The East Carolinian, July 13, 1994






Comics
Pirate Comics, brownlungs!
Two good ole gals ruminate on the rQ
wees of the opposite sex in rj r� .
Phoebe and a plethora of , r1
onomatopoetics in Nick
Examine page 4.
O Time.
Today
Tomorrow
Lifestyle
'I Hate Hamlet'
John Barrymore returns to
life on ECU Summer Theatre
stage to give budding actor
lessons in more than just
thespianism. See story on
page 5.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 36 D
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 13,1994
8 Pages
Trustees plan
for future
Fans, media turn out for Jordan
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
While many ECU students
spent this past weekend in-
doors, avoiding the typical
Greenville humidity, the ECU
Board of Trustees spent the
weekend at the luxurious (.rove
Park Inn in Asheville. The trust-
ees were not enjoying the usual
amenities of theGrove Park Inn,
such as the golf course, tennis
courts and swimming pool, but
instead they were taking adv an-
tage oi the Inn's conference
room.
Members of the ECU
Board of Trustees, Chancellor
Richard Eakin, Dr. JamesSmith,
executive assistant to the chan-
cellor, Dr. Robert Thompson,
director of planning and insti-
tutional research and Athletic
Director Dave Hart, attended
the weekend conference de-
signed to focus on the back-
ground of the university and to
look into the future of ECU.
"In part, they (the trust-
ees) wanted to take a long range
look at the university, to be-
come better infornu 1 and to
know about the planning pro-
cesses Eakin said.
Dr. George Dieter, dean of
the College of Engineering and
the full-time director of Continu-
ous Quality Improvement at the
University of Maryland at Col-
lege Park, spoke to the group
about improving productivity
and effectiveness.
"He spoke on the concept
ofContinuousQualitvTmprove-
ment, which is the higher educa-
tion version oi Total Qualitv
Management I "QM) spoken of
in business circles (akin said.
Dieter encouraged the
trustees to identify their cus-
tomers (the students) as any
business would do. Bv doing
this, the trustees can better serve
the 1C I community.
"The trustees had a chance
to discuss with him how that
concept was being implemented
at the University of Maryland,
and what it means tor higher
education Hakm said.
"The trustees are consid-
ering looking at that strategy
for ECU said Ian Eastman,
SGA president. "Currently,
ECU is already moving in the
direction suggested by Dieter,
with the Academic Intervention
program now being imple-
mented
Additionally, the group
discussed strategic planning for
the university.
"We are entering into our
second five-year plan of strate-
gic planning Eakin said.
I he group also talked
about preparing for ECU's 100-
year arum ersary in 2007 Inter-
collegiate athletics were dis-
cussed, as well as the relation-
ship between ECU and the com-
munity.
"The trustees are becom-
ing extremely interested in the
students' needs in dealing with
academic intervention strate-
gies Eastman said. "1 he S( A
is currently working with un-
dergraduate studies for devel-
oping strategies and plans to
increase student retention after
their first semester and first
vear
Photc by Jason Williams
Michael Jordan takes time out fron his recent game . n
Zebulon, N.C. to play catch with his teammates.
By Jason Williams
News Editor
Who wants to watch a 32-
year-old rookie outfielder bat-
ting .195 play minor league
baseball in rural North Caro-
lina? Apparently most every-
one does.
Legions of media, Raleigh
politicians and 15,006 fans
showed up for three Carolina
Mudcats games in Zebulon this
weekend. The large crowds
came to see Birmingham Baron
Michael Jordan on his second
trip to the city this season.
"We had huge crowds,
most definitely said John
Gardner, director of concessions
for the Mudcats. "The Saturday
night games were one of the
biggest nights of the year. Of
course people got to see Jordan
play.
"The parking lot opened
at three for the 6:05 p.m. game
and there were people lined
up waiting to get in then. When
we opened the gate at four, there
was a mad dash to the rightfield
bleachers where Jordan plays
rightfield
The Mudcats and Barons
played a doubleh-eader Satur-
day night and another game
Sunday evening. Attendance
was 8,442 for the Saturday
games and 6,564 for the Sunday
game.
Gardner said last year's
average attendance, while
high for a minor league base-
ball team, was in the neigh-
borhood of 4,500. Last week's
doubleheader, with the Jack-
sonville Suns, drew 6,387.
"Yeah, I came basically
to see Air Jordan said D.J.
Wilhelm, a Mudcat fan. "I've
onlv been to one other game
this vear, besides the first time
Jordan came through
Saturday's attendance
figure topped the previous
season high of 8,277 when the
Barons played in Zebulon in
April. Still, games with Bir-
mingham account for only
12.6 percent of Carolina's an-
nual attendance.
For the Nashville X-
Press, on the other hand, the
Jordan games make their sea-
son. The seven games the Bar-
ons have played in Nashville
make up 71 percent of the
team's total attendance for the
year.
"Right now we're sec-
ond in the league in atten-
dance behind Birmingham
Gardner said. "Chances are if
they didn't have Jordan, we'd
be leading the league
In addition to fans turn-
ing out in droves to see the
See JORDAN page 2
A (Mb of (I&ro (ttfiu
ucAllA
ZEBULON, N.C.
Home of the Carolina Mudcats
HUNTSVILLE, ALA.
Home of the Huntsville Stars
1993 Birmingham Series Avg.
4,730
5,581
1993 Season Avg.
4,500
3,700
Game Before 1st 1994 Series
4,897
754
1994 Birmingham Series Avg.
8,102
12,309
1994 Season High (vs. Birmingham) 8,442
13,200
Data taken from Carolina Mudcats, ews & Observer and Florida Times Lnion
Graphic by Stephanie Lassiter
Drink
up!
These
cheerful
fellows
apparently
found a way
to beat
Greenville's
humidity.
ZOE aids flood victims
Start Writer
itree
Photo by
Leslie Petty
School of Business adds health care degree
-)l.l 1 t � i lies
The Hast Carolina School of
Business will soon offer a health
care management option in the
MBA program, beginning in the
1994 Fall semester, said Don Boldt,
director of graduate studies in the
School of Business.
Eastarolina's MBA pro-
gram was accredited in 11'74, the
second oldest MBA program in the
state,nextto( hapel Hill, Boldt said
He added that the ECU School of
Business contains 300 graduatestu-
dents, 4t peri ent I t tin se work as
wellasattend( lassesintheevening.
"()ur MBA program isanold,
large, respected one said Boldt
'We take students with any under-
graduate major. It's a very profes-
sional school where in two years,
we will give students very broad
training
Boldt stated that the new
he.) I the are management option has
beer, thought about foranumberoi
years and will involve 12 semester
hours in theSchooloi Allied 1 lealth
during the student's second year,
replacing the usual nine hours ol
electives.Boldtaddedthattheman
datory tour health care i lasses will
be a survey of health industry, a
c lass in healthare i p ratii ins,
health care tinani t and health � are
strategic management
Bi
oldt said
that the School of
Business expects 15-25participants
in the new pn gram each year. With
all the ongoing changes in health
care, Boldt believes that this health
care option will be more demand-
ing and important than most mana-
gerial positions
I here has been tremendous
c ooperation In'tween the School of
Business and Allied Health said
Boidt "It's going to be a very su(
v essinl program and is really going
ti i prepare students foi the future
11 r further information re-
ig the new health care option,
Boldt i.in be rea bed by phone at
hisoffii e, loom 5203
m thi � � i . � room Building.
On Saturday, July 16, ECU
students and the Greenville com-
munity will be able to lend a help-
ing hand to the flood victims in
Georgia.
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity
will hold a donation drop in the
parking lot of the Winn-Dixie
Marketplace on the corner of
Greenville and Arlington Boule-
vards.
"The project is called 'Geor-
gia On My Mind said Robert
lewis, member of the fraternity
and leader of the drive. "We are
the first organization in Green-
ville to come up with this idea, to
my knowledge
lewis said the idea for the
project first came into his mind
after watching the 5:30 news last
week and seeing the damage in
Georgia live on the television
si ene.
During the following days,
1 ew is began planning the dri e.
"I contacted all radio and
n stations from Raleigh to the
i oast lewis said. "Probably 10
to 12
A number o! radio stations
agreed to cooperate with the tra-
ternit on the drive, including
U B 103.7 I M and WRNS95.1
FM
U BZ 103 7agreedtodoa
live remote I ewissaid. "WRNS
mit'ht also
Also, WITN-TV 7, Over-
night Trucking Company, and
Winn-Dixie Marketplace will be
involved with the drive.
Lewis said donations
needed for the flood victims in-
clude canned foods, bottled wa-
ter and clothing. These items will
be put into a "big trailer" at the
donation drop location and sent
to Albany, Georgia.
"Everything collected is
going to the flood victims in Geor-
gia Lewis said.
The American Red Cross
will handle all monetary dona-
tions people want to give to flood
victims.
"It people make cash dona-
tions, it will be to the Red Cross.
We are only going to accept mate-
rial goods Lewis said.
The fraternity members had
a number of reasons for coordi-
nating the project.
"Since it's summertime, we
have less distractions' Lew is said.
"It gives us an early start to help
the community. We hope other
fraternity organizations will do
the same. I think the main reason
we are doing this is because if the
tropical storm had come in our
direction, the people in North
Carolina would be in the same
situation
1 ow is recendy has made lit-
erary contributions to the Pitt
Community College Library and
See DONATIONpage 2
Summer
Ventures
a success
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
The unusually small
people seen wandering
around campus are not a
batch of growth-stunted in-
coming freshmen, but rather
upcoming 11 th and 12th grad-
ers who are participating in
the Summer Ventures pro-
gram held annually at ECU.
Each summer, students
from across North Carolina
are selected to be part of the
Summer Ventures program
held on six campuses across
the state. Students apply and
are selected on the basis of
their math and science abili-
ties and achievements.
"It is a statewide com-
petition said Dr. Floyd
Mattheis, directorof Summer
Ventures at ECU.
The students spend
four weeks on campus taking
special courses in chemistry,
phvsics, computer science,
problem solving, algebra and
medicine.
"There is no prescribed
curriculum Mattheis said.
Some of the students
spend the day at the medical
school learning how research
is conducted, while others
take courses in areas they are
particularly interested in.
" The medical school is
really a volunteer effort
Mattheis said.
Because medical school
statt areconsidered 12month
emplo ees, thev are not paid
for their work. Other univer-
sity employees are paid for
participating in Summer Ven-
tures because they are em-
See SUMMERpage 2





2 The East Carolinian
July 13, 1994
DONATION
Continued from page 1
: June 28
School of Medicine Admissions Office � A staff member
reported the larceny of a Eurorail pass from the Admissions
Office at the School of Medicine.
Austin � Two non-students were banned from campus after
they loitered in and around the men's bathroom in Austin.
Julyl
Third and Reade Streets � A non-student was arrested at Third
and Reade Streets for carrying a concealed weapon and posses-
sion of stolen property.
July 1
Willis Building � A visitor to campus reported the larceny of
money from her purse while at the Willis Building. The investi-
gation is continuing.
Ninth and Cotanche Streets � An officer assisted a Greenville
police officer with an assault on a female non-student at Ninth
and Cotanche Streets. The case is being investigated by the
Greenville Police Department.
July5
Whichard�A staff member in Whichard reported the breaking
and entering of her office. Two stacks of paperwork were taken.
The investigation is continuing.
July 6
Brody Building � A window of a truck parked at the Brody
Building was broken by a rock thrown from a lawn mower.
Pitt County Memorial Hospital�A non-student requested and
received transportation to Pitt County Memorial Hospital so he
could check himself into the Psychiatric Unit.
July 8
Leo Jenkins Center�Several staff members reported the disor-
derly conduct of a patient on the second floor of the Leo Jenkins
Center.
July 9
Garrett Hall � A resident advisor of Garrett Hall reported
another resident advisor of Garrett Hall had assaulted her in
Garrett Hall.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety crime reports.
the Ronald McDonald House of
Greenville.
"I donated copies of my short
stories to Pitt Community College
and the Ronald McDonald House
in the name of the fraternity
Lewis said. "I did the stories a
long time ago in a series called
'American Fiction
Lewis said he hopes to get
published one day and that he is
currently writing a western.
"I took the short stories
and sent them to the person in
charge said Alan Bailey, evening
coordinator of evening services
in the Pitt Community College
Learning Resource Center. "The
person who adds books to our
library collection took the mate-
rials and said we would add them
to our collection to make them
available to students to read
Lewis, an SG A member who
is on the welfare committee and a
worker at Public Safety, said that
the Ronald McDonald House of
Greenville sent the fraternity a
letter of recognition for its good
work.
Lewis hopes the donation
drive will be a success.
"I think it will have a posi-
tive outcome. I hope the commu-
nity will really get involved with
this. It can happen to anybody
SUMMER
Continued from page 1
"In Wildness is
preservation of the
world
�Henry David Thoreau
JORDAN
ployed for only nine months of the
year.
After attending class all day,
the students enjoy Greenville by
visiting the mall, attending movies
and going canoeing. The students
are staying in Garrett Hall and eat-
ing in Todd Dining Hall. The state
funds the entire program.
"It is funded by the state
through the university system he
said.
Other campuses who are in-
volved in the program are N.C.
Central University, Appalachian
State University, Western Carolina
University, University of North
Carolina at Charlotte and the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Wilmington. Approximately 100
students are selected per school.
The program will come to a
close this weekend with a talent
show on Friday night and presenta-
tions on Saturday. The students wil 1
give presentations based on their
research from 9 a.m. until noon.
Parents of the students and area
legislators will be invited to attend.
Mattheis said that all students are
given certificates for participation,
but no awards are given.
Continued from page 1
"We try to minimize the
competition he said.
Accord ing to Mattheis, most
of these students are straight-A
students or have remarkably high
GPAs. In recent years, more fe-
male students have participated
in the program, Mattheis said.
"Over the last years, we
have had more females than
males he said. "We have run
about 60 females to 40 males
Mattheis also said that al-
most every ethnic group is repre-
sented at Summer Ventures.
"It (Summer Ventures) is
very multicultural he said. "I
guess every ethnic group in the
state in represented
Mattheis noted an out-
standing Summer Ventures
alumnus, Scott Smith, who is the
only profoundly deaf student in
medical school in the United
States. Smith attended under-
graduate school at ECU, and is
currently an ECU Medical School
student.
"It is a chance to broaden
their horizons and see some dif-
ferent avenues they don't see in
high school
former NBA superstar, the
Mudcats have seen an increase
in media coverage of Baron
games as well.
"We issued about 200 press
credentials Gardner said.
"That is opposed to 15 to 20 for
a normal game. We had more
for the first one because it had
national attention. He was just
getting started then
Jordan's presence also
means a financial windfall for
club owners. Suns general man-
ager Peter Bragen, Jr. told the
Florida Times-Union that most
teams make about $50,000 more
playing Birmingham than they
would against any other club.
The Mudcats' concession
sales benefited as well. "Satur-
day was probably the biggest
night in our history as far as
total volume Gardner said.
"We had the benefit of early
gates and a doubleheader, but
we also had Jordan
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PIZZA GRANDE
PIZZA CHICA
A cup ffour tortilla imothe-ed with beoni,
"eed cheese, rolapenos guocomole. diced
'omatoet, block olives ond sou' cream
Add .95 for bee Or C - �'� c-
8UFFALO WINGS
Try our homemade w.ngi 'Koi o't RyMfl
hot: Served with celery corrot sticks,
orvj ronch dressing for dipping
CHICKEN FINGERS
Oiden tenoVio,n b-eooea and fried to o
de!ooui golden brown Served w.th .oey
mustard vc j-e ond garnished with celery
CxJ Carrot sticks
MEXICAN FINGERS
aVi' happened when the CRKMM crossed
me border I go duned r. Buffalo sauce1
CHIP DIP
A creamy blend of cheeses and spices
se-ved with blue com t�rt,llo chip
5.95
3.95
5.15
5.15
5.15
4.55
POTATO SKINS
Potato iir m fned to o golden brown topped
with mehed cheete. p'openoj. guocomole.
tomotoei. ond jour creom Add .93 fo bocon
beef. cHidten, tx chilt
FIESTA PLATTER
Try an assortment of tosfy Mexican
ODpei'ie'i featuring chili skint, o
quesodilfe. o beef ond bean fWo. ond
lolopenc poppe-i � -oi1 served w.lh o red
i-i-ce for dipping
GUACAM-OLE!
For you guocomole lower, a blend of esh
ovocodoi mimed w.th bits of tomotoei.
onions, ond cilantro. served on o platter full
of tortilla chipt
QUESO CON CHORIZO
Melted Monteey Ock cheese with scuteed
peppers, on.onv and tomotoei. topped w.th
Mexican chomo sousoge ond served w,th
flour tortillas
JALAPENO POPPERS
Melcon poppers iljffed w,th creamy
Wisconsin cheddor cheese and deed
jo'openos Served w.th. celery, carrot
sticks ond ranch dressing for dipping
J.95
4.95
4 55
ENSALADAS
TACO SALAD 5.15
A fresh totted salad topped with ground beef
cheddor cheese, tomotoei, cue -nbers. red onions,
block olivet, ond crowned with sour creom
Served in o crispy tortilla shell
ENSALADA CON POLLO
Seom.ng hot chicken tops o pkfer of fresh,
'essed solod w.rh tomctoes. cucumbers, cheese,
�ed onions, block olives, and crowned w.th
guocomole
CHICKEN TENDER SALAD
A crispy Rou' to-iiHo sotod bowl, topped w.th
itnpt of delicious chken tendc-i. cucumbers
cneese. block olives red oniont, ond tomatoes
5.15
FAJITA SALAD
A enspy Hour tortilla bowl filled "� a
fresh tossed satod Topped with you- choice of
beef or chicken, tomotoei, red on.ons
cheese, block olives, cucumbers end crowned
with guocomole Add .95 for ihrimp
CAESAR SALAD
Hi Me�icon' Named lor
CaetorCordini�Tijuana. Mexico 1924.
Oitp, romoine lettuce w.th homemode Coesar
dressing, freshly grated pormesar cheese,
and coutont Add 3.50 for m-itj. 't g' lied
chicken breoit
5.45
1.95
7Www9wmwwrAiwmrwwwvvw
ESPECIALIDADES
MEXICAN FLAG
A q- hd skinless icken b-ecti file s'uhed
w � indeed spinach, cove-ed w.th mehed
rihsM and rapped with a mecum hot,
oent,c sauce Se-ved with r.ce ond beans
STEAK OR CHICKEN
PICADO
Slnpf of i-tok or chcken scuteed w th bell
oecpen onions, tomotoei and ipiced w th
� con flavor Served wiA "ce and beans
HeOtC n�o"n yOur server of your preference
to- "i id or hot Delicious11
ENCHILADA SUISA 6.59
A Kjfi eo io-tfo 1'uffed w.rh fesh.
eom.ng chicken ond O creamy cheese
sowce r-side ond out Topped with, mehed
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CHICKEN FLAUTA 6.59
5 c: c' chidktn rolled in c a so, flour
� - bmA sour creom. gjocomole. cheese,
c� c'es. and tomatoes Se-ved vth rice
CAMARON VERACRUZ
jtE3 ihrimp smothered in Verocr; soje
modi of fresh tomatoes, on.cn, pimentos.
-cpc! erbi ond spicei Served on o bed
pi � -e w. vegetables
CHIM1CHANGA 6.99
your chece of be' or chc�en folded m o
crispy, flour tortilla ond topped w.th Mtty
Spanish sauce, sou' tmom, guocamo-e. and
d cheese Served & nee ond beans
POLLO YUCATECO 7.95
A grilled bor.eleu b'eas o' tender chicken,
covered w.th roaiied Anahe.m pepperi
and tasty il.cei of bacon topped wth me'ted
c"eese ond p.co de gai'o Served with r.ce
ond beans
SPINACH ENCHILADA 6.99
A soft com totillo iuffed w.th sp.noch,
w3utecd with onicm ad tomotoeiall
smothered in a ran;h�ro satfce. topped
with me'ted cheese ond cvocodo si.ees
Served w.th ce ond bean;
ENCHILADA DE
CAMARON 7.99
Shr.mp souteed w.h lon-o'oei e-�d spices.
wrapped in o wf1 co'r- to- ic imchered
in ro-�che-o lOaC, ore topped w.th melted
cheese and avoeodc sces Scved w.th rice
and vegetoblei
COMBINACIONES
5
anxs
CHICKEN SOUP
Dek-out, homemode
� .can style chicken soup
BLACK BEAN SOUP
A trad't.onol navome topped -nth frein
5.co de gollo ond lowr creom
6p-l ISO
Cup 1.99
CHILI CON CARNE
A bowl of Chico'i famous homemade eMi
topped w.th melted cheese, ed on.oni ond
sour cream Served �.th solline cackei
TACO
A -omemode toco shell filled with your cho.ee of
seaded beef, ground beef, or chicken, topped
� 'e"jce cheese, ond minced tomatoes
ENCHILADA
A ich cam tortilla filled w.th. you- choice of
s-edded beef, ground beef ch.cken or cheese,
ond covered w.th our homemode enchilada souce
ond r-et'ed cheese
ice and beans
CHILI RELLENO
A fresh rocsed Anah pepper, stuffed w.th cheese,
dipped in on egg boter and cooked to o golden
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One comb-nct-on
Two combinations
Three comb �notions
4.49
S.49
5.99
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Se-ved wSii -ice c-tc beans a'vi pedefi wth Fried ice Cmamf
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A ploHjt fjil of 0 mm. chicken cn.mongoA plans' full a' a mm. bee burnt�, a mini
0 mm chicken flot'ia. q6 an ench iodobeef ch.michanga and c beef enchodo
Sw sa Gamiihed w.th auaccmole sourcove-edwth melted cheese Gar nnhed w.th
c-ec-n o"d btock olivesguocomole sour cream and block oi.vet
ELGATO GORDO8.59CARDEN CRANDE
� �) -j.eninel.vei to ii(vh!A m.ni bean chim-canaa o sp-noch
A r e- hvii of o m�m ch.cken ch.m cho"paenchilodo and o bmoi 11 Mil auesod.Ha
p bee: toco ond o cheese ench.lodeGorn.shec � -ft- guoco�e sour cream.
��'�� ihed w.th goacomole sour cream.ond block ol'ves
8 59
8.59





Hmrimammmu
�������
July 13, 1994
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 3
�,
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lasslter, ,455. News Editor
Warren Stunner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders, Typesetter
Heather D. Dail, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Ay cock. Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Directoi
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
New strategy needed for domestic violence I
With the release of the tapes of Nicole
Simpson's 911 call a few weeks ago, the
issue of domestic violence has once again
jumped to the top of the list of news stories,
closely followed by the actual coverage of
the Simpson case. Literally dozens of stories
about abusive husbands have suddenly
appeared in the news. By contrast, in the
first five months of 1994, only six stories on
all types of domestic violence (child abuse,
wife beting and husband oeatir ran in
the major magazines of America.
No one is going to deny that domestic
violence is an epidemic in America. The
numbers regarding violence against women
are truly frightening: over 100,000 reported
rapes per year, more than 1,000,000 women
in physically abusive relationships.
However, the linking of the Simpson
murder case with domestic violence is
disturbing for at least two reasons. First,
though O.J. is a convicted batterer and is
therefore rightly deserving of our contempt
for his past crimes, the fact that he did abuse
his wife is legally irrelevant to the question
of his guilt or innocence in this case. The
vast majority of abusive husbands do not
kill their wives, and being a wife-beater
does not make one a murderer.
Second, one must wonder if the current
media emphasis on the subject will really
help the victims of this terrible crime. Much
more likely is the prospect that this will just
turn into another fad, which will soon fade
into the land of media oblivion like other
past fads (child abuse, incest, drug abuse,
etc.). Does anyone really believe that any
more will be accomplished by this media
blitz than that surrounding last year's
Bobbitt imbroglio? Instead, we would
suggest a strategy which has already been
proven successful.
At the beginning of the 1980s, drunk
driving was a much bigger problem than it
is today. It was widely ignored by the legal
system, and even used as a standard joke in
much of the entertainment industry.
However, working steadily, and frequently
quietly, Mothers Against Drunk Driving
(MADD) and other groups changed this
situation.
They put pressure on local law
enforcement and the legal system to take the
problem more seriously. They forced state
legislatures to pass tough new laws, and
helped get rid of those legislators who
obstructed progress. Working on a grass
roots level, they help change societal
attitudes, and without one big media blitz.
Such a plan, instituted by those women
and men who are committed to ending such
violence, would surely have a much better
long-term chance of actually reducing this
problem.
By Patrick Hinson
Zoo animals help promote care for to all beasts
My girlfriend and I visited
the North Carolina Zoo in
Asheboro over the Fourth of July
weekend, something that we had
been meaning to do and looking
forward to for quite a while, and
we finally got the opportunity. I
had never been to a "real" zoo
before, although I've been to a
couple of smaller ones, and I had
heard so much about the Norm
Carolina Zoo mat I thought it
would be a great experience, as
I'm a real nature lover and enjoy
seeing and learning about animal s
of the wild.
The North Carolina Zoo
specializes in animals from the
oontinent of Africa, and has so
many different species that I can't
even begin to try to list them here,
but visitors get a close-up view of
die animals in most of the exhibits
and a short piece of information
about where they come from. The
more I toured the park, however,
the more my mind began taking in
the individual animals and the
circumstances in which we were
able to see them, and I guess I
started to see the place in a
somewhat different light from
what I had expected.
For instance, there was a
troop of baboons in one exhibit,
about twelve of :hem living
together on a very small island,
surrounded by an algae-infested,
ti dck yeen pond anda wall. There
were three lions of the African
lains, two females and a male,
laying lazily about in the heat of
the day, sometimes staring out at
the viators with dull, flat, brown
eyes, but mostly just laying there,
obviously bored outof their minds
in their small enclosure, day in
and day out, every day of their
lives.
There were some animals in
enclosures only about ten feet by
ten feet, animals that were meant
to run, to hunt, to spend their lives
in the open and on the move. There
were three mountain gorillas, a
silverback and two lesser members
alone in a barren enclosure maybe
twenty yards by twenty yards,
with the trees blocked off by metal
wire making them unclimbable
and no real natural landmarks for
them to climb on and explore.
There was one exhibit in
particular that moved me more
than any of the others, a pen with
a full-grown black panther, a
beautiful, perfect specimen from
the deepest part of the African or
perhaps South American jungle.
The panther lay flat on a rock in a
tiny cage, maybe ten feet by ten
feet, and slept through the heat,
waking every now and then to
look lazily up at the spectators
making fools of themselves
(myself included) trying to get his
attention.
I began to wonder if perhaps
he dreamed of lying on a dark
branch high in the canopy of the
jungle, looking down at the
animals oblivious to his presence
moving far bebw him. I wonder if
he dreamt about the rain, about
the green and dark safety and
freedom of the jungle, of the lea ves
and vines from which he was
stolen. I wonder if h e dreamt abou t
the hunt, the electrified air and the
smell of the terrified victim, the
pursuit and climactic kill for which
he was bom. I wonder if any of
those things were still mere in his
mind, or in his memory, and
something inside of me told me
mat they must be, for they were
what he was put on earth for, not
to live in a small, clear-plastic
prison cell and be screamed at by
idiot little kids every day of his
life. In the very same enclosure a
spotted panther paced endlessly
back and forth.
There was a huge African
elephant out in the most spacious
of the exhibits, although still only
I vie'U. BE BACK itt A
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By Laura Wright
a grassy field about fifty by fifty
yards. I watched him (or her) for
quite a while, eating and bathing
at a small water hole, and I
remembered reading about
elephants in National Geographic
magazine; how they are very
intimate family members, and
sensitive communicators with
theirgroups.Icouldn'thelp feeling
sad watchinghim (or her)out there
all alone, perhaps wondering why
there were no more ca 11s from the
distance, why no one answered
his, waiting to hear a familiar voice
and never hearing it.
I guess it was the big animals
that moved ine the most, and
maybe that was what they were
supposed to do. While thinking
about how sad they were, at least
I got to see them and understand
that there are animals like that out
in the world, not just trapped
inside our televisions. The closer
we get to the wild like that, through
zoos, the more we come to try to
understand and hence care for the
animals of the wild. We are unable
to communicate with them, and
yet somehow we must, because
we are all children of the same
world, of the same God, whatever
we wish to call Him.
True, those animals were put
on earth to roam, some of them
moving hundreds of miles in their
lifetimes, but I realized that
perhaps they were the sacrifices
for their species, because by
coming to know mem seeing mem
and feeling for them in at least this
way, we can hopefully begin to
feel for them in a broader scope,
and somehow try to keep them
from extinction.
One thing I did realize that
day, without these animals on
earth our world would certainly
be a less colorful, more barren
place to live, and we should avoid
that at all costs, because there is
still so much to learn.
Summertime brings mosquitos, short tempers
I can't imagine that Greenville
would have been a very fun place
to live prior to the advent of indoor
air conditioning.
I crive around town and feel
thankful that my car has plenty of
freon. I try to go running in the
morning before it gets too hot, but
I waited too long the other day
and nearly died.
I tend to be sort of hard on
Eastern North Carolina; I consider
Greenville to bea town thdt'sabout
twenty years behind the rest of a
state that is about twenty years
behind the rest of the country. But
overall, during the two years that
I have lived here, I think that I
have adapted pretty well � if not
happily � to the political and
social norms of my surroundings.
Furthermore, I enjoy the fact that
itnever gets too cold in thewinter,
and I love being so close to the
beach.
But Greenville in the summer
is almost more man anyone should
be expected to bear. It's hot, if s
humid, and lucky for us, there are
plenty of mosquitoes and tobacco.
Some people seem to be able to
avoid being bitten, but I am a
mosquito magnet.
I once read that as the weather
gets hotter, ice cream sales
increase. That makes pretty good
sense. I suppose that water bills
increase, hot chocolate sales
decrease, sunscreen sales increase,
etc. However,noneof these things
was mentioned along with the ice
cream statistic. Instead, the
emphasis was on the fact that
violent crime also increases.
An increase in violent crime
during the summer months makes
sense. I know that during the
interval between the time that 1
turn my car on and the time that
the air conditioner effectively cools
the interior of my vehicle, my
temper rises and my patience,
what little of it I have to begin
with, disappears. I curse (to myself,
of course) at people who turn
without signaling and fight the
urge to rear end anyone with a
bumper sticker that says, "Don't
blame me. I voted for Bush
But I suppress any heat
aggravated tendencies that try to
erupt. Being in a state of continual
physical discomfort, like being too
hot, can cause people to react to
situations in more impulsive ways
that they normally would. Owning
a gun in the summer is probably
more dangerous than owning one
during the winter � the impulse
to use it might be stronger.
I suppose there are several
reasons why tempers flare during
the summer months. First, it's
harder to sleep when it's hot Lack
of sleep contributes to crankiness
and irritability. Second, doing
anything is about twice as hard as
normal when it's being done in
the heat and, therefore, is about
twice as frustrating.
A third theory was introduced
to me by a friend who told me that
he is allergic to mosquito bites.
Not only does his skin break out
around the bitten area, he claims
that being bitten triggers a
chemical reaction in his brain and
puts him in "a really bad mood
You can be as skeptical as you like,
but people have pleaded not guilty
to murder charges on similar
grounds. Once, a man accused of
murder claimed that on the night
in question he had eaten Twinkies,
and that the process used to bake
the snack cakes caused him to go
temporarily insane. During his
period of mental deficiency,
apparently, he killed someone.
Don't get me wrong; I don't
mink the heat, mosquito bites or
Twinkies are valid excuses for
violent behavior.
Just recently, two local men
shot each other during an
argument. Of course, I don't know
if the heat had anything to do with
that shooting, but I couldn't help
thinking that it might have
contributed to such a violent
solution. Maybe if we realize that
heat makes us volatile, we can
rationalize calmer responses to our
anger. Maybe if we could eatmore
ice cream. Maybe we could do
something about prevalence of
guns I guess that's another
story.
In the mean time, good luck
staying cool. If you go to the beach,
wear some flip flops; I got second
degree burns on the soles of my
feet from walking barefoot in the
sand. Blisters on the bottoms of
the feet tend to contribute to
irrational behavior.
By Jason Williams
Government intervention necessary in environment
As the sun set over the historic
district in New Bern, N.C Sunday
evening, I could not help but notice
the thin, white cloud s drifting over
the Neuse River. Not part of the
thunderhead that was quickly
dissipating, these clouds belonged
to the Weyerhauser lumber
processing plant on Highway 43.
Some say when the wind is
just right, you can smell the sulfur
stench in Greenville. I don't know
about that � I live in Grifton �
but I do know you can smell
Weyerhauser from several miles
away.
No matter what your political
philosophy, no matter what your
position on wetlands, or old
growth forests or endangered
species, no matter whether you
hike and fish and hunt, or just sit
on the couch and watch TV �
environmental problems like the
one mentioned above affect you,
and you should do something
about them.
I use Weyerhauser for
illustrative purposes only; I am
not a scientist and for all I know,
thecloudsand the smell may beas
harmless as phone sex. Besides, I
would prefertoiletpaperover com
cobs any day, and Weyerhauser
provides pulp for paper products.
But what if the steam causes
cancer, or emphysema or other
respiratory problems? What if the
discharge from company X's pipes
into me Tar River is harmful? What
if the pesticide Farmer Brown, Inc
sprays on our food might kill us?
As I see it, there are basically
two types of environmentalism.
The first deals mainly with
resource issues: forests, wetlands,
national parks, wildlife and land
use. Adherents to this philosophy
are generally more passionate and
spiritual about the natural world.
Ttese are the people who actually
use the national parks.
The second kind of
environmentalism concerns
pollution. This camp is certainly
larger, and well it should be. While
not everyone likes to go camping,
everyone does like to breathe clean
air and drink clean water. In fact,
this group should (but
unfortunately, and
incomprehensibly doesn't)
include everyone.
Why some conservatives,
many of whom support pro-
business initiatives, oppose
responsible environmental
legislation continues to confound
me. Dan Quayle, Jesse Helms and
others clearly benefit from the
second kind of environmentalism
and could benefit from the first, in
spite of the fact they vigorously
fight against it.
Their argument, which
essentially boils down to "Let the
market determine environmental
policy simply won't wash.
Capitalism is a wonderful
economic system, but it is, like
democracy, wonderfully flawed.
Just because forces in the market
prescribe an action doesn't mean
mat action is correct.
Before 1863, the market in the
southern U.S. dictated slavery.
Southern planters complained that
without slave labor, they could
not turn a profit on their cotton or
tobacco. Depriving people of their
personal liberty, however, is, and
always has been, wrong and
immoral.
Likewise, depriving me of air
that is fit to breathe and water that
is fit to drink is wrong. If businesses
cannot produce goods and services
without endangering my health
and still earn a profit, then they
must simply cease operations.
"King Cotton" died out in the
South when slavery ended, yet
the region still survived.
Some things outweigh the
need for a free and unfettered
market. Surely everyone would
agree that public health is among
them. I would go farther and
suggest that pristine natural areas
�mountains, beaches and forests
� should also be protected.
Next time you see a
smokestack emitting some foul-
smelling odor, think about that
second kind of environmentalism.
Thinkaboutwhether that chemical
is hazardous, poisonous or just
plain unsightly. Then think about
changing your lifestyle to be closer
to Mother Earth.






-The East Carolinian-
Page 4
Classifieds
July 13, 1994
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED 4 BLOCKS
FROM CAMPUS: Own room for $
� 140.0013 utilities. Call 830-2007, ask
for Raul.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR FALL
to share 3 bedroom house located in a
quiet neighborhood near the hospital.
Must be a serious student and non-
smoker.260.00 rent month includes
utilities and cable TV. If interested call
Harold after 4:00 p.m. at 830-5160.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 12 block from Art Bldg 3
blocks from downtown, 2 blocks from
Supermarket. Starting in August. Call
757-1947.
WANTED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share two bedroom apartment starting
August 1st, on block from ECU Cam-
pus. Call Angie, (910) 6544297.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR FALL to
share 3 bedroom, 21 2 bath townhouse
at Sheraton Village.200.00 13 utili-
ties. Available July 8. Contact Victoria at
355-1861.
AFT.FORRENT: 2bdrm1.5bath,free
water, freecable, full kitchen appliances,
washerdryer hook-up, close to cam-
pus, Available Aug. 1st, phone 758-4444.
APARTMENT FOR RENT - New unit,
2 bedrooms, wpatio, all new appli-
ances- - washerdryer hook-up, lease
ends May 1st. S 395.00 a month - Beat
rentincrease.Wyndham Circle. Call 830-
9545, leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! Fe-
male, non-smoker, non-drinker pre-
ferred, to share 2 bdrm. 112 bath apt.
at Eastbrook. Rent180.00 month, 1 2
utilities and phone. Call 7524663 (leave
message).
For Rent
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3 bed-
room at 206 East 12th Street, for $
450-495; 2 bedroom at 201 East 13th
Street for295; 3 bedroom at 908
Forbes Street for450. Near Uni-
versity, Call 757-3191.
ROOMMATE MALEFEMALE
NEEDED Aug. 1, to share 3 bed-
room duplex on corner of Stancil
and N. Meade. Rent$ 150.00month
and 13 utilities. On monthly lease.
Call 758-8422.
1-4 BEDROOM HOMES, Condo's,
Duplexes, and Apartments for rent.
$ 190.00 up! Short term lease avail-
able! Finders 321-6708. Small Fee.
Near Campus, rentals available
now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate, list your
ad free. To get a list of all the people
looking a roommate - 321-6708.
Small Fee!
HOUSEMATE WANTED! $
145.00month 14 utilities, cable,
phone, etc. Pets OK. Large back
yard. Quiet neighborhood. Avail-
able immediately. Call 752-5405.
ED Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
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Secretarial work. Specializing in
Resume composition wcover-letters
stored on disk, term papers, thesis,
legal transcriptions, general typing
and other secretarial duties. Word
Perfect or Microsoft Word for Win-
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752-9959) (Evenings 527-9133).
NCTAN-NORTH CAROLINA
AND TIDEWATER AREA
NATURISTS now being organized
to promote coastal recreation. For
more information, send1.00 and
SASE to NCTAN, PO Box 88, Pantego,
NC 27860.
Help Wanted
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits. Call
1-8004364365,
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LADIES WANTED: Models, Danc-
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INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
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STUDENTTO WORK IN LOCAL
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hours per week doing marketing for
the firm. An interest in going to law
school beneficial. Send resume to
PO Drawer 5026, Greenville, NC
27835.
ECU TRANSIT is now hiring for
Fall 1994 semester. Looking for de-
pendable bus drivers. Good driving
record a must! NC class "B" C.D.L.
with passenger endorsement and
no air brake restriction is needed.
Will help get license if needed. Inter-
ested persons apply in the Transit
Office, 258 Mendenhall, Mon
Thurs 1 p.m.4 p.m. Must be an
ECU student. For more informa-
tion, call 328-4724.
Help Wanted
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - Fishing Industry. Earn up
to S 3,000-$ 6,000 per month. Room
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OUUMG
We want cartoonists. We need cartoonists. We pay cartoonists.
If you want to be published in Greenville's only forum with original strips by
students, lissen up!
To apply, you must bring to our offices two finished 8" x 13" (two tiers
worth) samples of your proposed strip (lettering, inks, the whole taco) on
cardstock paper in heavy black ink. That's right, we are demanding. But if
your work is good, you'll run every week in Pirate Comics.
See Stephanie Smith, staff illustrator, for further information.
We're on the second floor of the student publication building.
And we're waiting.
i





�����������n
The East Carolinian
July 13, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5

Hamlet haters" invade ECU playhouse
Rex Hayes portrayed John Barrymore
Hate Hamlet Hayes is an accomplished
Photo Courtesy o- ECU Summer Theatre
In the ECU Summer Theatre's offering of "I
thesplan � a veteran of nine Broadway plays.
By Brian Hall
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Summer The-
atre continual its 25th season last week
with the production of the comedy "I
Hate Hamlet" The play continues the
recenttrerdoftheeiTtertanuTimtindus-
try to make productions about itself.
These productions can range from the
lilanbusJbisesC,toft�self�rdulgBnt
i?tfPWInthiscase,PaulRudnickhas
written and the East Carolina Summer
Theatrehas prcduoad a comedy some-
where between the two
The story centers around Andrew
Rally (played by JcrathanRobinson),a
young actor whose TV series, "L A.
Medical was recently canceled At the
beginning of the play, Andrew has just
antvednNewYoricindisbeirshown
his new apartment, once owned by tte
late actor Jchn Barrymore, by his rental
broker Felicia DantinefKateRnlayson).
Wesoonkamthatheliasbeenforcedby
hisagentIJllianTioy(DarrieLawience)
to play the tide role in "Hamlet" in a
production of Shakespeare in the Park.
Despite the urgingof Lillian, Felicia and
Deirdre(hisginriend,playedbyjenni-
fer R Terrell), Andrew is plagued by
doubts about his ability to play such a
demanding role. While debating
whethaiDplaythepart,Felidasuggests
aseario?tocaTtactBanymorethegreat-
est American Hamlet"
Thisdrarnaticmediumalbwsthe
introductia. of the true star of the pro-
ductiarvtheghostcrfBanyrrcrerurnself.
Played to perfection by Rex Hayes,
BarrymoreisavisKnofokiHollywood:
largerthanlife,stentcrianvokK,clres9ed
incomplete Hamlet regalia. Barrymore
ccmirKEsAndrewtoovenBmehisself-
doubts, using rhetoric, cajoling and a
swash-bucklingswcsdfightaround the
living room.
Whentheplaycontinues,onopen-
ingrughtoftheproductiorvArrirewhas
become Barrymore, from his voice and
delivery, to his incessant drinking. He is
still deeply concerned about his acting
abiliry,arririgrso,forthenextrnorn-
mghe reveals thatrusperfornvanoe was
a disaster. He is then forced to choose
between continuing with the serious
theater,ccreturrungtoHolrwoodwith
hiswnteproducer-clirectorfrieridGary
Peter Lefkowitz(ChrisMcGarry). Gary
offers ArKlrew$3rnilliontostarinanew
series, "Night School about a teacher
who is endowed with superhuman
powers at night This being a theater
production, it is left uptothereaderto
guess whi choice Andrew makes.
As Barrymore, Hayes stood out
arxtherestofthecastrfewasgiven
the best lines by Rudnick, and used
them to his full advantage Unlike
rnanyodTer3stjrtembers,hissenseof
comedic timing was impeccable His
physical comedy, such as his overly
dramatic entrances and his instruc-
tionstoAndrewontheproperwayto
take a bow, was uproariously funny.
The only member of the cast ca-
pableof holding his own with Hayes
for even a short while is McGarry. As
the self-absorbed parody of the shal-
lowHoIlywccd producer Lefkowitz,
McGarrynearrstoletheshow,espe-
daDy in the first act, with his hilarious
observations on life (e.g. Shakespeare
is "algebra on stage" and an actor is
"an English guy who can't get a se-
ries) Since his character is such a
shallow charicature of the producers
ofmodernenteteinmentrjrcided
an excellent foil for Barrymore
Indeed, the conflict between
See HAMLET page 6
Hanks brings gumption to Gump gjJBBBBJ�1
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
ForrestGump always remem-
bered his mama saying that "life is
like a box of chocolates. You never
know what you're gonna get
Films often have this same feel-
ing.
Take Forrest Gump for ex-
ample. The ads for the film have
been deliberately vague, claiming
that the world will never look the
same once you have seen it
through the eyes of Forrest Gu mp.
Other than the tag line and the
knowledge that Tom Hanks stars
in the film, very little can be sur-
mised about it. The viewer is un-
certain of what waits within the
proscenium arch.
Generally, a movie can be syn-
opsized in one or two lines. "A
bus is set to explode if it drops
below 50 miles per hour" could
describe Speed. "Disney's newest
animated feature" would describe
The Lion King. The line tells the
viewer enough to pique his inter-
est and therefore, presumably, see
the film.
Awork of artlike Forrest Gump
does not lend itself to being easily
sold. The film is too complex and
too unlike other films to summa-
rize so tidily. Other than having
Oscar winner Tom Hanks in the
starring role, Forrest Gump will
have to rely on positive reviews
and good word of mouth.
Forrest Gump tells the story of
America during the past 40 years
through the eyes of a man with an
I.Q. of 75. Gump, played master-
fully by Hanks, wanders through
the 60s, 70s and 80s, colliding with
t
many of the toughest problems of
the day.
Forrest experiences the frus-
tration and anger associated with
desegregation;Forrestexperiences
Vietnam as a private in the Army;
Forrest experiences Vietnam pro-
tests after receiving the Medal of
Honor. He also has a role in other
areas of cultural life; he dances for
a young Elvis
radeship.
The human characters in
Forrest Gump are what make the
film memorable. The tour of his-
tory is engaging, and ultimately
entertaining, but the charactersare
what touches the viewer's heart.
Jenny, Bubba, Lieu tenant Dan and
Forrest's mother (Sally Field) be-
come three-dimensional charac-
ters the
by shaking his
hips, un-
knowingly
aids John
Iennon in
writing
"Imagine
and calls to re-
port a break-
in at the
Watergate ho-
tel in 1972.
Though
Forrest helps
to shape history he never realizes
the importance of his acts, nor does
he care. He has his own wants and
desires. He is content to mow grass
all day or run for years on end
without thinking of much except
for his true love, Jenny (played by
Hanna R. Hall as a youngster and
Robin Wright as an adult).
Jenny is Forrest's first friend,
but certainly not his last. During
his tour of d uty in Vietnam, Forrest
meets Bubba (Mykelti
Williamson). Bubba is a shrimper
from Alabama who invites Forrest
to work with him upon their re-
turn to the United States. Forrest
also meets Lieutenant Dan (Gary
Sinise), his commanding officer.
He saves Dan's life and during the
ensuingyears, the two forma corn-
He is content to
mow grass all day
or run for years
on end without
thinking of much
except for his
true love, Jenny.
viewer cares
about. Even
though the
viewer may
see only one
side of the
character,
the actors do
such an out-
standing
job, that it is
easy to ex-
trapolate to
all other ar-
eas of that character's personality.
This movie is filled with cli-
ches. Rock music blares during
the Vietnam scenes, the hippie
scenes have tie-dyed clothing, long
hairand drugs,and thefilm'sclos-
ing could be taken from any film
whose setting is near the water.
Yet, these cliches serve an impor-
tant purpose in this film and are
not used frivilously. The viewer is
allowed to see scenes he has
watched many rimes before,
through the priviledged view of
Forrest Gump's eyes.
Forrest talks through most of
the film, relating his story on a
park bench to strangers. With
Forrest's narration, the viewer at-
tainsa sense of how Forrest views
the world. A horrifying ambush
in Vietnam is remembered by
Forrest as the time when the sun
came out after days of rain. Get-
ting wounded, to Forrest was like
getting stung. The simple plea-
sures Forrest derives from life of-
fer a profound lesson to everyone.
Yet Forrest Gump does not
preach. The story unfolds with
littleobvious manipulation on the
filmmaker's part. The only obvi-
ous goal in the film is to make
Forrest seem special. And in this
area, they have succeeded hand-
ily.
Though the film begins with
Forrest's mother insisting mat he
is just like everyone else, the
viewer immediately senses that
he is not. Forrest never makes
much of an effort to integrate into
the mainstream. He is more con-
tent to steer his own course and
thus accounts for a majority of his
success.
The success of Forrest Gump,
the film, owes a lot to steering
away from the mainstream, even
though it is a major Hollywood
film. The film breaks a lot of main-
stream rules. It is quite long (al-
most two and a half hours), lacks
a big moment near the end, has
very little profanity or violence,
and has a really goofy title. Yet the
film is doing well at the box- jtfice
and should continue to do so based
on the favorable word of mouth it
has been getting.
Forrest Gump is a film for ev-
eryone. To use an old reviewer
standby that has never seemed
more appropriate: "You'll laugh,
you'll cry, you'll shout for joy
On a scale of one to ten, Forrest
Gump rates an eight.
J Mi no
Me Your Chances
Worth A fry
Highly Recommended
American Ska-thic
Various Artists
m
Chapel Hill group smilin' about debut CD
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Chapel Hill is noted for that abrasive
post-punk genre that defines so many bands
to come out of that area. Knocked Down
Smilin' mixes this Chapel Hill sound with a
Southern-Fried Sea ttle edge and some spunky
funk rhythms. The end result is an onslaught
of aggressive grooves, not P Funk but Pit
Funk.
Knocked Down Smilin' has signed
with Dr. Lime Records out of Pittsboro. They
havejust released theirdebutalbum,aneleven
song CD entitled Natural Was The Static. The
titlewas inspired bya John Updike quotation,
"Human was the music, natural was the static
Mason Pitts (Bassist) and Bogie
Bowles (d rums), alumru of Berkley's Summer
Music Program, form a strong and melodic
rhythm section. Bowles really Lysdown some
innovative funk rhythms and at times he
whips the band into a funky tribal frenzy. The
powerful twin guitar lines of Sam Cloyd and
Martin Godwin, and the additional factor of
Godwin's burly vocals round out the quartet.
It's really hard to pin downonedefin-
ing sound for these guys. You can hear the
college power groove of groups like Billy
KNOCKED DOWN SMILIN Ar
AW Mm� � 4
natural waswe srat
Club Fest and Jonny Quest in their music,
sometimes. But there are also some distinct
Hendrix riffs in there, some Soundgarden,
Zepplin and Police, a mixture of old and new.
One of the best songs on the CD is
Good Look, a song about a broken friendship. It
begins with a preludeof hard riffsani broken
drumming, and suddenly jumps into a flow-
ing rhythm with a tremendous, flowing so-
prano sax traveling lightly over the melliflu-
ous funk, good vocals as well.
Bent is a dark groove. It begins with a
3 minute j im mixed with sound samples from
the movies House of Games, Batman and Sus-
pect. Then the lyrics kick in with "I wokeup late
and had a bowl of you for breakfast Some
very dark stuff, but still fun. The track More
Things Change is done with some of that vocal
distortion that bands like the Ministry made
famous, and it doesn't really work well. The
lead singer's voice fits the band fine without
this added twist. It takes a band that is not as
light hearted to utilize this technique effec-
tively.
The last track is funky and strange Not
Again begins with a funk riff that sounds like
some old Doobie Brothers tune, but the chorus
soon kicks in with a slow Soundgarden type
grind. This songreflects the majority of the bands
sound, a strange but appealing amalgam from a
diverse group of sources, eclectic if you will.
Knocked Down Smilin' is a good band
and they are trying to push the limits, but they
don't push hard enough in the right direction. The
college funk band is nothing really out of the
ordinary, in fact I think there are more bands with
this sound than with the grunge effect these days.
However this is their debut CD, and it makes me
wonder if they will push more to the dark, brood-
ing side of the music and let the funk take a lesser
role in their future endeavors. This CD is worth
checking out, so get outthere and support some of
your fellow Carolinians.
Anyone who says they don't like
skamusicjusthasn'tlistened toenough
of it Honestly, I don't think I've ever
met anyone who, after being exposed
to ska, didn't at least come away from
theexperiencefeelinghappy. Ifssuch
bvdy,bouncymusiqsometningabout
it just seems to spread like head lice
Part of this has to do, I'm sure,
withska'sdiveraty.Accmbinationof
reggae rhythms, polka beats, and big-
band-style horns, the basic ska for-
mula has more going for it than your
average Top 40 style. And, to make
things even more diverse, many ska
bands add their own personal twist
So there's funk ska, punk ska (some-
times known as ska-core), Jamaican
ska, jazz ska; there doesn't seem to be
any limit to the styles that have been
married to ska.
All of which brings me toAmeri-
can Ska-Thic, a CD collection devoted
to Mid west ska bands that showcases
ska's diversity. Designed tocoverthe
Midwest ska scene past and present
American Ska-Thic features ska outfits
from the past ten or fifteen years. An
excellent compilation, American Ska-
Thic offers ska in all its glory.
The disc opens up with Weaker
Youth Ensemble's "American Style
whichis,appropriatelyenough,a typi-
cal American ska tune. If s bouncy,
features a quick vocal delivery, and is
backed up with a beautiful bed of
homs,alltrademarksof American ska.
If s a fine way to open the album, and
whets the listener's appetite for more.
"American Style" is followed in
quick succession by a wide range of
ska tunes thatserveasanintroduction
to the ska scene. Johnny Socko offers
"Vasectomy which can best be das-
See SKA pa ;e 6
Flyin'Mice
Brighter Day

In 1989, Flyin' Mice got their
start inNorthCarolira'sfertileroots
music scene, Chapel Hill to be spe-
cific Their sound is really out of
anydefinitecategory,buttheyhave
been described as "psychedelic
bluegrass" or, oddly enough,
"Chapel Hillbilly music Not just
another "Dead" band, their suc-
cessful fusion of rockabilly and
funk gives their music a different
edge. Their second full-1 ength CD,
Brighter Day, has justbeen released
on Dr.Lime Records of Pittsboro.
Roots music has gotten so
popular lately that even our own
WZMB has acquired a show fea-
turing this type of music. In case
the genreisnot exactly cleartoyou,
there are a number a staple bands
that comprise thisstyle Bands like
The Allman Brothers, Phish, Wide-
spread Panic and some group
called the Grateful Dead are the
leading improvisers in this cat-
egory. Their sound is sort of a jazz,
folk, rock,and blues fusion. Around
these parts we have our own roots
music with the likes of Purple
School Bus and now Flyin' Mice.
In the fall of 1991 they released
their first CD, So Hi Drive, which
got good reviews from such maga-
zines as Option and Relix. The
Grateful Dead played this disc be-
tween sets at multiple shows on
their Spring 1992 tour. Flyin' Mice
have shared the stage with such
acts as Col. Bruce Hampton and
the Aquarium Rescue Unit,
Allgood, Leon Russell and other
nationally known acts. They have
received much praise on their im-
provising performances, reinven-
See MICE page 6
i,
I





m �w" �L
6 The East Carolinian
July 13. 1994
SKA
Continued from page 5
sfied as "funny ska Humor is a
major trend in ska; apparently, you
hyetohaveagoodsenseofhumorto
rfBty this stuff, johnny Socko in par-
tffidar is very funny, especially in this
song about vasectomy anxiety.
johnny Socko is followed by the
Peers' "Ye Olde Haus of Mutton
This is an insanely fast tune that epito-
mizes ska's party attitude the chorus
is an accelerated chant of "It don't
matteranywayandldon'trealrycare
This song's fast pace makes it incred-
ibly dancable, at least in ska terms,
which leads me to the next track,
"Bkankin' in Moon Boots" by Ten
Cent Fun. A tribute to the skank, the
preferred dance of ska fens (not a
sexual reference, as I once thought),
this is a party song through and
through. Ten Cent Fun also has the
cUstirrfoncifbeingoneoftheveryfew
ska bands to feature female vocals.
Moving right along, we get to
International Jet Sefs "Ifs Time
Another ska rarity, this one sounds
heavilyinfluerKKdbyjazz,whichgives
ita truebigband feel. Attheother end
o(faes&spectium,AmeriamSka-Thic
alsofeaturesHeavyMarmerV'Down
in Jamaica which is sort of calypso-
reggae-ska.
It's only towards the end of the
disc that we get to what seems to be
one of the modem ska's more domi-
nanttrends,ska-core.TlTisrnixofpunk
and skaseemsextrernelypopularwith
today's up and coming angry youth,
andAmeriajnSto-77nc'sentriesarenice
examples-FirstupistheBlueMeanies'
"Blah Blah Blah not so much an
angryrnmktuneascircusmusicplayed
at 78 RPM Yes, this one goes really
fast; with its zero production values,
how can punks not love it? The other
ska-core tune, Jack Kevorkian and the
Suicide Machines' succinct "Hey is
mciretraditkTial.Itstartsoutwithariff
thatsounds like bad thrash-metai, but
it picks up quickly. Their name alone,
however, makes them worth men-
tioning.
4meriHnSto-77iKdc�eswimtwo
very strange tracks. Ganster Fun of-
fersa ska versionof ACDC's "Shook
MeMNightLong'whkhnotworks
all too well It frightened me. This is
followed by Heavy Manners' won-
derful H"akin'rhe(emtoTeaThis
one doesn't sound so much like ska as
itdoeslateSeventiespunknewwave
stuff (sort of like pre-fame Btondie).
I'mnot entirely sure why it'shere,but
I'mnot complaining.
American Sha-Thk is a nice little
compilation. Ifs21 songswrapped up
behind a cover by alternative comic
book artist and ska fanatic i lumber
oneEvanDorkin,and if sloadsof fun.
Sorneofthestandardskatracksstartto
sound alike after a while, but the disc
rurBastaggering70minutessoIdon't
mfndsomuch.Sogethappv,al�,oady!
Listen to some ska today!
� Mark Brett
MICE
Continued from page 5
tion and fresh approach to a tradi-
tional genre.
Brighter Day is their latest at-
tempt at refining their vision of a
multi-genre, danceable, rootsy brand
of rock. This CD gives you 13 songs
that are hybrids of several genres.
The title track, "Brighter Day is an
acoustic song that borders on folk, an
optimistic tune with a soft groove for
dancing. There are numerous songs
with a very strong bluegrass flavor
and sparkling harmonies created by
a combination of guitar, mandolin
and banjo.
"Barney's Breakdown" and
"Blues for Bendy" are probably the
HAMLET
most traditional songs on this re-
lease, thesesongsareold style "back
porch music" for fans of folk. 'Tm
On My Way" has a very distinct
Cajun feel with a guest musician on
the accordion and a strange
rockabilly flavor.Most of their songs
haveanold time feel to them, yet the
lyrics are modem. These guys could
fit in in a number of different for-
mats, including country, rock, blue-
grass and folk, or even psychedelic
The final song on the CD is a
dolorous ballad recorded outside
of the studio under the Pittsboro
sky, you can even hear some bugs
and other unidentifiable noises in
the background. This song is con-
cerned with the loss of a lover to
suicide, a very powerful and bleak
song.
Brighter Day is definitely a step
forward for Flyin' Mice. If you are
into the roots music scene this is
definitely a band foryoutocheckout
and they will be in Greenville soon.
Theirexpertiseatimprovisationand
their synthesis of many genres will
appeal to a wider type of audience
and they remain true to tradition as
well for all you old timersout there.
�Kris
Hoffler
Brand New For '94
Parkview
at Kingston Place
1 & 2 BEDROOM2 BATH APARTMENTS AVAILABLE IN JULY
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PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY PRO MANAGEMENT OF GREENVILLE
Barrymore and Lefkowitz, both gross
caricatures, represent the conflict of all
arfcfcv Shouid the artist try to produce
tharwhkhistrueobleandbeautifuLbe
it Shakespeare or Rccaseo, or should he
sirrlyprcriucehvhkhwillprovide
himthegreatEstweahhy.TWscanfMof
artvs�ame,moreyvs.gloryragesinthe
rrrind of Andrew ihroughout the play,
mirroring the conflict that rages in the
character of Hamlet Robinson gave an
aclequateperformariceasAndrew,with
his performance frequently mirroring
ttepertcrmanceof Andrew asHamlet
Just as Andrew only occasionally man-
aged tocapture theaudience in theplay,
Robinar; only occasionally connected
with the real audience
Thesuppcitingcastwasectremery
mixedThebestofthelotwas Lawrence
as chajn-smoking agent Lillian, a one
tirnepararrKxircfBanvmc�e(andonce
more in the play, in a very touching
scene between the two fine ados).
Rnlayson did a workman-like job as
Felicia, thebrcfcerwnoendsupgoingtD
Hollywood on the arm of Lefkowitz.
Truly, these two shallow and greedy
characters deserve each other, so their
conTingtogether,dcriewitharninimum
of fanfare, which she did nicely. Her
worst mement was the seance scene
that summons Barrymore, whkh went
on too long, and seemed to lack any
Lifestyle
writers,
Maritis
soon tobe
theManso
call me
this week!
Warren
Continued from page 5
The East Carolinian
calls for applications!
Advertising Dept. seeks
Creative Director, Asst.
Creative Director,
Account Executives to
work with patrons to
create and design ads!
Editorial Dept. looks for
News Writers,Copy
Editors ,Typesetters, Sports
Writers, Lifestyle Writers!
"We need to fill these
positions and we pay for the
work, " dashing GM claims.
Applications taken in
Student Pubs, building!
ALIENS STEAL FORT DIX!
Married couple:
We worship sand! Sand is good
Neighbors: "They ain't right,
vitality or humor.
Also not very well done was
Terrell as Deirdre. A 29 year-old vir-
gin, much to Andrew's frustration,
and the product of a wealthy family,
her character mostly ranges from in-
visible to irritating, with only brief
flashesofcomedy,suchasthedelight-
fulsightofherinthecostumeofoneof
Ophelfa'sladies-in-waitingwhileput-
ting on a pair of high-top Chuck
Taylor's. The whole sub-plot of
Andrew's attempts to consummate
theJrrefaticnshioisverystrained,goes
on too long, and is just not funny.
OveralitheproductJonwasagreat
success, providing an excellent
everung'serrtertainmentasmanyhave
come toexpectfrom the ECU Summer
TheatreTheaction,directed by Walter
SdxieanxjvedaVxignk.Theentire
rrcductkritrxikplaceinthelivirroom
of Andrew's apartment, which was
weD designed by Robert C Alpers.
Edmond Felix's costume designs, es-
peciaLly the Hamlet regalia of
Barrymore, was excellent
The Summer Theatre will con-
dude its 1994 season next week as it
produces "Biloxi Blues The produc-
tionwiDrunfromJuryl9toJury23.The
play does contain some strong lan-
guage, and would be rated 1013 if it
wereamovie.
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MBMHBBBMI n
�����r�ii i rfcuiJif immmi mbM
The East Carolinian
July 13, 1994
Sports
Ponderings
Ahh, media hype. What
credible news source can live
without it? Not many, it seems.
� Why else would a
Dave Pond Sub200 OUt-
Assistant fielder in the bush
Sports Editor ieagues be fol-
lowed around by throngs of re-
porters, all hoping to find a mor-
sel of exclusive information that
hasn't been publicized by the me-
dia buzzards before them? Now,
public relations groups are get-
ting in on the act. Last weekend's
Carolina Mudcats program had
a glossy full-cover shot of the
Birmingham Barons' most well-
known � and weakest-hitting
� outfielder, 45 Michael Jor-
dan. Oh yeah, there is a small
Mudcat logo in the bottom left-
hand corner. This is simply a
Mudcat front-office sellout, just
to make a buck. This program
may become a "collector's item"
in years to come, but how can the
Mudcatplayersfeelaboutit?You
would never go to a Miami Dol-
phins game at Joe Robbie Sta-
dium, purchase a program, and
see Troy Aikman or Joe Montana
on the cover. The goal of any
public relations department is to
support and increase the visibil-
ity of its company or group, not
to shamelessly promote the op-
position.

Speaking of media hype, let's
talkjuiceforamoment. Although
the Nicole Brown Simpson
Ronald Goldman murder case
(sorry, contrary to some belief, it
is not the O.J. Simpson murder
case) is still unsolved, the media
nailed O.J. to the wall from Day
One. Time ran a clearly-doctored
darkened version of Simpson's
mugshot onnational cover, soon
after the murder charges were
announced. This came after
television's slightly-televised
tour of downtown Los Angeles.
Rush Limbaughrecently brought
up a good point about "The
Chase" � if O.J. had been slain,
would the police really have let it
go on for 60 miles with the sus-
pects in the truck just ahead? Of
course not. I've seen better police
procedure on "CHiPs
Monday's Major League
Baseball All-Star Home Run
Derby proved to be quite excit-
ing. Ken Griffey Jr. blasted seven
home runs to lead the .American
League sluggers to their fourth
straight victorv over the national
leaguers, 17-10. Chicago White
Sox slugger Frank Thomas hit the
longest shot of the afternoon, a
519-foot blast off the facade of
Three Rivers Stadium. The only
disapointmentofthecompetition
was Mike Piazza who, for the
second straight year, failed to go
vard, held to a few sharp line
drives butmostlypop-jps. Other
man that, the twentysomething
crowd of baseball's newest stars
proved thattheycandrawacrowd
and keep the people happy (as
shown by the numerous stand-
ing ovations during the Derby).
ECU still out to sea
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Where the Pirates will dock
their ship in the near future is still
undecided.
Still determined to join a con-
ference, ECU has two prospects:
the Metro (Louis ville,UNC-Char-
lotte, South Florida, Southern
Miss Tulane, Virginia Common-
wealth and Virginia Tech) and
the Great Midwest (Alabama-Bir-
mingham, Cincinnati, Dayton,
DePaul, Marquette, Memphis and
St. Louis).
Yet, there is also the possibil-
ity that these conferences could
merge with the football programs
dictating the way. Five of the six
football-playing school officials
(Southern Miss, Tulane, Louis-
ville, Cincinnati and Memphis)
met at the end of June to discuss
the situation, but nothing was re-
solved.
"By the end of the summer,
we hope to have everything
worked out and put an end to
this said Metro publicity direc-
tor Jamie Kimbrough in a phone
interview.
There was speculation that a
deal with the Metro conference
was close at hand, but apparently
that was not the case. A final de-
cision could happen in at least
two weeks, or by the end of the
summer, according to ECU sports
information director Charles
Bloom.
"If it happens, it will be a
wonderful thing said ECU head
coach Steve Logan. "If it doesn't,
at the same time we will just con-
tinue to keep doing what we are
doing. I don't think it is going to
be momentous if we don't get in.
File Photo
ECU running back, Junior Smith, is entering his final
season. He could easily be a Heisman Trophy candidate this
coming season. ECU'S last candidate was Jeff Blake in 1991
I think if we do get in, it will
obviously be a big deal for our
whole athletic program.
"We've just got to keep our
nose to the grindstone and keep
working, and eventually it is go-
ing to happen, I'm convinced of
that. I would like this thing to
work because the people they're
talking about I think that we are
very competitive with and a natu-
ral rival too. It could be really
good and I hope it happens, but
again I'm not losing sleep over it.
If it doesn't happen, I think it's
really important that wejustkeep
doing what we're doing and then
it will happen eventually
If ECU does join one or the
combination of these conferences,
the teams will most likely include
Southern Miss, Tulane, Cincin-
nati, Memphis and possibly Lou-
isville. ECU would most likely be
See CONFERENCE page 8
Jordan still swinging hot air
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Photo by Jason Williams
Michael Jordan, seen here making one of his
unsuccessful attempts at the plate Sat. night, has said
that he plans to spend the All-Star break with his family.
He has denied rumors of a basketball return.
Foraguywhocan'thit, Michael
Jordan sure draws a crowd.
On his second appearance at
Five County Stadium in Zebukm,
N.Cthis season, Jordan wentacom-
bined l-for-9 in three games, but
managed to attract record crowds
despite his .195 batting average.
In a Saturday night double-
header, the Carolina Mudcats split
with Jordan's Birmingham Barons,
dropping the first game 5-1 while
winning the nightcap 6-0. The Bar-
ons won Sunday's game 12-0.
Saturday's opener began with
autograph-seekers scurrying behind
the stands to get a glimpse of Jordan
taking batting practice. Once the
game began, fans crowded the
rightfield bleachers to cheer Jordan
on in the outfield.
The Barons' thirdbasemanChris
Snopekopened the first game witha
three-run homer over the left-field
fence,and Birmingham neverlooked
back. Pitcher Joey Vierra scattered
See JORDAN page 8
Im�
Based on last week's trial
and hype, what do you
think of OJ's case?
Photos by Leslie Petty
Angela Ervin�
"Guilty, based upon
evidence brought out
thus far, and the fact
he has no alibis
between the suspected
murder time. Time
will tell
Caroline Smith� "I
do not feel he is
capable of
committing an act
as harsh as they
are accusing htm
of. I believe he was
set up
Christopher Smitty�
"With all the
evidence that has
been presented,
everything points to
him being guilty, but
I do not see how he
could have done it
Page Folley� "He
is not guilty until
proven. Until then,
my opinion is
rather unbiased
Page 7
ECU Football Notes
SEVEN FORMER PIRATES ON CFL ROSTERS
Seven former ECU football players are listed on opening
season rosters for the Canadian FooTball League. This list includes
Jerry Dillon (Sacramento Gold Miners), Luke Fisher (Shreveport
Pirates), Charles Miles (Sacramento Gold Miners), Junior Robinson
(Sacramento Gold Miners), Al Whiting (Las Vegas Posse), Henry
Williams (Edmonton Eskimos) and Walter Wilson (Baltimore).
Dillon played linebacker four seasons (1989-92) at East Caro-
lina, finishing with 298 total tackles, with 22 behind the line of
scrimmage. Fisher finished his ECU career at tight end in 1991 as
the school's all-time leading receiver with 102 catches for 1,462
yards. Miles played running back for two seasons at ECU (1991-
92), gaining 319 yards on 32 carries.
Robinson played defensive back at ECU for three seasons
(1987-89) and had 184 tackles and 13 interceptions. He averaged
23.7 yards per kickoff return during his career, which is sixth on the
school's all-time list.
Whiting played wide receiver for three seasons (1988-90) and
caught 45 passes for 624 yards. Williams is third in ECU history in
career kickoff returns (1983-84), averaging 25.7 yards on 43 re-
turns. He led the nation in kickoff returns in 1983 with a 31.1 yard
average.
Wilson finished his ECU career as the school's career leader
in receiving yards with 1,670 (91 catches). He was a four-time
letterman (1986-89) at wide receiver.
SMITH ON DOAK WALKER PRE-SEASON LIST
Senior running back Junior Smith (Fayetteville, N.C.) is one of
38 pre-season candidates for the prestigious Doak Walker Award,
which recognizes the nation's outstanding collegiate running backs.
The list was released by the GTE-SMU Athletic Forum, which
selects the award winner.
This year's pre-season candidates are the most impressive in
the 5-year history of the Doak Walke� Award in terms of the
institutions they represent said George T. Reynolds, III, chairman
of the GTE-SMU Athletic Forum.
The Doak Walker Award is named for the Southern Methodist
University running back who led the 1949 Mustangs to a Cotton
Bowl victory and personified the term "scholar-athlete It is the only
major award which recognizes and rewards scholarship, citizenship
and leadership as well as athletic achievement.
Juniors and seniors playing in a running back position and
currently enrolled and in good academic standing at an NCAA
division l-A college or university may be nominated. In addition,
candidates for the Doak Walker National Running Back Award must
have demonstrated leadership and good citizenship.
Semi-finalists for the award will be selected by the GTE-SMU
Athletic Forum Board of Directors in November. The 1994 Doak
Walker Award and the accompanying $10,000 Doak Walker Schol-
arship to the award recipienf s college or university wiH be presented
at an awards banquet on December 6,1994, in Dallas, Texas.
Smith finished sixth in the nation last year in rushing, averaging
122.9 yards per game. He needs just 348 yards in 1994 to become
the school's career rushing leader. He already owns the school
marks for single-game and single-season rushing yards.
NU SKIN HONORS COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYS OF THE YEAR
For the second straight year, Nu Skin International is sponsor-
ing the College Football Plays of the Year. And for the second
straight year, ECU has been featured on a videotape, which
contains the top 45 plays in college football of the previous season.
Last season, ECU'S Reggie Robinson, a senior linebacker
from Greensboro, N.C, earned an honorable mention when he
intercepted a pass against Kentucky on Nov. 13,1993.
In 1992, Carlester Crumpler's game-winning touchdown catch
against Virginia Tech was featured.
The "Play of the Year" in 1993 featured Colorado running-back
Lamont Warren, who threw a 40-yard halfback pass to Charles
Johnson for a touchdown.
The videotape will go on sale in the late summer with proceeds
to benefit several charitable organizations.
For information on how to obtain the tape, write to Nu Skin
International, College Football Play of the Year, 75 West Center,
Provo, UT 84601.
Upsets occur in first week of
second session intramurals
(Rec. Serv.) � Several surpris-
ing upsets headlined play in the first
week of 2nd summer session intra-
mural sports as championship teams
from previous semesters were dealt
heavy blows while attempting to de-
fend their titles. Round robinplay will
conclude this week, and next week's
playoff action is expected to be highly
competitive. In 3-on-3 Basketball, the
featured contest matched the "Fat
Cats composed of players from the
lstsummersession5-on-5champions
against the "Longfellows who had
captured the3-c�rt-3titlesbothlast sum-
mer and during the 1993-94 year. Led
by the offense of Brian Haislip and
BartNeuman'TneFatCats" emerged
victorious over the "Longfellows
who were without Neil Torrey, witha
39-32 win The all-around offensive
play of Eric Foley and the long-range
shooting of Todd Moser kept it dose
for the "Longfellows "Nowhere to
Rua'behind the steady offensiveplay
of Daniel Finn and the rebounding of
Frankie Durham, defeated
"Solomon's Wisemen Return" 21-
15 ina defensivebattle. Jeff Byrd and
Jamie Rowland led the "Wisemen
whoweresetbackduetoaninjuryto
Mark Solomon. Finally, "The
Crusties" were winners 33-30 over
"De Mala Muerte led by a bal-
anced attack fromShannonCowan,
Brad French and Jacob Jones. Bran-
don WcotenandChrisNelsonpaced
the offense for "De Mala Muerte
In Co-Rec Softball, 1st summer
bessionrunners-up The Economics
Society" exacted a measure of re-
venge opening play with victories
over defending champion
"Summer'sFinest" 10-6andthe"Fun
TeamLesterZeagerscoredsixtimes
in the two games to lead the offense
while Scott Mozingo and Courtney
Harold made major hitting contri-
butions. "Summer's Finest" gained
a split for the week in taking a 16-6
See INTRAMURALS page 8





HBM HMHUMMI
8 The East Carolinian
July 13, 1994
Irish continue to make history
(AP)�Tradition, and the right to
call the shots, mean a lot at Notre
Dame. It wasn't easy to give up either
one.
Ninety-six years after the univer-
sity played its first men's basketball
game, it finally has joined a confer-
ence. Notre Dame traded autonomy
� a cherished institution under the
Golden Dome�for what could be a
fasttrack back to national prominence
as the 13th member of the Big East.
The Fighting Irish will compete in
the Big East in every sport except foot-
ball, beginning in 1995. As the only
big-money sport involved, and the
only Notre Dame sport not currently
tied toaconference, basketball was the
obvious focusofthemoveannounced
Monday.
Surrenderingitsindependentsta-
tus has been a sore subject for Notre
Dame. While basketball coach John
MacLeod cheered the lifting of his
biggest recruiting barrier, athletic di-
rector Dick Rosenthal bristled at the
notion that Notre Dame had been
forced into a league.
"Clearly, we didn't join the Big
East because we wanted to cease be-
ing independent said Rosenthal, in
Colorado forwhathesaid was his first
real vacation in seven years. "I think
Notre Dame could have stayed very
well as an independent
The main reason Notre Dame
sought out the Big EastlastNovember
wastoenhanceitsnon-revenuesports,
many of which have climbed to na-
tional prominence, Rosenthal said.
Thatopporfunity seemed tohave
been missed just four months ago,
when the Big East passed up Notre
Dametoconcentrate on self-preserva-
tion.
The conference expanded to 12
full-time members March 9, adding
football-onlyschoolsRutgersandWest
Virginia, but denying the same status
toTempleand Virginia Tech, also foot-
ball-only members. Play will be es-
tablished in 1996.
INTRAMURALS
Continued from page 7
win over the "Fun Team" as Claire
Norman, Sandy Meadows, and Mark
Holley have generated the primary
run support. The "Fun Team" hopes
to break out of their slump heading
into the playoffs but will require an
awakeningfromsluggerEmilyGoetz
to get the offense going.
Men's Softball featured some
high-scoringaffairs with the topgame
of the week matching "U Lose II"
against "Summer's Finest" (men's
team). Inanexcitingsee-sawbattle "U
Lose II" won a hard-fought 19-18 vic-
tory as Allan Smith scored the win-
ning run in the bottom of the last
inning tohelp his team finish the week
with a 2-0 record. Mike Kehoe scored
five times for "U Lose II" while Sfu
Windleyproidedstead)'pitchingand
scored four times as well. "Summer's
Finest" finished the week at 2-1 with
victories over "The Crusties" and
'TenthousePlayers"asToddThigpen,
Kemp Ewing and Bryant Becton pro-
vided steady hitting and defensive
play. "The Penthouse Players" also
finished at 2-1 as Rob Chapman and
Glen Hodgjns powered the offense.
Neil Dickinson played in only one
game for "Penthouse but scored
four times and pitched effectively.
"The Crusties" struggled during the
first week playing World Cup soccer
with the ball in the outfield and in
chilled some cold bats.
Golf outings and trips to Europe
left this unit somewhat in disarray,
but they hope for greater success in
theupcomingweek. The spectacular
fielding of Billy Layton and the hit-
ting of Kelby Thomdyke and Daniel
Finn highlighted efforts of the
"Crusties
Volleyball play also begins this
week in Christenbury Gym. Top
Teams include Marty Hurst's "Car-
riage House Best Crystal Tedder's
"No Fear" and Debbie Hill's "Beer
Huggers
JORDAN
Continued from page 7
seven hits in six innings to pick up
his fourth win of the season.
Jordan went0-for-3,andstruck
out with a man in scoring position
in the first inning. He failed to hit the
ball out of the infield in each of his
three at-bats.
Carolina won the second game
behind strong pitching by Mariano
Delos Santos and timely hitting by
centerfielder Jermaine Allensworth.
The Barons had only four hits, and
Jordan went 0-for-2, but reached
base on a walk during his final at-
bat. For the nightcap, he moved
from his usual position of rightfield
to designated hitter.
In Sunday's game, won by the
Barons, Jordan went l-for-4 with
two RBIs. After the game, he had
the following announcement:
"There wasa lot of speculation
made about my announcement of
retirement and going back to bas-
ketball, and itwasn'tstartedby me.
I think that's some of the media
pressures trying to get me back in
the game. That's totally not going
to happen.
"No, I'm not going back to
basketball, as I heard you guys say
on television and on the radio. I'm
here. I'm happy to be here and I will
remain here
Olson's Trivia Quiz
Q. Now that the All-Star break is here, what teams, or team, have
been first in their division with a losing record for the first half of
the season?
puepieQ J3.o pra lueS gt e poq pue pjOMi -�j. ' Ml!� ISM anSeai
CONFERENCE
Continued from page 7
a full-time member in all sports
with a new affiliation.
Louisville is apparently on the
bubble with this deal. About a
month ago, Louisville was a school
which was uncertain of which path
to take and they could possibly be
thinking that there football pro-
gram is fine as an independent.
Louisville athletic director Bill
Olsen could not be reached for
comment.
Virginia Tech is currently part
of the Big East in football. When
the Big East expanded Rutgers and
Temple as full-time members a
few months ago, it left Tech a little
disturbed. At the time, Big East
officials said that it would not ex-
pand at all until at least the year
2000, but Monday the Big East
grabbed Notre Dame into all
sports, except football, for a sort of
a compromise with the basketball
teams.
Now that gives the Big East
13 basketball schools and could
set the stage for another expan-
sion � possibly Tech for basket-
ball � and the league would al-
most have to go to divisional play
within the conference.
Tech has an agreement with
the Big East in football, and if
they were to pull out, they would
have to pay about $1 million ac-
cording to Tech sports informa-
tion director Dave Smith.
"We're really not looking to
get out at all Smith said in a
phone interview. "We would like
to have all our sports in one con-
ference, in the Big East. I'm sure
some of our alumni are disap-
pointed with the decision Notre
Dame's joimg The Big East, but
we understand the decision
If a decision is reached, the
plan will probably be put into
effect in the fall of 1996.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 13, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 13, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1018
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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