The East Carolinian, May 25, 1994






Sports
Closing In!
ECU is coming closer to
inking a deal with the
Liberty Bowl and possibly a
new conference. Story on
page 7.
Lifestyle
The Crow' Flies
Brandon Lee's last film
gets good marks despite
the plethora of mishaps
that occured during its
making. Story on page 5.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 3& �30
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, May 25,1994
8 Pages
Renovations to begin on central campus dorms
Wendy Rountree
Photo by Leslie Petty
Who knows what goes on behind closed doors? Actually, construction work has already begun on Slay
residence hall, pictured here, and on Umstead and White Hall, as well. Micro-friges are included.
Housekeepers begin rotation
Staff Writer
Campus living is chang-
ing, particularly housing. After
renovations, Slay and Umstead
residence halls will be open to
students fo- the 1995-1996
school year. Students assigned
to White Hall only have to wait
until this fall to enjoy their ac-
commodations.
Originally, Slay and
Umstead's renovation plans in-
cluded connecting the two halls.
However, because of financial
constraints, the halls will not be
joined.
'Basically, the hall will
be renovated as is said Inez
Fridley, associate director of
University Housing for Facility
Management.
In the future the two build-
ings will be connected, but un-
til then, there will be a court-
yard between the two buildings
and working elevators facing
the courtyard, said Emanuele
Amaro, director of university
housing
When construction begins
again, that courtyard will be re-
placed bv a three-story build-
ing. The first floor will be a so-
ciallounge space for students.
The second floor will
accomodate a computer room,
and the third floor will have a
weight room.
Other renovations include
all new mechanical systems
such as plumbing, electrical
wiring and hall carpeting. All
rooms will be air-conditioned
and furnished with new desks,
chairs, beds and carpeting.
Kitchens and 'bathrooms will
have new floor and wall tiles,
and each floor will have a
lounge. Amaro stressed that the
buildings will comply with the
American Disability Act (ADA).
Amaro has also proposed
that Slay and Umstead be co-
ed. Whether they will be co-ed
by building or floor will be de-
cided this fall. The occupancy
number will remain at about
500.
The residence halls will be
used "twelve months out of the
year, for summer school and
holidays Fridley said. Also,
they will be open for partici-
pants who attend conventions
and conferences held on cam-
pus.
Amaro said that the
dorm selection process will
begin in March. Students who
currently live in White Hall
will be given priority.
Starting this fall, White
Hall will house upperclass
students and offer single-
room accommodations only.
The hall will be co-ed by floor,
with one more floor for
women than men due to the
first-come, first-serve basis
that was proposed to students
this spring. Slightly more
women responded quickly to
the nev housing option than
men. Currently, the hall is
filled with returning students
and space for new students is
not available. The hall will
house close to 200 people.
Though the hall is not
See WHITE page 2
Jason Williams
News Editor
To students who live in resi-
dence halls, housekeepers often
seem like "mothers away from
home In the past, housekeepers
worked in one dorm, and devel-
oped close relationships with many
students over the course of the se-
mester. Thanks to a new policy that
rotates housekeepers to ensure that
theyallhaveanequitableworkload,
the days of getting to know your
housekeeper may be over.
The policy, implemented on a
trial basis for the summer sessions,
is designed to make sure house-
keepingworkis"evenly distributed"
among the several dorms, said Di-
rector of HousekeepingServicesCJ.
Jeck He explained that before the
rotation policy, housekeepers in the
high-rise dorms on the west end of
campus would take care of 20,000
square feet while those in me central
Jackie Qnassis
buried in D.C.
NEW YORK (AP)�It was a
fleeting moment 32 years ago, a
handshake and a smile. But George
James spoke of Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis as if she were a long-lost
friend.
"She was so beautiful said
James, a 77-year-old retired postal
worker, recalling his 1962encounter
with the first lady.
"Weboth said hello. Now, I'm
here to say goodbye
More than 1,000 ordinary
people mourned the passing of Mrs.
Onassis outside the Park Avenue
church where her funeral Mass was
held Monday. Their presence and
kind words were vivid reminders
that the public Mrs. Onassis tried to
keep atbay felt an intimacy with her
anyway.
"I loved Jackie very much
said Gladys Orchard, 74, who left
herMorristown,N.Jhomeat5a.m.
in hopes of getting a seat in St.
Ignatius Loyola Roman Catholic
Church.
Butlikeeveryoneelse without
an engraved invitation, Mrs. Or-
chard could get no closer than a
See ONASSIS page 2
campus dorms would take care of
8,000 square feet.
Jeck said he has yet to receive
feedback,eitherpositiveor negative
about the change; however, some
housekeepers do not like the new
policy. Onehousekeeperwentas far
as to resign last month when she
was moved from Cotten Hall.
Mattie Suggs, a housekeeper
for 11 years, quit in late April and
stopped working May 13. She
worked on the first floor of Cotten
Hall for the past six years. "They
changed it around so much, it got so
rough for me for 11 years that I just
had to leave Suggs said. She said
that she had been in an accident and
she could not do some of the work
"They justwouldn'twork with
me she said. "They changed the
working rules. They took two
womenoff thefloor,and theymoved
Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
me out to Heming Residence Hall.
The dressers in Fleming feel like
they weigh 500 pounds. I just can't
move them
Suggs said that housekeepers
had no input as to the decision to
rotate, and she was not consulted
about the policy change until it was
put into effect. "They kept it under-
cover, they didn't tell us anything
Some studentsareopposed to
the rotation policy as well. "This has
really upset me said Jennifer
Tedder, an education major who
lived in Cotten Hall last semester.
"My housekeeper takes care of us.
She's like a mother and makes this
place feel like a community instead
of a dreary dorm
Tedder also said she woi Id
not be comfortable knowing that
"complete strangers will be in and
out one dav after another
Student named Volunteer of the Year
Stephanie Lassiter
International program
offers cheaper travel
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Many students feel it would
be impossible to travel abroad with
their measly imcomes; however, it
is possible with the help of Global
Citizen Resource Network (GCRN).
GCRN is a new program es-
tablished to give students around
the world the opportunity to travel
and to intermingle with other cul-
tures in the world. With over 180
members worldwide, GCRN is a
great alternative for travelers in
countries such as the United States,
France, Spain, Australia and
Singapore. Members agree to host
other members for only two days
or nights per year, in exchange for
the same accommodations in an-
other country or another city within
their home continentcountry.
"It is also a domestic pro-
gram said Blair Ward, director of
membership recrui tment If a stu-
dent in North Carolina would like
to come to Los Angeles, that is pos-
sible
Ward said that GCRN offers
travelers the chance to get inside
the scene, rather than be lured into
traditional tourism traps.
"It helps studentsbridge anxi-
eties about traveling such as lan-
guage barriers Ward said. "Hav-
ing a member in another country
gives you the opportunity to get
into the local scene
Members provide GCRN
with an itinerary and GCRN gives
the traveler a list of members within
that area. The members are given
discounts on international air fares,
access to a computerized network
of travel contacts and translation
assistance. So, no need to worry
about being stuck in a foreign coun-
try with no dictionary.
TobecomepartofGCRRyou
must pay an initial $38 member-
ship fee, Ward said. Those who join
now are considered Charter Mem-
bers and receive a lifetime mem-
bership.
Those interested in GCRN can
call (619) 274-GCRN, or write: 5666
La JoUa Blvd. 121, La Jolla, CA
92037.
Assistant News Editor
Chris Lucas is another example of the out-
standing volunteerism that exists on the ECU
campus. The Ronald McDonald House of East-
ern North Carolina awarded Chris Lucas with
its Volunteer of the Year award at its annual
banquet April 21.
Lucas, a junior majoring in finance, was
recognized for his dedication and commitment
to the Ronald McDonald House.
"I know he will do a good job and stay until
it gets done said Stephanie Barnard, public
relations director for the Ronald McDonald
House.
"Lucas as he is called by his friends,
became involved with vol unteering about a year
ago when his fraternity, Pi Lambda Phi, helped
remove old carpet from the house. Lucas contin-
ued volunteering because he enjoyed helping.
As well as helping to assemble 8,000 lumi-
nary kits at Christmas, Lucas drove the van to
deliver the kits to towns around Greenville and
those as far away as Jacksonville. Lucas noted
that his favorite volunteer project was playing
Santa Claus when he delivered a bicycle to the
brother of an ill cnild who was sponsored by the
Ronald McDonald House.
"I feel fortunate to be part of the Ronald
McDonald crew Lucas said.
Traditionally, the Volunteer of the Year
award goes to a regular volunteer who commits
to a specific number of hours per week. But, the
people at the Ronald McDonald House felt Lucas
had made such a great contribution that he was
given the award.
"He was the leader of the pack Barnard
said.
Photo by Leslie Petty
Being Santa Claus is every child's dream, but it
was a reality for Volunteer of the Year "Lucas
In addition to volunteering and to partici-
pating in fraternal activities, Lucas is a member of
the ECU Student Reserve where he ranks as a
lieutenant.
"It is a chance to give back to the commu-
nity he said. "The community has given so much
See VOLUNTEERS page 2
World Trade Center bombers get 240 years
NEW YORK (AP) � Two
Muslim fundamentalists convicted
in theterroristbombingof the World
Trade Center were sentenced yes-
terday to 240 years in prison by a
federal judge who said he expected
them to die behind bars.
Mohammed Salameh and
Nidal Ayyad were the first two of
fourmentobesentencedatalengthy
hearing where all the defendants
were given the chance to address
the court. They spoke in Arabic,
which was then translated into En-
glish.
U.S. District Judge Kevin
Duffy sentenced the men after hear-
ing a statement requested by the
husband of a pregnant clerical
I
worker killed in the explosion.
"I'll never get a chance to see
him grow up Ed Smith said of the
boy his wife, Monica, was carrying.
' 'We all lost tltis because of four men
who wanted to blow up landmarks
in New York
The Feb. 26, 1993, bombing
killed six people and injured more
than 1,000 in the 110-story twin tow-
ers, the world's second-tallest build-
ings.
Salameh, 26, a Palestinian im-
migrant, was convicted March 4 on
charges of conspiracy, explosives
charges and assault. In his half-hour
speech to the court, he proclaimed
his innocence and accused the U.S.
government of covering up the real
storv of the bombing.
"I wonder how long I will
remain in prison until the govern-
ment reveals I was innocent?" said
Salameh. "Twoyears?Seven?Ten?
Twenty? God only knows
the sentencing in a heavily
guarded courthouse capped a trial
that lasted more than five months
and involved more than 200 wit-
nesses and more than 1,000 exhib-
its.
Duffv said the 240-year sen-
tences were calculated according
to the life expectancy of the six
killed bv the bomb �180 years�
and adding 30 years each on two
See CENTER page 2





2 The East Carolinian
May 25, 1994
CENTER
Continued from page 1
May 17
Brewster � An officer discovered a mechanical problem with an
air conditioning unit.
Student Stores � Officers responded to an intrusion alarm. The
manager was contacted and the building was checked.
May 18
Mendenhall � An officer assisted the Greenville Rescue Squad
with a visitor who had passed out.
Northeast of Brody � A non-student was arrested for Driving
While License Revoked.
May 19
Cotten Hall � A student was served criminal summons for a
worthless check.
College Hill Drive � A non-student was arrested for possession
of a weapon.
Umstead Hall � A student was arrested for Driving While
License Revoked and making an illegal left turn.
May 20
Outpatient Center Parking Lot�A student reported damage to
the rear window of a vehicle.
School of Medicine Visitor Lot � A staff member reported
breaking and entering of a vehicle.
May 21
Wright Building � Report of a possibly mentally disturbed
student was reported.
Fletcher Hall � Two non-students were banned from campus for
the attempted theft of a bicycle.
May 22
South of McGinnis � A non-student reported a male exposing
himself.
Cotten Hall � A criminal summons was served on a resident for
a worthless check.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
further counts.
" Mv intention is you stay there
(in prison) for the rest of your life
Duffy said after sentencing Salameh.
The judge added, "It is the mark of a
sneak and a coward to plant the
bomb to kill innocents and to steal
away, and that's what you are � a
coward
Duffy, whoalso fined Salameh
and Ayyad $250,000 each, told them
that any money generated by story
rights or book deals would go to the
victims' survivors.
" I can't imagine any one wan t-
ing to give you anything Duffy
told Ayyad.
Salameh was accused of help-
ing pay for and assemble the bomb
before renting the van that carried it
into the trade center's underground
parking garage.
Ayyad, 26, a chemist, alleg-
edly ordered chemicals for the bomb
and sent messages to news organi-
zations afterward that the motive
was to protest U.S. aid to Israel.
Mahmud Abouhalima, 34,
was often seen in the apartment
where the bomb was built, while
Ahmad Ajaj, 28, allegedly provided
bomb-making expertise. Ajaj was in
jail on a false-passport conviction
when the blast occurred.
Ajaj lived in Houston; the oth-
ers lived in New Jersey suburbs of
New York Gty.
Cont'd
from
pagel
WHITE
Cont'd
from
pagel
ONAS&S
VOLUNTEERS
Continued from page 1
to me
Joylynn Hannahs was also
recognized for her outstanding
work as the public relations intern
for the Ronald McDonald House.
Hannahs, who graduated in May
with a B.A. in communications,
was responsible for supervising
the assemblage of the luminary
kits sold to raise a $25,000 net
profit.
" I would call her a lif esa ver
Barnard said. "She really hustled
on the luminary project last fall
Barnard also recognized
Judy Baker and the ECU Student
Volunteer Program for their com-
mitment.
"We count on ECU
Barnard said. "We have a good
relationship with the university.
I would also credit Judy Ba ker f or
helping to coordinate their ef-
fort
block away. Held back by police
barricades, the crowd strained to
catch glimpses of John F. Kennedy
Jr Hillary Rodham Clinton, Arnold
Schwarzenegger and other mourn-
ers as they entered the church.
As police officers on rooftops
scanned the crowd with binoculars,
the funeral's uninvited guests kept a
quiet vigil under a cloudless sky.
Park Avenue, normally a river of
pedestrians and yellow cabs, was
mostly silent, except for the radio
broadcastof the service wafting from
radios.
When Mrs. Onassis' ma-
hogany casket finally was lifted into
the hearse, Noland Brockington
waved a sign reading' 'Camelot Will
Be Reunited In Heaven
air-conditioned, other features
are offered such as new car-
pet, miniblinds and paint for
the walls.
A special feature will be
a micro-frige for each room.
Micro-friges are a combination
of a refrigerator with its own
freezer compartment and a mi-
crowave oven on top. The mi-
crowave plugs into the refrig-
erator, and the refrigerator
plugs into the wall electrical
socket. Amaro said they are
cost-effective for saving en-
ergy and meets the voltage
load limit for the building
code. These micro-fridges
were acquired from a company
that supplies equipment to
hotels and other hospitality fa-
cilities.
I In I tiiin �hiiiiin
miMM iivlcil ui ail l;M wa'k
Idi Spoils ul
I Ik TkhrHl (K.I RS
t � i ,ti
sh I (
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water -Sewer "Cable �Draperies
�Self-cleaning Oven -Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections �Utility Room
�Patio with Fence "Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks "Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool �Basketball Court
�Tennis Court Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease � Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WUTHIN
FIVE MINITES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
752-0277 Equal Housing Opportunity
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
Openings for Fall & Both Summer Sessions '94
Your Next School Years Living Space In A
Student Village will be Guaranteed
If You Apply Now!
AT A PRICE THAT WILL COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
Need A Place to Workout?
Special
Summer Rates
For Students
Stairmasters
& Lifecycles
6-Wolff Tanning
Beds
AEROBICS
� 6 Days Weekly
� High & Low Impact
� Step Classes
� Toning Classes
FULL LINE OF
YORK FREE
WEIGHTS AND
NAUTILUS
INCLUDING
OVER 3500 LBS.
OF DUMBELLS
We Honor Any
Competitor's
Membership Price
Or Coupon
409 S. Evans St.
752-3880
(Across from The Elbo Room)
FREE
FIRST VISIT
WITH COUPON
(l per Customer wID
expires 81594)
409 South Evans
Street
(Across from The
Elbo Room)
752-3880
I
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J
MMMMNMMI





May 25. 1994
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 3
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
. ir
paper
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders. Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asa. News Editot
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU communi.y since 1925. The Eos, Carolinian publishes l2.(KK)copieseveryTuesdayandThurscla,v. The
masthead edUonal in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolyn welcomes eUers.hm,K do
words, which mav be edited fordecencor brevity. The East Carolinian reserves thernghl Jp
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian. Puhlicauons Bid ECU. Greenv.lle. N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
WHATEVER 5tifLL i &o ufi rim,
A man? MY SELt-esreerA ap
jfr , Posj'T HAV6 616,
STRONG. MAv "TO SHfl�� T
WITH W0� IS ULlOLrielg
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died last
Thursday night of cancer, bringing to and
end an era in American public life. Mrs.
Onassis was the last living link to the
Kennedy presidency. She seemed to embody
all the magic, romance and hope the era
represented.
When John Kennedy was inaugurated
in 1961, she was only 31, the epitome of a
new beginning for America. After nearly
thirty years of older leaders, America seemed
to draw new energy from its young first
couple. The first lad was a strong contrast
to her predecessors. Eleanor Roosevelt, Bess
Truman and Mamie Eisenhower were all
much older, less stylish women.
America fell in love with Jackie. She
was graceful and cultured. When her
husband was killed, she not only garnered
sympathy as widow, but also immense
respect for the brave manner in which she
handled herself in the aftermath. Almost
alone, she planned the most famous funeral
in American history
She also invented the Camelot myth.
In an interview for Life magazine, she
described the Kennedy administration in
idealized terms, even quoting lyrics from
"Camelot
America's obsession with Jackie
continued until her death. She was treated
like royalty, the closest thing America has
had to a queen. While she was in many
respects a very admirable woman, the two
elements behind much of the adulation she
is posthumously receiving is disturbing.
First, rather than being praised for her
intelligence, toughness or accomplishments,
too many are merely lauding her for her
beauty, style and grace. These are all
admirable qualities, and the last two are
certainly lacking in our day. However, are
these really the attributes for which one
should be remembered? Is this any way to
sum up a life, especially one which produced
as much as hers did? This seems to be a
subtle form of sexism � judging a woman
merely on her appearance and charm, and
not her accomplishments.
Second, there is something rather
disturbing wi th the apparent desire of many
people to admire royalty. In our day, royalty
has come to be seen as some sort of quaint
relic of the good old days. The whole reason
that there are so few monarchies left is that
they are ultimately inimical to personal
freedom.
The world surely lost an extraordinary
woman last week. Just as surely we are
capable of overcoming the urge to settle for
the superficial, and instead looking at her
many achievements as wife, successful
mother, professional woman and patron of
the arts.
By Patrick Hinson
By Laura Wright
Single women viewed negatively by society
Assault weapons provide sense of power
A few weeks ago I stood out
in the back yard of my girlfriend's
house, looking out over the vast
expanse of green, open farm fields
whileholding her brother's
Chinese SKS assault rifle in my
hands. I'd never fired one before,
and I was somewhat reluctant to
do it then, but I had always
wondered what they felt and
sounded like when fired. From
having always seem them on TV,
or read about �����HHMHB
had actually experienced. My first
reaction, of course, was mat it was
fun, that it was cool and macho
and all that. However, it wasn't
long before I started seeing the
gun in a different light. If I felt
powerful and destructive firing
the gun, how must a fourteen-
year-old feel when he holds one?
How must a drunk person, or a
person all cracked-up on drugs,
deranged and mad at the world,
���H feel when thev
Young kids who have
nothing, who wield no
power and who are
not overly concerned
about the future have
gold in their hands
when they hold a gun.
them in
various
books, I guess
I had
developed
somewhat of
a fascination
with them.
I
involuntarily
shut my eyes
as the rifle fired and was shocked
at the incredible sound of the gun
and the kick from the stock into
my shoulder as it went off. It was
like a canon; a huge, thunderous
burst of power and energy
condensed into a split second's
action, pulling the trigger.
I held the smoking gun
down and looked at it with wide
eyes. My girlfriend's brother
encouraged me to use the
'automatic to fire off ten rounds
back-to-back. So I did, and it was
a strange, exhilarating feeling of
power. I was almost embarrassed
to feel that way, having always
somewhat made fun of the pro-
NRA gun wielders. But there was
no denying it. I felt what most
young men must feel when they
hold an instrument as powerful
and destructive as a loaded
weapon, especially an automatic
weapon.
For a time, after firing the
gun, I thought about it and what I
hold one? How
must someone
who has lost all
regard for
human life feel
when he gets his
hands on one?
Serious
thoughts, aren't
they?
���� Young
kids who have nothing, who wield
no power and who are not overly
concerned about their distant
future have gold in their hands
when they hold a gun. They have
power and influence, the kind that
they would certainly neverpossess
without a gun. They have control,
or at least a sense of it, which is
rare in a teenager's life. The same
goes forthe junkie, hurting for a
fix or for money that they can't
wait too much longer to have. They
have the power to motivate people
and change things with a gun. The
power to (or so thev think) solve
their problems. So it is as well with
the person mad for revenge.
They're not thinking straight, their
mindsareclouded with anger. The
gun is a clear solution. Wipe out
the source of that anger by
destroying others.
Here I found myself
thinking back to the gun. The
owner of the gun 1 fired bought it
for less than two hundred dollars,
and got a discount for buying two
of them!
Do you see what I'm saying
here? It's not that I think most
people will use a gun like that to
wipe out a restaurant full of
people, it's that many people do.
Too many people who should not
have access to a weapon can walk
down to any store and pick one
up. My argument here is not so
much that I'm anti-gun as it is that
assault rifles and automatic
weapons are really only good for
two things; storage and killing.
Arguments to the contrary just
don't seem to hold much weight.
The NRA argument is a
tough one. It is truly a matter of
individual rights and the right to
bear arms. However, all I had to
do was pick up and fire a fairly
common weapon on the market
like the SKS to realize the very
dangerous power that guns like
those give to the individual. If
everv single person in the United
States is eligible to own one of
those, then I almost feel the need
to start carrying one around myself
(which, if you've been watching
the news, is the booming new
trend), because it really worries
me that I'll have to defend myself
some day from someone who
should never have been given the
opportunity to even touch a gun,
much less own one.
Guns kill. That's what they
were made to do. It doesn't take
too much intelligence to figure that
out. However, I think that
intelligent people like ourselves
must eventually concede that the
safety of the whole must over-ride
the rights of the few. We don't
need guns like those out on the
market, any more than we need to
see the gorv headlines in the news
each da v. More and more the two
of them seem to be directly related
I am working at a book-
store. For the most part, I think
that I couldn't have found a job
that is better suited to my dispo-
sition: I love to read, 1 get to take
books home with me and bring
them back after I'm done, and I
get a discount Life is good.
There have been a few ad-
justments that I've had to make,
though. For starters, I haven't
worked retail since I was in high
school. I had forgotten how hard
it is to stand on your feet all day
and I had forgotten how hard it
is to smile and be cheerful all of
the time. It's probably harder
for me than for most people; my
moods are very seldom smiley
and cheerful.
But, basically, I feel that I
am surrounded by good things
to read and I like my coworkers.
It's like I have found an oasis of
at least semi-open-minded-ness
in the otherwise barren land-
scape that I lovingly refer to as
Greenville.
I was feeling particularly
happy the other day � sort of
independent, self-fulfilled and
useful � and I was checking out
some of the new shipments. I
came across a book called The
Chronically Single Woman. This
title says a lot, thought I. Before
I even opened the book, I had a
pretty good idea about it's con-
tents.
First of all, I noticed that
the book was directed towards
the single woman as opposed to
the single person, individual, or
man, for that matter. Second,
according to the title, to be single
and female is a chronic condi-
tion, sort of like halitosis. Sort of
like migraines. Sort of like can-
cer.
In other words, to be single
and female is an undesirable,
but hopefully treatable, situa-
tion. There's something wrong
with you if you're a single
woman. If you're unaware that
there's something wrong, just
read this book. After you've de-
cided that you have something
akin to a disease if you're single
and lacking a penis, this book
will provide you with the self-
sacrificing strategies necessary
to get yourself a mate.
I thumbed through the
book and discovered that the
author's basic assumption is that
no matter how satisfied single
women believe that they are,
deep down inside they are mis-
erable because they long for a
man to make their lives com-
plete. I noticed that there was
no companion text for men.
Nothing titled The Terminally
Single Man. Apparently, mencan
be mentally healthy and single.
I started to reassess my
situation. I seemed to feel O.K.
as a single woman. Maybe I was,
deep down, longing painfully
for marriage and wifehood. Lots
of my friends are getting mar-
ried, I thought. What is wrong
with me? Suddenly my good
mood faded into mild depres-
sion.
Then Idealized that if
women read books that reinforce
the myths that we will only be
happy if married or devoting
our lives to men, then naturally,
we may keep on believing that
we are unhappy if we choose to
stay single. I think that it is prob-
ably more of a problem to al-
ways feel the need to be coupled.
I'm not trying to claim that
women don't want companion-
ship, because I think that every-
one, women and men, needs it. I
just don't think that a woman
needs to be classified as ill if she
actually enjoys being unat-
tached, uncommitted and places
her needs above those of a po-
tential mate. To claim that
women who are single are
chronic is like the Victorian
claim that outspoken women are
hysterical.
Lately, I've started to be-
lieve that my goals and needs
are more important to me than
anyone else's and that I like be-
ing single. I am completely un-
willing to compromise myself
at the moment and I feel O.K.
about that. Sure, it's nice to have
someone to wake up to every
now and then, but I wouldn't
give up my solitary early morn-
ing coffee and newspaper for
anybody right now.
I cheered up again and dis-
carded The Chronically Single
Woman as the chronically mis-
guided delusion. Then I came
across a book about Hillary
Clinton in which the author at-
tacked the first lady as a satanic
murderess. Can you say para-
noid? Remember: just because
it's published doesn't mean that
it's true; lots of Bozos write
books.
Letters to the Editor
To the editor:
I am writing in response to a letter that appeared
in the May 18th edition of The East Carolinian. This
letter stated, "Let's be honest about what SGA is. It's a
bunch of fraternity sorority leeches building a resume
while siphoning as much university money as possible
into the Greek beer fund. If SGA were to disappear
tomorrow, what would the average non-greek ECU
student lose?"
Well Mr. Dennis Wilhelm, I disagree. The Student
Government Association funds over 80 student
organizations, only 3 of which are "Greek" related. Is
it wrong for Greeks to get involved in SGA? I certainly
don't think so. Any full-time student with a 2.0 GPA
can join the Student Government Legislature. There
are a limit number of positions on the Legislature, but
lhe truth is that allof these positions are usually not
even filled. Greeks, or any other students for that
matter, should not be attacked for filling leadership
roles on our campus, they should be encouraged to do
so.
And as far as, "Siphoning as much university
money as possible into the Greek system's beer
fund please! Anyone who is familiar with Student
Government, IFC, Panhellenic or any other student
organization on campus knows that that has not,
does not and will not happen! There are very strict
limitations on what student fees can be used for.
ItamazesmethatagraduateofEastCarolina
University would make such uninformed
statements about Student Government. If it wasn't
for Student Government, you wouldn't have a
transit system, emergency student loans, financial
support for student organizations or a voice in
shaping university policy.
I've been involved in Student Government
for the past 3 years, and I've seen the positive
things that have been accomplished. I chose to get
involved and make a difference, not to sit back and
criticize, Mr. Wilhelm. What have you done?
Brynn Thomas
SGA Speaker '9394
All letters, in order to be considered for publi-
cation, must be typed, under 250 words, and con-
tain your name, class rank, major and a working
daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to
the Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications
Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
i






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-The East Carolinian-
Page 4
For Rent
HOUSEMATE WANTED to share
large 3 story house 3 minutes from
campus by car. Must be non-
smoker, grad student preferred,
commuterideal. Pleasecall Michael
"at 752-3635, leave message if no
answer available May 1st.
SUMMER SCHOOL Sub-lease
Ringgold Towers. Private room &
bath. Female only. For more infor-
mation call: Amy Beth, 758-5427.
NEED A PLACE TO STAY FOR
THE SUMMER? Apt for rent
across from campus. $200.00 a
month. Call Heather at 704-664-
3757.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
near Hospital. Must be serious stu-
dent and non-smoker. Located in a
quiet neighborhood with lotsof fruit
trees. Has garage for some storage.
Rent of $260.00 monthly. Includes
utilities and washerdryer. Avail-
ablejuly 15-Augustl5.Call Harold
after 4:00 p.m. if interested.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female,
upperclassman, non-smoker pre-
ferred to share house with other
females,rent$150.00andshareutili-
tiesphone. Own room and bath-
room, if interested, call 758-8126.
ROOMMATEWANTED: to share
house 1 block from campus.150.00
a month and split cable, phone and
electric. Call 830-1765, ask for An-
drew.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
2 bedroom and 2 bathroom mobile
home at Greystone Mobile Home
Park. Can start renting May 18, only
For Rent
$ 175.00 and 1 futilities. Prefer non-
smoking male student. Call Scott
Tanner at 321-0404 if interested.
NEED ROOMMATE FOR 2 BED-
ROOM APT. 1 block from
campus.Rent's142.50 , deposit is
the same as rent. 12 utilities,
washerdryer included in rent. Call
757-2820, leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED! 5 clocks
from campus, 3 bedroom duplex, $
150.00 monthly and 13 utilities,
wd hook-up. Prefer: non-smoker,
sociable female. Available NOW.
Call 758-8422.
AVAILABLE NOW ! 1 bedroom
duplex, $225.00 or 3 bedroom du-
plex, with 1 12 baths,420.00.
Walk to campus. Call 752-1375.
AUGUST 1ST. 1 bedroom garage
apartment,300.00, pets ok. Call
752-1375. Or 2 bedroom duplex
$325.00 pets OK call 752-1375.
PETS OK ! 2 bedroom duplex, $
380.00, AUGUST 1ST or JULY 1ST, 3
bedroom duplex,480.00. Call 752-
1375.
HUGE 5 bedroom duplex, 2 baths,
$ 500.00 or 4 bedroom townhouse, 2
1 2 baths, plus a basement, $800.00.
Call 752-1375.
aft
r
sfyn
Adventures of Kemple Boy
Classifieds
May 25. 1994
For Rent
share 4 bedroom apt. 2 12 bath;
convenient location. l4bills$ 156.00
rent plus deposit. Please call 752-
6835.
M Help Wanted I El Help Wanted gp For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
EM Help Wanted
NEED IT NOW OR LATER
WITH OR WITHOUT A PET
don't wait for the FALLSEMESTER
RUSH HOUR. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5
bedrooms from200.00 and up.
Call today 752-1375.
WANTED IMMEDIATELY ! 2
ROOMMATES male or female to
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
bestsummer jobaround. Playmates
Adult Entertainment call for more
info. 747-7686.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with flex-
ible hours and gain valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Bonnie at 355-
7700 for more information and pos-
sible interview.
ENTHUSIASTIC SALES PEOPLE
to operate cart in shopping mall in
Greenville, Wilson or Rocky Mount.
Call the Globetrotter in Raleigh (919)
782-5450, to arrange interview.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY
! Assemble products at home. Call
Toll Free, 1-800-467-5566, ext. 5920.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for female escortsand danc-
ers. Lucrative income available. Call
321-8252, or 714-5350 for E.S.E.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING- Eam up
to2,000mo. on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies, World travel.
Summer & Full-time employment
available, No experience necessary.
Forinformation,cal 1-206-634-0468,
ext. C5362.
NATIONAL PARK SUMMER
JOBS - Tour guide, dude ranch,
host(ess), instructor, lifeguard, hotel
staff, trail maintenance, firefighter,
volunteer & government positions
available. Excellent benefits bo-
nuses! Apply now for best positions.
Call: 1-206-545-4804 ext. N5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits. Call
1-800-436-4365, Ext. P-3712.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS for additional part-time
Sales Associates in the Juniors and
Men's Departments. Work with
todays hottest fashions. Flexible AM
or PM scheduling optionsclothing,
discountsalary. Interviews held
each Mondayand Thursday, 14p.m
Brady's, The Plaza.
LIFEGUARDS. Summer positions.
Greenville area. Call Bob, 758-1088.
RESIDENTCOUNSELOR-Human
services background preferred. Free
room and stipend in exchange for
hours worked on rotation. Contact
Mary Smith, REAL CIRS1S CEN-
TER, 600 E. 11th Street, 758-HELP.
WEEKEND CHILDC ARE: Mature,
responsible student wanted with
prior childcare experience to care for
our two children, ages 4 ad 9, on
weekend evenings and during a five
day period between July 29 and Au-
gust 2. Call 752-6372 for an interview.
For Sale
FURNITURE: Couch and match-
ing chair, $80.00 (set). Kitchen table
wchairs,$ 75.00. Tan lazy-boy, $
40.00.752-3552.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-W.heelers,
Motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Nationwide auction listings avail-
able now. Call 1-800-436-4363, Ext.
C-5999.
MOPEDS, Honda V A 50. only 600
miles,550.00. Puch, 2000 miles, $
400.00, excellent condition, 100
MPG, 30 MPH, No license ie-
quired. 756-9133.
ET1 Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFI-
DENTIAL, PROFESSIONAL
ResumeSecretarial work. Spe-
cializing in Resume composi-
tion wcover-letters stored on
disk, term papers, thesis, legal
transcriptions, general typing
and other secretarial duties.
Word Perfect or Microsoft
Word for Windows software.
Call today (8A-5P-752-9959)
(Evenings 527-9133).
EAST
CAROLINIAN
MALE SENIOR
COUNSELORS
TO WORK FOR �
WEEKS AT
SI Ml EH CAMP
PLEASE CALL
(919) 792-3960
&
H
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Deadline
Monday at 4p.m. for
Wednesday's edition
Announcements
Any organization may use the An-
nouncements Section of The East
Carolinian to list activities and events
open to the public two times free of
charge. Due to the limited amount of
space, The East Carolinian cannot guar-
antee the publication of
announcements.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication however, no
refunds will be given.
For more information call 757-6366.
MAD HATTER
P15580R13 26.52
P16580R13 29.97
P17580R13 29.17
P18580R13 30.50
P18575R14 31.82
P19575R14 33.15
P20575R14 34.48
P20575R15 35.80
P21575R15 38.45
P22575R15 39.78
P23575R15 41.11
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By Kemple
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
Ov MEDIAL tofarti rtcuT REcsrr eesEAfccH QSi HAS SHOWtJ THAT THE ANTI-MATTER. I TJiyWH'CH C5MPi�-IJ�5 7Ti� KErtpLC- CLOM�5 Vprcici- sTitutrufcE is e�rK��i-T u�-ST7tSl� ' poivjT look ro2.KAtt� 70 iCeival -rrfEACTlcW 0fj kmPlE LAC'S FACE ivrtevCKM TELL5 this is au i rEeol �IEAS MUCH,S YOUCAl
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AM'YWHAT?
by Dickens





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The East Carolinian
May 25, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Wild Colonials
settle at Brewery
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
Internationally-influenced
music finds a new home in
Raleigh's Brewery tonight when
the club hosts the Wild Colonials,
an innovative new band coming
off the West Coast. By drawing
from a number of different cul-
tural influences, the group pre-
sents an eclectic mix of sound as
creative as it is unique.
The group, formed in 1992 in
Los Angeles, is as unlikely an
association as could ever be found
on the music scene. Lead singer
Angela McCluskey was bom in
Scotland and provides a stirring,
emotional testament in all the
songs on the group's album, Fruit
of Life. A guitarist known only as
"Shark" brings a rock heritage to
the material and adds the perfect
complement to McCluskey's vo-
cals. Paul CanteJon adds classi-
cally-trained piano and violin
lines alongwithScottRoewe, who
acts as the group's utility man by
playing bass, horns and
whistles. Drummer Thaddeus
Corea, son of legendary jazz
pianist Chick Corea, rounds out
the group bringing his jazz and
rock influences into the fold.
In a telephone interview
last weekend, McCluskey and
Shark said they are both very
excited about bringing their
unique sound to the east coast
and hope that music fans on
this side of the country will be
as responsive as their western
counterparts.
"We all just love to get an
audience going McCluskey
said. "The people who have
come to see us have been so
terrific it's really very impor-
tant for me as a lead singer to
meet people and thank them
for supporting us. We've come
across some really great fans
out here (on the west coast),
and Ican'twaitforthe chance to
play our music in front of more
See WILDpage 6
NBC drama
tackles AIDS
Photo CourtMy of NBC
Randy Quaid and Eric Stoltz star in "Roommates a story of two men
afflicted with the AIDS virus. The show airs on NBC May 30 at 9 p.m.
By Patricia Dally
Staff Writer
The national release and accep-
tance of Johnathan Demme's feature
film Philadelphia, a compelling story
dealing with discrimination against
AIDS victims, has opened the once
taboo subject of AIDS and AIDS-re-
lated issues to other formats of enter-
tainment. The outrageous success of
this movie is a sign that the public is
becoming more aware,educated and
tolerant of the disease and its conse-
quences to people of all socioeco-
nomic levels and lifestyles.
Network television is lending its
hand to AIDS awareness and educa-
tion with the premiere of a two-hour
television drama on May 30, at 9:00
pm, called "Roommates" on NBC.
Thestory,inspiredbyatrue story,
is about two totally opposite men
Drought together under unusual cir-
cumstances to live and cope together
in the face of AIDS.
Randy Quaid is Jim Flynn, a het-
erosexual ex-convict out of jail on
parole for bank robbery. He con-
tracted the AIDS virus, HIV, from a
blood transfusion he received after
a bar fight Fighting with his family
and down on his luck, he moves
into "The Residence a home for
AIDS infected people run by the
AIDS action committee.
Eric Stolz, famous for his roles
in Some Kind of Wonderful and
Masit,isBillThomas,ahomosexual,
Havard-educated, government
grant consultant Out of a job and
on the fritz with his wealthy family
whoarehav ingtroubledealingwith
his situation, Bill also seeks refuge
at "The Residence
Elizabeth Pena is Lisa Elliott,
the social worker and director of
"The Residence" who brings this
unlikely duo together.
Afteradisastrous first meeting
and a difficult truce, the two men
are forced to come to terms with
each other and tough it out in a
small apartment at "The Resi-
dence
Jim, an extreme homophob,
must learn to bury his prejudices
and accept Bill's sexual orientation
See A'OS pags 6
As The Crow flies, its star is mourned
BylkeShibley
Staff Writer
Brandon Lee was a prom-
ising young action star before his
untimely death during the filming
of The Crow. Lee, the son of martial
arts star Bruce Lee, was accidently
shot when a gun supposedly firing
blanks discharged a live shot.
The set of The Crow had
been plagued by accidents during
its shooting schedule. A worker
was electrocuted, a wall fell on a
crew member and several other
incidentsoccurred during the shoot
leading EntertoinmentWeeklytorun
a story on the possibility that The
Crow was somehow jinxed.
A week after the story ran
in that magazine, Lee was killed in
the freak accident. The death and
injury surrounding 77k Crow cre-
ated an eerie, ominous feeling
about the film.
Now, a year after Lee's
death, The Crow has been finished
and released. The strangeness of
the events surrounding the mak-
ing of the film differ little from the
strangeness of the events which
unfold within the film itself.
The Crow begins with the
death of its protagonist, Eric
Draven (Lee), and his girlfriend.
Draven, a guitarist for a band
Rare Daze
plays final
ECU show
named Hangman's joke, had
fought to stay in a building that a
local gang wanted evacuated. To
convince the tenants to leave, both
Draven and his girlfriend are mer-
cilessly murdered.
As the prologue to the film
states, a soul that is unjustly killed
can sometimes return to exact its
revenge on iiiose who caused its
untimely demise. Thus, Draven re-
fui ns from the dead to wreak havoc
on the four hoods who killed him.
From the opening shots
The Crow promises to be a dark
parable of retribution. From dark
alleys to dark interiors to dark ex-
teriors, the filmitself, as well as the
story, provide little light for the
viewer.
The city in which 77k Crow
takes place looks more like the
Gotham City of Tim Burton's
Batman films than any city in
America. The film takes place
within a two-day span, and never
during that time does the sun shine.
Almost every scene in The Crow
takes place in rain and darkness.
The incessant precipitation adds to
the dreariness of the film.
The men who murdered
Dravenare the hardened criminals
of many a nightmare. With names
like Tin-Tin, Fun Boy, and T-Bird,
these hooligans kill people for the
fun of it with no remorse. The very
vileness of these men scares the
viewer. Evil of such magnitude as
personified by the killers chills the
viewer's blood.
Draven's redeemer on his
quest for revenge is a crow. The
crow is seen often sailing over the
city in dizzying overhead shots.
The crow flies into buildings to
announce the arrival of Draven
then flies back into the rain-swept
atmosphere of the city.
The camera work involv-
ing the crow proves magnificent.
The visuals in the film loou like a
cross between the aforementioned
Batman and Ridley Scott's Blade
Runner. Though not as striking as
either film, The Crow nicely creates
its own supernatural feel wi th stun-
ning camera and art work.
The story takes place on
Devil's Night, Oct. 30th. This night
has become infamous because all
the thugs in town use this night to
create as much chaos as possible,
mostly by burning down a multi-
tude of buildings.
The combination of the
rain, the darkness, the evil associ-
ated with Devil's Night and the
dark story creates a memorably
bleak motion picture.
Adding to the despair in
The Crow is some rather inspired
dialogue. At one point an antago-
nist states: "My father always told
me that childhood's over the mo-
ment you realize you're going to
die This is fairly depressing dia-
logue in a thoroughly dark film. In
another scene, Draven tells a little
girl that it cannot rain all the time.
Yet, the film would indicate other-
wise both figuratively and liter-
ally.
The plot of the film is rather
thin. From the opening scene the
viewer knows that he or se nerd
only wait to see each villain duly
dispatched. Enough interesting
characters are presented in the film
to buoy the script slightly. A little
girl who was friends with Draven
and his girlfriend maintains high
spirits amidst the drabness of ev-
erything around her.
Brandon Lee's tragic death is
accentuated becauseof his fine per-
formance in The Crow. His acting
and acrobatic skills both promised
even better roles for the future. His
acting is remarkable�he conveys
the pain and frustration of his loss
effectively, yet springs into action
with a fierce look of determination.
The Crow should serve as a fitting
tribute to Brandon Lee's abilities.
Cult films sometimes
prove difficult to predict, but The
Crow has all the markings of a cult
Photo Court��y of Atlantic Record
The late Brandon Lee, son of martial arts superstar Bruce Lee stars in The
Crow. Ike ShiWey c?"s the film a testament to Lee's fine acting abilities.
hit. Filled wim music culled from
punk and heavy metal bands, 77k
Crow may serve as a visual realiza-
tion of the dreary songs sometimes
written by these bands residing
outside mainstream culture. The
darkness of the film will draw view-
ers hungry for affirmation that the
world is going to hell, as well as
those who need a counterculture
hero who has the strength to right
injustice.
The Crow may not be for
all tastes, which also bodes well
for cult status, but for those will-
ing to enter its hypnotic spell the
film can provide surreal cerebral
pleasures.
On a scale of one to ten,
The Crow rates a seven.
By Kris Hoffier
Staff Writer
This past Saturday night, Rare
Daze took the stage for the last time in
Greenville. The Peasant's Cafe was
filled to capacity and Rare Daze gave
a performance worthy of any last
show. It was not sad or nostalgic, but
a celebration of the band's ability to
make you shake your booty.
If s good to have a warm and
smoky place to go on a chilly night
Peasant's Cafe was filled to the brim
with Emerald City residents hoping
to catch their fill of the music. After
the beer-nursing crowd was fully
packed in. Rare Daze began to kick
out the jams. Their mixture of funk,
psychedelia and retro60s good times
music seemed to strike a nerve with
the crowd.
RareDaze'ssetswerecomprised
of a collection of danceable originals
and cover tunes. Most of the songs
were quite long probably because
they took time to exploit the instru-
mental or solo parts of the song to the
fullest The instrumental section band,
comprised of guitarist Bernie Lee,
J Uh .No.
JV Take Your Chances
JyV Worth A Try
JVJ V Highly Recommended!
Photo Courtesy of Rara Daxa
Rare Daze, one of the most popular bands to tour Greenville in the past
few years, played their final Greenville show Saturday at Peasant's Cafe
Purple Schoolbus
Purple Schoolbus
J
bassist Dave Voightritter and drum-
mer Andy Rexroat provided a won-
derful pa 'etteof music towhkhsinger
Barbara Nesbitt added her consider-
able vocal prowess. Nesbitt, a whirl-
ingdervish on thestage,hasa voice as
soulful as it is beautiful, which capti-
vated the crowd.
Tearing through their last show,
the band combined originals, such as
"Carolina, Caroline" and "Burning
Bridges with covers from the '60s.
Nesbitf s voice was an interesting
addition toSlyand the Family Stone's
"Everyday People
1 must admit that 1 had, up until
See DAZE page 6
I must admit that the only
time I have encountered Purple
School Bus is in bars, shrouded
by a veil of alcohol and a crowd of
people. I can also say that in that
setting, 1 enjoyed the band's
mostly instrument-driven sound;
and it is for that reason I picked
up their self-entitled debut CD,
Purple School Bus. Apparently,
judging from the 1,000 CDs sold
in just 14 days of release, many
others had the same idea.
For those of you who have
been hiding under a rock, Purple
School Bus is homegrown. The
band, formed in early 1992, per-
formed their first gig opening for
Widespread Panic at the Attic,
here in Greenville. Since then,
they have been touring the East
Coast, from Washington, DC to
Alabama, performing for crowds
of up to 600 people. Their next
logical step was a CD, and a trip
to TGS studios in Chapel Hill pro-
duced their debut effort.
From my experiences
seeing the group in a live setting,
I found a musical quality that is
lacking on their CD debut. The
club-oriented music, which is
more musical than lyrical, seems
out of its element on disk. The
first track, entitled "Don't You
Realize shows promise for more
to come and the second track,
"Harder Everyday with its
Grateful Dead-like lyrics and
melody deliver that promise with
beautiful style. Unfortunately,
after that, I found myself lost in
the monotony of what appears to
be garden-variety alternative mu-
sic without much diversity in
rhvthm or meaning. The remain-
der of the tracks deliver a mes-
sage of optimistic hope and in-
spiration to "find yourself" . . .
boring.
I am reluctant to dismiss
Purple School Bus, seeing as they
have grown out of our own exist-
ence. I fee' we should applaud
them for a level of success that
has so far outlived what most of
us will achieve from here. Cheers
to their success, I think they have
talent that will grow with experi-
ence.
jeers to their album, I ex-
pected more.
� Patricia
Dally





6 The East Carolinian
May 25, 1994
WILD
Continued from page 5
DAZE
Continued from page 5
people
McCluskey said that al! the dif-
ferent influences in the band help to
keep the group "really fresh" and
she minks her Scottish background
adds a unique perspective to the
band.
"Being Scottish allows me to
add a lot of drama that people can
do without McCluskey joked. "I
certainly have a love for a good old
shanty � 1 guess that's only nor-
mal. If s really wild, all the different
influences that the band brings with
it. We've got everything from
Chopin to Urge Overkill influenc-
ing our work
"Everyone in the group can do
their own things and work with
other people in those own things,
and that makes us more mature
musically Shk said. "This band
came together by almost complete
accidentand the people in the group
just seem to work
The band has already sup-
ported singer Chris Issak on the
road and has been described as "al-
ternative folk-rock but it is virtu-
ally impossible to adequately clas-
sify this band. They are fine with
this distinction, however. As they
put it, such ambiguity might give
them an edge in their quest to re-
main viable in today's music indus-
try.
"We don't want to be a flash in
the pan McCluskey said. "We're
justtrying to make music that makes
people feel good
this point, very little working knowl-
edge of the band � in other words I
had never seen them before. Despite
my ignorance, several members of the
audience knew the band very well,
well enough to sing along with all of
the originals. With such a response as
this, it makes one wonder why the
band is disintegrating. 1 just don't
know.
About quarter to two the band
announced they would be playing
their last songand finished an original
numbe, Lut to the delight of the
Peasant's crowd, returned to do one
final, drawn-out rendition of "Not
Fade Away
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thisorv :nto oblivion when the man-
ager, or whoever, started to cut on
the lights to signal the band to stop.
They stopped,saidasmall good-bye
and the crowd dissipated quickly.
In a desperate attempt to gather
information for this story, I caught
the bass player on the vay out He
seemed in a hurry, so I only asked
him one question. "Any final state-
ments about the band?" I asked. He
stumbled, scratched his head and
said, 'Tell em' don't hold your
bream
Unfortunately, wewon'tGood-
bye guys, well miss you.
Continued from n?z- 5
To my faithful servants:
Lifestyle writers meeting Thursday
at 5 p.m. Call me if there is any
problem with this time.
See ya then,
Warren
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Metzger wants to send the
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The East Carolinian
May 25. 1994
Sports
Page 7
By
Dave Pond
Assistant
Sports Editor
Panderings.
After suffering through
an irqury-filled 1994 season,
the Phoenix Suns' outspo-
ken forward
Charles
Barkley is talk-
ing of retire-
ment. He has
said in the past thathe wants
to retire before his game to-
tally disintegrates, so why
not? Although he has never
won a championship,
Barkley will always be re-
garded as one of the game's
greatest and most colorful
players. After watching
Barkley hobble through the
Phoenix-Houston series, it
became quite obvious that
he was not having fun. After
averaging 38 points per
game in the first round of
the playoffs, Barkley seemed
toweardown,andaveraged
under 30 against the Rock-
ets. If Barkley decides to re-
tire, it will mark the end of
an exceptional player's, and
certain Hall of Famer's, ca-
reer. His flair for the game
wmbe missed, and corrunish
David Stern will be looking
for a new "character" who
can be a goodwill ambassa-
dor for the game along with
Shaq. It could be Glenn
Robinson or Jason Kidd.
Both are flamboyant
enough, and bom are very
young, ckwetotheageof the
NBA's most intense fans.
Liberty Bowl, Metro in the works
File Photo
ECU and Cincinnati are among the schools that possibly could join the Metro Conference as early as 1996.
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Since independent football
schools have become a dying breed,
ECU is avoiding any such fate.
ECU and six other indepen-
dents are nearing an agreement with
the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tenn.
The two-year plan guarantees a deal
that the team with the best record
will host the bowl. The other team
will come from an at-large bid.
The other independent teams
include Tulsa, Louisville, Cincin-
nati, Memphis, Tulane, Tulsa and
possibly Houston.
The Liberty Bowl has struggled
the last few years with attendance
and money, but will pay $750,000
or 75 percent of the gross revenue to
the host, according to The Neivs and
Observer.
'To have something to play for
at the end of the season would be of
great interest to our fans and our
student athletes said ECU Sports
Information Director Charles
Bloom. "This might be one of the
first times ever that East Carolina
University has ever been a part of a
group coalition or a league that
has had an automatic bid for a
bowl game
The most important aspect of
this agreement could be a big step
closer for ECU's affiliation with a
conference.
The Metro and the Great Mid-
West are about to make some pos-
sible household changes. These
conferences might expire, merge,
divide or just add new members,
in the next couple of weeks with
negotiations still in the process.
A football conference is what
most ECU fans have been hoping
to see over the last few years. The
Pirates pushed for an invitation
from the Big East a few years ago,
but it did not happen.
Football is the main sport that
will guide the way to either con-
ference, but there is a possibility
that all ECU sports could head
from the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation (CAA) to the Metro.
The benefits from a confer-
ence would make regular season
games more meaningful and will
See METRO page 8
With all of the accusa-
tions and investigations
corning out of Tallahassee,
Florida State head football
coach Bobby Bowden has
said he knows nothing of
the illegal activities reported,
in which, among other
things, .seven of his players
were taken on a Foot Locker
shopping spree by prospec-
tive agents. I believed
Bowden. when he declared
has innocence in the matter.
What I think Bowden (or
most coaches, for mat mat-
ter) doesn'tsee is mat these
agents, who workbehind the
backs of the schools, are the
reasons why athletes choose
certain schools instead of
others. There isasimple way
to sohe the problem. Col-
lege athletes should be paid
�oaUowanceorsalary.They
work, and the athletic de-
partment gets paid for it in
ticket sales and revenue.
There is no way to gauge the
amount of revenue that
Charlie Ward brought FSU
over his career there, but it
certaiiuygoesaboveandbe-
yond the amount of his
scholarship. Athletes are not
allowed to held other jobs,
so there u� probably no
steady source erf any extra
mcmey�)mi�gr�e�B�w,
except through pMnt� (As
we all know, that's never
enough. That's why I'm
here.) There is no rule that
says someone on an aca-
demicschoiarshipcan'thave
a job, so why is there one for
students onathletie scholar-
ships? College athletic de-
partments need to wisen up.
The athletes are going to get
the money anyway, so why
not make yourself look good
and give it to them your-
selves?
Last week, Jennifer
Capriati, the darling of the
tennis world, was arrested
on a marijuana charge. She
has slowly descended into a
world not uncommon to
child stars, affecting every-
one from Gary Coleman to
Jay North (me guy who used
to play the black-and-white
Dennis the Menace before
we were born). The
probtemstems from the chil-
dren not being allowed tobe
children. Whether it is the
agent or the overprotective
parents, they are forced to
See TENNIS page 8
Richmond deals
Bucs final blow
(ODU SID) � The Univer-
sity of Richmond defeated ECU
in semifinal action in the CAA
baseball tournament by a score
of 6-2 on Saturday. The game
was played at the Bud Metheny
Baseball Complex on the cam-
pus of Old Dominion Univer-
sity.
Richmond's Sean Casey set
aCAA Tournament record with
five doubles, including one to-
day.
Richmond designated hit-
ter EdToberhada tworunhomer
to put the Spiders on the board
in the second inning. Richmond
never trailed in the game.
Richmond pitchers Jim
Durick (5 13 innings) and
Dalton Maine (3 23 innings)
scattered eight ECU hits in nine
innings. Maine recorded his
fourth save in as many relief
appearances this season. Rich-
mondstranded 14runners, while
ECU left nine on base.
ECU finishes at 36-18 and
ODU went on to win the tourna-
ment.
ECU eliminated George
Mason 4-3 in game three of the
tournament.
The game see-sawed back
and forth through the first six
innings, but after GMU took a 3-
2 lead in the top of the seventh,
ECU scored two in the bottom of
the inning to claim the win.
Winning pitcher Johnny
Beck went the distance, scatter-
ing six his withsixK's. All three
GMU runs were unearned.
ECU commited seven errors in
the game.
ECU dropped game two to
Old Dominion, 15-4 Thurdsday
night. ECU took the early lead,
when leadoff man Jamie Borel
walked and later scored on a
ground out Brian Yerys. ODU
answered back with a run in
the bottom half of the inning.
The Monarchs scored two more
in the bottom of the second,
and broke the game wide open
with six in the fifth.
ECU went on to score one
in the sixth and two in the sev-
enth, while the Monarchs had
one in the sixth, three in the
seventh and two in the eighth.
Monarch starter John
Smith had a no hitter through
five, and only gave up two hits
in seven innings. He allowed
four runs, two of them earned,
with six K's.
The Bucs commited seven
errors in this game as well.
The Pirates beat UNC-
Wilmington 4-3, in round one.
JasonHead singled home Borel
in the top of the tenth inning
and Beck pitched the ninth and
tenth for the win.
ECU tied the game in the
top of the ninth when Chad
Tripplett scored on a squeeze
play. Clark dropped the bunt
to the right of the pitcher to
bring Tripplett home.
File Photo
The Pirates finished the regular season fifth, and completed
the CAA tournament in fourth. The team will have a new look
next season because of many seniors leaving.
1994 ECU football schedule
Sept. Sept. Sept.10 17 24
Oct.1
Oct. Oct.8 15
Oct. Oct.22 29
Nov. Nov.5 12
Nov.19
at Duke
at Temple
SYRACUSE
(Pirate Club Weekend)
SOUTHERN MISS
(Parents' Day)
at South Carolina
VIRGINIA TECH
(Hall of FameLetterwinners' Weekend)
at Tulsa
CINCINNATI
(Homecoming)
at Auburn
CENTRAL FLORIDA
(Academic SuccessChamber of
at Memphis
7 p.m.
6
4
p.m.
p.m.
4 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
Commerce Day)
2 p.m.
Graphic by Dave Pond
Borel named to All-CAA team
(SID)�ECU senior centerfielder Jamie Borel was
named first team All-Colonial Athletic Association at
the CAA Baseball Awards banquet on May 17 in
Norfolk, Va.
Borel, from Overland Park, Kan is batting .359
for the Pirates and ranks 14th in the league. ECU's
single-season and career stolen base leader (38 steals
this season, 65 career), Borel leads the conference in
steals and ranks 12th in the nation in steals per game.
Four other Pirates were recognized as second
team All-CAA selections including third baseman
Rick Britton, outfielder Jason Head, designated hitter
Brian Yerys and left-handed pitcher Johnny Beck.
Britton, from Venice, Fla leads the Pirates in
batting with a .383 average and a .628 slugging per-
centage. The senior also leads ECU in extra base hits
with 25 this season (14 doubles, two triples, nine
home runs) and is second in runs batted in with 49.
He currently ranks sixth in the CAA in batting and
seventh in RBIs.
Head, a sophomore from Hookerton, N.C is
batting .309 for the Pirates. He is second on the team
in doubles with 13 this season and has hit five home
runs.
Yerys, a junior from Charlotte, N.C is the Pi-
rates' second leading hitter, batting .371. With a .556
slugging percentage, Yerys leads the team in RBIs
with 55 and ranks fourth in the league for RBIs and
10th for batting. He has hit 12 doubles and eight
homers this season.
Beck, ECU's career-strikeout leader (313), received
his third all-conference award. Last season, Beck, a
senior from Garner, N.C was also named a first team
FILE PHOTO
Leadoff-man Jamie Borel will be missed by Pirate
fans. He holds the ECU career stolen base record.
selection. Beck leads the CAA in wins with a
10-1 record, is 10th in strikeouts with 64 this
season and ranks ninth in ERA (3.61). Beck is
second on ECU's all-time win list with 30 vic-
tories.
NBA playoffs bring along fighting
(AP)�A word, or just a look, is
all it takes to get a brawl started.
Sometimes it begins with something
thathappened a minute before, other
times it is the previous quarter or the
previous month.
An exciting and often artistic
playoff seasorufilledwithcomebacks,
near-comebacks and upsets, hasbeen
marred by two bra wls in the first two
weeks of the NBA playoffs. Players
are squaring off menacingly, just one
swing a way from another melee, and
that is what the NBA is afraid of.
"It was really disgusting for any
fan to have to watch it, and have fans
subjected to it commissioner David
Stern said after the Knicks and Bulls
brawled right in front of him Friday.
"It's something we're not going to
tolerate. Obviously, over the years
we have continued to change the
rules. We've taken all the steps.
"I mink that, overall, violence is
down. But given the media attention
it gets, we're constantly reminded
that whatever it is that we're doing
wehaven'tdoneitwell enough Well
continue to squeeze, at the risk of
costing teams games, at the risk of
costing teams series. You're not go-
ing to win in this league if you engage
in violence, and the players who en-
gage in that have no place in our
league
Knicks guard Derek Harper, de-
spite being suspended fortwogames
for his part in the brawl, agreed there
is no place for fightingat NBA games.
But he suggested th;? fights could be
controlled before they start.
"I think a lot of it is stirred up
because there's a lot of taunting
going on Harpertold NBC. "There
arealotofguysthatprovokediffer-
ent situations, and it leads to more
than you want it to lead to. I think
the referees have to cut the guys
from taunting so much
Harper,astarter,andChicago's
Jo Jo English, a seldom-used re-
serve, locked horns near midcourt.
Their wrestling match concluded
with Harper body-slamming En-
glish near the sidelines, a few feet
away from a glum-looking Stem.
Almost every player jumped
in, some undoubtedly trying to
See BASKETBALL page 8
(
� ����





8 The East Carolinian
May 25. 1994
METRO
Continued from page 7
bring regional rivalries.
Currently, the Metro contains
basketball members of Louisville,
Tulane, VCU, UNC-C, Southern
Miss, uth Florida and Virginia
Tech.
The Hokiesarecurrently mem-
bers of the Big East football confer-
ence, and it might not come as a
surprise if they departed. Tech was
not recent! v included as an all-sports
member when the Big East ex-
panded a few months ago. Rutgers
BASKETBALL
and Temple were the two additions
instead of Tech.
The Great-Midwest in basket-
ball contains Cincinnati, Memphis,
Marquette, AlBirmingham,
DePaul, St. Louis and Dayton.
A Metro football conference
could Include ECU, Cincinnati
Memphis, Louisville, Tulane, Tulsa
and Southern Miss. Louisville is the
key element in closing a deal.
A final decision could happen
later this week or early next week
break up the brawl, others getting
caught up in it.
The following day, Harper was
suspended for two games and fined
$15,000. English will miss one game
with a $10,000 fine.
The total of $162,500 in fines was
the second-largest in league history,
topped only by the $163,500 levied
after a fight between Philadelphia
and Detroit on April 20,1990, when
the principals were the76ers' Charles
Barkley and the Pistons' Bill Laimbeer.
Harper has a reputation for
gentlemanlyplay,butChicagocoach
Phil Jackson, a longtime critic of the
Knicks' physical style, said "some-
thing has happened" to Harper since
with both the conference realign-
ment and the Liberty Bowl contract.
Most likely, the bowl contract will
go into effect next season and the
conference will start in 1996.
"We would be happy either
way Bloom said. "Anything that
would happen would be better than
where we are right now
Whichever outcome ECU
chooses, it will be beneficial to Pirate
athletics and it will give fans some-
thing to cheer about.
Continued from page 7
he came to play in New York.
"It was very out of character for
me Harper said Sunday. "1 don't
think there was any excuse for it. At
the same time, it's easy for people to
say that you shouldn't do this and you
shouldn't do that, but in the heat of
battle, a lot of times you react, and all
of the time it's not the proper action
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Continued from page 7
grow up too quickly, and then, in
response, they rebel. Capriati, at
14, was the youngest player to
win a match at Wimbledon, after
her father pleaded to Wimbeldon
officials to waive the age require-
ment (16) so sh e cou Id co m pete
. . to improve her game Im-
prove her game? Couldn't she do
that on the junior circuits, where
officials are more accustomed to
handlingchild stars?Capriati has
the support of the tennis world
and is only 18, so there is still time
for her to get her life on track.
However, the first thing that she
needs to do is re-enter high school
and get her diploma. Then, if she
wanted to quit pro tennis, she
could go to college and build her
life in a different direction.

Now that future Hall of
Famer Nolan Ryan has retired,
46-year-old Florida Marlin right-
hander Charlie Hough, in his
25th season, has become
baseball's elder statesman. Tech-
nically, Hough has always been
older than Ryan, but Ryan's
greatness has always overshad-
owed his success at an older age.
He started out pitching in Los
Angeles, and moved through
Texas and Chicago before land-
ing in Miami. The thing about
Charlie Hough is his usefulness
and versatility. Hough is the first
pitcher on record to have started
400 games and to have relieved in
400 more. At 46, Hough's fastball
could be hit by any average high
school player, but he continues to
have success on the mound. His
dancing knuckleball has become
his most prolific weapon and
should keep him employed until
he decides to retire. Grabbing
Hough is one of the best moves
that Marlins GM Dave
Dombrowski has made to date
(along with trading for Gary
Sheffield and drafting Jeff
Conine). What better type of
player to bring experience to an
expansion pitching staff? People
make a big deal about father-
son combos in baseball (the
Griffeys the Bonds etc.). Let's
face it, Hough has pitched
against father-son combos, and
has had moderate success
against them and everyone else
throughout his career. With a
214-209 lifetime record and a
3.70 earned run average, Hough
will probably not be inducted
into the Hall of Fame, but he has
earned the respect of at least one
journalist for his efforts.
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 25, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 25, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1010
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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