The East Carolinian, July 20, 1994






Sports
Intramural Wrap Up
Intramural Softball,
volleyball, and 3-on-three
basketball are in their final
week of summer competition.
See story on page 7.
Lifestyle
Deep South Sex
Rosemary Daniell's
collection of poetry
delves into the theme of
sex in the Deep South.
See review on page 5.
Today
Tomorrow
ani
i
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 3?-r tO Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 20,1994
8 Pages
Political science prof, named Vice Chancellor
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
The political science depart-
ment is soon to be without one of
their"star" professors, Dr.Tinsley
Eugene Yarbrough. Yarbrough
will temporarily fill the position
of vice chancellor for academic
affairs, previously held by
Marlene Springer. Springer re-
cently was selected as president
of the College of Sta ten Island.
"He is an excellent choice,
and he is going to do a superb job
as vice chancellor, but we will
misshim in the department said
David P. Conradt, chair of the
political science department.
Conradt -aid Yarbrough is con-
sidered to be a "star" member of
the faculty of the political science
department.
Yarbrough who teaches two
sections of the introductory
American govemmentcourse and
one advanced political science
course each semester, will not
teach in the upcoming academic
year, but will return to the class-
room after a person is selected to
serve permanently as vice chan-
cellor for academic affairs.
Yarbrough said he and Chancel-
lor Eakin mutually decided he
would not be considered for the
permanent position.
"I will be holding the posi-
tion until the permanent person is
selected Yarbrough said. "I as-
sume that will be sometime next
summer
Yarbrough has already
started familiarizinghimself with
his new position, but he does not
officially begin for several more
weeks.
"In an informal way, I am
trying to get my bearings, but I
will officially begin on August 1
he said.
Yarbrough is also consid-
ered a "star" among his pupils.
"He makes students real'y
think about the subject by stimu-
lating class discussion said
Maureen Rich, a former student.
"He combines a great sense of
humor with his incredibly vast
knowledge of the subject. I wish
ECU had many more professors
like Yarbrough, and I hope this
doesn't mean he will stop teach-
ing because students will missout
on a lot
Yarbrough's classes will be
taught by a fixed-term faculty'
member, one who is hired tempo-
rarily.
"I've had the privilege of
knowing him ever since he came
to Greenville, around 1967,1968
said Herb Carlton, retired politi-
cal science professor. "In fact, we
shared an office together a long
time when he first started
Carlton, like Yarbrough's
former students, praised
Yarbrough'sacademiccredibiliry.
"He isa fantastic professor
he said. "He has won all the acco-
lades for his teaching and his
scholarship. He has had several
publicationsthathave won praise,
and he has also been recognized
by the American Bar Association
"I am delighted that Gene
Yarbrough has accepted this ap-
pointment said Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin. "He represents the
finest in teaching, research and
service at East Carolina. He has
served the university admirably
in a n umber of roles for more than
a quarter of a century, and I am
confident that he will bring a very
high level of leadership to this
critical position
In hisspare time, Yarbrough
enjoys collecting B-grade westerns
and serials of the Saturday mati-
nee era. Yarbrough became inter-
ested in westerns when he was a
child and attended the cliff-hanger
type series of movies, where the
end of the clip had the hero or
heroine in a life-threatening
situation. Sequels followed on
the following Saturday.
Yarbrough holds a
bachelor's, a master's and a doc-
tora 1 d egree from the Universi ty
of Alabama. He has been an ECU
faculty member since 1967. His
books have been recognized by
variousorganizations, including
the American Bar Association
which awarded him the Silver
Gavel Award. Harlan 1: udkuil
Enigma, his sixth book, is now in
production at Oxford Univer-
sity Press.
"I appreciate Dr. Eakin's
confidence in me, and I will give
it my best shot and hope I can do
my best job Yarbrough said.
N.C. legislature
gives ECU funds
By Jason Williams
News Editor
While many people com-
plained aboutthe length of the
General Assembly's recent
short session, legislators were
good to ECU. The medical
school will receive $4.8 million
to expand its Life Sciences
Building and another $5 mil-
lion in Medicaid reimburse-
ments.
The $4.8 million appro-
priation is part of a renovation
project that will cost a total of
$123 million, said Tom Former,
directorof medical centernews
and information. He expects
the General Assembly to give
ECU the remainder of the fund-
ing when it meets in the fall.
"We are particularly de-
lighted with the $4.8 million
for the Life Sciences Building
Former said. "We felt like our
chances had become poor to
receive any money this year.
We had just about written that
off
The money will be used
to increase the 15,000 square-
foot building to 75,000 square
feet. It will be used primarily
for research, especially cardio-
vascular research, Fortnersaid.
"We've been short of re-
search space at the medical
school he said. 'This will al-
low us to consolidate research
space that has been going on in
various nooks and crannies in
the building and in Brody
The second part of the
appropriation consisted of
$5,054,000 to recover Med ica id
expenditures. This money will
be used for several projects.
"This is something we
expected to receive Former
said. "It is money we earn when
our physicians see Medicaid
patientsand we a re reimbursed
for that. The money goes back
to Raleigh and we have to ap-
ply for it for special projects
He said the money will be
See FUNDS page 2
Public Safety
official appointed
By Teri Howell
Photo by Leslie Petty
John Taylor, deputy police chief in Washington, N.C, was
named assistant director of ECU'S Public Safety.
Staf Writer
The East Carolina Public
Safety Department will be go-
ing through some changes this
upcoming year with a new ap-
pointed assistant director.
John Taylor, the former
deputy chief of police in Wash-
ington, N.C. for the past 10
years, replaced Ron Avery on
June 27 as the new assistant di-
rector of the ECU public safety
department, said Teresa
Crocker, director of the depart-
ment.
"I developed an interest in
running a department Taylor
said. "I didn't want to retire a
officer and I possessed the de-
sire to seek out new manage-
ment skills
Taylor said he is just be-
come aquainted and oriented at
being Crocker's second-hand
man and at the way things work
at ECU's public safety depart-
ment.
"I'm starting to see things
T'd like to change, to imple-
ment Taylor said. "I think be-
tween me and Teresa, we can
provide a fresh new advance
in our leadership depart-
ment
Crocker said that
Taylor's job includes many
administrative duties. He will
be in control of crime preven-
tion, the training of new em-
ployees and telecommunica-
tions as well as policy writing
and development.
"John has a good under-
standing of law enforcement
Crocker said. "Because of his
experience and background in
the police department, John
will definitely be an asset
Crocker said that Taylor
has a desire to do well and his
familiarity of criminal justice
on the statewide level will be
a tremendous benefit to ECU's
public safety department.
"I want to help pick up
the attitude of the public
safety here Taylor said.
"There has been plenty of
things that the public safety
was blamed for in the past
that wasn't entirely their fault
and I want to help make the
department proud of itself as
well as gaining more respect
Photo by Leslie Petty
Oh, man. Another road closed sign, dude. Guess we need to turn around, huh,
huh. Or, we could just drive our car through the sign, huh, huh.Think we would
get in trouble for that? Nah. Huh, huh. CRASH!

Pot stolen from SBI Staff Reports entered through the front door, The East Carolinian using a tool to pry it open, and proceeded to ransack the entire Greenville police were office, called to the State Bureau of Godley said the thieves cut Investigation office in Green- power lines to the office and dis-ville, Monday to respond to a abled two battery-operated breaking and entering that oc- alarm systems. Police suspect the-curred Sunday night. Thieves break-in occurred around 2 a.m. stole 127 pounds of marijuana because that is the time shown that had been seized during a on the clocks, which stopped drug bust in Ayden last Fri- working when the power was day. cut. As of Tuesday afternoon, The drugs were taken from no arrests had been made in a locker in the evidence room, of the case, and Greenville police the SBI office. The building is officer William Harris said the located in an office park at 2406 investigation is still in Charles Boulevard, progress. He refused to say The SBI is offering a sub-whether the persons arrested stantial reward for the arrest and Friday, Alvin J. "Buddy" conviction in this case, and Hugginsof Ayden and John R Crime Stoppers will pay up to Stanley of Greenville, were $2,500 for information leading suspects in the break-in. to an arrest or recovery of the SBI agent Bill Godley told stolen property. All calls may be The Dailu Reflector that the routed toCrimeStoppersat758-break-in looked like the work 7777,andcaliersarenot required of professionals. He said they to identify themselves.Fugitive wanted Greenville Police request your assistance in solving an assault case Late Friday night, July 15, a white male was assaulted by another white male at Pantana Bob's, a bar located on Cotanche Street The assaultoccurred at 130 a.m July 16. The assailant is described as approximately 6 feettall,200pounds.Hewas wearing a red and pink shirt The assault is regarded as serious, as the victim is still suffering from injuries. . Anyone who witnessed the incident or has information about the as-sa ultmay call Detective Best of the Greenville Police Department at 830-4354 or Crime Stoppersat758





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2 The East Carolinian
July 20, 1994
Universities deal with date rape
MCAT test sheets missing
You sit through a grueling eight-and-one-half-hour stan-
dardized test that could help determine your future only to
receive notice later that the test evaluators cannot score your
exam because they lost part of it. This unlikely scenario may
sound like the stuff of academic nightmares, but it is wide-awake
reality for more than half the students who took the Medical
College Admission Test (MCAT) at the University of California-
Davis on April 23. Fifty-seven students who took the test at UC
Davis have received a letter from the MCAT Program Office in
Iowa City, Iowa, stating that parts of their tests have been lost.
The machine-scorable section of the MCAT, which isa prerequi-
site for admission to medical school, was missing when MCAT
officials received the tests from the University of California-
Davis testing site. In the letter, students were told they could
retake the test in June or August, when the MCAT is given across
the nation. If students chose not to retake the test, they would be
refunded the 150 dollar testing fee. The first retesting date
presented problems for most UC-Davis students because it fell at
the end of finals week, giving students little time to study. For
some, the later testing date could hinder their chances getting
into the medical school of their choice, since most have a rolling
admissions system which favors students who turn in early
applications.
Cool as ice
Summers in southern Florida can be downright hot, but a
sophisticated throwback to the ice age is helping a University of
Miami college stay comfortably cool. The UM'sRosenstiel School
of Marine and Atmospheric Science on Virginia Key has begun
conditioning the air of 11 of its 13 buildings with a new approach
to the old ice method. Early in tins century, ammonia was used
as a refrigerant to make ice, and air conditioning was accom-
plished by blowing air over the ice, thereby cooling the air. This
ice method was replaced long ago by methods that used environ-
mentally hazardous CFCs as refrigerants. Now UM has returned
to ammonia-made ice to cool air. The new system includes three
200-ton compressors that freeze 20,000 gallors of water each
night when energy costs are low. The ice is stored in three tanks
then is used for cooling during the day when electricity rates are
at their peak. Ammonia has a zero ozone depletion potential and
zero global warming potential. It also is cheap to use � 27 cents
per pound, compared with six to seven dollars per pound for
CFC replacements.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
(CPS) He says he is the vic-
tim. She says that she is.
She says after a night of so-
cializing at a Valparaiso Univer-
sity fraternity party, she was
raped by a student she had known
since high school and thought was
a friend.
He says the sex was
consentual and that his accuser
never once said no or tried to stop
his advances.
The young woman, a junior
at the time, reported the alleged
rape to administratorsat the small
Indiana college, who then called
for a disciplinary hearing against
the accused student.
Found guilty of rape by the
disciplinary panel and expelled
from the university, the accused
student took legal action against
the school, suing for $12 million
in damages. In his lawsuit, the
Valparaiso student is claiming he
was wrongfully suspended, de-
famed and deprived of his rights
during the college's judicial pro-
ceedings.
The Valparaiso University
case illustrates the difficulty that
many university administrators
now face in handling reports of
date rape. In an effort to be more
responsive to the rights of vic-
tims of sexual assault, many col-
leges have instituted more "vic-
tim-friendly" disciplinary mea-
sures.
But, in several cases, the ac-
cused are fighting back, saying
that these hearings violate their
due process rights. In addition to
the Valparaiso University case,
undergraduates from Kansas
State University, the University
of California-Santa Cruz and Yale
University have taken legal ac-
tion against their schools. This
backlash of multimillion-dollar
lawsuits is causing some univer-
sity administrators to rethink
their policies on punishment of
sexual crimes.
Bernice Sandier of the Cen-
ATiTIC

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With The Reflectors
ter for Women's Policy Studies
says the term "date rape" actu-
ally led universities to redefine
their policies on punishment.
"Rape was still something done
by strangers in the dark she said.
"People began to realize that
wasn't the case. There were
women who had been raped, and
they wanted their university to
do something about it
What resulted on many
campuses were d isciplinary pan-
els that usually involve a jury of
college administrators, students
or both. While campus judicial
policies vary from school to
school, most colleges use expul-
sion, suspension or community
service as a form of punishment.
Attorney John Bushemi,
who is representing the accused
Valparaiso student and his par-
ents, says that campus policies on
sexual assault must be impartial.
"I fully support the idea that an
institution take an aggressive
stanceagainst rape he said, "but
if they are going to do it, then it's
absolutely essential that the pro-
cess is fair because there is so
much at stake for the individual
Bushemi thinks that the de-
cision reached by the panel was
unjust because witnesses on his
client's behal f weren't allowed to
testify. "While the disciplinary
review panel heard the complain-
ant, her witnesses, and my client,
there were five material eye-wit-
nesses for my client who were
not allowed to speak Bushemi
said. "The refusal to hear them
makes the entire outcome not only
unfair, but also illegal
The National Association of
College and University Attorneys
(N ACU A) has published a model
for disciplinary hearings dealing
with sexual assaults. The model
says that while laws for public
and private universities may dif-
fer, they are basically required to
follow a course of due process.
"In recent cases, the Office
of Civil Rights has indicated that
all proceedings should treat
charges of date rape with real
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sensitivity said attorney Phillip
Burling, who helped draft the
NACUA guide. "Universities
have to follow the federal guide-
lines
That means university judi-
cial proceedings must do a bal-
ancing act, preserving the rights
of the accused while also protect-
ing the victim.
Officials at the University of
California-Santa Cruz know first-
hand how difficult this can be.
Not only was the university
slapped with a violation notice by
the U.S. Department of
Education's Office of Civil Rights
this spring for failing to properly
respond to female students' com-
plaints of sexual assault, but two
male studentsaccused of rape filed
a $45 million lawsuit against the
school. The men claim their rights
were violated during on-campus
disciplinary hearings.
The cases involved eight fe-
male students, who filed various
charges of rape, sexual assault and
harassment against four male stu-
dents for incidents that took place
from December 1992 to January
1993. During university disciplin-
ary hearings, the male students
were found guilty of the charges
and expelled. However, no men-
tion of why the students were
kicked out of school was made on
their permanent records, giving
these students the opportunity to
re-apply to other colleges.
Meanwhile, two of the male
shidents who were expelled filed
the lawsuit, which questions the
legality of the hearings and ac-
cuses the school of discriminating
against the students because they
are Hispanic.
With so much at stake, why
don't universities allow accusa-
tions of date rape to be decided by
the criminal justice system?
The answers are varied. For
the victims of date rape, univer-
sity judicial systems are quicker
and often less intimidating than
the criminal justice system. While
a ruling can take months within
the criminal system, a decision
from a disciplinary committee
can be handed down in a matter
of days.
"In the criminal justice sys-
tem, victims have very few
rights said Sandier. "In con-
trast, campus hearings are usu-
ally victim-friendly. One of the
reasons women -vho are raped
sometimes won't go to the crimi-
nal courts is because they know
it takes a long time for any type
of justice. They want the offender
out of their space as soon as pos-
sible
Becausedaterapeisacrime
where parties know each other
before the attack, and there is
often little evidence, prosecutors
are sometimes hesitant to press
charges. For universities, decid-
ing the guilt or innocence of the
accused often comes down to a
question of who is a more cred-
ible witness.
"The public perception
about campus date rape is of
what happens in the criminal
courts Burling said. "In col-
lege, you can say 'It's not so dear,
but I think something did hap-
pen They expect a guy who is
accused of rape to get sent to the
slammer, but some colleges are
just saying they're not so sure
about a certain case, and getting
someone off campus is often the
safest, quickest way to solve the
problem
However, some say there
is a danger that campus judicial
proceedings may not only be
unfair to the accused student,
but to the alleged rape victim as
well.
"Any negotiations should
involvethevictim said Sandier.
"Getting someone out of the
school doesn't solve the prob-
lem for the victim or for the rest
of the campus
Sandier also said that uni-
versities may soon find them-
selves financially liable if an ex-
pelled rapist, who has no indica-
tion of punishmentonhis record,
commits a sexual assault on an-
other campus.
For nothing can be sole or whole
That has not been rent.
William Butler Yeats
FUNDS
Cent, from
page 1
used to renovate the main outpa-
tient clinical area, to purchase a
linear accelerator (a device used
in treating cancer patients) and to
replace a waste incinerator.
Sen. Ed Warren, who repre-
sents ECU and Pitt County in the
state Senate, told The Daily Reflec-
tor that appropriations for ECU
are overdue.
"ECU isbeginningto receive
funding it should have received
years ago he said. It looks
very positive for the future. The
medical school does so many posi-
tive things for eastern North Caro-
lina, and this funding speaks well
for the medical school and the uni-
versity
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, when brought
The East Carolinian with the intentioi:
of applying for a job, is godd for ONE
WHOLE SEMESTER of:
1. Stress! Nowhere else can so much anxiety?
result in a published work � overnight!
2. Fun! Suddenly, deadlines and that ever-
present caffeine rush can cause even the
squarest of individuals to laugh like hell.
3. Money! Yeah, it ain't much, but think of the
power, experience and prestige!
Please, join us in our plight to inform the campus. Like
the military, we need YOU!
I
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- - -
tie nasi aruunian
July 20. 1994
Opinion
Page 3
TTie East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hlnson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chlnh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, 77k East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders, Typesetter
Heather D. Dail. Typesetter
Deborah Danie , secretary
Without a doubt, every one of us has been
to Raleigh via U.S. 264. Just as assuredly,
everyone has traveled on the Interstate
Highway system sometime in the past seven
years or so. While doing so recently, we have
noticed something that has probably been
noticed by everyone at one point or another.
Is there any real difference between
Highway 264 and any interstate highway you
can name? Take 1-40 as a close and convenient
example. The lanes are just as wide, the curves
just as gentle, and, in fact, there is a lot less
traffic on 264 than there ever is on 1-40 between
Greensboro and Durham. Yet the speed limit
in places on 1-40 is 65 miles per hour, while on
U.S. 264 the limit is 55 miles per hour.
There has been a lot of talk in the news
lately about individual states protesting the
federal government's imposition of unfunded
mandates upon the states. A good example of
this is California.The state is upset that
Washington has forced it to give welfare to
illegal immigrants while at the same time not
providing any money to pay for these benefits.
In a similar vein, the problem with the speed
limit is created by the imposition of the federal
government in what all but the most statist
believe should be a local affair.
The 55 miles per hour speed limit was
instituted by the federal government in the
early 1970s as a measure to conserve fuel
during the Arab oil embargo. At the time, no
one made any pretense that the purpose was
to save lives. Prior to the law, the speed limit,
even on many, small, two-lane country roads
was 70 mil ?s per hour.
About seven years ago, after many years
of public dissatisfaction, Congress passed the
current law, which allows states to raise the
limit to 65, though only on interstate, and only
in areas with a low population density. In
theory, states could still raise the limit on
other roads, but only at the risk of losing
federal highway funds.
This setting of one or two federal speed
limits is both illogical and unfair. Such laws
would be much better set by local
representatives, who are much more easily
accessible to those immediately affected by
the law. No one has ever seriously suggested
that Congress should decide other local traffic
laws. Indeed, states routinely handle traffic
laws much more important to public safety.
Moreover, this law is quite possibly
unconstitutional. The 10th amendment
reserves to the states all powers not specifically
granted to the federal government. These
granted powers are specifically spelled out,
and traffic law is not one of them.
We are not blind adherents to the theory
of states' rights. Many times in U.S. history,
like in the civil rights movement, federal
intervention was needed to protect the rights
of citizens which states were abusing.
However, in this case, it is the federal
government which is trampling on citizens'
rights. In a country the size of ours, to suggest
that one speed limit fits all is ridiculous.
By Laura Wright
Reproductive freedoms ignored and endangered
Birth control, in some form or
other, has been around for a long
time. It seems that soon after
people realized where babies
came from, as soon as they
understood the process by which
children were conceived, they
began to formulate ways to have
sex without reproducing.
Some of the things that they
came up with were definitely
interesting, if not dangerous. For
example, prior to the 20thcentury,
several
methods for
preventing
conception
included
inserting a
large piece of
coin currency
into the
vagina. The
coin, if the
woman was
lucky, served
as a crude
During a time when
women have more
freedom than we' ve ever
had before , it seems
absurd that our
reproductive freedom,
or lack of it, is as
Jfiffiaj; questionable as ever.
placing
pebbles in the uterus�don'task
me who figured this one out �
had the same effect as a modem
day IUD.
A sheep's bladder, placed
correctly, served as a type of
condom. Furthermore, if these
methods failed, herbalists often
knew how to make purgatives
that would cause the woman's
body to expel the fetus before she
carried it to term. Sex with such
primitive forms of contraception
was risky, and the contraception
probably very ineffective. Most
birth control options were only
open to wealthy women, and
abortive measures posed health
risks, but, as they say, necessity is
the mother (and in this case,
father) of invention.
Thank goodness we live in
the enlightened 20th century, you
say. Thank goodness we have
advanced beyond those barbaric
birth control methods. Thank
goodness that our contraceptives
are safe and inexpensive. All hail
to technology, right? Well, not
really.
It would seem that one of the
greatest assets to women's
equality over the past century has
been the availability of effective
birth control. And to some degree,
��nmtmm modern
birth
control
methods,
especially
the pill,
have
allowed
women to
decide
whether or
not they
want to
have
children
and when
they want
to have them. Legalized abortion
has given women the choice of
continuing pregnancy or
terminating it. Hurrah for
reproductive freedom.
But we aren't really all that
free. Not too much has changed
since the days when women risked
their health in the hopes that they
would be able to have sex without
having children. In an age where
computer technology makes itself
obsolete in less than five years,
where we can now produce tasty
tomatoes with fish DNA, birth
control, with the exception of
RU486 (which may never make it
to America) and Norplant, seems
to have advanced no further than
1960.
And as for Norplant, if s back
to the drawing board, folks.
Norplan i passed the Food and Drug
Administration's standards in 1990
and now about a million women
use it Norplant consists of sue rods
that are implanted into a woman's
arm and these rods release
hormones that prevent
conception for about five years.
Norplant sounded great. In
fact, legislators in 20 states have
proposed welfare benefits for
mothers who use the implants.
Several judges ordered abusive
mothers to have the implants in
order toobtainprobation. In spite
of the fact that we live in an
overpopulated society, legislating
reproduction is a frightening
prospect. When legislators decide
who can have children and who
can't, new forms of racism and
classism � not to mention old
forms of sexism � arise. Poor,
black women are victimized when
"reproductive freedom" becomes
reproductive imprisonment.
Now things have gone
downhill for Wyeth-Ayerst,
Norplant's manufacturer, as
complaints of heart attacks and
strokes associated with thedevices
surface. Also, removing the
implants has caused extensive
scarring and permanent nerve
damage. According to an article in
the July 15, 1994, issue of USA
Today, 500 women have sued and
50,000 more are expected to follow
their lead.
We need to examine, very
dosely, why certain drugs make it
past the FDA when they cause such
serious health problems. We need
toexamine why birth control is,as it
always has been, women's
responsibility and women's risk.
During a time when women have
more freedom than we've ever had
before (or so I'm told), it seems
absurd that our reproductive
freedom, or lack of it, is as
questionable as ever.
SHOW M�,SPORT, Which
one best exemplifies
THE GUILTY generation.
is;
I SEEN Mm,
OfRCER.THffTONE.
THERE, IN THE HAT
HIM.THAT LAiv-
LOOKIN'ONE x m
S8 NOT J
GETTirV' r�mm
A JOB
Let states make speed limit choices!
By Patrick Hinson
Beach is brief respite from dreariness of life
I guess almost everyone here
goes to Atlantic Beach whenever
possible. That's where I go,
although I really prefer Cape
Hatteras, or even Ocean Isle or
Emerald Isle, but Atlantic Beach is
the closest one,so that seems to be
where the majority of us go.
Sometimes the beach isn't
even where we want to go. We just
want to get out of town, and the
beach becomes an end in itself, a
mission. It kind of makes me mad
when I'm driving out there and
every other car is a load of idiot
high school rednecks, flying by
me at 95 miles an hour in their
low-rider Trans-Ams, but I
suppose I can deal with that if it
means I'm leaving Greenville, if
only for a few hours of freedom
from the "Emerald City" (and by
the way, who thought up that
stupid name?).
As I said, though, the beach
becomes an end in itself. There's
nothing to do here in Greenville.
There are no natural landmarks,
no hills, no forests to explore, no
interesting shops, malls or places
to go. Oh, yeah, the Tar River.
Whoopee. The malls here are a
sad testament to the character of
mis city. Boring.
Greenville is boring, real
boring. Once you get over the El bo
and every other bar in the city,
you realize that's about all there is
to see here. No wonder there's so
many bars in this small area. We're
supposed to get drunk and forget
about it. At least we've got some
kind of escape hatch with the
beach. You'd better take it too,
because that's all there is, unless
you want to head west or north to
the mountains, which is a real
escape, but will costyou a good bit
more. Now, if the mountains were
only two hours to the west, I'd
quit complaining.
The last time I was at Atlantic
Beach, I realized two things that I
didn't like. One was that there's
practically no public access to the
beach there, unless you want to go
to the cheesiest, rattiest section of
it (which is obviously where the
Atlantic Beach commerce wants
us to go); the section right in front
of the pavilions. I hate pavilions.
There's just nothing like having a
bunch of marines in speedos
blatantly checking out the girl
you're with all day, which is what
it's like there.
I go further south, and keep
going until I find another access,
which is a long way, about a half-
hour more. There's only that one
other access to the south in that
half-hour drive, although there's
more than enough space for there
to be several. Public accessesdon't
take up a lot of space. I'm all for
the preservation of wildlife and
wild areas, but when huge
amounts of people are pouring
in toa small amountof land, they're
going to find ways to the beach
one way or the other. Providing
morepublicparkingwould benefit
both parties.
Another thing I noticed at
Atlantic Beach was that there are
no garbage cans on the beach.
These are usually those heavy,
steel barrels that are placed near
the d unes. We've got garbage cans
on my beachathome, spaced about
a block apart, and they're there for
a very good reason. When most
people come to the beach, if they
don't see any place to put their
trash, they're going to just leave it
there. Oh brilliant, it'll just wash
away, right? When I walk down
the beach at Atlantic, there is
usually trash spaced along the
water line, as far as I care to walk.
I always end up picking up trash
on the beach as I go, just because I
know I'd be doing it if I was at
home, and in a way, I guess,
Atlantic is mine too, as much as it
is anyone else's. People leave their
potato chip bags, their cans, ice
bags, beer bottles, used sun tan
lotion bottles and diapers. God,
how I hate to see dirty diapers
lying on the beach. How
inconsiderate! It doesn't take that
much to bring that stuff back with
you. How can we just leave it out
there, to wash out into the ocean
and then into the marshlands that
clean the beaches? People, take
your trash home with you, despite
how drunk you may be by that
time, or at lea st to the nearest trash
can, when you go to the beach.
Mother Nature will be
damned proud of you.
By Jason Williams
Israel still unjust in its treatment of Palestinians
If ever a people were
mistreated throughout recent
history, it is the Palestinians. And
while the new "peace" with Israel
is a step in the right direction, its
terms show the unfairness of the
relationship between the two
parties.
From the beginning of the la te
1800s, Zionist, or Jewish
nationalist, claims to the land of
Palestine were illegitimate. The
Zionists based their claims on
historical possession of the land,
dating back to biblical times. The
problem with that is they hadn't
lived in those lands for nearly 2,000
years, not since the Diaspora, or
dispersal of the Jews by the Roman
empire.
Furthermore, the Zionists
claimed they only wanted a
sparsely populated desert land
and, to garner European support,
said they would bring civilization
to the Middle East. This attitude
was both incorrect and blatantly
racist: 690,000 people, mostly Arab
Moslems, lived in Palestine in
1914, while people of Jewish
descent made up only 11 percent
of the total population.
Because eastern Europeans
were essentially racist as well,
against both Arabs and Jews, they
were eager to support a Jewish
state no matter where it happened
to be located, Arab Moslems be
damned. Following WWII, the
Holocaust in Germany and
pogroms against Jews in Russia
and elsewhere, the United States
and others facilitated the creation
of Israel in 194ft
Evenatthattime,Jewsdidnot
make up the majority in Palestine,
and their claims to the land were
barely more legitimate. It was as
wrong to take Palestinian land
then as it is for Palestinians to
demand the extinction of theentire
state of Israel now.
Immediately after the
partition of the land into Jewish
and Palestinian states, Israel and
Jordan seized the Palestinian land
and split it between them, leaving
the Arab population no place to
go. Palestinians eventually settled
in Jordan, Lebanon, southern Syria
and northern Egypt, with
approximately 150,000 (from a
total of about 900,000) remaining
in their "homeland" of Israel.
In the 1967 war with Jordan and
Egypt, the Israelis seized the West
Bank from Jordan and the Sinai
Peninsula from Egypt, thus forcing
Palestinian refugees farther away
from the Jewish state. In both 1948
and l7theUnitedNations,backed
half-heartedly by the United States,
called on Israel to return the ill-gotten
land. Both times, with the exception
of the Sinai, the world community
allowed Israel to keep it.
For years Israel refused to
negotiate with the Palestinians
becauseitregarded the Yassir Arafat
and the PLO as terrorists. (An
interesting point to consider: In the
1930sGreat Britain considered future
prime minister Yitzhak Shamir's
Stern Gang a terrorist
organization, and had a price on
the head of future Nobel Peace
Prize recipient Menachem Begin.)
Thanks to a more open-minded
government led by a hero of the
1967 war, Yitzhak Rabin, Israel
began to take its place at the peace
table.
So far, Rabin has granted the
Palestinians someautonomyinthe
Gaza Strip and the West Bank city
of Jericho, but even this small step
has not been entirely sincere. Just
last week, Rabin's defense minister
ordered the border between Gaza
and Egypt closed to Palestinians,
effectively making them prisoners
in their own "autonomous" region
of the state.
Justice in the Middle East Will
not be served until Israel
renounces all claims on the land
taken in the 1967 war. The nation
could have long ago made peace
with Syria by returning the Golan,
and with Jordan and the
Palestinians by returning the West
Bank. To his credit, Begin signed a
treaty with Egypt in 1979, and
relations between the two nations
have been cordial, if not friendly,
ever since.
Before Rabin, however, Israeli
prime ministers were content to
take U.S. aid (in the form of over
$3 billion annually, by far the
largest "foreign aid give-away")
and buy weapons. They didn't
need to negotiate; they had the
guns. It will be a great day indeed
when Israel takes the initiative to
invest in peace.





-The East Carolinian-
Page 4
Classifieds
July 20, 1994
For Rent
For Rent
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
. CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 12 block from Art Bldg 3
.blocks from downtown, 2 blocks from
Supermarket. Starting in August. Call
757-1947.
APT. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm 1.5 bath,
free water, free cable, full kitchen ap-
pliances, washerdryer hook-up, close
to campus, available Aug. 1st, phone
758-444.
APARTMENT FOR RENT- New unit,
2 bedrooms, wpatio, all new appli-
ances - washerdryer hook-up, lease
ends May 1st.395.00 a month - Beat
rent increase. Wyndham Circle. Call
830-9545, leave message.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3 bed-
room at 206 East 12th Street, for450-
495; Near University, Call 757-3191.
1-4 BEDROOM HOMES, Condo's,
Duplexes, and Apartments for rent. $
190.00 up! Short term lease available!
Finders 321-6708. Small Fee. Near Cam-
pus, rentals available now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate, list your ad
free. To get a list of all the people look-
ing a roommate - 321-6708. Small Fee!
HOUSEMATE WANTED,145.00
monthly, 14 utilities, cable, phone,
etc. Pets OK. Large back yard, Quiet
neighborhood. Available immediately.
Call 752-5405.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share a 2
story, 2 bedroom, 112 bath apart-
ment for fall. Rent is190.00 and 12
utilities. Access to pool and laundry
facilities. Located on ECU bus route.
Call Jenna at 328-7888 or Heidi at (919)
233-1748. Can move in beginning of
August.
APT. FOR RENT. 1 bedroom, kitchen,
bath, 6 blocks from ECU.175.00 per
month, includes water. Available Au-
gust 1. Call 355-1399, leave message.
ROOMMATE FEMALEMALE
NEEDED. Aug. 1 to share 3 bedroom
duplex on Stancil and Meade. Rent $
150.00month and 13 utilities. Call
757-1823.
2 BR APARTMENT -195.00
monthly(orlessnegotiableforsome
work on the place). Secluded, private,
rustic, some furnishings. Best for 2-3
males. Call (910) 584-4848.
CAMPUS AREA 1 bedroom duplex $
160.00 or 1 bedroom furnished apart-
ment250.00. Walk to campus. Call
752-1375 Homelocators.
HOUSE FOR RENT 2 bedroom house
$ 475.00 pets OK, or 3 bedroom house
$ 600.00 others too Call 752-1375
Homelocators.
DORM BLUES Check it out 1 bed-
room250.00 or 3 bedroom duplex $
450.00 call 752-1375 Homelocators.
CHEAP! CHEAP! 1 bedroom150.00 2
miles to campus or utilities paid 1 bed-
room duplex295.00 2 blocks to campus
call 752-1375 Homelocators.
EH Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL ResumeV
Secretarial work. Specializing in
Resume composition wcover-let-
ters stored on disk, term papers, the-
sis, legal transcriptions, general typ-
ing and other secretarial duties.
Word Perfect or Microsoft Word for
Windows software. Call today (8A-
5P-752-9959) (Evenings 527-9133).
NCTAN-NORTH CAROLINA
AND TIDEWATER AREA
NATURISTS now being organized
to promote coastal recreation. For
more information, send1.00 and
SASE to NCTAN, PO Box 88,
Pantego, NC 27860.
lllftElVffiESI
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365,
Ext. P-3712.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Danc-
ers, Escorts, Massuers. Earn BIG bucks
in the cleanest club in North Carolina,
must be 18 years old. Playmates Adult
Entertainment. 919-747-7686.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- make up to2,000-4,000 mo. teach-
ing basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea.
Many employers provide room &
board other benefits. No teaching
background or Asian languages re-
quired. For more information 'call
(206) 632-1146, ext. J5362. I
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with flex-
ible hours and gain valuable business
experience. Call Bonnie at 355-7700
for information and possible inter-
view.
STUDENT TO WORK IN LOCAL
LAW OFFICE approximately 30-40
hours per week doing marketing for
the firm. An interest in going to law
school beneficial. Send resume to PO
Drawer 5026, Greenville, NC 27835.
ECU TRANSIT is now hiring for Fall
1994 semester. Looking for depend-
able bus drivers. Good driving record
a must! NC class "B" C.D.L. with pas-
senger endorsement and no air brake
restriction is needed. Will help get
license if needed. Interested persons
apply in the Transit Office, 258
Mendenhall, MonThurs 1 p.m4
p.m. Must be an ECU student. For
more information, call 328-4724.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$ 3,000-$ 6,000 per month. Room and
board! Transportation! Male or Fe-
male. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 545-4155, ext. A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Earn up to
$ 2,000monthly on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies. Seasonal &
Full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For info, call 1-
206-634-0468, ext. C5362.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
MEN, two names synonymous with
fashion and quality, are accepting ap-
plications for additional FT sales asso-
ciates for the following areas: Juniors
and Fashion Plus Sportswear and
Men's. Flexible AM or PM scheduling
optionssalarymerchandisediscount.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thursday, 1 -4 p.m Brody's. The Plaza.
ARE YOU SITTING OUTTHEFALL
SEMESTER or do you have lots of
free time now and during the fall se-
mester? Brody's is accepting applica-
tions for Receiving Room Associates.
Must be used to hard work. Some
lifting required. During the summer
and fall semester, must be available 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. OR available by 12 p.m.
three to four days per week and
occassional weekends. Applications
accepted Monday and Thursday, 1-4
p.m Brody's, The Plaza.
EASY,WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
�Assemble Products at homerCall Toll
Free, 1-800-467-5566, Ext. 5920.
ENTHUSIASTIC SALESPEOPLE to
operate cart in shopping mall in
Greenville, Wilson or Rocky Mount.
Call the Globetrotter in Raleigh (919)
782-5450, to arrange interview.
BABYSITTER needed starting Fall
semester Mondays and Thursdays,
3:00-5:15 for a nine-year-old. Respon-
sible person needed. Call 756-9394 af-
ter 5:00 p.m.
NEEDED TO HELP MOVE light fur-
niture, mostly boxes.5.00 per hour.
On Saturday, July 23rd and maybe
July 30th. Call 830-3640, leave mes-
sage.
TWO EAGLES TICKETS wanted for
the August 19th concert at Walnut
Creek. Call Ron at 321-1135 or
Michael at 752-9556.
For Sale
Announcement s
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boa ts,4-Wheelers,Motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DEA. Nationwide auction
listings available now. Call 1-800-436-
4363, Ext. C-5999.
GET RELIEF FROM PMSPMT prob-
lems. Amazing, safe, natural, easy. Call
919-355-8112 for two minute recorded
message.
QUEEN SIZE W ATERBED, dk wood
base, full motion,100.00. Glassbrass
table w4 wicker chairs,35.00.
Wickerglass coffee table,30.00. (919)
782-2106, after 5.
MOVING SOON - MUST SELL!
Couch with queen size pull-out, bed
includes new unused linens; good con-
dition,75.00 obo. Call Heather 758-
9207 (leave message).
FOR SALE: BUNK BED -200.00,2
dressers,50.00. Both in perfect con-
dition. Great for college student or
child's room. Willing to negotiate! Call
830-9017.
COUCH, CHAIR, LAMP, DINETTE
SET- all for only275.00 O.B.O Great
condition! Moving - must sell - Call
Nicole 321-4866.
COMPUADD 386 DX with 387
Coprocessor. 1.44 and 1.2 floppys, 8
megabytes RAM, 170 Megabyte IDF
Hard Drive, CD ROM, sound card,
VGA monitor with 1 MB graphics
card, Modem, Tape Backup (with 8
tapes), and choice of software. Call
Mike at 830-9255. Asking1200.00
(Neg.)
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES.
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are
interested in becoming
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS to individuals in
wheelchairs. Also, READERS
AND TUTORS are needed. Past
experience is desired but not
required. If interested, contact:
Office for Disability Support
Services Brewster A-116 or A-
114Telephone: (919) 757-6952
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests are
here! Be sure to pick up your FREE
video yearbook. Available at the
Student Store, The East
Carolinian, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall and the Media Board
office in the Student Publications
Building.
TUTOR TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Literacy volunteers will hold a
three day workshop to teach
volunteers how to become
reading tutors. The workshop
will be held on July 14, 15, and
16th, during daytime hours. Call
Literacy Volunteers at 752-0439
for the workshop schedule,
meeting place, and additional
information. One in every four
adults in Pitt County cannot read
the directions on a medicine
bottle or a child's note from
school. You can change the life of
one of these adults by giving
them the power of reading. Call
752-0439 for more details.
i Heroes Are Here Tod J
! 116 E. 5th Street i
757-0948
s Comics and Sportscards
J10 OFF w Couponj
expires 8-31-94
l
DO YOU NEED MONEY?;
We Will Pay You
CASH
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY H1LF1GER
NAUTIGA
POLO
v
o
&
&
�-
s$
WCALSCHANT:
NICE T SHIRTS &
SHCETS
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
f
tA�T
1
tfWitfiW
'WHAT IS THIS?
. MT'S A MAGYAR
TwEAViNG. PO YOU
LIKE IT'ARE VOU
I FAMILIAR WITH
MAGYAR FOLK-
' WASS? THEIR.
HISTORIC
RAPPORT
! WITH THE
FELINE?
THEY SAY
THE CRT
1 HAS ANCIENT f0
R
NO. AND WHAT'S MORE,
IT WOULP NEVER COME j
UP IN CONVERSATION-
aX9C.
rN0 TRICKS OR POWFRS.
DAODY-O. TVST
YOU AN 0 ! E. fiA N -T0-
VEIL, WHATEVER THE
.HELL YOU ARE.
POS IR IS
COME H�R�
, WJ IT'S YOUR MIND I VALUE,
I 3APIE. WHAT PO WOO TAKE ME
FOR A ROGUE WHO ONLY
APPRECIATES THE PHYSICAL.
NATURE OP A FRIENDSHIP?
Ml
fr sec vnsport iN
l YOUR EVE5.THE ABILITY
TO INTERPRET. WHY
ELSE WOULD X HAVE
BROUGHT YOU HERE,
OTMER THAU tetKM
MORE ASOUT VOU?
" BADAP-LERO�
r BROWN-SADDEST
, CAT-IN-THE-yjHpLf-
PAMN-TOWN SAYS
YOU'RE A VAMPIRE.
1SHAME ON YOU, L.EROY
1 PO INSULTING OUR
, PERFECTLY ACCOMO-
LPATING HOST

SSH!wat!l.eroy is
RAYING S0METHNG
Wr EXACTLY,
'DID HETELL
WOUrSj
s?
CRUNCH TIME
A
FALL'S A'COMIN AND WE NEED MORE CARTOONISTS IN ORDER TO
HAVE A FULL PAGE OF PIRATE COMICS.
SO, IF CRANKING OUT A TIER OR TWO A WEEK SOUNDS GOOD TO
YOU, HERE'S THE POOP ON WHATCHA GOTTA DO.
1) HAVE READY: 2 FINISHED, I SAY FINISHED, 8" x 13" SAMPLES OF
YOUR STRIP ON HEAVY PAPER IN HEAVY, BLACK INK. .IF THERE IS ANY
CONFUSION, READ NUMBER ONE OVER AGAIN.
2) FILL OUT AN APPLICATION AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN. SPECIFY
"CARTOONIST" ON APPLICATION. LEAVE YOUR PHONE NUMBER.
3) DONT YANK MY CHAIN! WE WANT TO PRINT ORIGINAL IDEAS BY
ARTISTS WHO ARE WILLING TO WORK TO GET PAID AND PUBLISHED.
HURRY AND DO ALL OF THE ABOVE AND YOU'LL GET PRINTED IN THE
MAMMOTH WELCOME BACK ISSUE ON AUG. 24TH.


I Killed Mrij juvt-
OKAY,cKAY,HE WAS (I
ALREADY DEAD SOT j
HE VAS stoMGAUO �
walking AvO -oooQ
hes 3ust not there.
THERE'S nothing (.EFT.
WHAT I Did iS- ITi"
Horrible. HoRRiat.e.r
I 8URAD HIM. THATSI
I Y FCwEfc.THATi WHAT
1 I CAN Do. 6&DTi
Too He-RRlBLE.
ARTELS SAID WE
CdulON'T HORT YA .
'BUT SHtJ Too BUSY
TO lOOTICE IF I 6ET
S.A LI'L FuKCETFu'L
-

-





jmamimamMmmum
The East Carolinian
July 20, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Virtuoso mandolinist to play at Attic Tuesday
Photo CourtMy of CM. ManagwiMiH
The David Grisman quintet will perform at The Attic next Tuesday. The Grammy-nominated mandolin player has
a list of album credits that reads like a Who's Who in the music Industry, and he Is a sought after virtuoso.
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
David "Dawg" Grisman, ar-
guably the world's best mandolin
player, will bring his incredible
talent to Greenville's Attic next
Tuesday night. Grisman will per-
form with his quintet on July 26,
treating local music fans to a form
of music that is hard to classify.
Grisman's style is referred to as
"dawg music" and, played mainly
on acoustic instruments, combines
elements of jazz, gypsy, Latin and
bluegrass into a high-energy mix.
Grisman, 46, has played
acoustic string music profession-
ally since 1964, when he got his
first job as a mandolinist with Red
Allen and the Kentuckians.
Grisman has since showcased his
fabulous playing on over 100 re-
cordings from a variety of musical
genres. His playing can be heard
on songs recorded by Bonnie Raitt,
Linda Rons tad t, James Taylor and
the Grateful Dead.
Perhaps Grisman's most fa-
mous collaboration is his 1974 re-
lease with the Dead's Jerry Garcia,
Old And In The Way, which is one
of the biggest selling bluegrass al-
bums in history.
Grisman and Garcia contin-
ued their association with the 1991
Grammy-nominated release
GarciaGrisman. The disc capti-
vated acoustic music fans with its
Ska
comes to
Full Stop
By Mark Brett
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
It wasn't so much that the
early evening crowd at the At-
tic last Saturday night wasnon-
existent as it was tiny and
strange. There I was, with three
sullen freshmen and a whole
bunch of rhythmless white
people with too much beer in
their stomachs who thought
they could dance. On second
thought, maybe that's not so
strange. At any rate, what few
of us there were had all shown
up to see Full Stop, a Georgia
band that had been billed as a
"ska-reggae" outfit. They
turned out to be a slightly dif-
ferent animal in reality, but I
didn't mind so much.
Sowhatkindofmusicdoes
Ful 1 Stop play? "Really, we play
reggJ(e-thrash-funk said the
band's frontman. "A little bit of
everythingEverything,tomy
mind, includes healthy doses
of jazz and roots rock, as well as
other minor influences. So Full
Stop is a pretty versatile outfit,
a six-man band complete with
keyboard and horns. The
keyboardist doubles on trum-
pet for some songs, while the
horn man plays no less than
four instruments, including
saxophone and flute. Put these
twoalongsidethestandardgui-
tar,bass,drumsandvocals,and
you get a very nice multi-lay-
ered sound. Full Stop plays
music with a catchy beat that's
both danceable and complex.
Full Stop is a talented
group, and it's too bad their
firstsetwassopoorlyattended.
They came on stage at 10:45, not
at all early for the Attic, and
played a nice, if lonely, 45-
minute set. At one point their
singer jumped off the stage in
desperation and walked around
through the audience, shaking
what few hands there were and
trying to get the sparse crowd
motivated. I couldn't help but
like the guys.
Unfortunately,itwasn'tun-
til their first set ended that very
many people showed up. I al-
most left then; I thought I had
See STOP page 6
Author explores
Deep South sex
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Sex, sex, sex. It is probably ob-
vious to anyone outside or inside
American culture that weas a coun-
try are obsessed with sex. It is the
basic idea that permeates most of
MTV's image flashes and it is the
most successful advertising lure to
promoteall types of products from
all over body sprays to cars to the
ever present bimbo beer commer-
cial. With an introduction like this
you would expect the rest of the
article to be about sex, right? Well it
is. Sex and poetry, to be exact.
This July will see the 20th anni-
versary edition of Rosemary
Daniell's landmark collection of
poetry. A Sexual Tour of the Deep
South The Push Button Publishing
company out of Hilton Head, South
Carolina, has started to put back
into print works by southern
women that has been unavailable,
and they are growing to include
writers with unique voices from
throughout the south. Daniell's
book is the first of many to come.
Rosemary Daniell began her life
as a poet in the suburbs outside
Atlanta with kids, a husband and
the Amerisan dream. Her first po-
ems were about nature and ani-
mals, a world away from the politi-
cally and sexually charged poetry
mat were to come later. She even
studied under James Dickey, who
loved her nature poems. She once
told him of her interest in two new
women poets, Sylvia Plath and
Anne Sexton. His reply was,
"They're just shrill, hysterical
women who write about throwing
their abortions in the gutter Not
too long after thi s, her poetry began
to change in subject matter.
This new poetry she began to
write scared even the author at
times, but she soon came to realize
that it was allowing her to break
two major taboos of Southern
women: speaking out honestly
about anger and sexuality. These
new poems were not at first easily
accepted. The editor at Liverright,
who had liked her earlier "safe"
poems said, "I hated them! I felt like
I had been thrown down a vaginal
orifice That just might be the ef-
fect of a woman poet who writes
more openly than a man.
The book is divided up into
four main sections: RadicalSurgery,
The Amazon's Daughter, Blood
Sherbet, and A Sexual Tour of the
Deep South.Eachoneof these chap-
ters takeson someextremely touchy
subjects dealing with power rela-
tionships, rape, lesbian relation-
ships, coming of age, the state of
women in society and, of course,
sex.
The first chapter, Radical Sur-
gery,seems to be almosta prophecy
for the '90s. The poem that opens
the chapter, "What's Happening
could easily be about Lorrena
Bobbit. It is a lovely poem about
going to bed with your lover and a
razor blade and equalizing things,
so to speak. This is a chapter of
blood and mutilation, an extreme
response to women's condition in
society. This chapter ends with "Liv-
ing on Rape Time an angry poem
bent on revenge, much in the same
vein as the opening poem. This first
chapter will probably cause most
men to shift in their seats a little �
itaboundswith phallic symbols and
sharp instruments.
Lesbian issues are explored in
the second chapter, The Amazon's
Daughter. Most of the poems in mis
chapter are concerned with the cel-
ebration of same sex relationships,
but the language is not anywhere
See SEX page 6
TEC reviewer not "Blown Away5' by action film

By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The most charitable comment
that can be said of the film Blown
Away is that it makes one appreciate
the genius of a film like Speed.
Blown Awayutilizes every cliche
it can in telling the story of a terrorist
who places bombs throughout the
city of Boston in an attempt to kill
members of the bomb squad. A per-
functory love interest for the hero,
several chase scenes, a close friend's
death and a final retribution for the
hero are all found in Blown Away.
Sadly though, little else but cliches
are found in this film.
Jeff Bridges stars as James Dove,
a member of the Boston bomb squad
whoistryingtooutrun his past Dove
was bom in Ireland and killed sev-
eral people with a bomb that he and
Ryan Gaerity (Tommy Lee Jones)
had planted. Gaerity escapes from
prison after twenty years as Blown
Away opens. (Whyittookhimso long
to break out is not explained, but
Gaerity makes the escape seem so
easy that one wonders why he re-
mained incarcerated all that time.
Gaerity escapes to America
where he sees James Dove on televi-
sion and thus decides to exact his
revenge on Dove for having left him
to rot in prison for so long. Gaerity
meticulously crafts bombs that are
desingedtokillmembersofthebomb
squad, each time making sure that
Dove knows whoisdoing the killing.
Therest of Bfozw.AuMy painfully
details the search for Gaerity. I was
hoping that Dove would find him
sooner because the film would then
have been mercifully shorter.
Stephen Hopkins (director of
Predator 2) should be relegated to
gradeBpicruresafterafilrnlike Blown
guitar-mandolin interplays.
Grisman has three such nomi-
nations to his credit and has revo-
lutionized the worlds of blue-
grass and jazz with his virtuos-
ity. A third Garcia collaboration
in 1993 also extended the man-
dolinist into children's music
with the release of Not For Kids
Only, a collection of folk songs
geared for a younger audience.
Grisman has also recently
released Tone Poems, an album
salute to acoustic sounds pro-
duced by vintage instruments.
A collaboration with guitarist
Tony Rice, the album is sure to
draw accolades from the music
community.
David Grisman is an artist
who has slipped through the
bonds of the music industry. He
is not bound to the mediocrity in
which the '90s music industry
would have him contained. He
is truly a virtuoso on his instru-
ment and the kind of musicjan
who could produce a once-in-a-
lifetime performance. He and his
band are world-class players,
and are drawing large audiences
wherever they tour.
Advance tickets for the show
are $10 and can be purchased at
East Coast Music, Quicksilver
Records, The Wash Pub or at
The Attic. The tickets will cost
$12 at the door the night of the
show.
Walnut Creek
presents Traffic jam
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
The English classic rock
band Traffic, featuring Steve
Winwood and John Capaldi,
reunitedjuly 12 to play at
� Hardee's Walnut Creek Am-
phitheater. The performance
was incredibly tight, and very
passionate.
They opened with "Pearly
Queen a tune that was fea-
tured on their second album
back in the early seventies. It
sounded just as it might have
20 years ago.
Soon after, they played
some music off the latest Traf-
fic album. But the new music
was played sparingly. One
thing that might have kept
many Traffic fans away from
the show was the threat of
hearing recent material from
the band. Nobody wants to
hear Traffic play Winwood's
solo material, and luckily
none was played.
Winwood displayed a
incredible variety of musi-
cal talents. It has always
been common knowledge,
that he has a remarkable:
voice. Eric Clapton once said:
that Winwood possessed the I
best voice in the world. But
I doubt people understand
the caliber of guitarist he isV
He played outrageous leads
on such classics as "Rock
and Roll Stew "The Low
Spark of High-heeled Boys
and "Dear Mr. Fantasy
Winwood played piano
and keyboards on songs like
"Glad" and "Leave the Light
On or Leave Me Alone It
See TRAFFIC page 6
Away. Hopkins cannot generate any
real tension with his camera so he
takes the easy way and uses, and
overuses, slow motion to drag out
scenes of suspense, especially just
before a bomb is about to detonate.
Hopkins' storytellingskillsareduller
than a butter knife. He jumps from
one scene to Jie next without any
obvious connection. He controls nei-
ther the soujid editing whicii makes
everyoneseemasiftheyhavemouth-
fuls of marbles, or the film editing,
which too obviously strives to create
artificial tension that does not exist
and which mangles scenes of true
tension.
The entire feel of Blown Away is
one of murkiness. The story is murky
because onenever quite understands
the politics of the story or how the
characterearenKtivated;thecinema-
See BLOWN page 6
Photo by Leslie Patty
The English classic rock band Traffic performed
last Tuesday at Walnut Creek Amphitheatre. The
group played a short but Intense set.





6 The East Carolinian
July 20, 1994
Roger & Me director goes to small screen
- "TV Nation" premiered last night on NBC
NEW YORK (AP)�With cor-
respondent Brian Ross bolting for
ABC News, his long-time em-
ployer, NBC, has lost its best in-
vestigative reporter.
But wait! Just in time to save
the day, up jumps that investiga-
tive ace, Michael Moore!
Michael Moore, native son of
Flint, Mich Michael Moore, the
"me" in his 1989 documentary
smash, "Roger & Me Michael
Moore, NOT Roger Moore�and
definitely not Stone Phillips!
Granted, NBC scrupulously
adds the word "comedic" to its
description of Michael Moore's
brand-new "TV Nation (Do they
mean his "investigative comedic
magazine show" is funnier than
"Dateline NBC"?)
And � full disclosure � it is
not within NBC's news division
that Moore (who produces, writes,
SEX
directs, hosts and otherwise mas-
terminds "TV Nation") is hang-
ing his ever-present gimme cap.
So what? Investigate "TV Na-
tion" (premiering Tuesday at 8
p.m. EDT), and you'll find it's the
freshest, most wickedly probing
magazine since "60 Minutes"
started ticking.
As if that weren't enough,
NBC wasn't kidding when they
called it "corned ic Why, "TV Na-
tion" is even funnier than "Mod-
els Inc this summer'sonly other
new series.
The best way to see "TV Na-
tion" is unprepared, so don't ask
what funny business Moore has
up his flannel sleeve.
Suffice it to say this week's
topics include Love Canal, free
trade with Mexico, Manhattan taxi
drivers, a prison without prison-
ers, and Twinkles in Russia.
Continued from page 5
Even better, there's not so
much asa mention of Brian "Kato"
Kaelin, the Betty Ford Clinic, Julia
Roberts, the information super-
highway or bad meat.
On the other hand, this is just
Week 1, with at least six more
shows to come. Could Moore
maybe have front-loaded all his
good stuff? Are crooked plumb-
ers and the flesh-eating virus slot-
ted for Week 2?
"No says Moore, a bulky
man with an unassuming manner
whom you underestimate at your
peril. Gladly, he reels off a few of
"TV Nation's" future scoops:
"We were wondering what
Dr. Kevorkian does on his day off,
so we went to Detroit to spend it
with him we went to the Ama-
zon where Avon ladies go up and
down the river selling cosmetics
to poor Indian women we went
to Washington, D.C to try to
bring the ambassadors of Serbia
and Croatia together to bring
peace to Bosnia by singing the
'Barney' song to each other we
Point taken, Michael.
By the way, when Moore says
"we he's referring to a crew of
correspondents that includes
filmmaker Rusty Cundieff ("Fear
of a Black Hat"), Ben Hamper
(laid-off automotive worker and
author of the best-selling
"Rivethead") and Merrill Markoe
(former "Late Night with David
Letterman" writer).
If they seem a varied group,
they do have one thing in com-
mon: no news credentials.
"That means we don't have
to create a false sense of objectiv-
ity, which never exists anyway
Moore reasons.
near as brutal as the first chapter.
There is even a litti e satire, as seen in
the poem "Bridal Luncheon "We
harness up our breasts, sling beads
upon our ears. Now with slanted
eyes we press, to find how she
'urpd the prev
Blood Sherbet is the third chap-
ter and a little more mild in its sub-
ject matter. It mainly deals with the
injustices that women face in soci-
ety, and many of the ideals and
icons that help perpetuate them as
second class citizens. The poem
"Mary, Mary" is a good example of
this. It begins: "Mary was a sucker-
done in by the culture- her role?
to get screwed by God This is a
chapter that calls for a change in
attitude, it asks women to change
their attitude from being centered
on others to being centered on her
survival as a strong individual.
The fourth and final chapter "A
Sexual Tour of the Deep South"
brings the book full circle. Aftc-
going through mutilation, lesbian
relationships and the destruction of
icons the book comes back to men
and women and their alliances. The
final poem, "The Angel Stud is the
author reconciling herself to men,
coming back to where she started
with a new vision. "And tonight,
touched by the Angel Stud,1 will
know how to flow toward a man
The book becomes a process, a jour-
ney to the self that allows her to
come back with a new lease on life.
This is not a book for those who
are afraid of radical ideas. The first
chapter can be shocking, while the
rest of the book is mild in compari-
son. It is not necessarily a women's
book either, after all, I'm a man and
I thought it was great. In A Sexual
Tour of the Deep South Rosemary
Daniell writes about sex with more
daring than any other Southern
writerlhavecomeacross. Her friend,
Pat Conroy, said "(Daniell) would
havecarriedRhett Butler up the stairs
andhadadamngoodtimedoingit
If there is one word that can sum up
this bookitishonesty,Daniell writes
straight from the soul without inhi-
bition. So next time you go into the
local bookstore ask for this book, if
they don't have it tell them to order
it, it's worth the price.
Lifestyle writers:
Whatever you do,
don't read this house
ad! It could start a
cataclysmic string of
events that would end
life as we know it!
Message from Managing Editor: Start
writing NOW for the Welcome Back
issue. Your blood pressure will thank
you for not procrastinating.
BLOWN
Continued from page 5
tography is murky because the film
looks like it was shot for video and the
quality is no better than a straight-to-
video picture; the acting is murky be-
cause no one seems to care the leastbit
about their character other than to
make it through any given scene.
The acting is episodic but only
because the film is also. Blown Away is
a collection of spliced scenes much
more than it is a complete motion
picture.ScenesinvolvingGaerityseem
especially out of place, like the film-
makers needed to stretch their ail-too
thin story into a feature length (and
then some).
ThefailureofBtou�i4iunisrnuch
moreevidentina summerwhere Speed
demonstrated how exciting an action
picture can be. In Speed not more than
five munutes of film time spent on
personal lives. Directory Jan DeBont
keeps the action fast and furious and
thecharacters in the film only develop
during the course of the action. In
Blown Away the film is mostly down
time spent on analyzing the charac-
ters' lives. Instead of an action film
Blown Away seems more like a long
therapysession for Doveand Gaerity.
Themostpatheticpartisrhattheaudi-
ence cares little if either one of the
characters comes toterms with his lie.
Btozwj4i�oydoespairJeffBridges
STOP
with his dad Lloyd. The elder
Bridges plays Dove's uncle Max
who offers age-old advice. Had
Max not been written with such
banality then Bridges may have
been able to breathe some life into
Max; butunforrunately, Max is just
another in a long line of cantanker-
ous old codgers who shovel on
advice whether it is wanted or not
JeffBridgesdoesnotfaremuch
beter man his dad. Bridges does
not seem able to lighten up. His
charactersaregenerallyintense(see
for example Fearless, The Fabulous
Baker Boys, The Fisher King, or 77k
JaggedEdge).lnBlown Away a)i$ter
touch wasneeded and Bridgescan-
notfindit.
Neither, for that matter, can
Tommy Lee Jones. Jones helped
make Under Sagegreat fun, but he
overacts in Blown Away and the
only thing he sabotages is the film.
Blown Awayhasalousy script,
terribledirectionand mediocre act-
ing. The special effects are lacklus-
terand the film is toolong. This film
should get blown away at the box
office rjyaUttepirturesthatatleast
promise some form of entertain-
ment
On a scale of one to ten, Blown
Away rates a four.
Continued from page 5
TRAFFIC
Continued from page 5
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arkmew
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became apparent watching the
show thatthe only reason he hasn't
received the accolades he deserves
for all his musical talents is be-
cause he can do so many things
that it would be impossible to fo-
cus on all his talents.
Capaldi looked very weath-
ered, but lacked no enthusiasm.
He sang lead on many songs, such
as "Rock and Roll Stew and
played the flute and tambourine
on others. Capaldi did most of the
speaking between sets.
About an hour into the show
clouds started lowering over the
Amphitheater and rain drops
gradually began to fall. Winwood
looked up and said, " I hope
nobody's getting wet back there
Then he proceeded to play "Rain-
maker a melodic psychedelic
tune featured on "The Low Spark
of High-heeled Boys
The only major complaint
that could be voiced about the
show was that it was too short.
The show was scheduled to start
at 8:00 p.m. and didn't begin un-
til 9:00. It ended around 11:00,
but when the show was over the
band looked exhausted. Many
times you see classic rock bands
set out to make a tour when
they're obviously past their prime
and really no longer have any
interest in playing music. They
sell tickets solely on the basis of
reputation. ButTrafficproved this
wasn't the case for them. It was a
very intense show, and they can
obviously still perform.
seen enough. That first set proved
their talenttome,butIthoughtrhey
were a little rigid. Their songs were
catchy, but didn't seem to have
much energy. I didn't think they
had much of an edge.
But I felt guilty about the idea
of leaving early, so I stuck around.
And when Full Stop took the stage
again at midnight, they gave me
edge in abundance. The larger au-
dience seemed to have energized
them, and they cut loose with a
quick succession of thrash tunes.
Suddenly, the guitars sounded more
like Living Colour than the Allman
Brothers. The band, not to mention
the crowd, waslooser and sweatier,
and die show picked up.
While Full Stop played mostly
what I assume was original mate-
rial, stuff Fm ncrt at aU familiar with,
they alsodidacoupleof cover tunes.
The first, and most well-received,
was their version of Rick James'
"Brickhouse While pretty close
to the original, Full Stop put their
own spin to the song, with slighdy
harsher guitar work and a faster
pace. Theydid the same with their
second cover tune, a choppy ver-
sion of the less-well-known cruci-
fixion song from Jesus Christ Su-
perstar. Thatonedidn'tgetasgood
a crowd response, but it was per-
haps the most surreal moment of
the evening (and, of course, my
personal favorite).
Full Stop put on a good show;
if'sjusta shame more people didn't
showupforitEven after thecrowd
thickened, it wasa low turn-outfor
an Attic show. But all is not lost.
According to the band, Full Stop is
touring all the time, and they'll be
returningtotheAtticlaterthissum-
mer and again in the fall. So catch
them then. You won't regret it
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-tmim�'�'� ii mi
�HOT
77ie JEosf Carolinian
0
July 20, 1994
Sports
Page 7
Spice added to affiliation
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
ECU's pursuit to join a con-
ference is still in process, but late
last week, things took a new turn.
According to a report out of
Charlotte, former NCAA execu-
tive director Dick Schultz ex-
plained that the Metro and the
Great Midwest conferences
could merge by the end of this
week. He has been working as a
Metro consultant and negotiated
the contract.
ECU hopes to enter all of its
sports into this new situation,
but it is possible that football
will be the only sport included
and the others will stay in the
Colonial Athletic Association
(CAA).
If the conferences merge, a
possible football conference
could contain ECU, Houston,
Louisville, Southern Miss
Tulane, Cincinnati and Mem-
phis.
These talks were ignited by a
lucrative television contract ne-
gotiated with Liberty Sports, a
Texas-bcsed company that tele-
vises games through the Prime
Network. Schultz said a decision
must be made quickly because
Liberty's contract offer expires
this week.
"I really think that, person-
ally, the story may have been mis-
represented in a sense, not inten-
tionally, but misrepresented what
is factually going on ECU Ath-
letic Director Dave Hart told Todd
Gibson of WNCT-TV. "What is
factually going on is that there is
an on-going study to see if it would
be feasible to merge the two con-
ferences Nothing is impossible,
as we have followed conference
realignment throughout the coun-
try, but I still think that the odds
are nearly as high as the report
would indicate
Photo by Harold Wise
Marcus Crandell, seen here waving in last year's opener against Syracuse, is
healthy and ready to return from a broken leg injury. The 1994 opener is at Duke.
There is a possibility that this
information was disseminated to
generate more interest and maybe
to quicken the decision process.
There is also a possibility that the
TV contract offer could be ex-
tended.
ECU Sports Information Di-
rector Charles Bloom said he does
not think anything will happen
this week and the negotiators are
still talking.
ECU has spent this summer
trying to join either the Metro (Lou-
isville, UNC-Charlotte, South
Florida, Southern Miss Tulane,
Virginia Commonwealth and Vir-
ginia Tech) or the Midwest (Ala-
bama-Birmingham, Cincinnati
and Memphis), or a super confer-
ence where these teams would
form one big conference.
Many negotiators associated
with these possibilities have said
that the end of the summer is a
good target date for determining
the future of ECU athletics.
Intramurals slowly coming to a close
Photo by Leslie Petty
Softball is one of ECU'S most popular intramural sports. All sports
offered by Rec. Services are open to all students at different levels.
(Rec. Serv.) � Heading into the final week of
the summer intramural sports schedule, volley-
ball, softball and 3-on-3 basketball teams are fin-
ishing regular season games anticipating each
sport's summer championship series.
In volleyball, "In It For Fun winners of the
"Team Most True to Their Name" award, are
having a blast and are powerhouses in the serve
department as Sonya Gooch aces her way into the
record books. Debbie Hill's squad "The Beer
Huggers" is in the number one spot with a 3-0
record. "Boustead's Crew "No Fear" and "The
Carriage House Best" are neck-and-neck with 1-
1 records. The league's biggest hitter is Crystal
Tedder of "No Fear while Rick Boustead, cap-
tain of "Boustead's Crew gets top defensive
player honors. Round-robin play ended Monday
with teams advancing to a single elimination
playoff tournament next week.
In softball action, the "Economics Society" is
the prognosticator's favorite to win the co-rec
championship. "Summer's Finest led by Patrick
Phillipe, was sinking fast in its last game, as the
underdog "Fun Team" took an early lead. Mark
ECU football
sets standard
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
ECU football is not just about
physical activities. It is also about
players helping players, and not
always just on the field.
This fall, 18 ECU players will
serve on the Football Academic
Leadership Team, also known as
S.T.A.R's (Student Taking Aca-
demic Responsibility). Team
members will help promote aca-
demic excellence and
team leadership, en-
hance communication
between the football
team and the Office of
Student Development
and challenge team-
mates to maximize their
potential both on and
off the field.
"These players
were selected based on
their leadership quali-
ties, both on and off of
the field and their committment
to graduation said Pam
Overton, ECU's assistant athletic
director for Student Develop-
ment. "They are the leadership
team for the sport of football at
East Carolina
The 18 members will be act-
ing as "big brothers" to the 18-24
incoming freshmen and transfers.
They will be paired up for the first
Terry
Tilghman
month of school to help ease
the new students' transition.
They will help relay student
development activities and
football information.
"We're hoping that the
football academic leadership
team can serve as positive role
models said ECU academic
developmentcoordinatorDana
Monson. "Not only for the in-
comingplayers,butfor the team
as a whole both on and off the
field
The leadership
team will help with
registration, study
halls and any tags
through campus
computers. They
will try to set up re-
ward systems to
help academically.
Planned study
hours and moni-
tored study halls are
also designed to
positively influence the new
athletes.
The group will serve as
role models and mentors for
fellow teammates, as well as
serving as ambassadors for the
football program at official
functions and actively partici-
pating in the "Athletes for Edu-
cation" Speakers Bureau at
ECU.
ECU Leadership Team
Lamont Burns (So Greensboro, ft.C.)
Dealton Cotton (Sr Norfolk, Va.)
B.J. Crane (So, College Partial)
David Crumbie (Jr Tallahassee, Fla.)
Mitchell Galloway (So Bennettsville, S.C.)
Jake Glfiray (So Sarasota, Fla.)
Dan Gonzalez (So Neptune, N.J.)
David Hart (So Wtnston-Salem, N.C.)
Chad Holcomb (So Smyrna, Ga.)
Patrick Hurty (Jr West Palm Beach, Fla.)
Derrick Leaphart(SrnDecator,Ga.)
Mark Libiano (Jr Easton, Pa.)
Emmanuel McDaniei (Jr Jonesboro, Ga.)
Jerris McPhail (Jr Clinton, N.C)
Scott Richards (S&, North Augusta, S.C.)
Junior Smith (Sr Fayetteville, NX.)
terry Titgham (Sr Mesquite, Texas)
Lorenzo West (So Atlanta, Ga.)
See INTRAMURALS page 8
Owners, players not a perfect match
(AP) � Baseball players and
owners are making it clear they
want nothing to do with each
other's proposals, leaving the
sport in a relentless march to-
ward a work stoppage.
"What the owners are pro-
posing is not different from the
salary caps they proposed in 1985
and 1990 union head Donald
Fehr said Monday after formally
rejecting management's salary-
cap plan. "In all cases their objec-
tive has been to deny players their
fair-market value, to destroy free
agency or blunt it, because to do
so will lessen salaries and owners
will pocket the difference
Fehr said the sides will meet
again Wednesday and said the
executive board of the Major
League Baseball Players Associa-
tion will meet either in person or
by telephone next week to dis-
cuss a strike date. Players men-
tion mid-August to mid-Septem-
ber as the most likely time for a
walkout.
"When there are other rea-
sonable options, that's the one
you consider last Fehr said. "But
if need be, that's the one you act
on
Management negotiator Ri-
chard Ra vitch didn't expect play-
ers to embrace the owners' plan.
Fehr said players are unlikely to
ever agree on a salary-cap plan
because they fear it would "de-
stroy free agency, harm competi-
tive balance, principally benefit
large-market clubs and reduce
incentives to grow the business
Ravitch said he was an opti-
mist. But he also has said he also
thinks there will be a strike.
"I was extremely disap-
pointed that we did not receive a
proposal that was responsive to
the problems in the game we are
trying to address he said.
And so baseball appears
headed to its eighth work stop-
page since 1972. Small-market
clubs, led by Milwaukee Brewers
owner Bud Selig, the executive
council chairman, say a funda-
mental change is necessary to
keep their teams competitive.
Large-market clubs, fearful of
attacks on their local broadcast-
ing revenue, agreed to a new rev-
enue-sharing plan in January �
but made it contingent on the
union agreeing to a cap.
"The proposal we received
on June 14 attempts to put an
arbitrary limit on player salaries,
what we think will be substan-
tiallybelow the fair-market value
of the players involved Fehr
said. "Why owners think players
would be interested in that kind
of system is beyond us
During the four-hour bar-
gaining session, Fehr asked own-
ers to return the threshold for
salary arbitration to two years
instead of three and to raise the
minimum salary from $109,000
to between $175,000 and $200,000.
U
NBA gets slammed out of court
Judge says it is time to bargain
(AP) � A federal judge, after
leaving everything the way it was
in professional basketball, now
wants the NBA and its players
union to keep off his court.
In finding the NBA's salary
cap and college draft legal and not
a violation of antitrust la ws, Judge
Kevin Duffy said Monday it was
time tor both sides to bargain.
"No court, no matter how
highly situated, can replace this
time-honored manner of labor dis-
pute resolution he said. "Rather
than clogging the courts with un-
necessary litigation, the parties
should pursue this course
Promising everything was
now open to negotiation, NBA
deputy commissioner Russ
Granik said he hoped "the play-
ers will come back to the bar-
gaining table so we can move
forward
"We think we have to find a
system that enables us and the
players to have a proper and fair
division of the revenues he said.
"If there's another system, we're
prepared to talk about that
Buck Williams of the Port-
land Trail Blazers, president of
the NBA Players Association,
said, "The most important point
that Judge Duffy wanted to make
is he wants us to settle this thing
at the collective bargaining table.
It may take a good while, but
eventually that's what's going
to happen
Meanwhile, the players plan
to appeal soon, said Frederick
Schwartz Jr a lawyer for the
union. "It seems to us that it is a
rather strange result that if you
agreed to something you are
stuck with it as long as the union
exists
Duffy's decision fell in line
with previous rulings giving pro
sports wide latitude to work out
labor agreements outside of
some laws limiting other busi-
nesses.
Duffy himself downplayed
the legal significance, noting
the issue had been in federal
court at least three times before
and saying he was "convinced
neither party cares about this
litigation or the result
"Both are simply using the
court as a bargaining chip in
the collective bargaining pro-
cess he said.
The ruling freed teams to
immediately resume signing
contracts with players, a prac-
tice that had been stopped by
the court pendinag resolution
of the dispute.
Duffy rejected the NBA
Players Association's argument
that the salary cap violated an-
titrust law, saying the NBA was
not subject to the law as long as
it has a collective bargaining
relationship with the union.





8 The East Carolinian
July 20, 1994
Grant stops in Charlotte on summer shopping tour
(AP)�Horace Grant brought
his free-agent shopping tour to
the Charlotte Hornets, where team
officials gave him a tour of the city
and team facilities.
The seven-year veteran has
scheduled five cities on his tour.
He's already talked with the De-
troit Pistons, Los Angeles Lakers
and Dallas Mavericks. Grant, the
former Clemson star, will be talk-
ing with the Orlando Magic.
"Our understanding is that
Horace is traveling around to get
a sense of things said Hornets
team president Spencer Stolpen.
"From the first day, when I
spoke to him on July 1,1 said, 'Call
around, call our players if you
want to get a true sense of the way
things are here I told him to call
Kendall Gill. We have nothing to
hide Stolpen said.
Grant and his attorney, Jimmy
Sexton, arrived Monday morning
and met at the team's offices be-
hind the Charlotte Coliseum with
Stolpen Hornets owner George
Shinn and player personnel direc-
tor Dave Twardzik.
Neither Grant nor Sexton
would comment on the visitor talks
they've had with other teams.
"I'm sure we'll talk more when
they have finished visiting the cit-
ies they are considering Stolpen
said.
The Hornets have a $1.9 mil-
lion slot available for next season
under the present salary cap, a fig-
ure that reportedly puts them in
the middle of the pack among the
teams Grant has visited with. De-
troit could have the most money
to offer following the retirement
of Isiah Thomas. The Lakers and
the Magic have the least amount
of flexibility for the 6-foot-10
Grant.
"Money was discussed only
in the broadest terms Stolpen
said of the Monday meeting.
Stolpen also said he would
meet with Ron Grinker, agent for
Atlanta forward Danny Manning,
within the next week.
New York will not let Keenan take off for Saint Louis
(AP) � After signing a five-
year contract with the St. Louis
Blues, Mike Keenan can't under-
stand why his old team is creating
such a fuss.
Keenan said Monday it was
inaccurate to say he shocked the
New York Rangers when he de-
clared himself a "free agent" on
Friday and then signed a five-year
deal to become the coach and gen-
eral manager of the Blues two days
later.
"It wasn't something that
came up overnight Keenan said.
"We weren't sitting on a button at
12:01 (am). It wasn't one day late,
they knew on June 14 what their
obligations were.
"It wasn't 'Oh, we all forgot,
it's now July 15, what happened?'
To say that happened is not true
Still, the Rangers are fighting
to keep him from leaving.
The Rangers and Madison
Square Garden asked NHL com-
missioner Gary Bettman to arbi-
trate what they termed Keenan's
"attempt to terminate his employ-
ment
The Rangers also requested
an investigation into Keenan's re-
ported agreement with the Blues
and reported contact with the De-
troit Red Wings. The Rangers
asked the NHL to prohibit Keenan
from working for any other team
while the issue is decided.
A statement said the Rangers
also would consider "all other al-
ternatives to vindicate their rights
Bettman responded that he
asked both sides to submit written
positions by Thursday, when he
will decide whether a hearing is
necessary. He also said that he
would have no further comment
on the matter until it is resolved.
Keenan and his lawyer, Rob
Campbell of Toronto, had plenty
to say on the subject during an
hour-long news conference Mon-
day.
Keenan cut his ties to the Rang-
File Photo
Minges Coliseum is currently under construction and hopefully it will be
completed by ECU'S first home game on Jan. 6 against East Tennessee St. The
area inside the building will be called Williams Arena. ECU is spending $11.4
million on the facelift which will modernize the 27-year old coliseum.
The TEC Sports Dept. needs
writers for the fall, and
help with the 1994 ECU
football tabloid. Just drop
by the student pub. building
INTRAMURALS �"?
Holley smacked a triple that
scored several runs for his squad.
The "Finest" lived up to its name,
and came away with the win.
In the men's division, Dave
Pond and the "Penthouse Play-
ers" defeated "U Lose II Pent-
house takes their games seriously,
and team members were seen
warming up two hours before the
game. They will meet the
"Crusties" in the first round of
the playoffs. "U Lose II" defeated
the "Crusties" during regular sea-
son play, 16-1. Finally, Phillipe
and squad "Summer's Finest"
heavy-handed their way to a 16-
15 victory over Penthouse in the
summer's top slugfest.
The campus hoopsters head
into the playoff tournament with
seven teams vying for first-place
honors. The "ECU Warriors"
could provide some upsets be-
cause of the little-known skills of
the team. "Nowhere To Run"
earns the top seed in the tourna-
ment with a bye in the f irstround
of play after accruing a 3-0 record.
The "Longfellows" scored 62
points and took the team sum-
mer scoring title against "De Maia
Muerte" in its final contest. The
real barnburner of the season
Hatched "Soloman's Wisemen
Return" against the "Crusties
iter both squads exchanged bas-
ets throughout the contest, the
'Wisemen" outlasted their oppo-
nent 41-39.
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ers, claiming that they'd
breached his contract by failing
to pay him several bonuses dur-
ing the regular season, plus his
playoff bonus within 30 days of
the end of the postseason. He
said he had yet to be paid any of
the bonuses, which Campbell
said involved a "very significant
amount of money
"Simply, they didn't meet
their obligations under the con-
tract Campbell said. "To me,
it's a clear-cut issue. It's not a
question of Mike resigning or
initiating action. He reacted to
their failure to live up to the terms
of the contract
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 20, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 20, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1019
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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