in the
last few years. I haven't been this
impressed with Kidman since I
first saw her in Dead Calm. It's a
relief to watch her play something
other than the male lead's love
interest.
The teen-agers are also ex-
tremely impressive. Casey Affleck
layers Russell with enough anger
and sexual energy to the point
where he has no other option but
to explode in violence. As Lydia,
Alison Folland presents us with a
character who just wants to feel
needed, to be part of something,
anything. Most impressive, though,
is Joaquin Phoenix. His Jimmy
moves from being a floating soul
with no purpose to a pathetic, de-
stroyed victim of false love. Jimmy
thinks he has finally found a pur-
pose in Suzanne, but he only dis-
covers that he is wrong, and is
forced to suffer the consequences.
To Die For is not for
everyone's taste buds. It does have
its slower moments, and Van Sant's
directorial choices may throw some
off. Van Sant combines the narra-
tive with documentary style inter-
views and bizarre visual edits that
give clues to the film's final out-
come. While this may not follow the
standard narrative style of most
films, it is not unfitting for this
movie. In fact, Van Sant's style only
adds to the film's engaging nature.
As television is continually
flooded with real-life murderers be-
come celebrities, it is refreshing to
see a film that exposes the shallow-
ness of mainstream media. America
is too fascinated with who killed
who and who slept with who. Who
cares? The world is screwed up
enough without having murderers
brag about themselves on "Oprah
While To Die For satirizes this
whole concept, it also takes its sub-
ject matter very seriously. It never
forgets that a murder occurs, that
people's lives are changed forever,
and that justice can take many
forms.
On a scale of one to 10, To Die
For rates an eight.
SANDRA BULLOCK
THE NET
itesiisip
Thursday, Februarys, 1996
Wright Auditorium � ISHIMMlHrHn'I
MasterCard and Visa" accepted. All tickets are General Admission. Doors open at 7:00 PM.
Tickets ore on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
For more information, call 1 -800 ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8-30 AM - 600 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
The Will Tynch Trio-Wednesday, January 31-FREE!
1:30 PM until 3:00 PM - The Wright Place
East Carolina University's Student Union is Now Accepting
Applications for Chairpersons of the Following Committees
for the 1996-1997 Term:
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MARKETING ' FILMS � VISUAL ARTS � LECTURE
BAREFOOT POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
Come by Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center
DEADLINE TO APPLY - Wednesday, February 7th
WZMB Sports will carry the women's basket game against
UNC Charlotte this Wednesday night. Airtime is 6:45 p.m.
Tune in to WZMB's News Updates Monday through Friday at
8, 10 and 11 a.m and at 1, 3, 5, 6 and 7 p.m.
Catch Sports Updates weekdays at 8:30 amd 11:30 a.m. and at
1:30, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. And don't forget to tune in to WZMB's
hour-long sports show, "Pirate Talk" on
Thursday night at 7 p.m.
Q1.3 FM
- East Carolina University
It's What's Between The Ears
That Counts.
Where do you go to gain "real world"
experience in a college-level program?
Use your head.
Think Disney!
Come learn about the WALT DISNEY WORLD College Program,
where you'll be able to earn college recognition or credit while gaining
the experience of a lifetime.
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Visit us at ovr presentation!
Date: February 1, 1996 Time: 7:30pm Location: Rm. 1032, General Classroom Bldg.
Interviewing: All majors for positions throughout theme parks and resorts. Positions include
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 30, 1996
MARK A. WARD
Attorney at Law
DWI, Traffic And Felony Defense
NC Bar Cerisfied Specialist in State
Criminal Law
24 Hour Message Service
752-7529
LIIvUa from page 5
somebody makes a particularly witty
or insightful joke on "Mystery Sci-
ence Theater 3000 What's the big
deal?
By the same token. I don't get
the need sports fans feel to rag each
other when somebody's favorite
team loses. What's up, guys? It's not
like your buddy personally lost the
game. Why must you torment each
other? Tell you what. When you get
off your butt and beat somebody at
a sport personally, crow all you
want. But if you're merely a specta-
tor, just keep your bloody mouth
shut.
And what is it with people who
memorize statistics? Don't they have
anything better to do with those
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brain cells? We might have a cure
for cancer, or at least the common
cold, if so many otherwise-useful
brain areas weren't filled up with
sports trivia.
There's a word for people like
this. geek. That's right; geek. All you
rabid sports fans out there, for all
your alpha-male grunting and "cool"
status, are geeks. Sports geeks.
Don't try to deny it. Don't even
think about it. You're just like all
us other geeks out here. What's the
difference between those stats-ob-
sessed people and a Trekkie who
memorizes episode numbers? Nada.
Football helmets or Spock ears, it's
all the same.
What makes you so special?
What makes sports geeks so much
more important than the rest of us
geeks that your personal obsession
can eclipse everybody else's?
Why, for example, do I have to
watch sports scores clutter up the
screen 24-7 on Headline News?
Couldn't that space be better-used
to give us a running count of how
many trees are left in the Rain For-
est? Make the environmental geeks
happy for a change.
Or how about keeping us up to
date on the death toil in Bosnia or
any of the other wars being waged
around the globe? Hourly body
counts, up to the minute coverage
on who's winning and who's losing
the world-wide contest between free-
dom and oppression. Now. that's
news.
Morbid? Maybe, but at least it
would be something that actually
matters. And we'd all be a little bet-
ter-informed about the state of af-
fairs for Mother Earth.
And. on a less-serious note, why
are my favorite shows so often de-
layed or pre-empted altogether in fa-
vor of overtime sports coverage? Do
they give the heroes of The X-Files
an extra 10 minutes to solve a par-
ticularly bizarre or complicated
case? Hell, no! They've got to solve
their problems in an hour, or they
don't get solved at all.
So why can't the NFL ever seem
to finish a football game in under
three hours? I can change the oil in
If you have 15-96
credits and a 3.0
g.pa. or better,
then you meet the
initial requirements
for membership to the
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society.
Till Rl Will. Hi; AN INFORMATIONAL
Ml I TING ON TlESDAY, JaMARY 30 AT
5:00 in General Classroom 1032.
my car and give it a tune-up in less
time!
Okay, maybe I'm being unreason-
able there. Some geek activities just
take more time to complete.
And speaking of time, what about
Super Bowl Sunday, the high holy
day of the sports geek? Could we
please take up some more air time
with pre-game chatter and endless
speculation? Please?
I just don't understand the all-
consuming urge of virtually the en-
tire country to watch this single
football game. Why does the Super
Bowl hold such obsessive power
over people?
It can't be that it's an exciting
game. With exceptions so rare as to
be beneath notice, the Super Bowl
is one of the worst games of the year.
One team inevitably chokes, leading
to a rout that never lives up to the
hype. Or the air time. Or especially
the wild devotion of the fans.
So I've got some advice for all
you sports geeks out there (those
of you who haven't hurled the pa-
per across the room, football-like, in
your rage). Think of it the next time
you prepare to shut yourself off from
the world for an afternoon of sports
overdose, or the next time you get
ready to make fun of a Trekkie.
Sports are meaningless trivia,
no more or less important than any-
body else's interests and obsessions.
Whether it's Star Trek, comic books,
math, stamps, computers or the
NFL, we are geeks one and all. Wel-
come to the club.
Any questions 7
ike at 752-4()7 or Tammx at S.W-VIIS
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Watch for additional drop box i
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8
Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
SPdJKES
Women win in overtime
First conference
win since early
January
Amanda Ross
SportB Editor
No question about it One of the
most exciting wins the Lady Pirates have
produced this season was this past week-
end.
Sunday's game between the Lady
Pirates and the Lady Spiders of Rich-
mond was a thriller. The game went into
overtime and ECU won by two points,
78-76.
This was a vital game for the Lady
Pirates who were looking for a much
needed win and evcvbody knew the
importance of the game
"We came into the game focused
knowing it was a big game, mainly be-
cause it was conference but aL. to get
our confidence back guard Danielle
Chariesworth said.
"They the players needed to come
away with this win Head Coach Anne
Donovan said. "We needed it for confi-
dence reasons and just emotionally to
get us over the hump right now, because
we have been playing hard and really
hadn't come up with anything. So this
was huge for us especially in a close
one like this
The Lady Pirates started off slowly,
but quickly began to gain momentum.
Richmond jumped to a 04 lead before
Tracey Kelley hit a shot underneath the
basket This was Kelley's second game
after returning from an injury to her
larynx that she suffered during the game
at American on Jan. 14.
"Tracey played like a demon to-
night" Donovan said. "She took care
of the backboard from the opening tip
and really established herself as a solid
rebounder and did that all the way
through
Belinda .�
Cagle, who has
been out since Jan.
15 with a shoulder
injury, did not re-
turn to the lineup.
ECU kept try-
ing to gain the
lead in the first
half but came up
short until the
7:52 mark when Laurie Ashenfelder
sank one of two free throws after a Jen-
nifer Meade foul.
The Lady Pirates were quick and
hustled for every shot Their quickness
paid off because they drew many fouls
in the first half. Richmond had 12 fouls
in the first half while ECU only had five.
ECU's biggest lead, with six points,
came after a Justine Allpress baseline
jumper to make their lead 23-17. The
Lady Spiders' Stephanie Eken hit an
eight foot jumper to cut the lead to four
with 455 remaining.
Tomekia Blackmon hit a shot un-
derneath to again build the lead to six
25-19 with 4:29 remaining. However, the
Lady Spiders came back and cut ECU's
lead to one, going into the locker room.
They the players
needed to come
away with this
��
win,
� Coach Anne Donovan
The Lady Pirates
held a 27-26 lead.
Kelley led scor-
ers with nine points,
Chariesworth added
eight and Blackmon
contributed four.
ECU out shot
Richmond .400 to
.387. ECU also did
better with free
throw percentages,
shooting .455, while
Richmond only shot
250.
The excitement
began in the second
half. Allpress came
out and instantly'
made a three pointer
to put the Lady Pi-
rates up 30-26. But
back-to-back lay-ups
for Richmond tied
the game at 30
apiece.
ECU had the
lead for most of the
game. Richmond
would occasionally
tie the game or go
up by one point but
ECU always had an
answer for their
points.
Free throw shooting was better for
the Lady Pirates in the second half. Up
from the first half, ECU shot .650 for
the second half.
With 2:14 the Lady Pirates were
up nine points 61-52. It looked as if ECU
had secured their second win in the
CAA, but that lead was cut when
Michelle Florin, a freshman for Rich-
mond, nailed three three pointers in the
last two minutes to cut ECU's lead to
6S63.
"We lost our focus Donovan said.
"Florin came in and drilled us from the
three point line and we lost our focus
m. defensively
With 13.5 sec
onds left Denise
Winn made a lay
up for the lady Spi-
ders to tie the
game at 65 each.
With time winding
down, ECU had a
chance to win it,
but a failed lay-up
in the final seconds, from Ashenfelder
.sent the game into overtime.
The Lady Spiders came out and
scored the first points during the five
minute overtime. At one point Rich-
mond was ahead by four, with 2:12 re-
maining in overtime, but an Allpress'
three pointer cut their lead to one, 73-
74.
Even when things looked bleak for
ECU during overtime everybody kept
their composure.
"In overtim, I think we kept our
poise really well even when we were
down we still came back and we knew
that we could end up winning it
Chariesworth said.
Richmond answered with a Meade
baseline jumper and the lead was three.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Tracey Kelley drives to the lane in Sunday's
game with Richmond. Kelley had 17 points.
A Chariesworth jumper cut Richmond's
lead again to one. With 48.2 seconds
left Donovan called a time out
After the time out Blackmon came
out to put the Lady Pirates ahead for
good with a shot underneath. Now the
score was 77-76 in favor of ECU.
Richmond quickly called a time
out with 12.4 seconds left in overtime.
They came out and fouled
Chariesworth who got two shots. She
made one and missed the second, but
ECU was still ahead. When the final
buzzer sounded, ECU had won 78-76.
Leading scorers were Allpress
with 21 points, while Chariesworth and
Kelley each added 17 and Blackmon
had 15.
Late in the game, Kelley went down
with a cut to the lip that required
stitches. She did not return to the game.
It is not expected to be an injury that
will sideline her for the upcoming
games.
Alipress continues to have strong
games for the Lady Pirates.
"Justine is a fine shooter and has
really stepped up her game overall
Donovan said.
This was only the second confer-
ence win for the Lady Pirates, but it
was much needed since the second half
of the conference season will begin soon.
"This was a very important game
for us Chariesworth said. "We knew
coming in we lost four in a row and we
knew this was a big game and that we
needed to step up and convert on the
opportunity
ECU is now 2-5 in CAA play and 6-
9 overall.
The Lady Pirates will host non-con-
ference in-state rival UNGCharlotte to-
morrow night at Minges Coliseum. Tip-
off is set for 7 p.m.
Former player contributes
donation for expansion
CraigPerrott
Assistant Sports Editor
Former Pirates Robert Jones and
John Jett of the Dallas Cowboys, now
have three Super Bowl rings since leav-
ing ECU as Peach Bowl Champions.
Jeff Blake is starting quarterback
for the AFC Pro Bowl team in his fourth
professional season. Little is mentioned,
however, of another former Pirate who
is currently contributing in the NFL but
came before the 1991 miracle year
George Koonce, who played defen-
sive end for ECU during the 1989 and
1990 seasons, now has made a name for
himself as a linebacker for the Green Bay
Packers. Koonce not only contributed as
a Pirate on the field, but now has con-
tributed as a Pirate off the field, making
a generous $50,000 Shared Visions cam-
paign gift to ECU's program for the
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium expansion
project
"As a former student and athlete,
this is only a small token of my apprecia-
tion for the direction and education 1
received at ECU Koonce said.
During Koonce's two seasons as a
Pirate standout he was one of the team's
most outstanding defensive players.
Koonce lead the 1990 Pirates in sacks
with seven and tackles for loss with 16.
He also ranked fourth on the squad in
tackles in 1990 with 84.
"George's generous gift to the Edu-
cational Foundation's Shared Visions
Campaign effort is significant that is as
a former ECU student-athlete, he has set
an example for others to follow said
Dennis A. Young executive director of
the East Carolina University Educational
Foundation.
Buzzer beating
shot wins game
Amanda Ross
Sport Editor
What could be better than a win?
How about a buzzer beating shot to
lift your team to a nne ooint victory?
That is exactly what happened
Saturday night when Othello Meadows
brought the ball down with five sec-
onds left in the game and with a 10th
of a second left on the clock and shot
a three pointer to give ECU a 4544
victory.
Meadow's shot got national expo-
sure making CNN's "Piay of the Day
and ESPN's "Today's Best" Although
the announcer for CNN said the fans
were going crazy in Greenville, S.C
instead of N.C. It was a mistake, but
the exposure was still good for ECU's
basketball team.
This was a huge win for the Pi-
rates against their arch rival UNC-W.
The Seahawks were second in the CAA
with a 5-1 record while ECU was tied
for third, after beating Richmond
Wednesday night 81-65. ECU, Ameri-
can and ODU were all tied with a 4-2
record going into the game.
UNC-W Head Coach Jerry Wain-
wright knew ECU was a very competi-
tive team.
"I think this (ECU) is an explo-
sive team Wainwright said. "They
really stress you
The game began slowly with ECU
winning the tip-off. The Pirates' first
points came when UNC-W's Bill
Mayhew fouled Von Bryant and sent
him to the line where he made one of
his two shots.
The game progressed slowly and
neither team was in double digits un-
til the midpoint of the first half. With
1021 remaining, Jonathan Kerner sank
a 12-foot hook shot to give ECU the
lead 10-9. But the Seahawks would
answer with their own hook shot by
Mayhew to make the score 10-11.
UNC-W's biggest lead in the first
half was seven points after a Preston
McGriff lay-up. But before the half the
Pirates cut the lead to one after a Mead-
ows three pointer from the rfght side,
ironically foreshadowing the end of the
game. The Pirates went into the locker
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Damon Van Weerdhuizen dribbles the ball down the court
against his defender. ECU beat UNC-W in the final second.
room down by one point 20-21.
Meadows led the scoring drive in
the first half with seven points, while
Kerner added four and Tony Parham
and Deron Rippey had three points
each.
The second half of the game would
prove to be the most exciting game of
the year. ECU came out aggressive for
the first two minutes hut then began
to get into a slump. Kerner started the
scoring for ECU with another hook
shot that made the score 22-21 in fa-
vor of ECU.
UNC-W built up a four point lead
24-28 with 16:43 remaining. Bryant
was fouled and took two shots and
made one. ECU had cut the lead to 25-
28. On the Seahawks' next trip down,
a questionable intentional call on Tim
Basham sent the Seahawks' Kenny
Avent to the line to shoot two. He
missed both shots and UNC-W re-
gained possession.
The Pirates started to gain mo-
mentum after Parham hit two three
pointers in a row that would give ECU
a 37-34 lead. With the crowd going
crazy, ECU would continue their quest
for the victory.
"I'm very proud of our ids Head
Coach Joe Dooley said. "We didn't quit
we didn't put our heads down
The game began to get tight when,
with 30.5 seconds remaining, Kerner
committed his fourth foul and sent
Darren Moore to the line for two.
Moore made one and the Seahawks
took a 39-42 lead.
But the Pirates weren't ready to
give up. Parham was fouled and was
given two shots. He sank botn of them
See BUZZER page 9
4t6lete otfe cvee�
Othello Meadows
Will Sutton
Stuff WHtor
After concluding his collegiate ca-
reer at ECU, Koonce played his first year
as a professional in 1991 with the World
League's Ohio Glory- He lead the league
in tackles with 91 that year and gained
attention from a plethora of NFL teams
who had overlooked him in the 1991
draft
Koonce signed with Green Bay in
June of 1992, and has been a stand-out
performer for the Packers since then,
leading his team to the NFC title game
against the eventual Super Bowl Cham-
pion Dallas Cowboys.
Koonce is one of three former Pi-
rates that has been on the Green Bay ros-
ter, joining Tootie Robbins and Bernard
Carter. Robbins was drafted by the St
Ixuis"Cardir.aLs in the fourth round of
the 1982 draft and Carter was a sixth
round pick by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
in 1994, before signing with the Packers.
One young man has turned many
heads this season playing basketball
for the ECU Pirates.
Saturday night in Minges Coli-
seum, he added another highlight to'
his total package of talent - hitting
the game winning three point shot
as the final horn sounded. The shot
propelled the Pirates to a one point
victory over arch rival UNC-W.
ECU seemed to be the right place
for Othello Meadows when he had to
decide where he was going to play
during his collegiate career. Originally
from Omaha, Neb he was recruited
by many universities like Creighton
and the Missouri Valley schools, as
well as the University of Utah,
He felt comfortable at ECU with
the coaching staff, especially Assistant
Don't
Coach Martin McGillan. The location
of ECU was also a big plus because it
was far away from home.
Meadows has had the opportunity
to play for former ECU coach Eddie
Payne, and current coach Joe Dooley.
so he has seen some different styles of
play.
"I feel Coach Dooley is a little
more intense and I like that" Mead-
ows said. "It gets us really pumped up
He is confident about his perfor-
mance so far this year compared to last
year's. However, he said he feels there
is a considerable amount of room for
improvement He vows to continue to
work as hard as he can so he can fur-
thermore help the team.
ECU was predicted to finish near
eighth place at the beginning of the
season by the preseason CAA voters,
but ECU has surpassed all their expec-
tations. Beating ODU, VCU. JMU and
UNGW, who were picked first to fourth
in that order, has silenced the critics.
"The people who picked us last are
not in the locker room day in and day
out or are they with us on the practice
floor Meadows said. "We lost three key
players, but obviously the voters forgot
about the ones coming back and the
new guys
ECU has surprised many people
with big wins over the leagues' top
teams so far. Meadows knows the sig-
nificance of these big victories over top
notch teams.
"It lets us know we can play with
anybody in this league if we come to
every game with our minds focused on
the task at hand Meadows said. "If
we play every game as hard as we can.
things will take care of themselves
Saturday's game was the kind of
game in which playing hard resulted
in a win.
"The game itself was incredible
Meadows said. "But we need to un-
derstand that this is only one game.
This type of game gives us a big boost
as we head toward the remainder of
the schedule
That final shot at the buzzer was
an exciting one for Meadows.
"I feel great 1 mean I just pushed
it down the court and was very fortu-
nate to get a decent louk at the bas-
ket It was a huge sigh of relief to see
the ball exit through the bottom of
the net as the horn sounded
As far as life off the court goes,
he is your average college student
Meadows enjoys reading, listening to
different types of music and watching
a movie or two when he has some
spare time.
The future holds a lot for Mead-
ows. At this point he isn't sure exactly
what his future holds but he definitely
has plans.
"like any other young athlete. I
would love to have the opportunity to
play at the next level (NBA). But for
now, I am a psychology major Mead-
ows said. "1 am keeping up with my
studies and my good grades reflect
that Basically, I am keeping all of my
options open for the future and hope-
fully my success on and off the court
will continue
Tomorrow night the Lady Pirate basketball team will
be playing UNC-Charlotte at Minges Coliseum.
Tip-off will be 7 p.m.
�� II - 'I -J





iW�� � i'iihi in "
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 30,1996
TOP A REASONS
TO IP SEND A
LOVE LINES AD
BUZZER from page 8
to make it 4142 still in favor of UNC-
W, with 23.2 seconds remaining. ECU
called a time out Then UNC-W turned
around and called their own time out
After the time outs, with 22.8 sec-
onds left Rippey fouled and sent Billy
Donolon to the line with two shots.
He missed the second shot and ECU
was down 4143. Dooley used his last
time out for the Pirates.
After the time out the Seahawks
fouled Kerner and sent him to the line
shooting one and one. ECU had a
chance to tie the ball game up if he
made both of the shots. He sank the
first one and missed the second one.
Now it was 4243.
With things winding down, ECU
knew they had to foul to get posses-
sion. Rippey fouled out with 5.1 sec-
onds left and sent Mark Byington to
the line shooting two. He swished the
first shot and choked on the second.
ECU still had a chance to tie or win
the game.
The inbound pass was to Mead-
ows and he dribbled down the court
went to the right side and with two
defenders guarding him, with .1 sec-
onds remaining, he hit a three point
shot that was nothing but net.
"Morris Grooms did a great job
getting the ball off the rim and get-
ting it out to me quickly on the wing
enough money
for a fabulous
moonlight cruise!
2 Love Lines
" The best way to say Happy Valentine's Day.
APPEARING IN OUR FEB. 13 ISSUE � ON SALE NOW
WIN THE "PERFECT
VALENTINE'S DAY"
Buy a Love Lines ad you are automatically entered
into our contest to win the Perfect Valentine's Day.
Flowers, dinner for 2 at Riverside Steak Bar, 2 passes
to Carmike Cinemas, coffee & dessert at Percolator
Coffee House. We'll also award two additional
packages to a second and third couple. We'll notify
the winners by phone on Feb. 9.
Participating sponsors: Riverside Steak Bar, Carmike
Cinemas, Percolator Coffee House, Papa John's Pizza,
and Chico's.
How to Save SSS in Your Apartment
5 �l1 Ul lolI St � �i
iPlCVNv
Rent isn't the only big cost of living in an
apartment. Your utility bills can also add up.
During the winter months, hold down your
utility bills with these money saving tips
1. Lock your windows in cold weather. They fit
tighter when locked.
2. Keep your blinds or draperies closed, except
when the sun is directly shining through your win-
dows.
3. Avoid placing warm dishes into your refrigerator
or freezer. Whenever possible, wait until they are
cooled to room temperature. (Make sure you
refrigrate the food within two hours after cooking.)
4. Use the smallest kitchen appliances-possible to �
cook meals- such as microwaves and slow cookers.
Meadows said. "I just pushed it up as
fast as I could and I got to half court
and saw there was about three seconds
left so 1 knew I had to get to the three
point line as quickly as I could and I
was able to get off the shot
"It ain't over till the fat lady sings,
so '0' stepped up and made the win-
ning shot Basham said. 0' is the
hero tonight"
The Seahawks were stunned,
while the Pirates were relieved. They
had won this hard fought battle by one
point to send them up in the confer-
ence rankings. Immediately after the
shot was made, fans rushed onto the
court to congratulate the Pirates on
their victory.
Dooley admits this was one of the
most exciting games he has been a part
of.
"I think what you saw was maybe
the best college basketball game that
I've ever been a part of as a coach,
player, spectator Dooley said.
In the finai seconds of play, Dooley
was just hoping that ECU would get
the shot off and it would count
"All I saw was '0' driving up to
the right and it looked like he was try-
ing to get back to the middle and then
all of a sudden I lost him and then I
saw the ball Dooley said. "I was just
praying the officials would say it was
good and then you look around, just
standing there and it was an unbeliev-
able feeling
Parham knows how important
this win is for the Pirates, and what it
proves to the other leagues around the
conference.
"It's a big win for us, and one thing
we showed tonight is that the game is
not over until it's over Parham said.
"We're never going to quit and we're
going to fight 40 minutes to try to win
the game
Parham led all ECU scorers with
13 points. Meadows finished with 12
points and Kerner had eight
Kerner knew this was going to be
a physical game on both ends of the
court.
"We knew it was going to be a
physical game, it always is because it's
a rivalry Kerner said.
ECU only shot .326 for the game,
while UNC-W shot .302. Despite the
low shooting percentages the Pirates
still managed to come away with the
win.
Now ECU is tied for second place
with a 5-2 record in the CAA. They are
tied with the Seahawks and ODU. VCU
is still in sole possession of first place.
The Pirates wili be home again
this Saturday at Minges Coliseum when
they take on American who they lost
to earlier in the season 75-85. Tipoff
is set for 4 p.m.
ATTENTION EASTENDERS AND
FANS OF BRISTISH TV!
Dan Abramson, editor of "The Walford Gazette"
and publisher of "British Television" will be
speaking in Greenville on Feb. 3. For Further
information call Judi Willis at 355-7374.


Jj
I
Greenville Wi Utilities
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville, NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
Recreational Services
tii1 Fwfrrcfp�M W��fw
Registration Meeting Tuesday, January 30
at 5:00 p.m. in Biology 103!
Open to all students, faculty and staff.
Residence Hall Leagues are available,
lien's. Women's and CoRec teams-
Four person teams I
Gl
CD
?!
GOLDEN KEY MEMBERS
AND NEW INVITEES:
0
Spring Break Florida Explorer
Explore Florida with ECU Recreational
Services Adventure Program.
Registration deadline: February 2
in 204 Christenbury
Program date(s): March 2-9
Pretrip meeting: February 20,
7:00 p.m ROC
Cost: $369 student; $415 nonstudent
(Deposits: $200 due January 19; balance
due on February 2 in 204 Christenbury.)
Get a hold of yourself!
fie dimbriO fowtr isopKing!
RESUME WORKSHOP
Jeff Henley, Career Sen ices Speaker
Thursday, February 1. 19
CCB 1019, 5:00pm
Brine Your Resume!
Tower Schedule
Starting
February 7
NEW MEMBER INDUCTION & RECEPTION
REMINDER
Tuesday, February 13, 19
Speight Auditorium
in Jenkins Fine Arts Center
7:30 pm
(Come early for registration)
Starting
March 11
Monday
Tuesday
lftl. iL.r r�
Thursday
Open
Wednesdays from 3:00-5:00 p.m.
(closed Spring Break)
Regular Hours
3:00-6:00 p.m.
3:00-6:00 p.m.
3:00-6:00
3:00-6:00 p.m.
Chapter t-shirts now available $10
You may purchase them at the meetings
beld throughout the semester.
(Next meeting, Feb. 1st)
�j
Any questions? Call Jacqie at 328-3302
0
For more information call Recreational Services at 328-6387.
(Jj
o
��
�nJl �





10
Tuesday, January 30,1996
The East Carolinian
Services
Offered
M : -il e Ma-C Pr -k-h :ms
Mothing Bat A Partg!
"NUFF SAID
call lee at 768-4644
efc
Travel Announcements
nSF0
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Help
wanted
1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
rnished apartments. S250 a month
6month lease
! SO UNIVERSITY APARl MENTS
ft?9 ?90i ; : : bth Street
�Or' sle L.iui-df.
'Special Student Le,ir
MOBILE HOME P.I '
1.1 o! Tommy WiUan
Why shop in L.A
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
SAILORS WANTED
Experienced racing crew
needed on "Peril a
C&.C 33, for spring races
on the Pamlico River.
Both males and females
I welcome. Resumes to
I B. Flye
co ECU Facilities Planning.
SUBLEASER WANTED IMMEDIATELY
TO share two bedroom 1 12 bath town-
house. Walking distance to campus. $250
per month 12 utilities and phone. Call
758-8952. Leave message. Will return call
ASAP
PLAYERS CLUB � female subleasers need-
ed for spring semester & or summer. Two
bedrooms, two bathrooms available. Wash-
erDryer, $250utilities. Call 353-0775
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE need
ed to sublease till May. 3 Bdrm Townhouse
at Sheraton Village. Master bdrm w pri-
vate bath. $200mo. and 13 util. Con-
tact at 321-2974
GREAT HOUSE! 2 ROOMMATES
needed to share 3 bedroom 2 bath house.
$210 rent utilities. Right across the
street from campus. Call Jenai 758-6649
THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR
rent near university. Central heat and air.
Washer Dryer hookups. Range, refrigera-
tor furnished. $489,752-6276.
FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE. FENCED in
backyard, pets OK. Walk to campus. Lo-
cated off of Woodlawn Ave. Lease and de-
posit. Only $550 per month. 758-1459
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS; room
mate wanted to share 3 bedroom 2 bath
house. $180 rent 13 utilities. Fun, easy-
going, studious. Call Danielle or Stacy 758-
6649
3 BEDROOM APT FOR rent above
BW3's, 1500 sq. ft 2 12 baths, $775.00
a month. Ask for Yvonne at 758-2616
SOLOFLEX WITH BUTTERFLY AT-
TACHMENT, dip-bar. and sit-up bar. $360.
Microsoft Office Pro for WIN95, CD-ROM
version $210. 10-inch Cerwin-Vega Sub-
woofer tube $60. Call 757-2935
PARK-PRE MNT. BIKE with toe clips, bar
ends, extended seat, post and u-lock.
$175.00 OBO. Guitar Effects Processor:
Digitec GSX-1, Twin Tube, 120 presets 10
patch foot controller $350.00 OBO. Call
Dave 7524324.
SONY CD PLAYER LIKE new $100. Will
negotiate. Call 355-3741
FOR SALE CMC JIMMY 4wd, power
steering and brakes, burgundy, excellent
condition, 50k, $9,600. Call Nan or Chris
752 2383
FOR SALE TREK 930 Mountain Bike
$400.00 OBO. Full size mattress and box
spring $100.00. Kenmore Washer $75.00
(steal). Call Jason at 752-7107.
REDUCE EXCESS FAT FOR thigh and
body. Order your Thigh Body Contour
Cream Now as seen on TV! Retails for
$19.90. Now being sold for only $12.90.
S&H is already included. Price Enter-
prises. 1543 Battery Drive. Raleigh, NC
27610
STUDENT WHOLESALE CATALOG.
STUDENTS now you can buy electron-
ics, home appliances, office supplies, au-
thentic jewelry, costume jewelry, perfume,
novelty items, and other items at whole-
sale price. The Student Wholesale Cata-
log is only $5.00. S&H is already includ-
ed. So order your Student Wholesale Cat-
alog now. Price Enterprises. 1543 Battery
Drive. Raleigh, NC 27610.
BALL PYTHON FOR SALE very healthy.
Good owners only. Very nice cage for sale
also. Best offer taken. Need to sell one or
both. 752-3390 ask for Korey.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ot information in U.S. -
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
Or rush $2.00 to Research Informitjon
11322 Idaho Ave. 206-A Los Angeles. CA 90025
ATTENTION LADIES: GREENVILLE'S
OLDEST and largest Escort Service is
now hiring due to our expanding business.
Earn up to $1,500 plus a week, escorting
in the Greenville and surrounding areas.
You must be at least 18 years of age, have
own phone and transportation. We are
also hiring male and female dancers for
private parties. Call Diamond Escorts Inc.
at 758-08 or Emerald City Escorts at
75703477 for and interview. Est. 1990.
NEED A RIDE TO Raleigh, Zebulon, or
Chapel Hill? Can you leave Friday after-
noon and return early Monday morning!
$10.00 per person. Call 413-9099
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800400-0209.
BABYSITTING OFFERED EXPERI-
ENCED AND kind. All ages under 13.
Available M-F after 6pm and weekends.
Call Elaine at 328-7030
FREE FINANCIAL AID OVER $6 billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income or
parent's income. Let us help. Call Student
Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext
F53624
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800406-7027
LOVE? MONEY? FUTURE? TALK live
to Psychics! 24 hours! 1-900-255300 Ext
9710 only $3.99 min Must be 18 yrs or
older. Serv-U 619-645-8434
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-263495 ext
F53624
I ATTENTION�
SPRING BREAKERS!�
� B00KN0W1�
JAMAICACAWWBAHAMAS5W�
� FLORIDA $129�
' ORGANIZE GROUPS & GO FREE)� �
� ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS�
I 1-800-234-7007� �
� �

Spring Break!
Bahamas Party Cruise
$279
It's Better In The Bahamas
15 Meal � 6 Parties
800-678-6386
Cancun $359!
Jamaica $419!
7 Nights Air & Hotel! Parties &
Discounts!
Florida $119!
1-800-678-6386
Greek
Personals
ROOMMATE NEEDED. ONE PERSON
to share rent for three bedroom house.
Rent $208mo. Walking distance from
campus. Non-smoker preferred. Contact
Jody at Beeper 1-800-578-7243-18257.
REMALE ROOMMATE WANTED CALL
830-3831
FEMALE ROMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom house close to campus.
13 rent and utilities. Must love dogs. Call
752-6999
SEMI-PRIVATE ROOM, 2 blocks from
campus, 3 blocks from downtown. Rent is
$145month. plus 14 utilities, please call
Debbie, Dawn or Jim at 758362
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, TWO bed
room apt, two full baths, will have own
room. Includes washerdryer. Must love
cats. Rent is $235.00 plus half utilities.
Nonsmoker, mature responsible student
No deposit needed. Call Leisa after 6:30pm
756-7433
NAGS HEAD, NC � get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed
room, 2 bath duplex. Lost of amenities.
Walking distance from campus. $275mo
12 utilities. Call 758-2232
RESPONSIBLE, FUN ROOMMATE
WANTED to sublease for May thru Au-
gust. $190mth plus 12 utilities. On ECU
bus route. Call 758-7890.
ROOMMATES WANTED TO SHARE
4BR Tar River Apt. Must move in ASAP
and pay Feb. rent Approx. $170. Call 830-
4925.
96 GT ZASKARLE 18 inch frame with
bottom bracket, front derailer & seat post
White Industries hubset 3 weeks old.
Frame $500.00, Hubs $225.00. Call Mark
at 830-8973 or 355050
LARGE SIDE BY SIDE refrigerator. Old-
er model, excellent condition, great for
family or several roommates. $300.00 757-
1789
ff
Help
wanted
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour, for more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conven-
tional English in Japan. Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext J53623.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Boardother benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext K53621
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in a way to
virtually eliminate your long distance
phone bill and make a substantial income
while doing it, call Jason at 756577.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext A53622.
START THE NEW YEAR off right by
calling Diamond Dave for your next party
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave at 758-5711 or 809474.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, campus
pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all for-
mats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-3611.
PI KAPPA PHI - thanks so much for the
social last Thursday night you guys re-
ally go all out - let's get together again
soon! Love, the AZD's.
Gfc
Travel
323GS
111 11(11 us
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
REPRESENTATIVES NEEDED FOR A
long distance telephone company. Must
have high morals and great personality
758-9181.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS! LOSE 10
30 Lbs. next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough. Guaranteed. Dr. recom-
mended. $35.50 MCViSA. 24 hr free info:
100-229-7562.
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
AVAILABLE FOR motivated students. If
you are interested call Chris at 3554402
or Jeff at 355-7700. Northwestern Mutual,
an internship like no other.
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
EARN EXTRA INCOME FULLTIME or
partime in your own Network Marketing
Business. Call 830-2178.
DON'T PASS UP THIS opportunity! Fast
growing telecommunications Co. looking
for reps in this area. Must be motivated,
self-starter looking for fun and money!
Enjoy working with others and being your
own boss. Full or part-time. Finally get
the rewards that match your efforts. Call
Scott for more information at 754-2111
ATTENTION LADIES TIRED OF being
broke, want to get paid Everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cru.e
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
IH'IVIti .
VAILBEAVER CREEK
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
PBIPEIIS0N MFMDMG � �I I B�W WTO' L� Of BM
1-SOO-SUNCtlSE
TOLL nB WroBWATION & WSWVATIOtU
OS 5U� OVM TO 0W WB STt Kt.
http:www.auneliaaB.ooni
CONGRATULATIONS JENNA BRYANT
ON your engagement! Love, your Big Sis
and Zeta sisters!
THE NEW SISTERS OF PI DELTA would
like to thank Renee for everything. We
couldn't have done it without you! We love
you! You're the best!
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS presenting an
AIDS Forum January 30,1996 at 7:00pm
in Wright Auditorium. Everyone is invited!
If you have any questions, please contact
Saysha Raper, 757769
SIGMAS THANKS FOR YOUR HOSPI-
TALITY during rush and a great time
Friday at bid night! Pika
DELTA ZETA WOULD LIKE to invite any
woman interested in Greek life to attend
our open Rush functions starting Janu-
ary 30,1996. for more information please
call Jessica at 752428.
PIKA CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
new pledges. Good Luck! The Brothers of
Pi Kappa Alpha.
ZTA, SOUTH OF THE border was lots
of fun, we hope to see you again soon.
Love, Theta Chi.
ALPHA PHI, THE TRADITION contin
ues, bid night was a blast Until next time.
Love Theta Chi.
CONGRATULATIONS STEFANIE HIP-
PLE ON being elected Panhellenic Presi-
dent! Love, your Zeta Sisters!
LAMBDA CHI - congratulations to your
new pledges! Friday night was a blast!
Love Chi Omega.
son at 7584622
INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL
EXCHANGE
sites still available. Meet som of the in-
ternational students! There are many sites
to choose from, pay ECU tuition, earn
credit and see another part of the world.
Stop by the General Classroom Building
on Wednesday, Jan. 31. between 8:45-2:00
to meet the students! Call 328769 for
more information if you can not be there.
EAST CAROLINA HONOR S
ORGANIZATION
The next meeting of ECHO will be held
Tuesday, January 30th at 5:30pm in GCB
1003. All students with a 3.3 GPA or bet-
ter are invited to attend. If you have not
already done so. please pay your semes-
ter dues at this meeting.
ECU LACROSSE
Anyone interested in playing lacrosse,
practices are held Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday at 4pm on the fields
behind the Allied Health Bldg. For more
info contact Brian Trail at 757-2661 or
Les Carrithers at 754-2894
BASKETBALL SHOOTING
CHALLENGE
COME out and show us your best shot at
the Basketball shooting Challenge on Fe-
bruary 6 at 8:30pm in Christenbury Gym
or February 7 at 4pm in Christenbury
Gym. For more information call Recrea-
tional Services at 328387.
DELTA ZETA
Delta Zeta would like to invite any wom-
an interested in Greek Life to attend our
Open Rush functions starting January 30,
1996. For more information, please call
Jessica at 752428.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP
RECRUITERS will be coming to Career
Services soon to interview prospective
graduates for employment! Learn how to
prepare, package and present your prod-
uct - Yourself - in this important interview.
This workshop includes how to deal with
difficult or inappropriate questions, what
the employer looks for, and how to fol-
low-up for positive results. Sponsored by
Career Services, the workshop is sched-
uled for Wed. Jan 31 at 3:00pm in the
Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
Street

w
Lost and
Found
REWARD! LOST: SHORT FAT female
beagle mix. Pink collar. Very timid; lost in
campus area. Call 830696 anytime.
For Sale
TOYOTA TRECEL 1990 4SP, hatchback,
GC, AC, AMFM. Cass, 122,000 miles
$2,990 neg. Great for students 328246
Ask for David leave message. Must Sell!
dk
Our new store is opening soon in the plaza mall. We have full and part
TIME SALES POSITIONS AVAILABLE. IF YOU ENJOY MEETING AND HELPING PEOPLE
AND WANT TO EARN EXTRA MONEY, THEN CONSIDER IOINING THE SOUTHEAST'S
LARGEST RETAIL FAMILY AND SALES TEAM DEDICATED TO OFFERING THE BEST IN
FRIENDLY, HELPFUL CUSTOMER SERVICE. WE WILL HELP TO DEVELOP YOUR SALES-
MANSHIP SKILLS AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE. WE OFFER A COMPETITIVE PAY PLAN,
BASE HOURLY RATE WITH COMMISSION, MERCHANDISE DISCOUNT, PRE-PLANNED
schedule for full and part time. other benefits for full time include
medical and life insurance, paid vacations, holidays, and sick days,
profit sharing and pension. applications accepted on wed. jan. 31 to
Thur. Feb. 1 from 10am - 6pm. Come prepared to interview. Interviews
will be hfld rvt carolina east mall
SPRING BREAK '96, WITH only 1 week
to live - DON'T BLOW IT! BOOK NOW
Florida $109, Bahamas $359, Jamaica
Cancun $389. Organize a group - TRAV-
EL FREE Sun Splash Tours 1-800426-
7710
SKI & SNOWBOARD-CAMPUS REPS
NEEDED Springbreak '96 Intercollegiate
Ski Weeks- 5 day lift ticketcondo lodg-
ing 5 nights parties & activities. Mt Or-
ford. Canada (Near Vermont) (Drinking
Age-18) Trip only $219. Reps earn free
trips. CASH. New Equip etc. Call Ski Trav-
el Unlimited: l00-999-Ski-9.
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 Lowest Price Guarantee! 7
nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on FoodDrinks! http:www.springbreak-
travel.com 10078-6386
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to Best
Bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches-Near Disney)
$169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
CRUISE 7 days $279! Includes 15 meals
& 6 free parties! Great BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http: www.springbreaktravel.com -100-
678-6386
PIKA JOB WELL DONE during Rush.
Extra thanks to Alan for an excellent job
preparing Rush.
ALPHA PHI THANK YOU so much for
letting us use your house during RUSH.
Without your warm hospitality our rush
would not have been so successful. Love,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
KAPPA SIGMA - thanks ya'll for a hootin'
hollarin' good time at the Western Social
last Friday night! Let's break some bottles
again soon! Love the AZD's.
SOCIAL WORK GROUP MEETING
Qualified Social Work applicants from Fall
1995 are reminded to attend an Admis-
sions Group meeting in Rawl 102 on Wed-
nesday, January 31, at 4:00pm.
international student organization
Who: ISA, When. February 5, 96, Where:
GCB 1017, What: Organizations plans.
Everyone is welcomed to attend. Don't
miss it Free Food.
ADVENTURE PROGRAMS
STRAP ON your back pack and hit the
trails with Recreational Services Adven-
ture Program's Introduction to Backpack
ing Class February 6 from 6pm in the
Recreational Outdoor Center. Interested
individuals will need to register in 204
Christenbury by February 5. For more in
formation call Recreational Services 32&
6387
SHABBAT SHIRAH
A WEEKEND OF SONG AND JEWISH
CULTURE: Come and join Congregatior
Bayt Shalom Sisterhood in celebration o
Shabbat Shirah and Sisterhood Shabbat
Feb. 2. 3, and 4! Congregation Bayt Sha
lorn is located 2 miles east of Hwy 264 or
Hwy 33 (10th St. extension). Fridaj
evening, Feb. 2. 8pm: the Temple Beth Oi
Choir from Raleigh will again enhance out
service with their song. Saturday evening
Feb. 3, 7:30pm: Dan Abramson, editor o
the "Walford Gazette" and publisher o
"British Television" will speak on the Jew
ish presence in British television, with vid
eos of London's East End. Sunday after
noon, Feb. 4, 2pm: Barbara Rush, folklor
iststoryteller, speaking on "Tales Jewisl
Women Tell" from her book "Jewisl
Women's Tales Books and publication
from both Ms. Rush and Mr. Abramsoi
will be available for purchase and signing
An exhibit of art and crafts for display am
sale will be held after Ms. Rush's lecture
and sisterhood gift shop will be open. Cost
$6 covers both lectures (What a bargain
$3 for college students, with ID. Ma
check to Lori Troger. 919 Charlton Place
Greenville, NC 27858. For further infoi
mation call Judi Willis, 355-7374.
Announcements
THE GREENVILLE PITT COUNTY
special Olympics will be conducting a track
& field training school on Saturday Feb
3rd from 9am - 4pm for all individuals in-
terested in individuals to coach track
field, we are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: rollers-
kating, swimming, gymnastics, bowling,
and volleyball, for more information con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 8304551
HOSPICE OF TAR HEEL
Needs volunteers to help patients and fa-
milies, and to assist in the Hospice office.
Two Orientation classes will be held. The
daytime class will run January 30th and
February 1st from 8:30am to 3:30pm. The
evening class wnl be held on February 6,
8, 13. and 15 from 7 to 10pm. For more
information or tsi register call Nancy Pier-
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Christian Social Fraternity RUSH! Jan 3(
31, Feb 1 at 8:00-10:00pm. For more ir
formation. Call 321-7539.
ECU COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
the ECU College democrats will be hok
ing a meeting on Tues. Jan. 30 at 8:00 i
room 1001 GC A quest speaker will b
sponsored and all students and faculty ar
welcome, for more info call matt at 32i
3709
(B-CLAD)
(Bi-sexuals. Gays. Lesbians, and Allies fc
Diversity) Our next meeting is 31 Jai
1996 at 7:30pm in room 221 of Mendei
hall Student Center. Speaker is unknow
at this point but we'll definitely talk aboi
something positive. Please bring canne
food for our ongoing Picasso food driv
Take Care!





Title
The East Carolinian, January 30, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 30, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1120
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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