The East Carolinian, January 25, 1996






THURS
January 25,1996
Vol 71, No. 33
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Around the State
DURHAM (AP) - Four middle
school students were suspended
this week after school officials
found a handgun in the locker of
a 13-year-old seventh-grader.
Neal Middle School principal
Floyd Mitchell said he recom-
mended a year-long suspension for
the seventh-grader. Criminal
charges are pending further inves-
tigation by the Durham County
Sheriff's Department, Mitchell
said.
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) -
The Associated Press reported er-
roneously Tuesday that a diseased
heart caused the Jan. 2 ueath of a
student who collapsed on a high
school basketball court
The cause of Jason Rumph's
death has not been officially de-
termined. Dr. Gary Renaldo, a car-
diologist, said the pathologist be-
lieves a massive bruise to the brain
caused the death but that Rumph's
enlarged heart contributed to it by
causing him to black out and fall.
Around the Country
HOUSTON (AP) - A 10-year-
old who is 8 12 months pregnant
ran away from a youth center,
prompting a police search and rais-
ing fears that she will attempt to
have the baby without medical su-
pervision.
The child came to the atten-
tion of state caseworkers Jan. 12,
when she posed as a 14-year-old
and tried to apply for welfare ben-
efits for herself and the child she
is carrying.
JARRATT, Va. (AP) - A man
who killed a convenience store
clerk was executed Wedesday by
injection after a 22-minute delay
to allow medical personnel to find
a vein large enough for the needle.
The drugs were injected
through the top of Richard Townes
Jrs right foot after unsuccessful
attempts to insert the needle in
his arms.
Around the World
TOKYO (AP) - Japan's Su-
preme Court refused Wednesday
to move the trial of an American
serviceman accused of raping a
schoolgirl off Okinava, the island
where the rape took place.
The ruling clears the way
for final arguments to be heard
against Pfc. Kendrick Ledet, of
Waycross, Ga and the two other
U.S. servicemen accused of raping
the 12-year-old Okinawan girl last
September.
WUERZBURG, Germany (AP)
-A medic was discharged from the
U.S. Army Wednesday after a
court-martial jury convicted him
for refusing to wear a United Na-
tions beret in a peacekeeping mis-
sion in the former Yugoslavia.
Spc. Michael New, 22, was the
first American serviceman court-
martialed for refusing to wear U.N.
insignia on his uniform or to ac-
cept foreign command on a United
Nations operation.
Employee resigns following arrest
Universtiy hiring
policy may need
adjustment
Amy L. Royster
Staff Writer
A university employee resigned
this month after being arrested and
charged with taking indecent liberties
with a child.
Ronald Finnegan, 31. worked for
ECU as a maintenance mechanic for
approximately one year. On Jan. 16,
Finnegan was indicted for taking inde-
cent liberties with a child. The offense
allegedly occurred in July of 1995
against a child under the age of 16.
Personnel employee Joan Taylor
said Finnegan resigned from his posi-
tion in a letter without stating a rea-
son.
According to records in the Crimi-
nal Department at the Pitt County
Courthouse, a felony fugitive warrant
from another state was dismissed on
Nov. 15, 1991.
Director of Housing Manny Amaro
said that Finnegan's work behavior did
not correlate to his alleged criminal
behavior.
"It's really disturbing. Finnegan
was a model employee Amaro said.
"He went far beyond just work every-
day. People are heart-stricken that this
happened
Amaro said that Finnegan was
interviewed and the references he gave
on his application were investigated be-
fore he was hired.
"We do
check in-state
criminal records
but we need to
check records
across the coun-
try. That way we
would have known
about his prior his-
tory Amaro said.
"We need a
university policy
now that this type
ot mtormation is available m a central-
ized computer Amaro said.
Any new policies regarding per-
spective employee's applications,
"would have to come from the Person-
nel Department Amaro said.
Finnegan's
"It's really
disturbing.
Finnegan was a
model employee
� Manny Amaro, director of
housing
job entailed gen-
eral maintenance,
general carpentry
and knowledge of
door and window
hardware in cam-
pus residence
halls.
The job de-
scription in-
cluded, "good
communication
skills due to the
position's involvement with students,
Taylor said.
Freshman Allison Morgan, lives
in Green and is concerned that
Finnegan worked in the residence
halls.
"1 stayed in an all girls dorm be-
cause I didn't want just anybody and
everybody walking around. Knowing
about this is kind of scary Morgan
said.
Another Greene resident, fresh-
man Tiffany Joseph said, "I feel safe,
but the university should check to
make sure employees don't have any
type of police record
Doug Melton, a junior said, "I'm
upset thinking that the university
does not check into employees' crimi-
nal records across the county. It needs
to be checked into
Finnegan is scheduled to appear
before the court for an arraignment
hearing on Feb. 12.
Textile professor hosts
student workshops, lecture
Surface design
techniques,
finished works will
be shown
Sharon Franklin
Staff Writer
We expect works of art to hang
on a wall or perch on a pedestal,
but a certain professor's radiantly
hued silks glide across the skin like
a whisper.
Jason Pollen, professor of tex-
tiles at Kansas City Art Institute and
president of the National Surface
Design Association, is on campus
this week to demonstrate his tech-
niques in a series of student work-
shops and a public lecture.
The lecture is tonight at 7 p.m.
in the auditorium of the Jenkins Art
Center. The lecture will include a
slide show that demonstrates both
the techniques of surface design and
examples of finished works.
The workshop participants, lim-
ited to textile arts majors, are learn-
ing the dye and fusing methods of
applying surface designs to silk. Any-
one wishing to observe and listen is
welcome to attend the final session
on Friday afternoon.
Pollen leads off ECU'S Visiting
Sororities adopt
Greenville cops
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Jason Pollen, professor of textiles at Kansas City Art
Institute, demonstrates one of his surface design tech-
niques to onlooking art students.
Textile Arts Program for the spring
semester. The program will also fea-
ture Patricia Campbell on Feb. 19-
23 and Junko Sato Pollack on March
18-22. An exhibit of works by the
visiting artists will be on display at
the Greenville Museum of Art from
Feb. 21 through March 31.
Pollen said the visiting artists
will introduce students to unique
methods of manipulations and ex-
pand their possibilities in textiles as
art and business.
"I'm here to bring the students
a new kit of tools he said. "Today's
modern tools make it possible to
learn the processes quickly and
work spontaneously.
"Color is a big part of it. There
is a vastness of tints and shades to
work with. Students work sponta-
neously, expanding their color vision
until their personal view is revealed
in an individual statement
Sara Edmiston and Janet
Fischer, professors in ECU'S textile
See TEXT page 4
Program fosters
positive liason
between officers
and students
Wendy Houston
Staff Writer
Panhellenic, governing body for
the national soroities. has just in
troduced the program Adopt-A-Cop,
which will produce strong relations
between the eight national sorori-
ties and the Greenville Police De-
partment.
The program was brought to the
attention of ECU's Panhellenic rep-
resentatives last March during their
Southeastern Panhellenic Confer-
ence.
Panhellenic set up a rough draft
with the improving suggestions of
Chief Charles Hinman, Captain J.E.
Ennis and Major Joseph
Simonowich. To add a few legal sug-
gestions, Blaire Carr, the Greenville
Police Department lawyer, assisted
in making the rough draft.
"I am very excited about this
program Carr said. "Obviously
ECU makes up a large portion of
Greenville and Pitt County. We are
more than happy to foster a posi-
tive liaison between the police de-
partment and the campus. The of-
ficers have interpreted the program
from females being targeted and
being at a greater risk of crimes
The Adopt-A-Cop program is de-
signed to be an educational oppor-
tunity for both sororities and the po-
lice.
"The police department has no
negative connotations of sorority
women said Maureen McKenna. Al-
pha Omicron Pi and current
Panhellenic president. "However,
they are aware of the vandalism and
other minor things, which can eas-
ily be prevented by security mea-
sures
The police department has as-
signed one officer to each sorority
house. Their responsibilities include
See COP page 4
Drenched
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Students made their way down the sidewalk in front of Student Health Wednesday
afternoon, while fighting the wind and getting drenched by the downpour.
Course pays off
Debra Byrne
Staff Writer
A non-credit course on how to make your money last is being offered
through the School of Business and Professional Programs.
The course started up again this past Monday and is being taught
by Dr. Joseph Kiely, a finance professor.
Investment Strategies for the 90s is a course that is being held on
six consecutive Monday evenings from 6:30-9:30. The course is being
offered in two phases. Phase I is for ages 45 and under and began on
January 22. Phase II is for ages over 45 and will begin on March 11. This
course is being held in the General Classroom Building, room 1028.
There are no qualifications needed to sign up for this course. The
purpose for the two phases is that the class is geared toward two differ-
ent groups- young professionals that want to invest in their futures and
possibly even the futures of their children and older couples looking
toward retirement. This course will focus on the immediate concerns of
the two groups.
Suzy Mozer, a graduate assistant in Professional Programs said that
not many students are interested in taking this course because it is ca-
tered more towards those who currently have income.
"About 30-50 percent of the attendants are faculty Mozer said.
"Some graduate students do attend, however traditionally aged students
usually do not. This class is open to the general public and no one should
feel excluded
This is the second year in which this course is being held. It is of-
fered every semester, this being the fourth.
There is a $99 enrollment fee for this course which includes your
textbook and a parking permit if needed. If you are a couple and are
See PAY page 4
WCtfte
Forgotten music of '95 revisitedpage f
OPINIQliU
Campus construction, enough alreadypage t)
S PO JueUuf
Student Phoenix bound for Super Bowlpage 1 1
?ee&4�
Wuv fo reacA ui
Thursday
Clear, cooler
High 52
Low 41
Weekend
Cool, chance of rain
High 54
Low 39
Phone
(newsroom) 328 - 6366
(advertising) 328-2000
Fax
328 - 6558
E-Mail
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg
2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;
across from Joyner





�Ma��awnwi
Thursday, January 25, 1996
f7e fast Carolinian
Construction team places in contest
Overdose kills MU student
A preliminary autopsy revealed what killed Daniel Berrey, but questions
remain about the manner of his death.
The 19-yearold computer science major was found dead in his room in
Wolpers Hall at the University of MissourhColumbia (MU) on Oct. 31.
Berrey died of an overdose of diphenhydromine, according to a toxicology
report released by the Office of the Medical Examiner.
How the chemical got into Berrey's body is still under investigation by the
MU police and the medical examiner. Whether the student's death was acciden-
tal or intentional is also still under investigation
Embezzler to pay back $580,000, $50 at a time
Every month Christy Tutin makes a $50 contribution to the University of
Missouri-Columbia (MU).
At this rate she will pay back about a tenth of the more than half a million
dollars she embezzled from the university. Tutin served about one year in prison
after being convicted of stealing $666,776 from MU during her employment
with the graduate studies program.
But Tutin will have to make partial financial retribution for her crime, a
probation officer said, under the terms of the release, Tutin must perform 500
hours of community service and pay the university $50 a month during her
three years of federal probation.
Tutin has paid the $80,000 the court ordered her to give the university,
leaving an unpaid amount of more than $580,000 at the end of the three-year
probation period.
Racist e-mail message may have UNC origin
A racist e-mail message, possibly from a member of the University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC) community, listing the top 10 reasons "Why all blacks
should GO BACK TO AFRICA has been sent to multiple Internet newsgroups.
UNC Dean of Students said an investigation has begun to see who has
made "misuse of the university's educational technology
Student murdered, roommate charged
Murfreesboro police have positively identified a body found late November
as that of 25-year-old Middle Tennessee State University junior Andrew Pokiemba.
The body of the slain student was found lying face down behind a Days Inn
parking lot
An assistant county medical examiner said Pokiemba died from a "contact
gunshot wound to the back of the head Police said he had been dead less than
an hour when found.
Later police arrested Poklemba's roommate, 18-year-old Rudolph "Rudy"
Munn, a freshman, and charged him with first-degree murder in the case.
Compiled by Marguerite Benjamin. Taken from College Press Service
and various college newspapers.
Stephanie Ann Eaton
Staff Writer
A team of six students from
the construction management de-
partment showed ECU was a
forced to be reckoned with at a
competition sponsored by the As-
sociated School of Construction
Southeast Region in Atlanta, Geor-
gia on Nov. 17.
These students took part in a
12-hour construction estimating
competition. The objective of the
contest was for the students to pre-
pare a presentation for a $1.1 mil-
lion project to sell. The students
were given only 12 hours to pre
pare the project.
ECU competed against eight
other schools. Schools attending
the competition were Ciemson,
Auborn, University of Florida. Uni-
versity of North Florida, Southern
Tech and VPI.
When the competition was
over ECU walked away with an
Honorable Mention.
"We actually tied for third
Yale's Teaching
Assistants shut out
but we lost the coin toss said Dr.
Douglas W. Krugar, chair of the
construction management depart-
ment.
This was ECU's first time com-
peting in this competition. The six
students who competed raised the
money to compete in this compe-
tition and also received donations
from local area businesses.
The victory in Atlanta allowed
ECU to compete nationally at the
National Home Builders Conven-
tion in Houston, Texas. The com-
petition is taking place today. The
students were given a few weeks
to put together a $114 million
project. Their objectives for this
competition was to estimate utili-
ties, discuss landscaping, financ-
ing, determine where to put roads
in and vast amount of other dif-
ferent topics.
"I expect the students to do
very well at the national competi-
tion Kruger said.
The six students representing
ECU were Dante Berini, Jason
Ellington, Chris Edwards, Brian
Relay, Mike Zurey and Heather
Banks. The faculty coach was Jim
Kennedy.
"I think this is a very good or-
ganization for students to get in-
volved in Kruger said. "It gives
students a chance to grow in their
profession. It allows them to use
their skills. The national competi-
tion will give them the opportu-
nity to talk to over 1,000 home
builders from all over the United
States
(CPS) - Yale teaching assistants
have decided to call a halt to a grade
strike rather than lose their spring
semester teaching jobs.
At noon Jan. 15, the first day of
spring semester, the teaching assis-
tants turned in the grades they had
been withholding as part of their fight
to unionize. Since December, nearly
200 teaching assistants have withheld
fall semester grades to force Yale to
recognize their union, the Graduate
Employees Student Organization
(GESO).
"Rather than attempt to come to
some kind of agreement with gradu-
ate teachers, the administration and
individual faculty members have
threatened striking TAs with disciplin-
ary hearings, with expulsion, with
lock-out and with their academic ca-
reers wrote Robin L. Brown, chair
of the GESO in a letter to Yale Presi-
dent Richard C. Levin. "Facing the
prospect of losing an entire semester's
worth of income, striking graduate
teachers have voted to hand in our
grades at noon Jan. 151 so as to se-
cure our teaching positions for the
coming term
Earlier in the month. Levin in-
formed Tas by letter that a failure to
turn in grades would mean a loss of
teaching jobs for the spring semester.
To date, the university has refused to
recognize the GESO as a bargaining
See YALE page 3
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The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 25, 1996
Attention ECU Faculty and Staff
403(b)
TAX SHELTERED ANNUITIES
AND CUSTODIAL ACCOUNTS 403(b)(7)
General information workshop on these
flexible supplemental retirement savings plans
ISSUES ADDRESSED THAT MAY BE BENEFICIAL TO YOU:
� Current Income Tax Savings - Pre-Tax salary reduction.
� Tax Deferred Growth - Take advantage of the growth potential of the
financial markets to accumulate wealth and defer taxes until retirement.
� Loan Provisions - Borrow income tax free and pay back at a low
interest rate.
� Early Retirement � Withdraw before age 59 1II without paying the
I OH IRS early withdrawal penalty (SEPP).
� Estate Planning - How these dollars can affect your estate and the
proper use of beneficiary designations.
� Chartible Giving - Pass tax free to your favorite charities.
� TransfersExchangesDirect Rollovers - What to look for, proscons,
and procedures.
� Other Supplemental Plans - How 403(b) co-ordinates and compares
to 40I(k) and 457 plans.
Date: Tuesday, February 6,1996
Time: 5:30 - 6:45 pm
Place: Willis Building, 1st Street
NO FEE OR OBLIGATION
Ercssnieis
Joe Kiely PhD
Melissa Goodson
Stanley Sams
Jim Bengala
ECU Finance Department
Certified Public Accountant
Attorney At Law
Certified Financial Planner
REPLY by Friday, February 2, 1996. Call 355-5222 for reservations.
Sponsored By:
AMERICAN EXPRESS FINANCIAL ADVISORS INC.
The premier Financial Education Seminar organization.
JL.JLJb from page 2
agent, maintaining that teaching as-
sistants are students, not employees.
Graduate teaching assistants contend
that they are at the poverty line and
want to form a union to ensure bet-
ter working conditions. They also ar-
gue their work saves the university
money while enhancing undergradu-
ate education.
On Jan. 10, graduate teaching
assistants marched outside the
school's Hall of Graduate Studies,
wearing signs that said, "Stop Intimi-
dation. Start Negotiation About 140
of the 500 protesters, including fac-
ulty and students from Yale and other
universities, were arrested and
charged with creating a public distur-
bance after they blocked a street
The demonstration was fueled by
disciplinary charges leveled against
three elected union leaders, Cynthia
Young, Diane Paton and Buju
Dasgupta, all of whom face possible
expulsion.
"If you go on strike, you expect
to lose pay. To use academic retribu-
tion is crossing the line said Lafer
of the Federation of Union Employ-
ees, wiih which GESO is affiliated.
"It's incredible to us that Yale has
come to the point of threatening to
East Carolina University's Student Union is Now
Accepting Applications for Chairpersons
of the Following Committees for the
1996-1997 Term:
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DEADUNE TO APPLY - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7,1996
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expel its own Ph.D. candidates
The protest brought no change
to the university's stance.
"there is a minority of graduate
students that wish to be considered
employees of the university said Yale
Spokesman Thomas Conroy. "The uni-
versity rejects that
notion. It doesn't
make any differ-
ence how the stu-
dents reflect their
opinion
Disciplinary
hearings for the
three students were
set to take place
Jan. 10 in the Hall
of Graduate Stud-
ies, but were moved
to an undisclosed
location when the
administration
heard about the
planned protest
Debbie Epstein, a professor of
women's studies at the University of
London, flew in to support daughter
Diane Paton during her hearing and
spoke at the protest
"I'm proud of Diane Epstein
said. "If more members of the Yale
administration had her sense of integ-
rity and courage, we wouldn't be
here
Epstein called the grad strike "a
really good action that fulfills all your
responsibilities to the students. It just
doesn't provide administration with
the grades they
want
She ques-
tioned why
three women -
one of whom is
African Ameri-
can, the other
two who are
non-citizens -
have been
singled out. The
administration,
she said, has
picked on
people who tra-
ditionally have
��� marginal rights
in society "to intimidate the others
The committee found Paton
guilty of "disrupting university busi-
ness" and "refusal to obey an order
issued in the line of duty by a faculty
member A letter of reprimand has
been placed in her file, and Paton is
If you go on
strike, you expect
to lose pay. To
use academic
retribution is
crossing the
line
� Lafer of the Federation of
Union Employees
barred from teaching for the spring
semester.
"She came to Yale with a lot of
high hopes Epstein said. "She's very
anxious and nervous about what this
means to her career, but that isn't
stopping her from doing the right
thing
Although the students paper, the
Yale Daily News, opposes the grade
strike, Yale's two employee unions,
representing clerical workers, techni-
cians, dining hall, custodial and main-
tenance workers have shown their
support
Robert Proto, president of the
university's union for service and
maintenance employees, was arrested
during the protest.
"Yale could never treat us the way
they treat these teachers - because
we have a union. We will stick by
GESO for as long as it takes Proto
said.
If they succeed in unionizing, Yale
teaching assistants would belong to the
first such labor group at a major Ameri-
can private college. Only a handful of
public schools, including the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin and the University
of California-Berkley, have allowed
graduate students to unionize.
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(Behind John's Convenient M�rt)
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5 GRANDE TVs





Thursday, January 25, 1996
The East Carolinian
PAY
from page 1
COP
from page 1
is $!25 for both
mc tt-xtbook and
Th; ighl of class is free
nre about enrolling.
u pd then receive
nol then you owe
;i graduate assis-
al Programs, said
a variety of
will learn about mu-
lls and will
gg sti rts n how you
npanies.
S4 d m include
� planning, tax
id insurance. Ev-
� tant to one's
uture will be covered.
the first meeting was ba-
ly an information meeting, it
sign up. If inter-
. ssional Pro-
can eva
�rJ
providing educational programs,
conducting house checks and being
informative towards personal safety
issues.
For example, Officer JJ. Rios is
the representative for Zeta Tau Al-
pha. He provided an educational pro-
gram when he attended a sisterhood
meeting. He has also gone to din-
ner in an effort to get to know ev-
ery girl. He said he is also interested
in attending a GAMMA (Greeks Ad-
vocating Mature Management of
Alcohol) meeting.
"He (Rios) has been exposed to
the Greek side that he didn't know
or see beforehand said Stephanie
Hippie. Zeta Tau Alpha and incom-
ing Panhellenic president. "He has
gone above and beyond his call of
duty. 1 am very excited that this pro-
gram is up and running
The program is an educational
opportunity and a chance to work
with the police department; how-
ever, the officers are in no way obli-
gated to be safety nets, preventing
the sorority girls from facing any
consequences if they were to get Into
legal trouble, McKenna said.
1 JLA1 from page 1
arts department developed the Vis-
iting Artists Program.
Edmiston. who is on creative
leave this semestersaid Pollen was
chosen for the series because of his
nationally known reputation.
"1 took a master's class with
Jason two years ago and have hoped
to bring someone of his stature to
our campus Edmiston said.
Showing examples of the
artist's work. Fischer added, "You
can touch this art and feel the sur-
face luxuriousness of the fabric
Pulling out a length of deep rose
silk, she continued. "Look at this�
Each tiny piece of color has been
individually applied. 1 hope every-
one can see this
Twenty-one textile arts majors
are participating in the workshops.
During Monday's session, they lis-
tened to the lecture and then
headed to the workroom for some
hands-on experience.
"Everyone's excited because
it's great to learn something new
said Howey McAuley. a senior.
Ginger Clark, also a senior, said
she plans to apply surface design
techniques to her weaving and be-
lieves the program will enhance her
creativity.
"We realize we owe a debt of
gratitude to the School of Art for
this opportunity that has been
earned Senior Linda O'Leary-Allen
added.
Do you have a photograpic eye?
Do you have a sense of what is newsworthy?
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for
the position of
R l-l
3 r
13 n
If you have notable experience with photography
and know how to develop film,
come by the Student Pubs building
and fill out an application.
We promise you will gain experience,
and we may even pay you!
1 B
Thurs
insane prices on bourbon & vodka drinks
ROSCO
homegrown band
knocked down smilin
Coming Thurs. Feb. 1st Col. Bruce
k
Sun Sunday Bloody Sunday $1.50 Bloody Marys 51.00 Dom beer
Tues. M U G NIT E Bring a mug, a smile, & a dollar and receive a beer
wU. J
WOMEN'S RUGBY CLUB
Interest Meeting TONIGHT,
January 25, in Christenbury Gym
room 102 at 8:30. For More informa-
tion please contact Megan Johnson at
758-9978.
University
College is
moving its
office to the
Erwin Bldg.
on Tues.
Jan. 30.
If you have 15 - 96
credits and'a 3.0- .
g.raor better,
then you meet the.
initial requirements
FOR MEMBER Tn TH
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society.
There; wii.i iti w i.i i )Ri vi k i
MKLTInV, ON Tl LSI) N . .I l K M)
5:00 in General Classroom 1032.
??? Any questions ?T?
Cull Mike 01 ?2-4(r i loiiinn ,n su '
"TWO BIG THUMBS UP!
ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST FILMS
- Gtne Sisltel. SIS EEL & EBERT
"AN IRRESISTIBLE
COMEDY AND A
WICKED DELIGHT
-Janet Maslin. SEW YORK TIMES
NICOLE KIDMAN
TO DIE FOR
AI she wanted was a little attention.
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 25
FRIDAY,
JANUARY 26
SATURDAY,
JANUARY 27
PICTURESULS
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Doors Open at 9pm!
Contestants can call 758-4591 or sign up at the Elbol
All Campus
Men's
BEST
CHEST
CONTEST





"fHjM �l�
Thursday, January 25,1996
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Construction. Sigh.
The two major construction sites that have been "beautifying"
our campus for so long now just won't go away. Delay after delay
has hit the projects, and they're lingering like a stray dog around
the west end of campus. Many of us are beginning to wonder if we'll
ever see the new library or rec center reach completion.
The university must be tired of hearing us bitch about this stuff
by now, and quite frankly, we're tired of bitching about it When the
rec center plans were first announced, debate raged over whether
or not we really needed it
That didn't matter, we were told. We were getting it whether we
needed it or not Whether we wanted it or not Besides, we were
told, it would be great in some vague way. And since it was going to
be paid out of money that was stockpiled just to build it we the
students wouldn't have to lay out one thin dime for its construc-
tion. So we didn't have a right to bitch.
That was more than two years ago and at least that many con-
tractors ago, and the damn thing's still unfinished. There have been
unforeseen delays, we've been told. The weather, a constant nag-
ging pain here in Greenville, has held up construction. That's cool;
that's understandable.
Of course, it probably doesn't help out that every contractor
we do business with seems to go belly-up within a year of inking the
deal. It's like there's a curse on this place or something. But that's
also understandable; the university couldn't foresee the bad busi-
ness sense of others. Neither can we really expect them to be aware
of all the gypsy curses flying against the school.
And construction always takes longer than originally planned.
Problems like bad weather, poor business sense and curses arise all
the time to delay the swift completion of large buildings. We've all
seen the movies.
But if you look downtown, you'll discover that the city of
Greenville has built a new fire and police headquarters complex. It
was started well after the rec center construction, and our dedi-
cated public servants are alreadv moved into their new home.
It sits not more than five or six blocks from the rec center, too.
Which makes us wonder how much of a problem the weather has
really been this past year.
And then there's the matter of all that money that was laid
aside for construction. Apparently, the university has been augment-
ing that cash with a percentage of our student fees.
How large of a percentage? Well, TEC called the Cashier's of-
fice to nail down that figure, we were told to call the rec center for
that information.
Yes, we were told to call the non-operational, partially con-
structed rec center. We'd be surprised if they had the indoor plumb-
ing ready to go in that place, much less a functional office. The
secretary's would Je running around in hard hats, for God's sake!
Anyway, there are some obvious problems surrounding our cam-
pus beautification projects, and we here at TEC just thought you'd
like to know.
Construction. Sigh.
Some ECU
graduates may
endure four
years of
construction
and never use
the facilities
they helped
pay for.
Healthy habits eat students
Understanding our bodies is an
important element in leading a healthy
lifestyle. Students stuggle with the pres-
sures of college life - eating healthy
and exercise is far from toppriority for
many. We are too stressed, rushed, tired
from studying or partying last night to
worry about what we stuff into our bod-
ies before class. This is a major problem
on campus, and I must admit that I am
guilty.
My resolution for this year is to
treat my body better than I have in the
past I would like to forget the bad hab-
its of late night pizza from Papa Olivers,
greasy Chinese food, many Burger King
breakfasts on the run and especially
too many servings of Ben & Jerry's
Cherry Garcia and Chocolate Fudge
Brownie. I am getting tempted right
this second, control, I just need some
solid willpower. The results of this "en-
ergy" food from the past has taken its
toll on my body. I look and feel great
No, truthfully, I feel worn down and
my jeans are too tight I know I am not
alone in this stuggle to eat right and
exercise the buldge away.
Everywhere people look these
days, magazines, billboards and obnox-
ious television advertisements scream
at us lazy Americans to get off our
couches and eat their products and
workout with Nordic Track, or any num-
ber of those gadget that look like mod-
ern torture chambers. Sure, they make
it look so darn easy, and do you ever
see a heavy person on those ads? No,
never. The model is slim, gorgeous, tan
and looks so happy doing her little
tricks in front of millions of viewers who
are sitting on their butts watching.
I know exercise is important and
I try my best to keep myself on an exer-
cise regimine, and eat well, but my good
intentions do not always keep me mo-
tivated. Society puts young people
uner enormous pressure to fit in.
Jennifer Hunt
Opinion Columnist
There's one way
to look, one way
to be: ultraslim
and ultratoned
� ,�!�
There's one way to look, one way to
be: ultraslim and ultratoned. We try
to rebel against the brainwashing, and
say, "society cannot dictate how I will
live, but ultimately we all become vic-
tims under the pressi there is no
escape route A remarkable percent-
age of young college women conform
to this body image at universities across
the country. Also, shared at schools
nationwide is an epidemic of eating
disorders due to the pressure to be
"perfect The disorders include:
bulimia, anorexia, abuse of laxatives
and a less serious condition known as
disordered eating, meaning a person
has overdieted, but has not dropped
to 85 percent of normal body weight
I have friends who suffer from
these life-threating disorders, because
they are so desperate to fit into a tiny
pair of jeans or look good in their new
ski pants bought two sizes too small
for incentive. I feel sorry for them, but
no matter how hard I try to convince
them to stop, they continue their hor-
rifying habits.
According to an article in Glam-
our, Charles Murkofsky, M.D a psy-
chiatrist who runs a Program for
Mangaging Eatinf Disorders, "In an
enviroment with such social pressure
to conform, there's an operative ethic
that says, If you need to eat, need to
give in to food, you have failed in some
way. Eating is immoral, and you dem-
onstrate your excellence by not giving
in
The latest Slim Fast television ad
I saw, said that you can "replenish"
your body with their vitamin loaded
shakes. Their motto: "losing weight
never felt so good I wish this was true.
I tried Slim Fast when I was younger,
and I did lose weight However, the tin
can failed to tell me that once I started
to eat three full meals a day, my body
would kick out of starvation mode and
gain back the weight I had lost plus an
additional five to 10 pounds. I guess
my body was trying to protect itself in
case I got another crazy diet idea.
The media is not helping young
women in America. In addition to the
bombardment of television ads, we see
magazines full of slim beauties dairy,
supermodels so thin they could slide
through a closed door, Barbie dolls dis-
torting our image of the womanly fig-
ure. If Ms. Barbie doll was blown up to
human proportions she would be in a
hospital bed with an I.V. needle stuck
into her arm for nourishment I could
keep going, but you get my point
I am not a diet and exercise ex-
pert I am just like you trying to work-
out eat healty and accept my body at
its potential (not society's goal). What-
ever weightloss and exercise goals you
have for yourself, remember you are in
charge. Treat your body with kindness,
nourish yourself with healthy food and
fluids (H20 is excellent), and find a fit-
ness activity you really enjoy. You don't
have to be a superstar to be in good
shape, or succeed by any measure but
your own; you just have to accept your-
self with pleasure and cut yourself
some slack now and then.
HOUNDED m5 �,
The East Carolinian
Tambra Zlon, Editor-in-Chief
Crissy Parker, Advertising Director
Celeste Wilson, Production Manager
Wendy Rountree, News Editor
Marguerite Benjamin, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Brandon Waddell, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Amanda Ross, Sports Editor
Cralg Perrett, Assistant Sports Editor
Panl Hagwood, Staff Illustrator
Crlstie Farley, Production Assistant
Jeremy Lee, Production Assistant
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information call (919)
323-6366.
Kami Klemmer, Production Assistant
Xlall Yang, Systems Manager
Tim Hyde, Copy Editor
Patrick Hlnson, Copy Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Copy Editor
Panl D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Journalism lost to culture
Call me a sentimentalist, but I
often wonder what happened to truth
in journalism? I may be beginning to
sound like my parents, but, like them,
I long for the days when journalism
was more than the latest atrocity.
Everyday, it's OJ another mur-
der, another teenager convicted of
selling drugs or civil wars in foreign
countries. What happened to the good
stuff? I know it's out there, but unfor-
tunately today's journalists are trained
to cover politics and policing - not
peoe.
Journalists like Charles Kuralt are
icons of the past, people of the '60s.
Kuralt, whose claim to fame "On the
I -tad has become just another retiree
lost in the limelight to sensationalists
who are taking over the television
waves. We've lost focus of the good in
life and seem to thrive on tribulations.
Just turn on the tube, it's everywhere.
"Teenage homosexuals, cross-dressing,
headbanging mothers and "Fifty-
year-old mothers who can't keep their
eyes, and hands off their daughters'
boyfriends are everyday topics.
Cosby's Tempest Bledsoe and the Par-
tridge family's Danny whatever-his-last-
name-is have put those who started
the talk show phenomenon out of
business. Donohue, the first of talk
television, recently annovnc.d the
cancellation of his show.
Don't get me wrong, the last thing
Stephanie Lassiter
Guest Columnist
Seeing Kuralt on
television is like
grandfather.
Her$ sweet.
I care about watching is talk televi-
sion, and I don't think that Donohue's
cancellation is the end of the world,
but I just want to know why honest
journalists like Kuralt are dropping
from the business like flies. Anyone
who has ever seen Kuralt's "North
Carolina is my Home" knows what a
great sense of pride that program can
instill in a North Carolina native.
Kuralt has a knack for taking noth-
ing and making it into a story full of
life and feeling. As an inspiring jour-
nalist, Kuralt was challenged to set out
on the read in search of stories about
nothing. Kuralt's "On the Road" be-
came a daily must in the homes of
many Americans. Years later, Kuralt
published a book by the same name.
Kuralt could bring tears to the
eyes of his readers by reminiscing
times with his grandparents, who with
his parents, raised him on their
Wilmington farm. Kuralt's most recent
book America is a best seller, not be-
cause of its shock value, but because
of its truth. Kuralt unlike television
journalists such as Barbara Walters
and Diane Sawyer, doesn't seek out
famous figures. Instead, Kuralt relies
on everyday people - people like his
grandparents who taught the value
of honesty and truth.
Seeing Kuralt on television is lik-
ing seeing your grandfather. He's
sweet He's honest and his audience
knows they can expect perfection
from his journajism. Whether he's
interviewing some little old man who
has never seen a television or the
president of the country, you know
you won't be disappointed. That is un-
less you're so desensitized that you
don't even notice the blood and guts
smeared across your TV screen night
after night.
People need sentimentality to ex-
ist In a world full of death and vio-
lence, it's people like Kuralt (and Andy
Griffith) who remind us what life's re-
ally like. Unfortunately, days like
Thanksgiving and Christmas, when
everyone seems to be happy and thank-
ful, only come around once a year.
Letters to the Editor
Conspiracy runs rampant
To the Editor,
We the students and the faculty
of East Carolina University were in-
formed in writing, as long ago as 1992,
that abond referendum had been ap-
proved by the North Carolina General
Assembly for the construction of the
recreation and fitness center as well
as the new library annex on the west
side of campus. It was our understand-
ing that there was also a surplus of
billions of dollars in the state budget,
and it was high time that ECU re-
ceived its fair share of this benefit
Also the increasing tax revenues from
sales tax and ad valorem tax on auto-
mobiles was more than sufficient to
maintain the upkeep and utilities for
these structures well into the future.
Also, our student fees for athletics
were being increased by 11 to sup-
port these projects and the additional
seating that was and is proposed for
Minges Coliseum Williams Arena and
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, those two
structures being dedicated solely to
revenue producing varsity athletics.
Now we are told that when the
new recreation and fitness center is
completed, once the fraud corruption
and graft of it's former construction
company can be unraveled, that we
the students and faculty are expected
to pay membership fees of $100 and
$240 respectively to be admitted to
the new facility, and existing exercise
and sports facilities on campus in
Christenbury Gymnasium will be re-
placed by a computer center to re-
place the antequated (sic system in
Austin building, and R.O.T.C. pro-
grams will take over the remaining
space. If this is not a genuine con-
spiracy on the part of the ruling class
of the military industrial complex,
will somebody, pray tell, explain what
it is?
The weight room in Minges was
removed in 1994, and the Sports
Medicine Building is basically off lim-
its to the average student who isn't
a varsity athlete. Should our priori-
ties be centered around the concept
of profit maximization for a small
clique of modernizers, or the ben-
efit of all the students and faculty
of East Carolina University?
Richard F. Becker
Senior, Construction Manage-
ment
To the Editor,
I read all of the articles about the
Liberty Bowl in the January 11,1996
edition of The East Carolinian. Not
once was the marching band men-
tioned. Being the largest visible stu-
dent organization on campus, you
would think we would get a little pub-
lic recognition.
Our football season is just about
as stressful as the team's. We get here
a week before other students to start
drilling our. shows. We practice rain
or shine, in hot or cold weather for
Where's the band?
approximately six hours a week. We
are at every home game and an occa-
sional away game - rain or shine. If
you will notice, the statistics show that
ECU won all of its home games this
season � makes you wonder doesn't
it sic The band did not travel to any
away games and everyone sees what
happened (just kidding guys).
I am not in any way trying to dis-
credit the football team or program. I
just wish the Marching Pirates got just
a smidgen of thanks for making the
20 hour bus ride to Memphis and back
(as opposed to the team's flight).
Congratulations should also go
out to the cheerleaders for their sup-
port and putting up with the band
on the bus ride to Memphis. Again,
congratulations to all who partici-
pated in the Liberty Bowl '95 victory.
PS. Please remind ESPN to stop
lying about us about being on TV
during any games.
Sincerely,
Tracy L. Bass
Junior, third year Marching Pi-
rate
No weapons allowed
To the Editor,
The focus of the letter is to con-
vince students to be more aware of the
university weapons policy and the
state law. Last year reported incidents
dealing with weapons possession in-
creased from the previous year. There
are some students who don't take the
time to read about the weapons policy,
thus they may not be aware of the
penalties involved. Possession of a
weapon on campus owned property
not only violates the rules of the
school but also the state. The policy
states any member of the university
community who violates North Caro-
lina General Statute 14.269.2 pertain-
ing to weapons on campus is subject
both to prosecution and punishment
in accordance with state criminal law
and criminal procedures and to disci-
plinary proceedings by the university.
In some circumstances it is a felony
to possess or carry an open or con-
cealed weapon on educational prop-
erty. First time offenders could face
twelve to fifteen months in prison
without parole. The Clue Book states
violation of the school code of con-
duct letter T and W is grounds for
suspension from the university for one
semester if the weapon is a knife, BB
gun, or an air rifle. t one year sus-
pension would be given if the weapon
�� j .jeep�����'�a���
is a gun, rilfesic, pistol or powerful
explosive. Try to avoid situations
where a weapon could be brought on
campus. For example, if you go hunt-
ing don't forget to take your rifles out
of your vehicle before coming to
school. Also if you have to switch cars
with a buddy who keeps hisher gun
in the car, remember to take it out of
the car. Even a small pocket knife
could get you suspended for a semes-
ter, so be aware of the penalties. To
get more information on the weapons
policy consult your clue book and
weapons policy pamphlet.
Dominic Hardy
Senior, EXSS





Thursday, January 25,1996
The East Carolinian
PIRATF
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GENERAL FRUSTRATIONS
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BY JOHN MURPHY
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PRIMATIV. MAN
BY CHILDERS
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PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia
USA
-





�� B�
Thursday, January 25,1996
The East Carolinian
Thespians of Diversity
esurrect MLK legacy
Flattening
Dale Williamson
SenlorWriter
A young black couple pay tribute
to Martin Luther King, Jr. at his me-
morial. As they stand holding all the
King merchandise they bought at the
gift shop, a strange, confused man ap-
pears before them. To the couple's
amazement, they realize the man is a
resurrected Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
However, this is a King with a '60s vi-
sion still intact The '90s he is witness
to are not exactly what he had ex-
pected, or hoped for.
Thus begins Reginald Watson's
original play and the latest perfor-
mance from the ECU Thespians of Di-
versity. I Have Seen the Mountain Top
and It Don't Look So Good is a his-
tory play that addresses past and cur-
Vent social issues in a very' engaging
manner. After writing and directing A
Kwanzaa Story, a play depicting the
lives of several fictional Africans and
African Americans throughout history,
Watson knew that he and his thespian
group had more to say.
History plays are a challenge by
their very nature, but Watson's script
presents historical fact and voices so-
cial commentary without souading
preachy. His three main characters (Dr.
King, Wanda, and Johnny) each repre-
sent a certain life perspective on the
African American experience.
As Dr. King, Terrence Dove gives
a subtle, toned-down performance that
adds a nice depth to a character who
is shocked and bewildered by the world
he has been thrown back into.
Latisha Lisane and Darrell
Armstead play the couple. While
Armstead's Johnny is headstrong and
stubborn, he is not stupid. Armstead
provides some nice comedic touches
to lighten an otherwise heavy mood.
Lisane layers her Wanda with a will-
ingness to believe in the impossible and
a desire to help change things.
The focus of the play is on the
acting, writing and directing. Partly
due to a limited budget and partly by
choice, the set and the lighting are
minimalistic But Watson uses his bare
stage to great effect by incorporating
other artistic genres within the play.
Along with the play itself, audiences
will be treated to live musical perfor-
mances and a dance interpretation of
Stevie Wonder's "Visions
Still, the selling point of the pro-
duction is the subject matter. The Dr.
King we are presented with is an inter-
esting one because we view the man
from all angles. We learn that not all
African Americans were on Dr. King's
side, we get glimpses of him as a fam-
ily man and a husband, and we discover
that perhaps Dr. King's death may have
actually helped his people's cause by
transforming the man into a symbol.
See MLK page 9
Everything looks bright
Brad Oldham
Smttor Writer
For four years now, the six-man
band of Everything has been a heavy-
weight in the downtown Greenville
music scene. The Washington, DC
natives have established themselves
as one of the most successful bands
touring the Southeastern club circuit,
forming a grassroots following that
has grown dramatically over the years.
The name says it all with these
guys; their music is as diverse as the
band's personalities.
� Frontman Craig Honeycutt has
an incredible gift of being able to bring
the audience into the show. Drummer
Nathan Brown does a good bit of the
singing for the band, trading off and
harmonizing with Honeycutt
Newly acquired keyboardist and
trombone extraordinaire Wolfe Quinn
has added a musical intensity that was
greatly needed at a time when the
band was beginning to become a
shade predictable. Bassist David
Slankard, saxophone specialist Rich
Bradley and guitarist Stephen Van
Dam bring it all together to produce
a sound that can rotate from funk-
rock to jazz.
Anything goes with Everything.
After an extremely hard-driven song,
they can transform themselves into a
Mexican-sounding sextet that some-
how ended up drunk in New Orleans.
It's like a fiesta, DC-style. This isn't a
band that you can just sit back and
drink beers to; these guys put on a
show that packs much more than just
background music for a social setting.
"We really try to hold people's
attention at our shows Honeycutt
said. "That's what makes it a show,
instead of just a bunch of guys play-
ing in a basement somewhere. In or-
der to make it go, you have to go out
there and really make it happen
Last year brought on some ma-
jor changes for Everything, who had
worked the Indie scene for some time
after attending James Madison Univer-
sity in Virginia together. The band got
fi
"WTVAvte.
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
Kids love big trucks, and ECU students love parking spaces. This photo gives us both
with the clearing of the large, flat surface that will offer more parking at Allied Health.
Percolator hosts Poetry Slam
Sarah Wahiert
Staff Writer
Attention all poets and poetry
fanatics! The Percolator Coffeehouse
Poetry Slam wants you!
A Slam is a competition with
about 15 contestants who compete in
five rounds to see who comes out on
top. It isn't easy, though, because the
audience is supposed to be critical and
feel free to call out comments; that's
the whole point
The theme of this slam is 95's
worst poetry Poets are asked to
bring either their worst poems or po-
ems they wrote that make fun of some
types of poetry. According to Chris
Yoshida, who will oversee the Slam,
that means, "stuff you know people
will laugh at you for writing
Chris Yoshida also heads the po-
etry readings that are regularly held
at the Percolator every other Sunday
night. He arrived here last fall after
deciding to take a break from Wake
Forest to make some extra money. He
had heard that the readings had
stopped last year and decided to be-
gin them again. So far, he's had a
pretty good turnout
"Hopefully someone will take it
up after me Yoshida said. "It's good
fun
A poet himself, Yoshida shared
his ideas on the art form. "Poetry is a
release of my emotions to words he
said. "I write every day. I do it to cre-
ate something interesting.
"Poems are the sharing of expe-
riences. With every piece of art there's
a social statement Poetry is a living
thing, like a tree. It's as important as
that tree and as ourselves. It can also
be about what we wish to experience.
"This poetry slam is to get poets
aware of their audiences Yoshida
continued. "It's a great place to de-
velop your own voice and work on the
presentation of your poems. Plus,
there's a small prize if you win
Mark the date on your calendar
and start preparing your best "worst"
material. If the prize isn't incentive
enough, getting your voice heard
should be.
Discover forgotten music of '95
The 10 best releases you
didn't hear (but should)
Jay Myers
Senior Writer
Photo Courtesy Everything
The wholesome lads exposing themselves in extreme close-
up are Everything, who will be at the Attic tomorrow night.
signed to Capricorn Records, who re-
released the band's Labrador CD,
which had previously been put out by
Everything's own label.
The band also replaced
keyboardist Mark Reinhardt with
former Full Stop member Quinn, who
also attended JMU with the guys.
"Wolfe was somebody we kept in
touch with since JMU Honeycutt said.
"We just felt like we were growing as a
band, and sometimes you've got to
change to keep growing. Its going re-
ally well though now. Mark still lives
See EVERYTHING page 10
Over the course of an entire year there are so many
records released that it would be impossible for any one
individual to keep up with each and every title that comes
out That's why we have music critics.
There is nothing a music reviewer likes more than
listening to record after miserable record so that they
can then tell the general public what albums are worth
killing for and which albums are so heinous that it
would be better to maim yourself than to
listen to them. Unfortunately, critics can
only write a limited number of reviews
in one year.
Fortunately, I've been given
the chance to fill in those gaps by
telli6 you about 10 albums you may
have missed in the last year. They are
in no particular order and each of
them easily garners an "A" rating (if
not an "A" in some cases).
Of course, some of you are sure to have heard of
these albums. If so, consider yourselves cool. If you
haven't then you've got quite a smorgasbord in front of
you. Dig in.
1. Link Wray and the Raymen, Mr. Guitar, The Com-
plete Swan Recordings - He's still around, but Link Wray
made his best music back in the late '50s and early '60s. This
double disc of tracks he did back then showcases his destruc-
tive creativity on the guitar. You want fast? You want loud?
You want bleeding fingers and broken strings? Then look no
farther, my friend. Especially nice are Wray's covers of the
Batman TV theme and the intro to the Shadow radio pro-
gram. That's way out man.
2. John Patton, Boogaloo - Although this jazzfunk al-
bum was cut way back in 1968, it is technically a new release
this year. Blue Note, the label for jazz aficionados, has kept
this superbad record on the shelf for 27 years, only recently
releasing it as part of their Rare Groove series (this entire
series is recommended, too). Patton here proves to be the
ultimate acid jazz pianist which is amazing considering that
musical form didn't even exist in his day. If it's groovin' you
like to do, then throw this bad boy on and.you will never stop.
3. Squatweiler, All Tempo Hot Pants - This
Winston-Salem, NC power trio has been gar-
nering a lot of press recently, as well as
high praise from stars of the indieal-
ternative scene. Henry Rollins says
they're his favorite new band. Boss
Hog invited them up on stage at a re-
cent gig at the Cat's Cradle in Chapel
Hill (although they were too shy to actu-
ally accept). Mitch Easter (former REM pro-
ducer and leader of Let's Active) absolutely loves
them. Yet they still haven't gotten that coveted recording
contract Because of this you might have to take a drive to
Greensboro or Winston-Salem to track down their new al-
bum. It's worth the trip.
See MUSIC page 9
CD. Reviews
Every paper has a TV critic, but
our critic is no normal couch potato,
no mere TV junkie. No, our man wil
watch anything, anytime, regardless
of quality or good taste. Truly, he has
no shame, and that is why we call
him "The TV Whore
Kevin Chaisson
Senior Writer
You know, there's one thing that
I've learned from my many years as a
commentator on the wonder and
glory that is television: people like the
weirdest stuff. That fact alone makes
the job of a TV whorecritic a dicey
one, because my personal biases
against a TV show (and trust me, I
have very few) will probably be much
different than much of the country's.
I feel guilty stuffing my opinions
down someone's throat that happens
to think "Family Matters" is quality
entertainment, or that Heather
Locklear deserves to be even nomi-
nated for an acting award, and so on.
Okay, maybe I don't feel guilty for
those, but certainly for others. Take
"Duckman: Private DickFamily
Man on the USA cable network Sat-
urdays at 10 p.m for example.
"Duckman
ing "Duckman?" Well, I like the show
all right but I feel wonky recommend-
ing it to anyone. It smacks of a good
thing taken too far.
One of the show's selling points
is that, despite
for those of you
out of the loop, is
a half-hour ani-
mated comedy
that follows the
adventures of a
caustic, widowed
private detective
and his malad-
justed family. How
maladjusted? Well,
he lives with the
hateful twin sister
of his deceased
wife, his stoner
teenage son, the
twins (well, a two-
headed child, each head a different
sex), and a semi-comatose, flatulent
grandmother. Did I mention that he's
a duck? Well, he is.
Why do I feel guilty about review-
He lives with the
hateful twin sister
of his deceased
wife and
a flatulent
grandmother.
Did I mention
that he's a duck?
garnering main-
stream success, it
still holds to un-
derground roots.
The series is
based on a comic
strip by under-
ground artist
Everett Peck,
who also serves
as producer. Peck
has a wicked
sense of humor,
most of which
still filters into
the animated ver-
sion of his cre-
ation. The jokes that don't were prob-
ably removed by network sensors.
To give you an idea how cool
See DUCK page 8
ackstar
Derek T. Hall
Staff Writer
Treadmill Trackstar
Excessive Use of
the Passive Voice
While some critics would ar-
gue that this album is a positive
experience, I'm left wondering what
I missed.
"If I had a machete, none of
this would be happening is a
quote on the cover of this band's
promo pack. The album itself is cov-
ered with a picture of an acoustic
guitar, painted in American colors,
that is about to be run over by a
bulldozer. This all comes from an
album with the title Excessive Use
of the Passive Voice. Does this
seem like a positive experience? I
don't think so!
Although this album is no
walk in the clouds, it still has its
shining stars. From the creepy
monotone of singersongwriter
Angelo Gianni to the variety of in-
struments used, this album is safp
from going under. However, is "not
going under" what a band really
wants?
Treadmill Trackstar, among
other things, does have persever-
ance. The band consists of Angelo
Gianni on vocals and guitar, Heidi
Brown on the cello, Chris Brigg on
bass and backing vocals, and Tony
Lee on drums. Most of the album is
very original, but some people will
not be pleased due to how similar
Gianni's voice is to Billy Corgan's
of Smashing Pumpkins. Don't get
me wrong, Smashing Pumpkins are
unbelievable, but too much of any-
thing can make you sick as a dog.
Due to the lack of originality
on the vocal end, a shadow of doubt
hovers over the album. 1 really
couldn't get into the groove. It is
definitely an acoustic album, but a
raspy, grungy voice doesn't fit into
its context.
On a more positive note (I
guesi the album was produced by
See MILL page 9
JH "1





NMM flMMMHMVM
8
Thursday, January 25, 1996
7)e fast Carolinian
DUCK.frompage7
Peck is, he also serves as a writer for
Nickelodeons "Rugrats" and writer
designer for "Sesame Street among
others. So yes. the show has winning
credentials. That, 1 like.
Voice actors, you say?
"Duckman" gives "The Simpsons" a
serious run for its money. Duckman
himself is voiced by Jason Alexander,
who has risen to fame as the guy in
the Rold Gold Fat-Free pretzel com-
mercials. Oh. and he's on "Seinfeld
too. Nancy Travis (So I Married An
Axe Murderer) plays against type as
Duckman's sister-in-law, Bernice. And
those are just the leads.
As do "The Simpsons
"Duckman" tries to grab an amazingly
diverse and cool array of voice actors
to do guest shots. The big difference
here, and another strong selling point
for "Duckman is that "The
Simpsons" gets cool mainstream (i.e.
recognizable to the general, often
clueless, public) folks to guest sta
whereas "Duckman" goes for simply
cool.
Names like Michelle Pfeiffer. Paul
McCartney, Elizabeth Taylor and
Johnny Carson have guested on "The
Simpsons "Duckman" touts Tim
Curry, John Astin (the original Gomez
Addams). Amanda Plummer The
Fisher King), Sandra Bernhard, David
Duchovney ("X-Files"), Lisa Kudrow
("Friends") and Penthouse magazine
founder Bob Guccione in its group of
voice actors. You make the call as to
which one you think is cooler.
So where does "Duckman" go
wrong for me? The best way I can ex-
plain my point is to piss off a lot of
people, so here goes. There are those
who think Jim Carrey movies are re-
ally, really funny (and you know who
you are), and those who don't. Why?
Because the joke is taken too far for
some people. I, personally, cringe ev-
ery time some drunken fool pulls that
"May I ass you a question?" line from
Ace Ventura at a party.
A similar example from
"Duckman" would be the grand-
mother who. let's face facts, is a fart
machine, a veritable frenzied factory
of flagrant flatulence. Doing this once
an episode can be pretty funny (espe-
cially when it makes her blanket flut-
ter like a mainsail in a squall), but
come on! Much of "Duckmans hu-
mor is like this - taken that one step
too far.
The first episode of this season,
called "Noir Gang was really nice,
though. Done entirely in black, and
white, it was a spoof of the film noir
style of crime dramas in the 1930s
and '40s. Duckman and his pig part-
ner. Cornfed (that's a nice joke!), in-
vestigate the murder of a stripper
(voiced by "Cheers" alumnus Bebe
Neuworth) that they both desired.
This was beautifully done, with "cam-
eos" from Humphrey Bogart, Peter
Lorre and a host of other faces from
the film noir past
Future episodes are to have riffs
on The Bridges of Madison County,
the Cold War thriller The Manchu-
rian Candidate and even the classic
"Star Trek" episode "Amok Time
which featured a horny Spock beat-
ing the hell out of Jim Kirk to impress
a woman who really doesn't want him
(whoo, sounds familiar). With ideas
like these, "Duckman" appears to be
on the right track, despite my reser-
vations.
How about this. I will make a
promise to you, the reader, to keep
an eye on "Duckman see that it lives
up to its hype and potential, and try
to keep my reservations about its bath-
room humor in check. But you have
to promise me that you'll never do any
more bad Jim Carrey impressions, or
make me watch Dumb and Dumber
ever again, except the karate scene
(which was pretty funny).
On a scale of one to 10,
"Duckman: Private DickFamily Man"
rates a promising seven.
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Attention All Students
Come Join Us Each Thursday Night For
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For More Information Call Eddie and
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e At the 4 o'clock
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SANDPIPER BEACON HEAiII IFOIU
174UJ JUONT BEACH K.D PANAMA C II i iTAC.ll U MU
INFORMATION 1-800-488-8828
Ian Mh 1996
Creativity in
Public Speaking
Stephen dray,
Assoe. Director,
University Unions
(.fiuliT Communication
George Grcssman
Counselor
MSC Kin 212, 4-5pm
Feb 1. 1996
Leadership: Discipline
or Passion?
J. Marshall
Asst. Director
Student Activities
MSC Km 212,
4-5:30pm
Using the Media to the
leader's Advantage
Paul Wright,
Metlia Advisor
MSC "Km 212, -4 Spin
Feb 8. 1996
Personal Style &
Communication
Dr. Rosina Chia,
Psychology Prof
MSC Rm 212, 4-5pm
5
OnK .it Perkins Family Restaurants and Baker) can you enjoy
all n! your breakfast lunch and dinner favorites anytime ol
the da ! night, like our fluffy buttermilk pancakes, scrumptious
edible bread bowl salads, premium three-egg omelettes, steaks,
shrimp and more All available It hours a day, 7 days a week.
sV Greenville HKil
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9l9-3r ni:
HrrakfiM. Dinner mcl
r.viTMhmR In Hrnf-en
Feb 13. 1996
A Leaders' Guide for
Handling Wellness
Issues
Heather Zophy,
Health Educator
MSC Rm 212,
4-5:30pm
Solidifying bonds
Through Tcambuilding
Kari brown & Steve
bobbit, Asst. Directors,
Ret. Services
MSC Rm 212, 4-5:$0
March 21. 1996
Maintaining Your
Motivation
Shelly Garafolo, Asst.
Director,Unlverslty
Housing Services
MSC Rm 212, 4-5pm
Feb'IS. 1996
Discover. Your
Leadership Style
I.cmar bell � William
Walker. Residence
MSC Rm 212, � Spin
Feb 29. 1996
Personal Power
Dr. Matthews,
Vice Chancellor,
Student Life
MSC Rm 212, 4-5pm
March 26. 1996
Marketing Yourself,
Your Organization or
Your Program
Carol Woodruff.
Marketing Dir
University Unions
MSC Rm 212, CSpm
Feb 20. 1996
Meeting Effectiveness
Dr. Henry Ferrell,
History Professor,
MSC Rm 212, 4-5pm
Croup Process &
Awareness
Donna Walsh, Director,
Health Promotion &
Well being
MSC Great Rm 1
4 5:30pm
March 28. 1996
Diversity & Leadership
Dr. Bryan Haynes,
Director, Minority
Student Affairs
MSC Rm 212, 4 5pm
Feb 22. 1996
Professionalism &
Leadership
Dr. Helen Grove, Dean,
School of Human
Environ. Sciences
MSC Rm 212, Spm
African American
Leadership: Traditional
& Congressional
Perspectives
Taffye Benson Clayton,
Director Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center
MSC Rm 212, 4-5pm
Personal &
Organizational Finance
Mr. Manny Amaro,
Director,
University Housing
MSC Rm 212,
4-S:30pm
Registration Information: Register for the Leader Talkshops by calling 328-4796 or stopping by Student
Leadership Development Programs, 109 MSC. You must register by noon the day before each TalkShop.
Registration is free with a valid ECU student ID. Attend 10 of the 16 Leader TalkShops and receive a
certificate of accomplishment. Plus, for each TalkShop you attend, your name will be entered into a
drawing. One person will win a $50 Student Stores gift certificate and 5 will win a t shirt. The winner will
be contacted on April 15, 1996 by SLDP personnel.





The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 25,1996
edia&oord
seeking
te assistant
Ucants.
selected will serve as a
marketing assistant for the
Media, answering to the
Media Adviser.
requires an average of
hours per week.
Is must be currently enrolled
students in good standing.
ismarketing education andor
experience is a plus.
r more information, call 328-6009.
MUSIC from page 7
4. Ben Lee, Grandpaw Would -1
am constantly amazed by the output
of this 16-year-old Australian rocker.
In his band Noise Addict he plays punk
with wit and pop with feeling. On this
solo album he approaches balladry and
vocal harmonizing coupled with acous-
tic instrumentation and reaches it as
easily as Matthew Sweet or Lou Barlow
can. If this is just the beginning for
Ben Lee, then he will be bigger than
Jesus. Hell, he'll be bigger than Neil
Young, for God's sake. You heard it
here first
5. T. J. Kirk, T. J. Kirk - Who says
young people don't listen to jazz any-
more? It's just that they also listen to
funk and metal and rock and rap and
bluegrass and, well, you get the idea.
T. J. Kirk have obviously listened to all
of these things and somehow have put
them all together in a blender to pro-
duce one distinct sound. Even though
I know that the band name, T. J. Kirk,
stands for three influential jazz and
funk artists, 1 like to think it's also a
nod to old J. T. Kirk from Star Trek.
This band is definitely going where no
band has gone before.
6. Friends Of Dean Martinez, The
Shadow Of Your Smile - Best
Soundtrack of the Year, no question.
What, you never heard of the film?
That's probably because this band just
crafts instrumentais that sound like a
film score. Originally named Friends
of Dean Martin, the band pays hom-
age to spy films, westerns, surf music,
and lounge. If this was a real
soundtrack, then I personally guaran-
tee it would be an instant cult classic.
So relax, throw this record on, and
become your own Quentin Tarantino
or Robert Rodriguez by playing mov-
ies in your mind.
7. Palace Music, Viva Last Blues
- Auteur musician Will Oldham rein-
carnates himself every time he makes
a new record, appearing variously as
Palace, Palace Songs, The Palace
Brothers and, most recently, Palace
Music. Each album is distinctly
The ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee Presents
MUMINA
IUUMIHA'96 EXHIBITION
January 29 - February 15,1996
Mendenhall Gallery
RECEPTION
Tuesday, February 13,1996
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM in Mendenhall Gallery
CAU FOR ENTRIES
Friday, January 26,1996
1:00 PM - 8:00 PM in Room 243 Mendenhall
Registration Packets Available at the Mendenhall
Information Desk and Gray Gallery
$3.00 Fee Per Entry - Limit 3 Entries Per Person
Cash Prizes Totaling $1,050 to be Awarded
GET WINS
OS2 Warp is the totally cool way for
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A piece of cake to install, OS2 Warp gives you
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But there's more. OS2 Warp comes with a
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applications like a word processor, spreadsheet,
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Now you're probablv thinking that something
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Oldham, though, with its country rock
flavor and laid-back instrumentation.
This album is more Neil Young than
his previous Uncle Tupelo-like records,
because it contains lots of guitar and
drum power, but nevertheless it fulfills
a listener's needs.
8. Cornershop, Woman's Gotta
Have It - A multicultural indie rock
album sounds like a delight, huh? Wel-
come to the Cornershop. Using Far
Eastern rhythms with modern rock
instruments works very nicely, and
Cornershop makes you feel as though
you've just met Buddha, resplendent
in his new Pavement T-shirt, gig bag
under arm, on a dusty road in India.
And you can dance to it, too. Ah, sweet
enlightenment
9. Spain, Blue Moods of Spain -
This is one smoky record. You can
barely see the band because of all of
the mist around you. Laid back and
jazzy, Spain definitely puts one in a
blue mood. The lead in this endeavor
is Josh Haden, son of jazz great Charlie
Haden, and you can tell that he learned
everything he needed to at his father's
knee. For all those moody times when
you need the right music to get things
going, think of Spain.
10. Axiom Funk,
Funkcronomicon - They may not tell
you, but this is Parliament Funkadelic
all over this double disc. George
Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worell,
and Eddie Hazel (in his last perfor-
mance) are all here. The album also
features special guests of large stature
such as Sly Stone, Maceo Parker and
Bobby Byrd. That's right, it's P-Funk
with Sly and the Family Stone and the
JB's. 1 don't have to say any more,
right?
MILL from page 7
Angelo Gianni, Conrad Hunter and
Mark Bryan of Hootie and the Blow-
fish. These days, being from South
Carolina must have its advantages.
There is no doubt that with friends
like this, Treadmill Trackstar will have
an inside track, but how far will they
really go?
From the record deal to the pro-
duction of this album, this whole
thing just doesn't make sense. One
has to ask, "If Gianni wasn't in good
with the Hootie clan, would he still
have a record deal, or for that matter,
ever get one?"
My advice to the band would be
to start over and not focus on a fixed
sound. Don't be afraid to explore new
territories. If you don't, you'll never
know what you were missing out on.
After all, what would have happened
if John Lennon had started closing
his mind? That's something I don't like
to think about
JVILlV from page 7
The play also voices concern about
lack of black leadership in today's soci-
ety. Watson's script does not shy away
from stating that many of today's black
leaders just are not doing what needs
to be done. In fact, what is discovered
by the end is that change can be had
through the little things in life, like
working with the church and helping
the poor.
The ECU Thespians of Diversity
will not stop with this productioa There
are plans for a black history play in mid-
February. Anyone who is interested in
joining with the Black Thespians, con-
tact Reginald Watson at 3286684.
Have Seen the Mountain Top
and It Don't Look So Goodwill be per-
formed on Thursday, Jan 25 in
Mendenhall room 244. The show begins
at 7 p.m. and is free and open to the
public
The East Carolinian would like to apologize
to the patron's of the Attic for any confusion
due to the mistakes in last Tuesday's Ad.
Wednite: $1.00 admission
with ECU ID tm 9:30
Sat nite: $5.00 admission was incorrect
A Matter Of Taste
Try our lunch and dinner entrees
LUNCH
lamaican Jerked Beef Sandwich; Spicy strips of grilled
flank steak in a pita with lettuce, tomato, onion, and hot and
sweet Carribean sauce.
-Cayman Islands Grill; Spky grilled chicken sandwich topped
with onions and peppers; seasoned with lime, garlic and island
sauce.
Lemon Pepper Chicken Sandwich; Ho Hum! Just another
chicken salad sandwich Not so! We use fresh roasted chicken
combined with perfect ingredients that make for an instant
classic Served on French bread
Middle East Salad Plate; Hummus (sesame, chickpea
spread), Tabbouleh (bulgar wheat, lemon juice, olive oil,
parsley&. irunt)Icucumber Raita (cucumber in yogurt dressing)
joined together with our cucumber & feta cheese salad to form
a cool refreshing luncheon plate. Served with fresh pita bread
Lunch Mon-Sat
11-30 -230
Dinner Wed-Sat
5-30 -9:30
For Reservations Call
355-1111 or
For speedeBvery Call
355-7585
2
We Are
Herelt
Greenville Blvd
3
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03

Q.
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03 3"
4





,mmm

10
Thursday, January 25, 1996
The East Carolinian
EVERYTHING fromP.ge7
near us and hangs out with us and
stuff. It was just a change we felt we
needed to make
While the band's new relationship
with Wolfe was strengthening, their re-
lationship with Capricorn was falter-
ing. As the New Year rolled in, Capri-
corn and Everything went their sepa-
rate ways, ending a short relationship
between the label and the band.
"It was definitely a business deci-
sion Honeycutt said. "We had really
good working conditions with Capri-
corn, it's just that our expectations
were different. They're going to con-
tinue to put out Labrador for us, we
just won't ever record anything with
them. It's like two people getting di-
vorced but still staying friends at the
same time. We learned a lot though,
about how labels work, and their mo-
tivations
So what's in the future for Every-
thing? Finding a new label to work with
is possible, and with the band's on-
slaught of new material recently, the
notion of putting something out them-
selves is also a possibility.
"We have a lot of stuff in the plan-
ning stages now Honeycutt said. "We
have so much material that we re sort
of logging in. Our goal is to put out
something kind of fun yet sneaky at
the same time, while keeping our vi-
sion focused the whole time
Everything knows that this is a
great time to be a hot band in this re-
gion. They have shared the stage at
one time or another with every band
from the Southeast that has recently
made it to the next level.
Bands such as Hootie, Dave
Matthews, Widespread Panic and
Edwin McCain have played the same
clubs, in front of the same college kids
that are checking out bands such as
Everything and Gibb Droll these days.
The band doesn't see the emerging
regional success as sands in the hour-
glass of fame passing them by.
"It seems logical to think that this
is a good time to jump to the next
level Honeycutt said. "But it all works
in cycles. Whether or not we make it
there now or what, we need to just
continue to make good music and get
more and more people into it Because
the more we play these bar scenes, the
more the grassroots following will fuel
the fire
Honeycutt admits that the constant
touring does take its toll at times.
"It's always frustrating when you're
on the road so much. It's been like that
from the start But that's what it's all
about: the hunger of it all. The frustra-
tion equals energy for us. and it gives
us an adventure of figuring how to bring
it out Of course it's frustrating though,
watching these bands on MTV with their
videos, while we're out busting our nuts
every night What can't get lost is the
essence of it all. What are you really
trying to do with what you've got?"
Everything will be performing to-
morrow night at The Attic. Fairfax.
Virginia's Emmett Swimming will be
opening the show, and both bands will
be in the WZMB studios tomorrow af-
ternoon from 3-6 p.m.
This week's topic:
WEIRD TV
1. Kolchak the Night Stalker cover-
ed the supernatural beat for INS.
the International News Service
2. "The Six Million Dollar Man"
was based on the novel Cyborg.
3 Lancelot Link, secret chimp, did
his simian sleuthing for APE (that's
the Agency to Prevent Evil).
4 BUI Bixby played Anthony
Dorian, title character of "The
Magician?"
5. The only actor to follow "Planet
of the Apes" from movies to
television was Roddy McDowall.
6. "Tales of the Gold Monkey"
chronicled the .Rarders-esque
adventures of Jake Cutter.
7. Gomez Addams' chosen profes-
sion was lawyer (not that we ever
saw him square off against Perry
Mason or anything. .)
8 The first "Twilight Zone"
episode was entitled "Eye of the
Beholder
9. Poor, cursed Quentm Collins
suffered from lycanthropy (he was a
werewolf, for the uninitiated).
10. Number 6's real name was
never revealed, but some "Prisoner"
fans with wicked senses of humor
think he was really John Drake, the
spy character that Number 6 actor
Patrick McGoohan played a year
earlier on "The Secret Agent
i mint!
ItlcM ti 11
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, January 25
Bruce Frye
and the Lonely Rider Band
at the Attic
Roscoe
at Peasant's Cafe
Movie: To Die For
at Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, January 26
Everything
at the Attic
On.inous Seapods
at Peasant's Cafe
Saturday, January 27
Archers of Loaf
with Queen Sarah Saturday
at the Attic
Rasta Rafiki
at Peasant's Cafe
Yo La Tengo
at the Cat's Cradle
Carver Music
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Monday,
January 29,1996
The flips and
leaps are amazing!
But how do they keep
Student tickets
$12 in advance
with a valid ECU
ID. All tickets
$25 at the door.
Tickets are available through
the Central Ticket Office.
Mendenhalf Student Center,
328-4788; TDD 328-4736. (J
6. a.m. to 9 a.m.
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. GRATEFUL
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12 a.m. to 3 a.m.
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PIRATE
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REQUEST LINE
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.






11
Thursday, January 25f 1996
The East Carolinian
Hamrick pushes
for progress
Brian Paiz
Senior Writer
When Mike Hamrick was named
to be ECU'S Athletic Director last
spring, he had to fill some big shoes
of the departed Dave Hart. Hart had
brought ECU's athletic program to
a new level, and Hamrick knew the
Pirate fans would settle for no less.
Hamrick came to Greenville
and "took the bull by the horns" as
he immediately scheduled North
Carolina and North Carolina State
for future football contests. Hamrick
is closer everyday to getting ECU's
football program into a much antici-
pated conference.
I recently sat down with
Hamrick and spoke with him about
everything from conference affilia-
tion to ECU's progress in gender
equity.
Q: When Dave Hart left for
Florida St last spring, you actively
sought this job. What were some of
your reasons?
A- had been to East Carolina
before, and I had seen the kind of
support that this program has, not
only from Us students but from it's
alumni I can remember vividly the
Peach Bowl and all the ECU fans
that went to Atlanta. When I was
at Arkansas-Little Rock, I remem-
ber all the Pirate supporters that
were in Memphis for the 1994 Lib-
erty BowL I knew ECU had a good
support base, and 1 honestly believe
Mike Hamrick
that if you have good facilities and
fan support not only from your stu-
dents, but your, alumni, then you
can be successful and competitive.
I saw all of that at East Carolina,
and that is the type of program that
I wanted to be associated with.
Q: What were some of the items
discussed at the recent NCAA con-
vention in Dallas?
A: The mair issue at the NCAA
convention was restructuring.
What that basically did was estab-
lish the chancellors and the presi-
dents at Universities as the main
decision makers in intercollegiate
athletics. It also laid out the man-
agement structure in intercolle-
giate athletics, a decision that I
believe was very positive and
needed to be done.
Q: Of course the big issue for
East Carolina lately has been it's
possible affiliation with Conference
USA. Was there much spoken about
East Carolina in Dallas?
.4: Conferences meet when
they get to the NCAA convention.
East Carolina met with the CAA,
and we dealt with issues in our re-
spective conference. Conference
USA did meet and I was told that
the Presidents of each university
did meet and expansions were dis-
cussed. The Conference USA presi-
dents did agree that they were in-
terested in expanding. It's no se-
cret that East Carolina is looking
to get conference affiliation, Con-
ference USA knows that and we
have had some preliminary discus-
sions with them, and along with the
Big East We have made it known
that we feel that we need to get into
a conference for our football pro-
gram, and where we are at this
point I really don't know. We've
done all that we can do, and now
it's just kind of wait and see.
Q: What do you tell Pirate fans
when they say, "well Conference
USA did not want us the first time,
so why should we join their confer-
ence?"
A- tell Pirate fans, that I do
not believe that is correct. I think
the majority of schools in Confer-
ence USA did want ECU as a mem-
See HAMRICK page 12
support base, and I honestly believe " � � �'
Seahawks prepare to fly
into Minges on Saturday
� I i k. k i speed have been the biggest pluses double figures in scoring. Mc(
Improved UNCW
squad desires to
continue success
Dave Pond
Senior Writer
After a grueling early-season
schedule against the likes of Cincin-
nati and Umass that sent UNCW
reeling with a 2-8 non-conference
record, Head Coach Jerry
Wainright's Seahawks (7-9) have
climbed into the upper echelon of
the CAA standings with a 5-1 con-
ference record.
Saturday's contest between the
Pirates and the Seahawks will be the
45th overall meeting between the
two teams; each squad has claimed
22 wins. Last season the teams split
the season series, with each team
winning in their home arena. Over-
all, UNCW is just 5-6 at Williams
Arena, and the Pirates have yet to
lose this season at home.
speed have been the biggest pluses
for the Seahawks this season.
Through their first six conference
games, UNCW has limited opposing
teams to an average of 52 points per
game.
"Our mmmmmmmmmmmummmmmmm
strength will be
the enthusiasm
that is brought
about by a mix
of young and
old players
Wainright said.
"Our veteran
players will be
pushed by our
newcomers,
and I think that
will lead to tre-
mendous inter-
nal competi-
tion, which should help us to im-
prove
The 'Hawks are led by 6-11 se-
nior Preston McGriff (10.3 ppg), a
returning All-CAA second-teamer.
He is one of three UNCW players
(along with guards Mark Byington
"Our strength will
be the enthusiasm
that is brought
about by a mix of
young and old
players
� Head Coach Jerry
Wainright
double figures in scoring. McGriff
also leads the squad with 6.7 re-
bounds per game and is his team's
second-leading shooter at 50 percent
(67-of-133).
"They've got a very good expe-
mmmmmmm rienced frontcourt
with McGriff and
Darren Moore (9.7
ppg, 6.2 rpg.) who
have both done a
very good job
said ECU Head
Coach Joe Dooley.
"Carlos Toomer
(3.8 ppg 1.4 rpg.)
is playing a lot bet-
ter too, so they've
got a very good in-
side attack
� The Seahawks
will try to bring a
balanced scoring attack into Will-
iams Arena on Saturday, for good
reason. They average just 59.8 ppg,
yet they are 4-1 (3-1 CAA) when they
spread the scoring around and three
players notch double-figure totals.
Improved defense and team and Billy Donlon) averaging inSee UNC page 13
PER-GAME AVERAGES PLAYER C FG FCA 3P3PA FT FTA
I
34BASHAM,T T3 4.8 11.2 3.0
40KERNERJ 14 4.1 8.6 0.1
00 MEADOWS, O 14 3.4 7.1 1.4
12PARHAMJ 14 2.4 7.6 1.1
54 BRYANT, V 13 2.5 4.5 0.0
33 HAMILTON, V 14 2.8 5.8 0.1
05RIPPEY, D 13 2.1 4.5 0.2
22 GROOMS, M 13 2.3 4.2 0.0
15VANWEERDHUIZE, D 11 0.4 1.0 0.0
44 JONES, C 14 0.4 1.4 0.1
23 THOMAS, L 3 0.3 0.7 0.0
04 DOUGLAS, D 6 0.0 0.7 0.0
EAST CAROLINA 14 24.4 54.4 5.7
6.7
0.2
2.9
4.4
0.0
0.5
0.8
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.3
0.0
2.7
2.1
1.6
3.1
2.5
0.6
1.6
1.1
0.2
0.1
0.0
0.3
3.6
3.3
2.4
4.4
4.4
1.1
2.9
2.0
0.4
0.3
0.0
0.3
Get
crazy!
These fans know how
to get the crowd roaring
during basketball
games. Dubbed "The
Minges Maniacs they
make it hard for oppo-
nents to stay on top of
their game.
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Swimmers hope to
remain undefeated
Dill Dillard
Stetf Writer
Being at the top is always nice.
Right now the men's and the defend-
ing CAA champion women's swim
team knows what I'm talking about
After sweeping the Spiders in
Richmond this past Saturday, the Pi-
rates started their final run towards
the CAA crown on a high note. The
victory put both the men's and
women's teams at 4-0 in the CAA
standing, while having 8-1 (women's)
and 7-2 (men's) overall records. Mo-
mentum and togetherness are usually
key factors in a team going to the next
level, and for the second half of the
seacon for the Pirates it'll be essen-
tial.
"Road trips I feel brings the team
together sophomore Lee Hutchens
said. "When we swim at home meets,
family and friends are there cheering
us on, but when we're on the road,
we travel together and we really have
to get behind each other during the
meets
Hutchens is not whistling Dixie
either. Since Dec. 2, ECU has had only
one home meet out of six. Not to men-
tion the last two regular season meets
will be on the road as well.
"It's just how the scheduling
works Hutchens added. "Last year
the whole last half of the season was
Photo by CHRIS GAYDOSH
Lynsey Bullington, a freshman swimmer, gets ready for
Saturday's away meet against UNC-W. The swim team
hopes to remain undefeated in CAA action this weekend.
at home, plus road wins always helps
a team build momentum
With only seven seniors on the
lady's squad and just two from the
men's team bidding Greenville fare-
well, youth is the word to describe
ECU's "department of water and
power
"Yes, there are disadvantages of
being a young team, but we've
brought in recruiting classes the past
few years that are unbelievably fast"
said senior McGee Moody. "So with
the talent that we have it's just a mat-
ter of getting the younger swimmers
experience, which at this stage of the
season, it's not a big problem
"The younger swimmers just look
up to the older athletes, and leader-
ship has been good this year, so youth
really hasn't been a major problem
said junior Melanie Mackwood.
One would think that a grueling
road schedule would hurt a young
team like ECU, but with this squad's-
winning percentage, it proves the con-
trary.
"It's an advantage that this road
swing comes at the end of the sea-
son McGee added. "By this time the
See SWIM page 13
Student wins Super Bowl tickets
Amanda Ross
Sports Editor
While most of us will be watch-
ing the Super Bowl from our tele-
vision sets, one lucky ECU student
will be watching the game from end
zone seats in Sun Devil Stadium in
Phoenix, Az.
Junior Henry Bunn won a trip
for two to Super Bowl XXX. The
contest was sponsored by the Dr.
PepperSeven-Up Corporation and
WTRG 100.7.
Bunn heard the contest while
he was channel surfing on his car
radio. The contest was held at
Burger King in Knightdale, N.C.
Bunn was in the area so he stopped
by the Burger King and entered one
slip, and one slip only.
On Monday, Jan. 15, this part-
time insurance broker was coming
back from a sale when he heard his
name over the radio as the contest
winner.
"I only put one slip in, so it's
pretty amazing Bunn said.
Not believing what he had
heard on the radio, Bunn stopped
in the Burger King to make sure
he had heard his name correctly.
Sure enough, he won an all expense
paid trip to the Super Bowl for him-
self and a guest of his choice. The
total cost of the trip is around
$7,000.
Bunn will be taking his wife on
the trip and needless to say she was
pretty excited too.
"She screamed and said I can't
believe it Bunn said.
This Pittsburgh Steelers fan
will be flying out tomorrow morn-
ing and coming back Monday
evening. While in Phoenix, this
Zebulon native and his wife would
15.7 14.9 23.9
SPORTS INFORMATION DEMR
SID - The ECU women's track team opened the
1996 indoor track season at the UNC Indoor Invita-
tional in Chapel Hill, N.C. on Sunday afternoon.
Two Lady Pirate's qualified for the ECAC Cham-
pionships during the competition. ECU sophomore
Saundra Teel qualified with her preliminary time of
8.31 in the 55 meter high hurdles.
Carla Powell, a senior from Greenville, N.C. also used
the 55 meter preliminaries to earn the right to compete
in ECAC Championships. She placed second in her heat
with a Mme of 7.22.
Cther top five finishers include. Michelle Clayton (sec-
ond-weight throw, fifth- shot put). Lave Wilson (fifth- Triple
jump) and Amanda Johnson (fourth- 55 meter dash).
'�
like to do some sight seeing.
"We possibly would like to see
some local sites. We would like to
see the Grand Canyon but I think
we could be too far away to go
Bunn said his friends didn't
quite believe that he had won at first
and it took him a while to convince
them he really had won.
"My friends didn't really believe
it until I showed them the sheets
Bunn said. "I don't think they
thought I was telling the truth
Once they believed him some of
them jokingly asked if they could
go along.
"A lot of them asked about go-
ing. I've become popular all of a sud-
den
As far as the game is concerned,
Bunn does see the Steelers coming
out with a victory.
"I predict Pittsburgh will win
28-24 over the Cowboys





12
Thursday, January 25,1996
The East Carolinian
HAMRICK from page
11
ber the first time, and I don't think
it is right that Pirate fans label Con-
ference USA as not wanting East
Carolina. I believe it was one school
in particular, maybe another that
said well let's go into this confer-
ence and let's kind of take a wait
and see attitude with East Carolina.
Where 1 know four, maybe even five
schools greatly supported East
Carolina, because they know of our
quality athletic program.
Q: East Carolina's athletic bud-
get is on the lower scale of Division
I institutions in the NCAA. How
does ECU compete, money wise,
with other major universities?
A: We raise more money pri-
vately, we sell more season tickets,
we continue to get more money
from our radio and television
broadcasts, our students are very
supportive with their student activ-
ity fees. With the additional 12-
14,000 seats in Dowdy-Ficklen sta-
dium, that's an opportunity for
additional revenue. We'll try to put
more people in those seats, that's a
main way to get your budget up.
Q: A major issue in the NCAA
in recent years has been gender eq-
uity. What are some of your feelings
on this issue in particular?
A: I think we are making tre-
mendous progress here at East
Carolina in our gender equity.
We've paid close attention to it in
the short time that I have been here.
It's an issue that we have to deal
with enthusiastically, aggressively
and try to do the right things in
the area of gender equity. To do
those things you have to have the
funding, and we have to work hard
to get the funding, to do the things
in gender equity that we need to
do.
Q: East Carolina has been
known to be a "stepping stone" for
some coaches. Are you scared that
with success in the athletic program
that you may lose some of your
coaches?
A: I believe East Carolina can
no longer be viewed as a stepping
stone. East Carolina's athletic pro-
gram is one of the best in the coun-
try, and once we get our stadium
completed, and hopefully get into
a conference, play our in-state ri-
vals, and now with Minges Coli-
seum renovated, 1 think that ECU
is on the right track. Financially,
our coaches and staff's salaries are
becoming very competitive. We are
also at the point that if we'have
good coaches and they leave, we
can hire good coaches to replace
them because of what we have here
at ECU.
Q: Do you feel that it is very
important for the athletic depart-
ment to be in touch with the stu-
dent body?
students. Secondly, because the stu-
dents fund us so well in my opin-
ion here with their student fees. I
think we need to be in touch with
them, we need to know what they
are thinking, we need to know what
they want from our program and
the students here become alumni.
Alumni is very important to our
program and my philosophy is if
that the student has a good experi-
ence while they are here, then
they're going to continue to support
you the rest of their life.
Playing
your cards
right means
advertising
with us!
Q: How has it been working
with Chancellor Eakin?
A: It's been good. Dr. Eakin is
very supportive of athletics and at
the same time understands that ath-
letics needs to be kept into perspec-
tive. He has made it clear to me that
academics are important, and
about no NCAA violations. Dr.
Eakin is not afraid to win. He wants
to win, and be very successful.
You'll find him at all the athletic
events, and he is very supportive.
How to Save $SS in Your Apartment
A: Absolutely. The student
body here at ECU is the heart and
soul of everything we do here. First
of all because our athletes are our
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Rent isn't the only big cost of living in an
apartment. Your utility bills can also add up.
During the winter months, hold down your
utility bills with these money saving tips
1. Lock your windows in cold weather. They fit
tighter when locked.
2. Keep your blinds or draperies closed, except
when the sun is directly shining through your win-
dows.
3. Avoid placing warm dishes into your refrigerator
or freezer. Whenever possible, wait until they are
cooled to room temperature. (Make sure you
refrigrate the food within two hours after cooking.)
4. Use the smallest kitchen appliances possible to
cook meals- such as microwaves and slow cookers.
Greenville
Utilities
H
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ffi.
��p i
Drop-Ad with
? NO lines.
0 NO waiting.
5Z NO headaches.
Were talking classifieds, not classes.
The East Carolinian introduces
SA NO HASSLE DROP-AD!
Pick up one of our classified ad
envelopes (like the one shown
here), fill it out and place
your payment inside.
Then drop it off in our box in front
Student Stores or at the information desk in
Mendenhall, in addition to The East Carolinian office.
Placing a classified ad couldnt be easier!
v
kSSLE C
Just look for our logo
around campus for
No Hassle Drop-Ad!
Ln
y
-
A service of The East Carolinian.
Watch for additional drop box locations as we make it even easier to Drop-Ad!






The East Carolinian
Thursday, January 25,1996
13
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8 Pieces
led Chicken
Super Bowl Special
Soft Drink Feature
Superpretzel
Soft
Pretzels
2 Liter
Coke Or Diet
Coke
09
SWIM from page 11 UNC from page 11
younger swimmers have learned that
it's only a different pool they're swim-
ming in
McGee's comments are obviously
true looking at the records, but this
next UNC-W meet might be a bit dif-
ferent than the others.
"Oh, without a doubt this is the
biggest meet that we have left before
conference sophomore Mike
Donnavan said. "It's always intense
with UNC-W. It's probably the biggest
rivalry in the conference so there will
be plenty of talking going on
"We have to go in with a tough
skin because we know they're (UNC-
W) going to do a lot of talking
Mackwood added. "We'll just have to
keep our composure and get the job
done
In the previous season, the hated
Seahawks from the Port City edged
the men's team and topped the Pirates
in the conference standings. Not to
mention the CAA champion Lady Pi-
rates getting the best of the Seahawks
last time.
It's no secret that both the Bucs
and the Seahawks will be gunning for
each other in this regional showdown.
This match-up will be Jan. 27 at 2 p.m.
on the campus of UNC-W.
Byington and Donlon have been
the most pleasant surprises for the
Seahawks this season. After watch-
ing most of last season from the end
of the UNCW bench, Byington has
claimed hold on a starting position
this year by pouring in 10.3 points
per game.
In his first season in the CAA,
Donlon has made himself known
quickly, draining over 48-percent of
three-pointers. However, he's
struggled at the charity stripe (51
percent) and has almost a one-to-one
assistturnover ratio.
"UNCW's perimeter players are
starting to play well Dooley said.
"Byington, a sophomore, is playing
a lot better, and Donlon has really
come into his own at the point. Now
they have started to become more
offensively balanced - they've his-
torically always been a good defen-
sive team
The biggest question for ECU
will be the health of sophomore
point guard Tony Parham, who is
fighting his way back from an in-
jured hip.
"He's got a hip pointer, and he's
all sorts of banged up Dooley said.
"Tony's getting treatment for it right
now and we'll just have to wait and
see how it is
During half-time of Saturday's
contest, televised on Home Team
Sports, the East Carolina football
team will be honored in a special
ceremony honoring their achieve-
ments during the 1995 season.
"It will be a very special day for
East Carolina University said ECU
director of marketing Steve Cowan.
"The football team will, among other
things, present the Liberty Bowl
championship trophy to the Univer-
sity on Saturday afternoon. That,
and the fact that we are playing our
arch-rival UNC-Wilmington, make
this an afternoon that all Pirate fans
should be a part of
A Williams Arena sellout crowd
for Saturday's televised game would
give the Pirates a big boost in con-
tinuing their home-court success
during Dooley's first season at the
helm of the ECU program.
"We've got the best crowd in
the conference - I don't think that
there is much of an argument about
that Dooley said. "We've got a
great basketball atmosphere, and
hopefully people will keep coming
out like they have been
(T
TRBLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT

Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN. the weekend of
February 23-25,1996. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
�O All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
A M m Thursday, January 25,1996
H JF 6:0� P-m.
"Mf Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
HfflK "THE PNE pm�
There is a $2.00 lwjfllnl'M1 fcMbMBJhaHMBMBI Pfginmrimi fount TfflflnMrftrMffirtffllMfl Tidlwimim
Fi I mill Hi niTtinnHi ipm1 Tini 1iii�Pni i Im Milmlln uimnlftu ifTitimil 11MflirthOimi HelllM
Student Activities Office, 32M711 ask for Mark, fix more infannation.
V
xwck suor snow
FRIDAY, FEB. 9,1996 AT8FM
MENDENHALL BILLIARDS
J
4$
t
� sup���wl PARTY T � v�
�L&Zfji WALK (OR SWIM) DOWN TO
V UNDERWATER CAFE
l BEST SUPER BOWL PARTY EVER!
I
l
10 20 an lfi 50 40 30
NEW BIG
SCREEN TV
10
DOOR PRIZES
AT HAtFTIME
It's What's Between The Ears
That Counts.
13 oz.
All Natural Selected Varieties
Hunter 2EZ00 Dyna Bites Or 73�SO0
Ice Cream 12 gai. Z9 Cheese Bites? .Z9
Selected Varieties h SeaPak �
Nabisco 469 Shrimp 2X)0
Crackers8.5.io oz. m Poppers 6 .
'j�
Prices Effective Through January 30,1996
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday January 2. Through January 30, 1996 In Our Greenville Stores
On'y We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None"Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
Where do you go to gain "real
experience in a college-level program?
Use your head.
Think Disney!
Come learn about the WALT DISNEY WORLD College Program,
where you'll be able to earn college recognition or credit while gaining
the experience of a lifetime.
Walt HDisneg World
Visit us at our presentation!
Date: February 1, 1996 Time: 7:30pm Location: Rm. 1032, General Classroom Bldg.
Interviewing: All majors for positions throughout theme parks and resorts. Positions include
attractions, food & beverage, merchandise, lifeguarding, among many others.
For more information, contact: Mary Cauley
An Equal Opportunity Employer Drawing Creativity from Diversity





iBiiiriffli tmmmmimmmm
14
Thursday, January 25, 1996
The East Carolinian
PER-GAME AVERAGES
DON'T
PLAYER
C FC FCA 3P 3PA FT FTA
03 ALLPRESS, J
42 BLACKMON, T
22 KELLEY, T
05 CHARLESWORTH, D
32 HAYES, S
24 ASHENFELDER, L
14CAGLE,B
34 JAYNES, B
30 SUTTON, L
44 THORN, M
11 JAMES, A
EAST CAROLINA
13
13
12
13
13
13
12
11
13
7
5
4.7
4.8
3.6
3.0
1.7
2.1
1.3
1.4
0.8
0.1
0.4
12.2
8.5
9.1
7.5
4.2
6.0
3.0
2.5
1.8
1.0
1.2
2.1
0.0
0.1
0.5
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
6.4
0.0
0.3
2.6
0.0
0.8
0.4
0.1
0.0
0.6
0.0
3.4
2.9
1.4
1.6
1.6
0.6
1.1
0.7
0.2
0.6
0.0
4.1
5.2
2.1
2.9
2.5
1.3
1.2
0.9
0.7
0.6
0.0
13 23.2 54.8 3.0 10.8 13.8 21.0
Editorial Board
Meeting 5:00 Thursday
L�
This weekend is going to be full
of Pirate basketball at Minges
Coliseum. First, Saturday after-
noon, the men's basketball
team will be playing UNC-W.
This game will be televised and
tip-off is set for 4:30 p.m. Dur-
ing half-time the 1995 Liberty
Bowl Champion ECU football
team will be honored. Then on
Sunday, the women's basketball
team will be taking on the
Spiders of Richmond.
It's Your Choice!
Otf
Tip-off for that
game is 2 p.m.
The ECU Populor Enterfainment Committee Presents
&esi&
Thursday, February 8,1996
Wright Auditorium
WMRfimi
TICKET PRICES
Student $8.00
FatuityStaff $10.00
General Public $12.00
At the Door $15.00
WRQ WVDO
MasterCard�and Visa accepted. All tickets are General Admission. Doors open at 7:00 PM.
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
For more information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787), 328-4788, or TDD 328-4736
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM or the ECU Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Looking for a more convenient way to pay
your utility bill? Starting early in February,
you'll be able to use "GUC Express
Greenville Utilities' new satellite office. GUC
Express features three drive- thru lanes so you can
pay your bill quickly and there's plenty of parking
if you want to go inside to apply for service or
inquire about your bill.
For your convenience, GUC Express will be open
Monday through Friday from 7:30am-5:30pm.
The 24-hour Drop Box will also be available for
payments.
GUC Express is located in the former Centura Bank
building at 509 SE Greenville Boulevard, across the
street from First Christian Church (near Kroger).
Hfum
GUC
EXPRESS
HEllQ-M�YEiS
III The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee Presents I j I
i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i
To be held on Thursday, April 11, 1996, at 8:00 PM on the Mall
First Prize: $500 CashOpening Band at Barefoot on the Mall (April 18th)
Second Prize: $100 Cash
-Deadline For demo tapes is Friday, February 16,1996 at 5:00 PM.
-Five Bands will be chosen to perform at the Battle of the Bands. o
-PA will be provided by the Popular Entertainment Committee.
-Five finalists will be notified the week of February 25.
-Winners will be determined by judges.
To audition for the Battle of the Bands, please submit a demo tape containing
three songs, a Press-KitBio, and the Entry Form below to the Student Union
Offic?, Room 236, on the second floor of Mendenhall Student Center or Mail to:
Popular Entertainment Committee ' , , . , , n ,
� M , , n c j p Official Battle of the band'
236 Mendenhall btudent Center �
East Carolina University ; Name of BandContact Person: WM
Greenville, NC 27858 Address
For More Information, Call the ' Phone Number(s): I
� Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
otNr
m
�� �� � � � � � � � � � � � -� � � � -��.� � .





15
Thursday, January 25,1996
The East Carolinian
m
Help
Wanted
fa
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &.
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
For Sale
if
Help
Wanted
A GARDENS
Q UNIV-tRSilY APARTMENTS
NecJCASH???
We Buy CDS,
Caette. ana Lp �
Well pay up to $5 eaan for
CDY
VI I I
TELEMARKETING
Steenier Cam
(leaner M-
nrs "vX
DON'T PASS UP THIS opportunity! Fast
growing telecommunications Co. looking
for reps in this area. Must be motivated,
self-starter looking for fun and money!
Enjoy working with others and being your
own boss. Full or part-time. Finally get
the rewards that match your efforts. Call
Scott for more information at 754-2111
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in a way to
virtually eliminate your long distance
phone bill and make a substantial income
while doing it, call Jason at 756-0577.
GET PAID FOR CLIPPING coupons. Up
to $180.00 per week Send SASE to 102
3 Brownlea Dr Greenville NC 27858
Greek
Personals
m
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
5 jycit
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, TWO bed-
room apt, two full baths, will have own
room. Includes washerdryer. Must love
cats. Rent is $235.00 plus half utilities.
Nonsmoker, mature responsible student
No deposit needed. Call Leisa after 6:30pm
756-7433
5 BEDROOM HOUSE, TWO living-
rooms, two baths, fireplace, fenced in back-
yard, 105 N. Elm. St. 1 year lease, pets
OK, $1000.00 per month 752-6833
READ ME ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bed-
room, 2 bath duplex. Lost of amenities.
Walking distance from campus. $275mo
12 utilities. Call 758-2232
THREE BEDROOM DUPLEX ON
STANCIL Dr. One female preferably to
share. $355 total month rent Security de-
posit of $17730 needed. No lease require-
ment Call ASAP 758-0607 nonsmoker
preferred.
TOWNHOUSE 1 12 BATH, gas logs,
near hospital, excellent condition, Call
756-9643
ROOMMATE NEEDED SPACIOUS
HOUSE directly across campus. $200 a
month, plus utilities. Call 752-1263
ROOMMATE NEEDED FREE RENT in
January and security deposit is paid in full.
Players Club Apts. Own room, 2 Full
Baths. $250 month. Call Kyle at 353-
0668(910) 862-2491.
NAGS HEAD, NC - get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer, central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 6- $1500.00 per
month; sleeps 8 - $2100.00 per month
(804) 850-1532.
THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR
rent near university. Central heat and air.
WasherDryer hookups. Range, refrigera-
tor furnished. $489,752-6276.
RENT IN JANUARY AND receive your
last months rent free with lease. 1 and 2
bedroom apts. in various locations. Poto-
mac Properties 752-9722
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share a four bedroom house with three
other girls. Must be responsible, reliable,
and easy-going. For details please call 756-
0857 ASAP
FEMALE ROMMATE WANTED TO
share 3 bedroom house close to campus.
13 rent and utilities. Must love dogs. Call
752-6999
Why shop in LA
New York, or even
Raleigh for
that matter
21st Century
(formerly BLTs Boutique)
Downtown Greenville
is all that matters.
louiiy Wages ec
Commission
Call 7(V()()33
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library at information In U.S. -
all subjects
Ord-r Catalog Today with VIsaMC or CO
800-351-0222
or (310)477-8226
Or rush $2 00 to RmmtcH Information
11322 Idaho Kve K206-A Los Angelas, CA 90025
Services
Offered
STUDENT WHOLESALE CATALOG.
STUDENTS now you can buy electron-
ics, home appliances, office supplies, au-
thentic jewelry, costume jewelry, perfume,
novelty items, and other items at whole-
sale price. The Student Wholesale Cata-
log is only $5.00. S&H is already includ-
ed. So order your Student Wholesale Cat-
alog now. Price Enterprises. 1543 Battery
Drive. Raleigh, NC 27610.
FOR SALE CMC JIMMY 4wd, power
steering and brakes, burgundy, excellent
condition, 50k, $9,600. Call Nan or Chris
752-2383
FOR SALE TREK 930 Mountain Bike
$400.00 OBO. Full size mattress and box
spring $100.00. Kenmore Washer $75.00
(steal). Call Jason at 752-7107.
PARK-PRE MTN. BIKE with toe clips,
bar ends, extended seat, post and u-lock.
$175.00 OBO. Guitar Effects Processor
Digitec GSX-1, Twin Tube, 120 presets 10
patch foot controller $350.00 OBO. Call
Dave 7524324.
96 CT ZASKARLE 18 inch frame with
bottom bracket, front derailer & seat post
White Industries hubset 3 weeks old.
Frame $500.00, Hubs $225.00. Call Mark
at 830-8973 or 355-8050
REDUCE EXCESS FAT FOR thigh and
body. Order your Thigh Body Contour
Cream Now as seen on TV! Retails for
$19.90. Now being sold for only $12.90.
S&H is already included. Price Enter-
prises. 1543 Battery Drive. Raleigh. NC
27610
'95 FLEETWOOD SW 14X76 2BR,
2bath, All options. 10 min. from ECU. Take
over pmts, plus cash back from owner. 1-
919-5566905
TREK 7000 MANITOU SHOCK bar
ends; post seat; cream colored magic tires
and LX components. $550 call Mike at
752-9850 or leave message.
1
w
Lost and
Found
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World trav-
el. Seasonal & full-time employment avail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-971-3550 ext.
C53623
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000-$6,000 per month. Room and
Board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206)971-
3510 ext A53622.
WANTED 100 STUDENTS! LOSE 10-
30 Lbs. next 90 days. New Metabolism
Breakthrough. Guaranteed. Dr. recom-
mended. $35.50 MCVISA. 24 hr free info:
1-800-229-7562.
ATTENTION LADIES TIRED OF being
broke, want to get paid Everyday. Call Play-
mates Massage, Snow Hill, NC 747-7686
INTERIOR DESIGNER NEEDED - part
time or full time. Experience needed in
furniture layouts, presentation boards and
cad system. Call 931-6904 and leave a
message.
TEACH ENGLISH IN EASTERN EU-
ROPE - Conversational English teachers
needed in Prague, Budapest or Krakow.
No teaching certificate or European lan-
guages required. Inexpensive Room &
Board other benefits, for info call (206)
971-3680 ext K53621
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour, for more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to $2545hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For information call:
(206) 971-3570 ext. J53623.
START THE NEW YEAR off right by
calling Diamond Dave for your next party
Diamond Dave is a professional Disc
Jockey with a first class sound system. Call
Diamond Dave at 758-5711 or 8093474.
NEED TYPING? CAMPUS SECRETARY
offers speedy, professional service, cam-
pus pick-up and delivery. Familiar with all
formats. Low Rates. Call Cindy at 355-
3611.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800400-0209.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
GRANTS & scholarships available! Bil-
lions of $$$ in private funding. Qualify
immediately. 1-800406-7027
FREE FINANCIAL AID! OVER $6 bil-
lion in public and private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parent's income. Let us help. Call Stud-
ent Financial Services: 1-800-2636495 ext
F53624
ALWAYS IN A HURRY? Never enough
time o type those papers? For fast pro-
fessional service, call Heidi 321-8282. If
no answer, please leave message.
FREE FINANCIAL AID OVER $6 billion
in public and private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income or
parent's income. Let us help. Call Student
Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext
F53624
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEWLY
elected officers of Alpha Delta Pi: Presi-
dent Brooke Hunter; Vice President Tra-
cy Jones; Membership Education VP, Car-
lyn Lupton; Alpha Education Chairman,
Julie Tanner; Treasurer, Katherine Bu-
drow; Asst Treasurer, Kelly Warfield; Rush
Chairman, Marcia Jackson; Standards,
Kira Chapman and Jennifer Uhal; Social
Chairman, Neely York; Senior Executive,
Carey Meadows; Junior Executive, Aman-
da Parrott; Sophomore Executive, Laura
Holcomb; Guard, Stephanie Barczack;
Recording Secretary, Lisa Jones; Corre-
sponding Secretary, Cameron Ward; Pan-
hellenic Delegate, Becky Lockemann;
House Chairman, Lee Beeby
CONGRATULATIONS TO SIGMA
SIGMA SIGMA on having the third high-
est sorority GPA! Way to go Alecia Page
on your 4.0! Good Job
THANK YOU TO DR BROWN, Dept of
Psychology for being a great faculty advi-
sor. We appreciate your continued sup-
port Love, The sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi.
CONGRATS TO ASHLEY MAC and JEN
MURRAY for getting 4.0's last semester.
Your Alpha Omicron Pi sisters are proud
of you!
Announcements
ing Clinic) located next to the Belk Build-
ing (School of Allied Health Sciences) near
the intersection of Charles Street and 264
By-pass. NO APPOINTMENT IS NEEDED
- PLEASE DO NOT CALL THEIR OF-
FICE FOR AN APPOINTMENT. WAITING
IS OUTSIDE THE CLINIC WAITING
ROOM. SIGN IN BEGINS AT 4:50pm.
Screenings are conducted on a first come,
first serve basis.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Christian Social Fraternity RUSH! Jan 30,
31, Feb 1 at 8:00-10:00pm. For more in-
formation, Call 321-759.
EAST CAROLINA HONOR'S
ORGANIZATION
The next meeting of ECHO will be held
Tuesday, January 30th at 5:30pm in GCB
1003. All students with a 3.3 GPA or bet-
ter are invited to attend. If you have not
already done so, please pay your semes-
ter dues at this meeting.
M
Greek
Personals
REWARD! LOST: SHORT FAT female
beagle mix. Pink collar. Very timid; lost in
campus area. Call 830-06 anytime.
flDO YOU NEED MQNEY7
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR YOUR USED
We also buy TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER
JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken Gold
Pieces
&
Stereo's
TV's
VCR's
CD players
Everything
you need
to start
your own
business.
St Li) i i Swap Shop
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI10-12,1:30 -5& SAT FROM 10-1
come into the staff parking lot in front of wachovia downtown,
drive to back door & ring buzzer�
At Excel Telecommunications we've made starting your own busi-
ness easy. We've placed everything you'll need into one small box.
Contents include: No capital investment. No inventory. No delivery.
No quotas. No employees. No experience.
For more information about an opportunity in one of the world's
fastest-growing industries, call today.
� HT MmMINTATIVI
m
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SISTERS of Alpha Xi Delta: Stephanie
Brenna, Kristin Cosmai, Ronna Jo
Edwards.Sarah Floyd, Allison Furgal,
Amanda Galich, Amy Graves, Ronda
Hardee, Megan Hopkins, Emilie Hughes,
Kate Jones, Stephanie Kocen, Linda
Korpusik, Alicia Main, Tricia Mallory,
Amanda Mastin, Betsy Mullinix, Erica
Newport Jennifer Oglesby, Kristi Rose,
Randi Seamon, Kathryn Templeton,
Marisa Tjerandsen, and Harriet Turner.
You guys are the best!
GO SIGMA BASKETBALL
ALPHA OMICRON PI IS presenting an
AIDS Forur" 'anuary 30,1996 at 7:00pm
in Wright Auditorium. Everyone is invited!
If you have any questions, please contact
Saysha Raper, 757-0769
THETA CHI: THERE WERE lots of tall
orders south of the border. We never
thought we'd see a tree in the desert Bet
you didn't either. We enjoyed the
margaritas. Love the ZTA Senoritas.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA CHRISTIAN So-
cial Fraternity RUSH! Jan 30, 31, Feb 1;
8:00-10:00pm. For more information call
321-7539.
For Details
Call 830-4876
n�
TlitiMMiiMATitM mmmm
to fit. T9m firm to Now.
Travel
�1�1 �
I ATTENTION� �
SPRING BREAKERS!� �
� BOOK NOW!�
yUtAEVCANOJNDARAMASSJW�
� FLORIDA $129�
� ORGANIZE GROUPS 4 CO FREEl� �
� ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS�
I 14002)47007� �
� �
mm
XS Nil ON (UN l WS'III lioi US-
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAAAA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
KEY WEST
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
PER PERSON DEPEND ON DESTINATION WEAK DATES LENGTH Of STAY
t-SQO-SfJNCHAS
toll mi MffoManoN a. ksmvations
http
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS PARTY
CRUISE 7 days $279! Includes 15 meals
& 6 free parties! Creat BeachesNightlife!
Leaves from Ft. Lauderdale!
http:www.springbreaktravel.com -1-800-
676386
CANCUN & JAMAICA spring break spe-
cials! 111 Lowest Price Guarantee! 7
nights Air & Hotel from $429! Save $100
on FoodDrinks! http:www.spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-67&6386
SPRING BREAK '96, WITH only 1 week
to live � DON'T BLOW IT! BOOK NOW
Florida $109, Bahamas $359, Jamaica
Cancun $389. Organize a group - TRAV-
EL FREE Sun Splash Tours 1-800-426-
7710
SPRING BREAK! PANAMA CITY! 8 days
room with kitchen $119! Walk to best
bars! 7 nights in Key West $259! Cocoa
Beach Hilton (Great Beaches - Near
Disney) $169! Daytona $139! http:
www.springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
SKI & SNOWBOARD-CAMPUS REPS
NEEDED Springbreak '96 Intercollegiate
Ski Weeks- 5 day lift ticketcondo lodg-
ing 5 nights parties & activities. Mt. Or-
ford, Canada (Near Vermont) (Drinking
Age-18) Trip only $219. Reps earn free
trips, CASH. New Equip etc. Call Ski Trav-
el Unlimited: l-800-999-Ski-9.
ECU WOMENS LACROSSE
CLUB
Thursday Jan. 25 ECU Womens Lacrosse
Club meeting. In Christenbury room 102.
All interested players please attend. No
experience necessary. For more informa-
tion call Laura Stockett at 758-4431
SHABBAT SHIR AH A
WEEKEND OP SONG AND
JEWISH CULTURE!
Come and join Congregation Bayt Sha-
lom Sisterhood in celebration of Shabbat
Shirah and Sisterhood Shabbat - Feb. 2,
3, and 4! Congregation Bayt Shalom is
located 2 miles east of Hwy 264 on Hwy
33 (10th St extension). Friday evening,
Feb. 2, 8pm: the Temple Beth Or Choir
from Raleigh will again enhance our ser-
vice with their song. Saturday evening,
Feb. 3, 7:30pm: Dan Abramson, editor of
the "Walford Gazette" and publisher of
"British Television" will speak on the Jew-
ish presence in British television, with vid-
eos of London's East End. Sunday after-
noon, Feb. 4,2pm: Barbara Rush, folklor-
iststoryteller, speaking on "Tales Jewish
Women Tell" from her book "Jewish
Women's Tales Books and publications
from both Ms. Rush and Mr. Abramson
will be available for purchase and signing.
An exhibit of art and crafts for display and
sale will be held after Ms. Rush's lecture,
and sisterhood gift shop will be open. Cost
$6 covers both lectures (What a bargain)
$3 for college students, with ID. Mail
check to Lori Troger, 919 Charlton Place,
Greenville, NC 27858. For further infor-
mation call Judi Willis, 355-7374.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
CAREER
Find out which career is right for you.
Take assessment instruments and learn
how personality affects career choice and
satisfaction. Learn the secrets of good
decision making as well as the best way
to really find out what a job is like. This
five-part program will help you find the
answers to your future. Mondays at
2:30pm beginning January 29 or Tuesdays
at 10:00am beginning January 30. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 for more in-
formation.
RECRUITERS will be coming to Career
Services soon to interview prospective
graduates for employment! Learn how to
prepare, package and present your prod-
uct - Yourself - in this important interview.
This workshop includes how to deal with
difficult or inappropriate questions, what
the employer looks for, and how to fol-
low-up for positive results. Sponsored by
Career Services, the workshop is sched-
uled for Wed. Jan 31 at 3:00pm in the
Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
Street
Announcements
THE DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
AND DISORDERS
Will be providing the language and hear-
ing screening for students who are fulfill-
ing requirements for admission to upper
division n January 29, 30 & 31 1996
from 5:0O-6:00pm each day. these are the
only screening dates during the Spring
Semester. The screening will be conducted
in the Belk Annex (ECU Speech and hear-
INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL
EXCHANGE sites still available. Meet som
of the international students! There are
many sites to choose from, pay ECU tu-
ition, earn credit and see another part of
the world. Stop by the General Classroom
Building on Wednesday, Jan. 31, between
8:45-2:00 to meet the students! Call 328-
6769 for more information if you can not
be there.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Anyone interested in providing a suppor-
tive role model for a child between the
ages of 5 and 12; two hours a week, Please
contact Dan 355-8823 or Jean 752-6312.
Applications are now available in Brew-
ster A 309. We also ask all old members
to contact their director of service for up
coming dates.
B-GLAD
(Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians, and Allies for
Diversity) Our next meeting will be Janu-
ary 31st 1996 at 7:30pm in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Look for our
next announcement in T.E.C. to find out
what's going on for this meeting. Remem-
ber to bring canned food for our Picaso
food drive.
THE GREENVILLE PITT COUNTY spe
cial Olympics will be conducting a track
& field training school on Saturday Feb
3rd from 9am - 4pm for all individuals in-
terested in individuals to coach track
field, we are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: rollers-
kating, swimming, gymnastics, bowling,
and volleyball, for more information con-
tact Dwain Cooper at 830-4551





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 25, 1996
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 25, 1996
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1119
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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