The East Carolinian, April 7, 1994






Comics
Hot Crackers, Pirate Comics!
The long-awaited return of
Wang TV (for real this time!).
Plus a big duke-a-roo in
Kemple Boy, and much more!
All on page 6.
Lifestyle
Where's the Beer?
Dr. Nancy E. Crouch of
the Nutrition and
Hospitality Management
Department says
restaurants are skimping
on beer. Story on page 9.
Today
ii-MiiviVivWn:iiir
The East Carolinian
Vol.69No.�3
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, April 7,1994
18 Pages
SGA faces another election
STOPP!
If you're fed up with campus parking (or lack
thereof), attend the Students Tired Of Parking
Problems, April 14, at 2 p.m. in GCB1011.
Chancellor Eakin plans to speak to the group, and
wouldn't that be a great time to asksome
questions? Speak but and be heard!
Conference offers help
By Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
No one really knows what
the future holds for our educa-
tion system. However, ECU'S
School of Education has some
pretty good ideas.
For the past five
years, a conference has fTr
convened to present to mm
North Carolina's Tr
teachers the available ��
technology for their wwC
classrooms. This year, n"
the conference, titled "
"Connections: Linking the
Classroom to the World dem-
onstrated to the 900 participants
that learning should not only
teach the students but make the
over-all learning experience fun.
"We want to show the
teachers things that are possible,
not the things that would be nice
HHr
for them to have said confer-
ence co-chair, Dr. James S.
Pressley.
At the conference, public
school teachers participated in
hands-on demonstrations of com-
puter ware that not only aids their
students in learning, but
connects their class-
Tr room to the world. A
key note speaker
from the National
8 �� Telecommunications
" and Information Ad-
ministration and an
advisor to Governor
Hunt spoke on the theme
of "Development of the Informa-
tion Highway and Its Impact on
Public Schools
Participants were able to
choose from several sessions and
labs that included working with
See TECH page 5
By Maureen Rich
News Editor
Amid protests of dirty cam-
paigning, claims of fixed voting
booths and charges that all three
candidates were over budget, the
SGA elections screeched to a halt
last night. A new obstacle cap-
tured participants' attention �
the need for a three-way run-off
for the position of SGA president.
Brynn Thomas received 40.6
percent of the vote, while both Ian
Eastman and David Reid received
29.3 percent of the student body
vote. To win an election, one must
garner 50 percent of the voting
body.
Similarly, the race for vice-
president also resulted in a run-
off, this time between only two
candidates, Sheila Boswell and
Chris Munley. Boswell captured
43.5 percent of the vote, while
Munley grabbed 30.5 percent.
Scarlette Gardner received 24.2
percent, and as the third-place
candidate, is not qualified for the
run-off.
The run-off will take place
April 20, exactly two weeks from
the original election date, unless
all candidates involved agree to a
run-off in one week. Their unani-
mous consent would then prompt
a legislative vote. A run-off in one
week is unlikely, said Keith Dyer,
spokesman for Brynn Thomas,
because Thomas will not want the
run-off to take place in one week
as he is out of town.
The elections for the posi-
tions of secretary and treasurer
resulted in two clean sweeps.
Michael Carnes won the position
of treasurer with 53.5 percent of
the vote, and Doug Spears won
with 52.3 percent of the vote.
The results were tabulated
by Wendy Creasey, research co-
ordinator, using the same com-
puterized system that professors
use to tabulate test results taken
from blue or "bubble" sheets.
"We ran multiple data
checks to insure accuracy
Creasey said. "These results are
completely accurate
Both Dyer (speaking for
Thomas) and Eastman expressed
satisfaction with the results.
"I'm excited about the run-
off Eastman said. "Maybe now
we can get away from the dirty
campaigning and concentrate
on the issues. I'm very pleased
with the number of people who
came out and voted. They know
what I'm about � I'm very satis-
fied
Dyer expressed confidence
that Thomas would win the run-
off, and shunned all allegations of
dirty politicking.
"We feel like this is a vic-
tory Dyer said. "Brynn is the
better candidate, and this was a
psychological victory
Dyer pointed out that the
four candidates running together
� Thomas, Boswell, Carnes and
Spears � either won their posi-
tion or will participate in the run-
off.
Reid, speaking from
Filibuster's restaurant shortly af-
ter the results were announced,
voiced confusion that such a tie
could have occurred.
"Does that not sound
strange?" Reid said. "I'mjustlook-
ing forward to talking about real
issues: crime, parking, student
fees. Obviously, there was some
wrong-doing going on. I'm not
See ELECTION page 4
Water gun
fight leads
to arrest
By Jason Williams
Former Russian spokesman to visit
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
Russian media comes to
ECU tomorrow in the form of a
very famous individual. Former
spokesman for Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev, Gennadi
Gerasimov, will wpend all day
Friday at ECU.
Gerasimov served as
spokesman for Gorbachev and
Eduard Schevardnadze during
theeraofglasnostandperestroika.
He also served as political advi-
sor to Yuri Andropov, who be-
came head of the KGB and later
lead the Communist party.
"Gerasimov's familiarity
with the Russian political scene is
significant and his viewpoints will
be fascinating said political sci-
ence professor Maurice Simon,
who helped arrange the visit.
Gerasimov's topic is "Post-
Communist Russia: Continuity
and Change Therefore, he will
be open to questions about the
former Soviet Union and about
current Russian-American rela-
tions.
Gerasimov will speak to
political science students in Dr.
Carmine Scavo's "Media and Pub-
lic Policy" course at 10:00 a.m.
Friday in the C wing of Brewster,
room 101. He will givea 25-minute
speech and will be open to ques-
tions for the remaining 25 min-
utes. Gerasimov will also hold an
open question and answer forum
in General Classroom building
3007 from 3:00-4:30 p.m.
Both discussions are open
to ECU students and the general
public.
"Gerasimov's visit presents
a rare opportunity for ECU stu-
dents to interact with someone
who has held important positions
in the Soviet and Russian media
Simon said.
Later, Pi Sigma Alpha, the
political science honors society
hosting Gerasimov's visit, will
host a dinner and speech featur-
ing the topic "American-Russian
Relations in a Changing World
This event is open to Pi
Sigma Alpha members only.
He is spending this semes-
ter as a visiting professor in the
political science and communica-
tions departments at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Wilmington.
Assistant News Editor
Police arrested ECU
football player (John)
Allen Williams late Tues-
day night and charged him
with disorderly conduct
and resisting arrest, cam-
pus police said yesterday.
The incident took place af-
ter a water gun fight in
Scott Residence Hall got
out of hand.
At approximately 10
p.m ECU Public Safety
and Greenville Police re-
sponded to a complaint by
Scott Residence Hall staff
that a "large number of
individuals were engag-
ing in water gun fights
with Super Soaker water
guns said Lt. Keith Knox,
Public Safety information
officer.
Upon arrival, offic-
ers observed Williams, a
starting wide receiver on
ECU's football team, in
possession of a water gun.
As the officer was escort-
ing Williams to his police
vehicle to issue him a cam-
pus citation, he became
disruptive and uncoop-
erative, at which time he
was placed under arrest
for disorderly conduct,
Knox said.
"Williams became
belligerent, demanding
that I return the water pis-
tols wrote Public Safety
Officer S.B. Kittrell in his
police report. "I refused
and he stated: 'You will
not take those water
guns
After Kittrell es-
corted him outside, Will-
iams struggled with
Kittrell for "approxi
mately 30 seconds to 1
minute" before being
forced into the car, the re-
See ARREST page 5
Spring cleaning hits streets of Greenville, thanks to fraternity
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
When fraternity brothers
just do not feel like conducting
spring cleaning at their own
houses, they hit the streets of
Greenville. In this case, Fifth
and Summit treets received the
cleaning.
The Sigma Phi Epsilon fra-
ternity scoured the streets from
top to bottom, picking up pa-
pers, cigarette butts and vari-
ous assorted pieces of trash dur-
ing the five hour cleaning spree.
Some brothers expressed
disgust at what they found.
"Students at ECU should
be more conscious of their lit-
tering habits said a tired-look-
ing Saed Hamad, vice-president
of the fraternity. "Maybe if ev-
erybody cuts down with pollu-
tion on campus and around
Greenville, it will make the area
look better than it already does.
We feel it is our responsibility
to give back to the campus and
the whole community
Many Greek and other lo-
cal organizations adopt streets
and help take responsiblity for
them. The familiar signs read-
ing 'This street adopted by
' can be seen throughout
Greenville and are part of the
Adopt a Street program.
Sig Ep adopted Fifth and
Summit Streets from the city
of Greenville a few years ago.
There is a sign on Summit
See CLEAN-UP page 5
eople
on the street
Did you vote in the SGA
elections? Why or why not?
Bob Wharton, senior: "Yes,
because students should not have
any right to opinions involving
school issues if they do not vote
Allison DeBastiani, sophomore:
"Yes, I read some good information
on one particular candidate, and
felt they would do a good job
Katiti McCuller, sophomore: "Yes,
because I think it is important to
elect good officers to represent
the student body
Ramon Navarro, junior: "Yes,
because I think the people that are
running are going to do something
about a major issue. As a part of
the student body it's my
responsibility to vote, and the
people I vote for are my voice





2 The East Carolinian
April 7, 1994
March 30
Austin Building �M:34 a.m. Bomb threat.
Scott Residence Hall � 8:38 p.m. Damage to real property (bathroom).
March 31
Bottom of College Hill � 2:13 a.m. Armed robbery; assault with a deadly weapon.
South of Christenbury Gym � 2:56 p.m. Driving while license revoked; speeding.
April 1
Southeast of the Galley � 5:47 p.m. Report of communicating threats.
April 2
Tyler Residence Hall � 3:18 p.m. Report of harassing phone calls with communicating
threats and disorderly conduct.
April 3
Basketball court area, Belk Residence Hall � 8:55 p.m. Report of assault.
South of Scales field house � 9:45 p.m. Breaking and entering; larceny (auto).
April 4
General Classroom Building � 2:10 p.m. Report of larceny of ECU property.
South of Ficklen Stadium � 6:50 p.m. Breaking and entering; larcenv of a vehicle.
April 5
West of Mendenhall � 1 43 am. Second degree trespass; larceny of a sign.
Tyler Residence Hall � 4:20 a.m. Report of communicating threats bv telephone.
Belk Residence Hall � 4:35 a.m. Possession of marijuana, drug paraphernalia.
Aycock Residence Hall � 6:00 a.m. Arrest of student for communicating threats over the
telephone.
Brody School of Medicine � 9:00 a.m. Report of larcenv; credit card fraud.
Compiled by Jason Williams Taken from official ECU crime reports.
4
&
t0n �a W
t
A

PHASE 3
ECU WELLNESS FAIR
Thursday, April 14 from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
(see Tuesday, April 12 East Carolinian for
the Complete Evolution)
Disabled students speak out
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Take a walk bv the student
stores Monday and you may see
something of interest � an ob-
stacle course sponsored by PUSH
(People United to Support the
Handicapped) Monday will mark
the beginning ot a series of events
to promote Disabilities Awareness
Week.
"Sometimes disabled stu-
dents get lost in the crowd and
thev need a voice for their con-
cerns and to raise awareness and
to show what thev can do, not so
much as what thev can't do said
Susan Pogemiller, advisor for
PUSH.
Showing ECU what thev can
do is the objective for Tuesdav
night. Ml students are invited to
join in Mendenhall from 7-9 p.m.
to strut their stuff at a party com-
plete with a live band. Wednes-
dav night the activities will return
to Mendenhall with the puppet
show "Kids on the Block Each
puppet has its own unique dis-
ability.
Thursdav has been titled
"Assume a Disability Day" and
able-bodied students are asked to
assume a disability for the entire
day and then speak about this
learning experience ip. Mendenhall
at 7 p.m.
"This vear the main thrust ot
Disability' Awareness Week is to
show our abilities rather than our
disabilities said Mark Jayson,
president of PUSH
"We have the same hopes
and aspirations of everyone else
The organization partici-
pated in a rock-a-thon March 1�.
Phi Sigma Pi sponsored the event
and WZMB broadcast some of the
rockers on the air, Jayson said.
ECU currently has 20 stu-
dents in wheelchairs, nine sight
impaired, 30 hearing impaired, 130
learning disabled and 30students
with other disabilities. Some ex-
amples ot other disabilities are
severe arthritic conditions or
Lymes disease.
"All ot these people have
special needs, and sorru need more
attention than others said C.C
Rowe.directorot 1 y I disabilities
services. "W hat we try to do is in
view of the limitation imposed by
the disability, we provide reas n-
ably support services
Rowe began the disabilities
program at ECU in 1977.
A brochure distributed
through the program lists the ob-
jectives as; no individual with a
disability will be discriminated
against, all physical and attitudi-
nalbarriers be removed insofar as
possibleand full assistance to stu-
dents with disabilities.
Rowe said that the largest
recent expansion of the office has
been to accommodate students
with learning disabilities.
The Americans With Dis-
abilities Act, passed in 1991, makes
life a lot easier for people with
disabil.ties.
"Before then we had section
304 of the rehabilitation act of
1973 Rowe said. "The ADA just
extended some requirements of
section 304
Because of the ADA, Rowe
had to make a complete evalua-
tion of ECU in order to meet new-
standards.
"We had to publicly ac-
knowledge where we had some
deficiencies Rowe said. "Also
we've had an cm-sight review bv
the office of civil rights about four
years ago. This campus was
viewed as being very friendly but
not perfect for people with dis-
abilities this is an older c impus
and most of our buildings were
builtbetore thecodes required the
accessibility standards that they
do today
Rowe has proposed that
more than Sll million from the
state legislature go toward up-
grading facilities on campus.
"We have an ongoing and
rather massive program for cre-
ating a barrier free campus
automatic doors, curb cuts,
ramps. We are trying to get fund-
ing now I or elevators on campus
but all of these items cost a lot of
money Rowe said. "We have
things that you don't even think
about, we need better fire alarm
sv stems. When a fire alarm goes
off deaf people can't hear that
Regina Duncan credits
Rowe for making ECU a friendly
environment for students with
disabilities
"Many architects think that
their buildings are handicap-ac-
cessible if it has a ramp in the
front, but accessibility is more
than ramps Duncan said. "Ac-
cessibility means that a disabled
person is able to go anywhere an
able bodied person goes
Duncan will not allow her
wheelchair to get in the way of
everyday activities.
"if 1 can't get in somewhere,
1 just get someone to carry me
in Duncan said.
Not all students with dis-
abi iities are lucky enough to find
such simplesolutionsaround the
barriers.
Theautomaticdoors wesee
all overcampuscost about $2,500
each, Rowe said. He believes that
ECU is fortunate because cases
of vandalism to equipment are
rare.
"Some of the wall switches
have been kicked but I wouldn't
say we've had any problem with
vandalism and I think that's a
real compliment to the students
Rowe said.
Several buildings on cam-
pus are in need of elevators.
Rawi, Austin, Graham, Spillman
and Whichard top floors are all
inaccessible to those with dis-
abilities.
Students with disabilities
See DISABILITIES page 5
I 210 E. 5th Street
758-8612
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Home Finders 321-6708





April 7, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Help wanted for Special Olympics
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
If you did not get enough of
the Olympics in February, you will
have another chance on April 15.
This time, however, there will be
no scandal involving Nancy
Kerrigan and the infamous Tonya
Harding.
Instead, there will be hun-
dreds of special people compet-
ing in sports from rollerskating to
track and field. These athletes are
called Special Olympians because
of their handicaps.
The participants are all men-
tally reatarded individuals, but
many of the contestants have other
handicaps such as blindness, deaf-
ness or Down's Syndrome.
This year's Olympics will be
held from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
Rose High School Stadium on
Arlington Boulevard.
"Without volunteers these
games would not be possible said
Connie Sappenfield, coordinator
of Pitt County Special Olympics.
An orientation for volunteers
will be held on Wednesday, April
13, in the Old Joyner Library, room
221, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Volun-
teers must be able to commit to the
all day event (from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m
). Volunteers will be selected on a
first-come, first-serve basis.
Volunteers will be respon-
sible for being "buddies" to the
athletes, primarily to help them
get to their events on time. Stu-
dent organizations on campus reg-
istered early to be volunteers re-
sponsible for lunches, drink
stands, timing and other necessi-
ties of the games. The games re-
quire approximately 1,000 volun-
teers, and more than 700 of whom
come from ECU, Sappenfield said.
Long-term volunteers were
selected as early as August to coach
the athletes in bowling, track and
field and other sports. Many vol-
unteers are recruited from the ECU
Student Volunteer Program, di-
rected by Judy Baker.
"We are making it easier for
them jnd for us Baker said.
Eight track and field athletes
will be selected to go on to the
State Special Olympics to be held
May 19 in Greensboro.
Students interested in vol-
unteering for the Special Olym-
pics should attend the special ori-
entation session scheduled for
April 13. For more information,
call Lisa Ihley, volunteer coordi-
nator for Special Olympics, at 830-
4551.
Students or groups inter-
ested in the ECU Student Volun-
teer Program can call Judy Baker
at 757-6432 or stop by 201
Christenbury Gym.
News writers!
Meeting today at
4:00 p.m. Please,
please don rt bring
leftover Easter candy.
I have enough.
Chancellor holds arts contest
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Michael Preston, D'Jean
Jawrunner and Wendy Eaves met
the chancellor in his office at 11
a.m. Monday. Thesestudents were
given awards and commended bv
Chancellor Eakin for winning an
essay and art exhibit contest, spon-
sored by ECU's Martin Luther
King committee. The ceremony
was April 4, the anniversary of
Martin Luther King's death.
Michael Preston's essay won
first place. He said he did not write
it to compete, but because he feels
strongly about civil rights.
"I wrote about how we need
to take more responsibility for civil
rights and instead of blaming ev-
erything on everybody else
Preston said. "Its not a black or
white thing as to why I wrote the
essay, just taking responsibility for
human rights and for the rights of
others, that we all have a respon-
sibility to the whole cause
"I wrote that the recent
events that you see happening
with the Rodney King case and
events such as David Duke nearly
getting elected in Louisiana for
senator it shows a lack of re-
sponsibility on both parts
Preston said. "Here you see people
in Los Angeles destroying the only
homes they've ever had. Martin
Luther King never stood for that.
He preached nonviolent protest,
doing it judicially and through the
legislation, and getting out there
and voting
A series of three prints won
first place for the art exhibit por-
tion. D'Jean Jawrunner, a gradu-
ate student in art, said she entered
the contest because she had de-
cided to try to show more of her
work.
"I did a series called 'Dis-
card and these are done on the
principle that some things should
be discarded and some things
should not be discarded
Jawrunner said.
She made the intaglio prints
by etching metal plates.
"The first one is a Chinese
take-outboxwhichontheoutside
of it depictsa city, tall buildings,
and on the inside at the very bot-
tom of the cup, you see faces of
children, who are runaways- chil-
dren who really aren't cared for
and are lost in those areas
Jawrunner said.
"There are also two other
boxes, one of them is a pie-shaped
box that also has stripes on the
outside like an American flag
folded, yet it is also shaped like a
wedge of pie she said. "On the
inside, there are stars and a pic-
ture of the face of an old woman.
That one deals with the problem
of American aging society. I know
a lot of people who have worked
very hard and they're very fright-
ened for their futures
Jawrunner's third print
looked somewhat different from
the other two. The matte contained
a red light which cast shadows
across the picture when lit up.
"The third one is designed
in the shape of a Dixie cup. The
outside is full of Ku Klux Klan
she said. "Its a hood, and you can
see these eyes. On the inside are
printed crosses and people being
hung, hanging from crosses
Completing the series has
taken over a year and she is hop-
ing to add more print to the collec-
tion.
A second-place prize was
also given for the art exhibit.
Wendy Eaves, an elementary edu-
cation major, sketched her pencil
See AWARDS page 5
Ah,
sunshine!
Finally, warm
weather is here. An
excuse to cut class,
or try to convince
your professors to
hold class outside!
Despite windy
conditions yesterday,
only several dozen
hats were seen flying
off into the Greenville
sky, and only a
handful of faculty.
With exams coming
up fast, don't forget
to take advantage of
this great weather
before it means
flunking a class. And
don't ever work for a
newspaper where
they give you this
much room to run a
cut line.
jm&&&&:
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES
MAY 1 - AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
ofci �hie pLaces
m
&
SORORITY RUSH
Informal Convocation
April 13, 1994 TK
5:00 P.M.
Mendenhall, Great Room
FALL INFORMAL RUSH n
August 17-22, 1994 jU
� casual attire
IjIj � any questions?
call 757-4235
THE fe
�MlNQRJTY�
BEACHING OUT TO SEHVE YOU !
Sponsored by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee.
APRIL 13th7:30 P.M. Coffeehouse PICASO Featuring Three Guest Speakers.
This event will be c audience participin informal discussion in which ation is encouraged.
mm





�I MMMPMH
- 4 The East Carolinian
April 7. 1994
4-H kids learn to sew
Summer sewing program teaches lost art
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Technology may be great
For some things, but if asked, 4-
H leaders will say technology
has been the cause of a rapid
decline of men or women's abil-
ity to create necessities for them-
selves, such as hand-sewn gar-
ments.
. . "I would dare say that sew-
ing is a disappearing skill said
Ginger Ausband, program co-
ordinator for the 4-H club sum-
mer sewing program. "It is no
longer a necessity of life, so the
baby boomer generation never
learned and now their children
are growing up with no one to
teach them
:i i This summer, local 4-H
kids will have the opportunity
to learn to sew thanks to the
efforts of many volunteers, that
i� if the volunteers can be found.
Kids have been turned away for
the past several years because
there have not been enough vol-
unteers to teach them to sew,
Ausband said.
"We have people out there
who want to sew with no one to
teach them Ausband said.
The 4-H club, which stands
for Health, Heart, Hands and
Head, was formed to offer op-
portunities to children where
they can reach their own poten-
tial and better themselves for
adulthood. The Pitt County 4-H
club was the only North Caro-
lina 4-H club to win the sewing
promotion grant from the
American Sewing and Craft As-
sociation. The grant, for $700.00,
will be used for supplies, print-
ing costs, advertising costs and
other related costs.
So you do not know how
to sew, or even how to thread a
needle. It is okay, the 4-H club
will provide short cram sessions
where volunteers are given les-
sons on how to choose patterns,
how to cut patterns and fabrics
and other basic sewing guide-
lines.
Volunteers will be teach-
ing approximately 30 4-H mem-
bers from the ages of 10-19 at
the N. C. Cooperative Extension
Service of Pitt County Center
located at the new Agricultural
Facility of Pitt County Center.
The lessons will take place June
11-14, June 20-23, June 27-30,
July 18-21 and July 25-28. A fash-
ion review will be held July 28
where the seamstresses have the
opportunity to model their fash-
ions.
"Our primary function is
how to pick out a pattern and
proper materials and prepare
the patterns and fabrics for use
Ausband said. "The children
will focus on straight and curved
seams and hemming and they
will use not only a regular sew-
ing machine, but also a serger
for construction and finishing
Sessions will be held for
the volunteers on June 10 from 9
a.m. to 12 a.m. and on July 8
from 9 a.m. to 12 a.m. Those
interested in volunteering can
contact Dale Panaro or Evelyn
Spangler at 757-2802.
Earthquake center investigates tremors
EDITOR'S NOTE � In the
basement of the nation's earth-
quake center in Golden, Colo is a
bank of computers that monitors a
network of 130 seismic sensors
across the country, automatically
issuing a detailed report on every
seismological incident that might
be interpreted as an earthquake.
The idea is to get the word out fast,
to save lives.
GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) �
When the ground began shaking
in California, the phonesat the U.S.
Geological Survey's National
Earthquake Information Center
started ringing. And they did not
stop for eight straight hours.
The NEIC is the nerve center
of a computerized nationwide net-
work of seismological sensors that
record even the faintest seismic
activity � including trucks rum-
bling over rough roads and small
mine blasts.
"We locate all the significant
earthquakes around the world and
distribute information about them
as quickly as we can to people who
have the ability to prevent a disas-
ter and save lives says Waverly
Person, the center's operations
manager and the jovial, graying
man who routinely appears on
network television when big
quakes hit.
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ELECTION
Continued from page 1
When the 6.6-magnitude
earthquake struck Northndge,
Calif in Januarv, Person wasawak-
ened by his pager shortly after 5:30
a.m. Information relayed to his
pager indicated a major tremor that
had caused extensive-damage. Be-
fore he could leave his house,
"Good Morning America" had
called and asked him what he
knew.
"That's not unusual Per-
sons says. "Peop le often ca 11 us and
ask for inf orma tionbefore the shock
waves (which travel at the speed of
sound) reach us
Personarrived at NEIC about
6 a.m. and spent the next seven
hours standing in the control room,
giving interview after interview
and update after update.
"I started the day at 6:10 a.m.
and went home at 2 o'clock the
next morning he says. "And I
was back by 5 a.m. because they
wanted me to go live on the 'To-
day' show
Asked about the big5.3after-
shock in California in late March,
Person said, "People were very,
very excited and it frightened a lot
of people. Itdid cause some signifi-
cant damage, but I think the main
effect was it scared people.
"Many scientists expected
that an aftershock of that magni-
tude could occur. But many of the
people in California felt that since
they had gone so long without
getting an aftershock, it wasn't
going to happen again
Person, 60, says he is no
celebrity, but he does consider
himself a pioneer and role model.
"I'm more or less a pioneer
as an African-American in this
field hesays. "There may have
been one or two before me, but
I'm the first I know to come this
far. I get more requests for inter-
views than I can handle, most
from predominantly black maga-
zines who are looking for role
models
The NEIC was founded by
the U.S. Department of Com-
merce in 1966 and was based in
Rockville, Md. Thecenter moved
to the National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration facil-
ity in Boulder, Colo in 1972.
After the center was moved to
the U.S. Department of the Inte-
rior, it relocated to the Colorado
School of Mines campus in 1973.
Gathering earthquake in-
formation in those early years
was difficult because there were
few seismic sensors to provide
data. Technological advances
have made the task simpler.
A bank of computers in the
basement of the NEIC building
constantly monitors a network
saying it swayed the vote that
much, but things definitely need
to change
All three presidential can-
didates voiced the hope that is-
sues would be pushed to the fore-
front during the ensuing cam-
paign days.
"I plan to sit down with the
three presidential candidates and
ask them what we could do to
make the run-off better said elec-
tions chair Dale Emery. "I want
them to cut down on the negative
campaigning. We're all grown-up
here
Emery compared the presi-
dential campaigns to those of sec-
retary and treasurer. "The secre-
tary and treasurer candidates ran
exemplary campaigns Emery
said. "I wish they were all like
that
r
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For all those who voted in yesterday's elec
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Read the paper and listen to the debates.
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April 7, 1994
The East Carolinian 5
QUAKE
Continued from page 4
of 130 seismic sensors across the
country, automatically issuing a
detailed report on every seismo-
logical incident that might be inter-
preted as an earthquake.
The report includes informa-
tion on the earthquake's date, time
and location; its magnitude, epi-
center and proximity to key popu-
lation centers, and a list of local
emergency preparedness officials
to contact and their phone num-
bers.
The system also automati-
cally rings up pagers worn by ev-
ery NEIC employee and by certain
local officials � such as railroad
routing centers and dam mainte-
nance and monitoring officials.
"In 1992 we located 19,540
earthquakes worldwide, between
1 and 8 on the Richter scale Per-
son says. "In 1993, we're going to
have more � about 20,000. That's
not because our technology is get-
ting better at detecting them Last
year, there were just more earth-
quakes.
The Richter scale is a mea-
sureof ground motion as recorded
on seismographs. Every increase
of one number means a tenfold
increase in magnitude. Thus, a
readingof7.5reflects an earthquake
10 times stronger than one of 6.5.
When an earthquake hi ts, the
NEIC's 22-person staff swings into
action, alerting the proper authori-
ties, verifying and updating com-
puter reports and using every
means possible � including tele-
vision and radio interviews, tele-
phone calls, fax machines and tele-
grams � to get the word out.
Usually within minutes after
a major earthquake is reported,
Denver-area television news crews
are in the NEIC's control room,
lined with rotating drums that dis-
play seismic activity from sensors
across the nation.
That is when Person takes
center stage.
"Waverly may be the most
important person we have here in
terms of getting out information
that people can understand says
John Filson, the NEIC's branch
manager. "I've got a Ph.D. and I
just can't seem to get the point
across with the cameras rolling.
I'm really happy we've got Waverly
here
DISABILITIES
Besides disseminating infor-
mation about earthquakes that
have just occurred, the center also
compiles and publishes informa-
tion about earthquakes and seis-
mic activity.
"Our historical database is
second to none from 1900 to the
present. And it's updated every
week Person says.
He says the center'sdatabase
is tapped often by builders who
want to know an area's seismo-
Continued from page 2
Central Book &
IF YOU FIRST DON'T
YOU'RE
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756-7177-
Mort-Fri 8t3(V9:30 Sat & Sun 9:Q0-9;30
Greenville Square shopping-enter (next to Kmart)
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After Graduation
You need the experience and we can help you gain
that experience before you graduate.
Qualifications:
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'At least a 2.0 average
'Your own transportation
�An excellent work ethic and
a willingness to learn
'Available to work about 20 hours
per week, Monday-Friday
�Previous sales experience is not required
is the correct term.
"They are students first, who
just happen to have a disability
Rowe said. "When you say 'dis-
abled students that means that
they are not able if you are a
person with a disability that means
that there may be some things, or
maybe one thing, they can't do
Angelina Pavone agrees
with that. She was diagnosed with
multiple sclerosis at the age of 20.
"I was withqut disabilities
for 20 years then I'm told that I
may have an attack where I can
never walk again I have to look
out for a lot of things Pavone
said.
Pavone said that students
generally treat her as a normal
human being and that her life at
ECU is more normal than her life
at home.
"Here I have bars in the bath-
room athomel'mpulling on the
sink Pavone said.
Pavone said that people are
all too often unaware of barriers
that can be prevented. She men-
tioned a WZMB display in front of
the only accessible entrance to the
student stores. She said that she
has encountered rudeness and
misconceptions over her disabil-
ity butrefuses to let anything bring
her down.
"Having MS has really made
me stronger, because I think, if
I can beat this, I can beat any-
thing she said.
Pavone suffered a stroke
in the spring of 1990 and since
learning to walk again is un-
able to walk far due to numb-
ness in her feet.
"They've told me twice
that I would never walk again
and I'm walking. I use my dis-
ability to encourage myself, es-
pecially when it comes to test
time she said.
Pavone said that she does
not want special attention, just
consideration. Her advice to
students across campus is not
to look at disabled students with
pity, but with encouragement.
Having a disability can
also have some advantages.
Pavone said she gets to park in
the best spots, has early regis-
tration so that classes can be
moved when necessary to ac-
cessible spots and has her own
remote control to open the door
to her dorm.
Keep an eye out for bal-
loons across campus next week.
They will mark the accessibility
of buildings, Jay son said. Pub-
lic announcements, flyers and a
banner on the mall will all re-
mind us of ECU students with,
disabilities.
logical history.
Despite all the data available,
Person says it still is not possible to
predict earthquakes or to identify
trends.
"You can't predict earth-
quakes. Period he says. "Wehave
AWARDS
drawing titled "People at Har-
mony with Nature" for a home-
work assignment.
"It represents people con-
nected with nature, a flower and
butterfly and persons face all con-
nected with a vine. The vine was
green, that was the only thing in
the picture that had color Eaves
said.
All of the winners were glad
to have had the opportunity to
meet the committee that selected
the winners.
"We went to the chancellor's
office, and he was most cordial
Jawrunner said. "We were intro-
psychics call in all the time who
tell us, 'There's going to be an
earthquake in California But
that's not really a prediction. You
have to know magnitude and
location, and so far that hasn't
been done
Continued from page 3
duced to the committee who was
responsible for judging our
work. It made me feel real spe-
cial
"Ienjoyed meeting the com-
mittee Preston said. "I like to
see who had read my essay, and
it was nice to see their reactions. I
got a very positive reaction to my
message. It's an honor that the
chancellor of the university has
read something that I wrote
All of the winners were
given certificates, and first place
winners were awarded $100.
Wendy Eaves received $50 for
second place.
TECH
demonstrations of the Internet
and virtual reality programs.
Through these hands-on sessions,
teachers were able to see the fea-
sibility of incorporating' this tech-
nology into their classrooms.
In its fifth year, the confer-
ence has seen a drastic increase in
the number of participants, from
71 at the first conference, to about
900 at the most recent.
Although the conference is
primarily for North Carolina's
teachers, there were also partici-
pants from Virginia as well as
Costa Rica.
About 23 vendors were also
present at the conference, to pro-
vide information on product
availability and display the ac-
tual products that were demon-
strated in the labs.
EAST
CAROUNAN
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer 2
ARREST
port said.
"Mr. Williams resisted the
arrest and had to be forcibly
placed into the police car by the
arresting officer Knox said. Wil-
liams was released on a $500 se-
cured bond. A court date was set
for May 25.
About 80 to 100 people gath-
ered to protest the arrest; how-
ever, no other arrests took place,
Knox said. After Williams was
taken to the car, "approximately
100 irate subjects continued with
Continued from page 1
Planning has already be-
gun for next year's conference.
The conference, as Pressley said,
is "out-growingGreenville The
presentations are free to the gen-
eral public. The labs require alee
in order to participate.
Not only did the confer-
ence provide its participants with
hands-on experience, but there
is also a reference guide pub-
lished after the conference to pro-
vide the teachers with descrip-
tions of the software and listings
of people to contact for purchas-
ing the software.
Pressley expressed the goal
of the conference when he said,
"Technology is invading our
public classrooms. Our teachers
need to accept it, know where to
get it, and learn how to use it
Continued from page 1
verbal and obscene language
Public Safety Officer K.L. Jack-
son wrote in his report.
After Public Safety's at-
tempts to disperse the crowd
failed, "Greenville had its dog
exit his vehicle and while still
leashed backed the crowd back
into the lobby of Scott the re-
port said.
"There was no riot Knox
said in an interview with The Daily
Reflector. "It was more than the
officers on the scene felt like they
could handle, so they called the
Greenville police to stand by. The
water gun was not mistaken as a
weapon. It was just that the indi-
vidual got uncooperative and did
not want to get into the car
Knox said police pinned
Williams against the police car in
order to force him in the vehicle.
At that time, Williams began
shouting and hollering, which led
to the charge of resisting arrest.
"That's when people started
coming in and hollering back
he said. "But that's as far as it
went. I think it was a little blown
out of proportion. It was just an
unfortunate situation
Head football coach Steve
Logan had no comment on the
incident. However, Sports In-
formation Director Charles
Bloom said that Williams will
remain on the football team.
Williams, 20, lives in Scott
Residence Hall and is originally
from Rock Hill, S.C. Williams
was unavailable for comment.
CLEAN
-UP
Con't
from
pagel
Coming Attractions:
Leaders Educating & Developing
LeadershipWorkshops
street announcing their new
parental status.
"It gives the adopter
something to be proud of and
the best thing of all is that it
benefits the environment of
ECU said fraternity brother
Scott Gagain.
Sig Ep does this clean-up
three times a semester. The fi-
nal contribution will be just
before final exam week.
Use these skills to put you in the director's chair
April 12,1994
7:30 pm
109 MSC
The Actors & Actresses
Who Make the Cast!
Presented by Ken Knighten
Try diversity to develop your team
April 13,1994
5:00 pm
109 MSC
M2
M2: Motivation Day
Presented by Valerie Langford
Here to pump you up!
Watch the dominc effect on your
friends and members.
April 14,1994
4:30 pm
MSC MPR
Time Busters! For Leaders!
Presented by Richard Pappas
(The Prince of Time)
If you need to turn back time,
If you don't have time to come to this
session, then you need to be there!
For More Information Call 757-4796.
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
North American Van Lines is now
accepting applications from college
students and staff for its Summer Fleet
Program.
Summer is the busy season in the mov-
ing industry, and we need your help to
handle the load. We will teach you to
safely operate an 18-wheel rig and
load household goods cargo - at no
cost. We pay your room and board
while you're in training. Once you
receive your Commercial Driver's Li-
cense, we'll pay you $425 per week,
plus $125 per week living expenses,
plus bonus.
To qualify, you must be 21 years old,
have a good driving record, and be
available for training in May (the end
of April would be even betterl)
Take a break from the classroom, and
make the most of your summer with
North American Van Lines. We'll
promise you an adventure you'll never
forget.
Call 1-800-348-2147, Dept. ZB-84.
nofttiAmerican.

" WMMiMiVM





mf0mtl0M
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Opinion
April 7, 1994
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Assi. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Gina Jones, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jodi Connelly. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
3asthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
��Words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
�� For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Media reflects society, not vice-versa J
What is it with blaming the media for every
problem that occurs in the world? Those involved
in media don't sit around having secret meetings
- about how they can destroy the social fabric that
seemingly innocent people base their entire exist-
' ence on. Nor are we even a single entity, poised
' and ready to scarf up any fallen scraps of morality
that fall into our line of vision. We report and we
comment. We offer solutions. We try to improve
those things that are orf of joint.
For example, the recent occurrances in
" Wedowee, Ala whereahigh school principal has
, stirred up a considerable amount of controversy
I supposed racial beliefs, spawned a large interest
in a small southern town, heretofore unknown.
The USA Today story pointed out that "Many
� white residents blame the media for fueling con-
�troversy
Now, comeon. To make a statement like that
� is to declare mat somehow, the news cameras,
reporters and journalists conspired with the prin-
cipal, deliberated on an idea, men put the contro-
versy into action. Seems absurd, no? The media
(and we are not a single entity) is not to blame for
the nation's ills. We simply want to expose stories
for what they are � truth or fiction.
Maybe this example sounds too ridiculous
and far-fetched. Another such instance along the
same lines is the report that we know all too well
i � teen sex. This dilemma finds its way into the
J 'newsabouteveryothermonth. Newstudiescome
, up with the same explanation as every one that
I J has gone before them: Nothing. The real answer
that no one wants anyone to discover as to why
teens have sex so early (and why it keeps getting
earlier) is two-fold.
First of all, we humans may have a higher
intelligence than other animals (according to us),
but the commonality we all have is that we are all
animals. The biggest drives in animals are food and
sex, for reproducting the species. It's that simple.
No religious teaching will ever destroy that, it only
staves it off for awhile.
The other factor is fha t the age for teens ha v ing
sex for the first time isn't really getting earlier. It's
just that we talk about it a lot more. Teens had sex
in the '50s, folks. I hate to break it to ya.
So this AP wire story crosses my computer
screen concerning the issue of teen sex. I scan it, not
expecting anything new and enlightening and
instead I come across the revelation: "Approaches
to sex are often affected by culture, but social
forces are changingatti hides like the impact of
urbanization, changing family structures and mass
media
Yes, they're so right, the wholedownfall of the
American society (namely you) is in the our hands.
The Media. We cannot endure the burden any
longer. We are the reason you lost your virginity at
the age of 13. We've been such bad parents.
That right there is the true problem�the real
parents drop their kids down in front of the TV and
let their minds turn to mush. Make 'em read a book.
Oh, wait, not the D.H. Lawrence.
I suggest in addition to regulating the amount
of television watched, implemeting a little sex edu-
cation and making kids aware of the dangers of
sexual intercourse in the '90s before blaming the
very people that attempt to inform the public of
such dangers. This paranoid bashing of anything
that moves is destructive and harmful.
Or am I just altering your views?
By Laura Wright
Madonna: Social critic or social embarassment?
I have never been a Da vid
Letterman fan. I didn't watch
his show before he switched
networks and I don't watch it
now.
Once, when my mother
; was in New York City, she ran
into Letterman on the side-
walk. I mean literally ran into
him. They
said
ex-
By using a contrived
lesbianism to appeal to
male sexuality, she
undermined an entire
group of individuals �
real lesbians do not love
women in order to get
attention from men.
�-$se me
� to one an-
- other and
r- proceeded
oh their re-
specti ve
ways. Nei-
ther one of
them knew
who the MHHaiHHi
other was
but my mom's companions
told her with whom she had
just had the privilege of collid-
ing.
Not that this story about
� my mother has anything at all
to do with the fact that I don't
watch Letterman, but it's the
closest that anyone in my fam-
ily has ever come to meeting
- someone famous. Wait, I take
that back. Once in the Atlanta
�"airport, I think I was about
eight years old at the time, I
h met Jim and John�the Haggar
Brothers�from "Hee Haw
Back to Letterman. I
heard about his experience
with Madonna, as is usually
- the case with me, several days
I i after the fact. I was, however,
fortunate enough to see a vid-
eotape of the event this past
Monday. I may start watching
Dave from now on; I have a
, new respect for anyone who
could endure what he en-
dured.
Watching Madonna's at-
tempts to beat Dave at his own
game, I starting thinking about
the cultural phenomenon that is
Madonna. You've got to hand it
to her; she is constantly capable
of finding ways to stay well
within the public eye. I keep
thinking that she's gone as far
as is humanly
possible, that
there is noth-
ing left for her
to exploit, that
she will fade
into obscurity,
but then she
turns around
and tops her
last scandal.
�hmbb I don't
know why I'm
writing about Madonna, I mean
she gets enough attention as it is
and she is on my top ten list of
things never to write about
(she's number five on said list,
right after Dan Quayle and right
before the "Long Island Lolita"
ordeal). I guess I feel as though
1 have grown up with Madonna
and have seen her go through
her various personaes.
In high school, I wanted to
be her � she was rebellious,
sexual and talented. In college,
I admired the way she openly
flew in the face of what America
felt to be acceptable behavior.
She had no shame. She didn't
care what anybody said about
what she was doing, in fact, the
more controversial she could be,
the better.
Then, at some point, I lost
interest. I think it had something
to do with the fact that with the
"Justify My Love" video and the
Sex book, I felt she was selling
out. By using a contrived lesbi-
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
As my fourth year at East Carolina draws to a
close, I am becoming disgusted with the lack of
cynicism toward the recent media saturation of the
public with negative gun "hype Considering the
popular use of "Question Authority" bumper stick-
ers, it stands to reason that "Gen. X" would be leery
of any further centralized control over ourcollective
lives. Obviously, it is not the case.
Well ga ther round 'ca use here's something they
won't teach you on MTV. An oligarchy is a military
state. Its citizens are subject to tyranny and unjust
legislation � pressed upon them by a centralized
"policing force In other words "Spaud ng, you'll
get nothing and like it An oligarchy comes to be, if
and when the power to assemble and overthrow is
extracted from civilians.
Now chew on this. Have any of you authority
questioners found itodd that violentcrimein America
dropped in 1993, yet media coverage (stoked by the
executive branch) has used grim and shocking foot-
age to create a phobia of private gun ownership? One
might ask "Why did the media blitz begin?" Well,
it looks like if we are to be quilted into the "security
blanket" of the international community, certain
unalienablc rights must be usurped from America's
citizens. It must happen because Americans cur-
rently have more freedoms than any other nation in
the world. Because many of these nations function
as socialist systems (cloaked in monarchy), we
must also assume this appearance� if we are to be
homogenized into a redistributive world culture.
It doesn't take a college education to realize
that violence and civil unrest cannot be curtailed by
making it a crime for honest citizens to own fire-
arms. Instead, they are problems spawned by so-
cial, political and economic inadequacies. Will "Gen.
X" wake up in time to realize that power in the
hands of the few � sucks? Or will we continue to
allow the laying of groundwork for a submissive
and servile populace to come? Time will tell.
Jason A. Horton
Senior
English
anism to appeal to male sexual-
ity, she undermined an entire
group of individuals � real les-
bians do not love women in or-
der to get attention from men.
Still, I wait to see what
Madonna will come up with
next. I think she's interesting
and I think that culturally she's
important by virtue of the fact
that she does push people's but-
tons. She's not really testing to
see how much she can get away
with before she loses her fan
base; she doesn't really care to
stop even if it means that she
falls out of favor with a lot of
people.
Entertainers like Madonna
are actually valuable in discov-
ering how socially unacceptable
behavior triggers potentially
damaging reactions. I don't
think, for example, that Sinead
O'Connor has been very popu-
lar since her appearance on "Sat-
urday Night Live Remember
that? After her performance, she
tore a picture of the Pope in half?
Last I heard, she had attempted
suicide. Rosanne Barr was some-
what less stigmatized when she
grabbed her crotch during a
renditition of the "National An-
them but her public appeal
was greatly lessened at least for
a while.
As for Madonna, she is liv-
ing proof that if a person contin-
ues to "act up it may be pos-
sible to numb public outcry.
Madonna has pushed the
boundaries so many times that
we don't really criticize her any-
more when she does something
like tell off David Letterman.
We just sort of say, "that's Ma-
donna for you and then,
maybe, we secretly wish that we
had that much nerve.
To the Editor:
I went out in front of General Classroom at
4:30 amon registration day. I was the third person
there. As people began to arrive I asked them what
terminal they were using, etc. and etc; they informed
me that whoever got in the door first and up the stairs
first won, in other words, a free for all. I had just had
a cast taken off a week earlier and was walking with
a limp. I tried to speak rationally to these people but
nothing worked: registration had turned them into
anarchists.
When these people told me that they were not
going to respect the fact that I had woken up earlier,
gotten out of bed earlier and dragged my butt across
campus earlier, 1 vowed to be first in line. When the
little old lady came and unlocked the door at 7am, I
screamed please why don't we let her in first, it was
obvious that that wasn't going to happen so I just
pushed through like everyone else. I would have
thrown people down the stairs if they got in front of
me, luckily no one did.
So the time came, I was first and do you know
what happened next? Of course you do, I got
screwed. I had listed 18 hours of primary classes
and 18 hours of alternatives and I walked out with
4 hours: two night classes.
If anyone at ECU wants to tell me there is
nothing wrong with this system, I would like to
have a few words with them. After this latest upset
(terminal problems) I debated storming Chancellor
Eakin's office with tears in my eyes. Yes I will admit
it when I finally left my sacred terminal, I bawled,
I was not immediately emotionally capable of com-
pletely my registration process, I took ten minutes
to pull myself together.
But really, who can I blame? I know that if I
tried the ECU bureaucracy would shift me around
for hours of my precious time. So please tell me,
who can I urge to change this terrible system or at
least put some public safety on the scene to main-
tain order?
Tammy Zion
Sophomore
Communications
To the Editor:
I can not help but think how some professors
(in the Chemistry dept.)think that they are Gods and
no one can touch them. I wonder how many students
share this feelings with me? I will, later on share my
experience at ECU since my arrival in summer 1993.
Thanks to Dr. Donald F. Clemens my visit here has
come to an end. I see no need for abuse, mistreatment
and most of all insult.
What do I mean by this? Why am I bothering to
write this letter especially since I am leaving in 5
weeks? To answer this question I must say that I feel
sorry for any student to accept sic the abuse by
some professors and hope that they stand for their
rights. How can they forget that we are paying their
salaries, giving them an easy life? Working few
hours a day, 9 monthes ski a year.
I would like to share an unfortunate experi-
ment with the readers to show the degree of abuse by
a professor toward his student. After completing a
chemistry class (taught by Dr. Clemons) I received a
grade that I thought 1 did not believe I had earned
I asked him if I could see my final test (after a few
minutes of arguing with him) he stood up and said,
"I am FUCKING tired of you, if you dont fsfcj leave
I will sue you I was very shocked as well as
disappointed. I wrote a letter to the dean of Chem.
department and chanceller hk Eakin, all I re-
ceived was an apology letter. I do not think that is
enough and nor do I beleive that the letter of
apology is sincere. I have spoken to many chem.
students and most are unhappy with the dept.
Last semester Dr. Clemons failed 87 students
out of 190. Dr. Holly failed 55 of his students.
How can 50-55 of students be dumb and stupid
and unable to pass an entry level class? Or is it that
ECU accepted all applicant fsfcj whether qualified
or not? Or maybe, just maybe, most chemistry
professors just dont fsfcj care and not worth a �?
Rizz Khoshnan
Senior
Chemistry
To the Editor:
In response to Mrs. lrwin's editorial on 3
29: I too find it sickening that the Republican
party is hounding our great President on issues as
stupid as honesty or integrity.
What are they thinking?! They should be out
working for their constituents, not doing inane
investigations into such an important figure, re-
gardless of his dealings with James McDougal. So
what if McDougal was tried on eight counts of
bank fraud? So what if Susan McDougal, long-
time friend and business partner of the Clintons,
is being sued for writing over 300 unauthorized
checks reaching almost $200,000? There is (fortu-
nately) no law that says we have to associate with
reputable people.
Who cares how much they report on their
income tax forms? After all, we play the num-
bers with the IRS (wink), why not the President?
As for the $20,000 check he wrote to buy a house
for his mother, who wouldn't! Heck, I like The
East Carolinian so much, I'm going to send you
check for $50,000. Hope ya'll don't mind I got
the money by cheating on my state taxes. 1 just
want to help my dear old school paper!
Bill Clinton is the President of this great
country. Why should he be distracted by such
silly investigations into his dealings while he
was Governor of Arkansas? It is time we left this
brave man alone so he can enjoy his Big Macs
and morning jogs in peace!
John Dillard
Freshman
Undecided
� '�mmm





April 7. 1994
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
Page 7
For Rent
For Rent
El Help Wanted! SI Help Wanted
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TWO ROOMS FOR RENT in 3br, 2
12 bath. One bed furnished. Many
ameneties at the complex. Available
May. Please call Lisa 321-2922, leave
message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
responsible, non-smoker to share 2
bedroom apartment. $167 a month
plus 12 utilities. Deposit required.
Available May 1. Call April 752-7599
1-6 BEDROOM HOMES, condo's,
duplexes, and apartments for rent.
$190 up! Short term lease available!
Finders 321-6708 small fee. Near cam-
pus rentals available now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate list your ad
free. To get a list of all the people
looking for a roommate 321-6708
small fee
RINGGOLD TOWERS. Sub-lease
efficiency apartment. (May-July) Per-
fect for summer school. Practically
on-campus- free parking. Call- Leave
a message 758-7882
UNFURNISHED LARGE FRAME
HOUSE, 6-8 bedrooms, 2 baths, for-
mal areas, suitable for responsible
student group. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. $960month. Available June 1,
possibly sooner. Also, private effi-
ciency garage apt. for one. $250
month. Available May 15. Pleasee
call 752-5296
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT Tar
River Estates May-August or take
over lease Near pool and bus stop
contact (Chris) 757-1022
FOR RENT: $250 per room each sum-
mer session; phone, cable, util. in-
cluded. For more info, call 758-3936.
NEEDED- one female to sublease
apt. for both summer sessions. Own
bedroom. $175 utilities per month.
Call Dawn at 752-3422
AVAIL. MAY 1ST contemporary,
two story, three bedroom, 2 bath du-
plex. Cathedral ceilings, second floor
w 'balcony overlook. Walk in
closets,closets with shelving in bed-
rooms, ceiling fans, wd hookup,
dishwasher, disposal, storage shed,
energy efficient. $600month $600
deposit. Call Michele or Debra, 321-
4793
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouse apt. Washerdryer, pool,
tennis court. $215 month 1 2 utili-
ties, avail. May 1, 94. 321-8406
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED to
share 4 bedroom house close to cam-
pus. $118.75month 14 utilities.
May- August only. Call Amy 758-
7328.
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS
of North Carolina (Nags Head) this
summer? For summer employment
info, please call Pat or Lea at 1-800-
833-5233.
MID-MAY-1 bedroom apartment, 1
block from GC building. $320month
includes watersewerbasic cable.
Laundry facilities and pool. Call 758-
3364.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment. Close
to campus great location. Call
Patricia 752-0009
AVAILABLE FOR FALL SEMES-
TER- 1 bedroom, in 2bedroom apart-
ment located in Tar River apartment
complex. Mature, responsible female
preferred. Deposit required. $240
monthly rent plus 1 2 bills. 830-8984
NOW AVAILABLE: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
nicely decorated with all major ap-
pliances. $230 1 3 bills. 756-8459
(Sara).
SUBLEASE for summer or take over
lease. Two bedroom apt. near cam-
pus, $380 monthly. Need one or two
people to cover half rent or more.
May is paid, call Neil, 758-2334
APARTMENT FOR RENT 2 bed-
room duplex, pets ok (deposit re-
quired), close to campus, wd hook-
ups, available 4th of May, rent $350
call 752-5080
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share large 2 bedroom, 212 bath
townhouse. Quiet area. 12 rent 1
2 utilities. Non-smoker and studi-
ous individual. If interested cail
Michelle at 355-1754
AVAILABLE MAY. 2 bedroom, 1.5
bath condo with all appliances $450
month call Eric at 355-0005
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
SUMMER: 4 bedroom, 2 12 bath
house, need 2 roommates for sum-
mer. Rent$165per month plus utili-
ties, close to campus. Cail 758-8616
ask for Tricia 205 N. Eastern St.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bdrm carriage house townhouse- so-
cial, non-smoker- 1 2 utilities- May
94 to May 95 pref. Rent $170 mo. call
Jason at 321-6693
FEMALE NEEDED to share apart-
ment at Wyndham Cir. 4 blocks from
campus $190month plus 12 utili-
ties call Kelly 758-4450
WALK TO CAMPUS! Available
May 1st. Young professional couple
seeks responsible student to rent a
room one house from campus! In-
cludes cable, phone, utilities and
private entrance. Graduate student
preferred. References required. Call
758-9903.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. 1 bed-
room, newly built. $275 month.
Available May. Call Lynn 355-1486
or Kathy 830-4983 leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share brand new Wyndham Court
duplex starting August 1st. Non-
smoker please! Call Jamie 931-7426
SI Help Wanted
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counse-
lors, Instructors, Kitchen, Office,
Grounds for western North
Carolina's finest Co-ed youth sum-
mer sports camp. Over 25 activities
including water ski, heated pool,
tennis, horseback, art Cool moun-
tain climate, good pay and great
fun! Non-smokers. For application
brochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp
Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1 -800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Midwest Mailers Po Box
395, Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate
Response.
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull-time. Set own
hours! Rush stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 HillandaleRd.
1B-295 Durham, NC 27705.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT- Make up to $2,000-4,000
mo. teaching basic conversational
English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Ko-
rea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For info,
call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
best summer job around. Playmates
Adult Entertainment call for more
info. 747-7686
RESPONSIBLEPERSONtocarefor
children in our home. Tuesday and
Thursday- 7:30-5:30 references re-
quired. Call 756-0417before9:00pm
HELP WANTED female escorts ap-
plications available now. Lucrative
financial opportunities. Call 321-
8252 anytime or 714-5350 after
4:00pm
CASHIERSSERVERS Andy's
Cheesesteaks @ the Plaza. Must be
available a min. of 11-2 M-F will
consider 11-2 MWF and 11-2 TTH.
Some weekends. No phone calls
please.
POSITIONS OPEN: water analy-
sis- established pool company. 8-1
or 1-6 and every other Saturday.
Must be able to work on Holidays.
Call 355-7121
WAREHOUSE POSITIONS: Full-
time- April until September. Satur-
days may be required. Ca 11355-7121.
HELP WANTED modeling, danc-
ing, adult conversation full or part-
time. Will accomodateschool sched-
ule. $300-500 weekly call 746-6762
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for office associates. Positions offer
a variety of job duties including:
Trader Kate's
Opening for Stock & Delivery Person
30-35 hours a week. Must be neat, well mannered,
and outgoing. Must be able to lift heavy merchandise
and have a clean driving record.
Salary based on experience.
Apply in person Tuesday April 5, between
l-6pm & Thursday April 7 between 1-6 pm.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000 $5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
computer data entry, preparation
of mailer, supply requisitionsdis-
tribution. For computer position, in-
dividual must be proficient with
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft word,
Pagemaker, Access and others. In-
terview Mon. and Thursdays, 1-
4pm, Brody's The Plaza.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
tor addtional sales associates in the
Juniors and Men's Departments.
Flexible Part-time am, afternoon, or
pm scheduling options. Interview
Mondays and Thursdays, l-4pm,
Brody's The Plaza.
EARN MONEY in your own home
or business stuffing envelopes.
Great opportunity! Tired of work-
ing for someone else? For info, rush
$1 and self addressed stamped en-
velope: Po box 1811 Greenville, NC
27835
'ct.Aj.)fll K nirrcntly a rpptin;
applications for the position of
Production Manager. Some
audio editing experience is
required and Audio Production
Majors are preferred. Apply at
WZMB andor contact A. Lee
Judge at WZMB at 757-4751
For Sale
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motohomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA. Na-
tionwide auction listings available
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
EUROPE THIS SUMMER? Fly-only
$169! California- $129 ea. way!
Florida too. CaribbeanMexican
Coast rt $189! No gimmicks-no
hitches. Airtech 1-800-575-TECH
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, frame,
mattress, heater, padded rails $175
or obo. 757-9645
1985 CONNER MOBILE HOME,
12'x56 Two bedrooms, one bath,
kitchen and livingroom. Located in
Evans Mobile Home Park. Partly
furnished, underpinning and a 6'x6'
storage building included in the
price. Perfect for starting couple or
ECU students trying to save on
monthly rental costs. Available for
move in on August 1st. Asking
$9,500. Those interested please call
(919)321-2577 for more information.
HAWAIIAN ISLAND CRE-
ATIONS SURFBOARD (6ft) and
O'Neil wet suit, $220 for both. Call
758-1818
LOSE WEIGHT NOW! 25- 30 people
wanted. No will power needed. Doc-
tor recommended. All natural. 100
guarantee. Products for body build-
ers too! Call: 752-2551
HATE TO SELL '76Volvo wagon.
Almost 119,000 miles. Great me-
chanical condition! Very reliable!
Kept good maintenance records. Still
have owner's manual $980 firm.
752-6993.
KICKER CTF SPEAKERBOX, ex-
cellent condition, paid $385 new, ask-
ing $275 obo. Call John at 355-8996.
FOR SALE: couch with matching
chair, $125 Dorm loft with headboard
and bookshelf, $90 ask for Lee Ann
752-1360
78 VOLKS RABBIT good condition
$700 obo must sell asap at, 2 dr call
931-7381
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: warm weather
is approaching and you want to look
your best! Sports supplements at ma-
jor discount prices: Met-rx, OXG,
Creatine, Cybergenics, Vanadyl Sul-
f ate, Hot Stuff, Weight gain powders
(all), Amino Acids, Super
Chromoplex, Tri-Chromelene,
Cybertrim, Quick Trim, Super Fat
Burners, Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, Su-
For Sale
per Golden Seal, and manv more!
Call Brad at 931-9097 for more info.
E3 Services Offered
For Advertising
Information, Contact out
of our Account 'Executive
1 �
SHELLEY FURLOUGH
TONYA HEATH
SEAN MCLAUGHLIN
BRANDON PERRY
10 Services Offered
Sorority socials and weddings. For
the widest selection of music and
unbeatable sound and professional-
ism, except no imitations! Discounts
to all ECU students. Call Rob @ 757-
2658 ,
OLDER ECU STUDENT with fam-
ily seeks position of groundskeeper
in exchange for living quarters. 11
years landscaping experience. Mov-
ing to Greenville in May. Please call
Phil at (919)426-1409
E
i
Personals
TYPING- Quick and accurate re-
sumes- letters - term papers, excellent
proofreading skills, satisfaction guar-
anteed. Wed Fri. 9am- 5pm reason-
able rates 321-1268
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
secretarial work. Specializing in re-
sume composition w cover letters
stored on disk, term papers, general
typing. Word perfect or Microsoft
Word for windows software. Call to-
day (8a-5p�752-9959) (evenings�
527-9133)
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in Fraternity and
LAST SATURDAY, ECU'S Goju
Shorin Martial Arts Club kicked butt
in Wilmington, NC once again. Match
19th ended with a bang when Ea$t
Carolina University cleaned up th;
awards table. Congratulations gods
to Jason Davis, Pam Marr, CKris
Richards, and Sonia Swaney for first
place in Kata; Kiesha Kerns and
Michelle Trnnt for first place in spar-
ring; Jose Bercedoni, Kiesha Kerns,
and Michelle Trant for second place
in Kata; Randy Bower, Kim Brinson,
Chad Doherty, Pam Marr, and James
Roberts for second place in sparring;
Lee Baird, Kim Brinson, and Chris
Newton for third place in Kata;DaVid
Jordan and Chris Richards for third
place in sparring; Mike Schertizinger
and Sonia Swaney for fourth place in
sparring; and Paul Rogers for honor-
able mention. Overall, East Carolina
University was well represented and
honored by its Goju Shorin Martial
Arts Club. Keep up the good work
and congratulationsfordoingitagain!
IQ
Greek
SIG MA NU-congra tula tions to Steve
Mann and MikeCollini, thesoul men,
for winning the Greek Week all sing.
CONGRATULATIONS
CHANDRA on your PIKA lavalier!
Love, your Sigma sisters.
SIG EP, we had a great time last Wed.
night, the surprise was very enter-
taining! Let's get together again soon.
Love, Sigmas. ; i
Carolina Imprints
Now hiring for 2nd & 3rd shifts.
Requirements are as follows:
�High School Diploma
�Valid Drivers License &Transportation
�Drug Screening Mandatory
�Steady Past Employment a must.
Call Monday through Thursday from 6 to 8 pm only
for phone interview at (919) 830-1929 � Weekend shifts available.
2
ITRACT
FOR T.
GOOD
(NO
(BRINi
on camera inte
t-s:
at GUNSMOKE
15 MILES SO
12 BLOCK
3pm to
ODUCnONS
ON RIGHT
WIGGLY
i.
FIELD SCOUTS - LATE MAY TO MID-SEPTEMBER.
MUST BE TRUSTWORTHY, RELIABLE, AND
CONSCIENTIOUS, IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE,
LOVE THE OUTDOORS AND HAVE RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION. SALARY PLUS MILEAGE.
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS LOOKING FOR
SUMMER WORK. SEND RESUME TO MCSI, '
P.O. BOX 370, COVE CITY, NC 28523
OR FAX TO 919-637-2125.
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
1994 Greenvi"e Pitt County Special
Olympics spring games will be held on
Fri. April 15 at Rose High School Sta-
dium. Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddieschaperones for the
special olympians. Volunteers must be
able to work all day from 9am to 2pm.
An orientation meeting will be held on
Wed. April 13inold Joyner library room
221 from 5 til 6pm for more info, contact
Lisa Inly at 8304551
ART AND RELIGION IN THE
SAMUEL H.KREST
COLLECTION.
Art History society presents a lecture by
Dr. David Steel,curatorofEuropean art,
North Carolina museum of art on Wed.
April 13at 7:00pm in the Francis Speight
Auditorium in Jenkins Fine Arts Build-
ing.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR APRIL 5-11
Tues. April 5�Ned Holder, trombone,
graduate recital (AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00pm, free) Also on Apr. 5�Bryant
Moore, piano, senior recital (AJ Fletcher
Recital hall, 9:00pm, free) Wed. Apr. 6�
ECU Trombone choir, George
Broussard, Dir. (A Retcher recital hall,
8:00pm free) Thur. Apr. 7�ECU Con-
cert Choir, Brett Watson, Conductor (AJ
Hetcher recital hall, 8:00pm, free)Fri.
Apr. 8�Angela Gomes, cello, graduate
recital (AJ Fletcher recital hall, 7:00pm,
free) Also on Apr. 8�Rodger Bryan,
string bass, senior recital (AJ Fletcher
recital hall, 9:00pm, free) Sat. Apr. 9�
Michael A. McDonald, tuba, junior re-
cital (AJ Hetcher recital hall, 4:00pm,
free) Also on Apr. 9� Fred Richard
Smith, trumpet, senior recital (AJ
Hetcher recital hall, 7:00pm, free) Also
on Apr. 9�Mike McGinnis, composi-
tion, graduate recital (AJ Hetcher recital
hall, 9:00pm, free) Sun. Apr. 10� Sun-
days at theGallery concert Vocal cham-
ber music by ECU students dir. by A.
Louise Toppin (Greenville museum of
Art, 2:00pm free) Also on Apr. 10�ECU
concert choir, Brett Watson, conductor
(First Presbyterian Church, Kinston, NC,
7:30pm free) Also on Apr. 10� ECU
trumpet choir and Quintessential Brass
Quintet, Britton Theurer, Dir. (AJ
Hetcher recital hall, 8:30pm, free) Mon,
Apr. 11� ECU Percussion players,
Harold Jones, Dir. (AJ Hetcher recital
hall, 8:00pm, free)
ATTENTION ALL
ORGANIZATIONS
Gamma Sig and Alpha Sig are collecting
coins for the Dream Factory April 4-15 in
front of the Student Store. Please help us
grant a child a dream.
THE PRE-PHYSICAL
THERAPY CLUB
will be holding a meeting April 11th in
Mendenhall (rrom 14) at 8:00pm. All
are welcome. Elections will be held dur-
ing this meeting. If you have questions,
call Dawn (757-0573)
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
(ACS) meeting Thursday 5:30 Hanagan.
Interested students welcome.
ECU POETRY FORUM
will meet on Thursday, April 7th in
Mendenhall StudentCenter, Room 248at
8pm. Open to the general public, the to-
rum is a free workshop. Those planning to
attend and wanting critical feedback on
their work should bring 8 or 10 copies of
each poem. Listeners welcome.
IS IT FRISBEE IS IT GOLF?
No it's frisbee golf! Come join a frisbee
golfsinglestournamentonWed.andThur.
April 13-14.Cometothedisccourseat3:00
and be ready to show us what you've got!
For more info, call Recreation Sen ices at
757-6387orstopby204ChristenburyGym.
MASSAGE CLINIC
given by ECU FT students, April 13 from
6pm to 9pm at Allied Health Bldg. $1.50
per 10 min, max. 30min. $2.00at thedoor.
Tickets may be purchased from FT stu-
dents or Back & Limb Clinic in advance.
Ladies wear halter orbikini top&shorts,
men t-shirt and shorts.
THE NEXT GAMMA BETA PHI
MEETING
will be held on April 12 at 5:00pm in
MSC Multipurpose room. All members
must attend! Officer nominations and
elections will be held at this meeting.
Don'tforgetyour baked good for Teacher
Appreciation Dav! We would also like to
thank all members who helped with the
book drive and who donated books. We
look forward to seeing you there! for
more info, contact Allison at 931-8285.
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The East Carolinian
April 7, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 9
Paintbrush taken to fashion
i
By Cindy Hawkins
Staff Writer
Jacqueline PetersCully is a New
York designer and colorist who has
her paintbrush on the pulse of the
international fashion industry.
Sponsored by the Minority Pres-
ence Initiative Series, this distin-
guished designer will be conduct-
ing a lecture and workshops in the
Jenkins Fine Art Center April 7-9.
Sara Edmiston, a textiles professor
in the School of Art states, "We are
very lucky to have such a distin-
guished artist on campus
Cully, who aspired to be a fash-
ion designer in the 1950s, traveled
to France to attend an esteemed
fashion school run bv the Paris Cou-
ture Houses. Upon
entering New York
City, she met with
fashion editors who
proved to be deter-
rents to fashion de-
sign, compelling her
to seek a career in tex-
tile design instead.
The initial rejections
allowed Cully to
flower as a designer
and eventually she
founded the Jackie
Peters Design Studio.
Her clients include Liz
Claiborne, Oscar de la Renta and
Gottex Swimwear. She has been
profiled as a fashion god-head in
Ebony and Galleria magazine. Her
Era
IAS I
CAKOl INA
UNIVERSITY
thriving business is
the result of an
ingenuitive selling
strategy in which she
began to display de-
signs on silk instead
of using the tradi-
tional paper model.
"This makes it pos-
sible to drape it over
your arm or gather it
up like a skirt. It
makes a design so
much easier to sell
Cully said.
Cully is also a painter whose
passion is watercolors. She has ex-
hibited her work in American and
Canadian galleries for many years
and has been featured in Watercol-
ors magazine.
"Creating a textile is more regi-
mented-there's more of a formula-
whereasevery timeldoanewpaint-
ing, it challenges me with new ob-
stacles Cully said.
For all interested persons, the
free lecture isat7p.m. on Thursday,
April 7th. The workshops will be
on the following two days and will
offer instruction on the use of French
Sennelier dyes on silk. This dy-
namic artist and business woman
promises to be an interesting and
open teacher. "Teaching has taught
me to analyze what I was doing in
order to give the information to
students and this industry has given
me a lot she says. "I think I should
give something back
Where's
taste in
our beer?
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
There are ales and lagers,
lights and stouts, porters, bocks,
pilseners and specialty brews.
But the average American res-
taurant patron might never
know it, and that's a shame,
according to an East Carolina
University beverage manage-
ment expert.
Or. Jennifer E. Crouch, a
professor in the Department of
Nutritionand Hospitality Man-
agement, is convinced that the
majority of beer drinkers are
missing out on the flavor of
Win at Hendrix Theatre
good brews and it may be time
for restaurants to help broaden
the tastes of their customers.
Restaurants should use
their menus to give their cus-
tomers a beer flavor range,
Crouch said.
In England and Germany,
where beer is socially accepted
as a food, restaurants and tav-
erns offer as many as eight dif-
ferent brands on tap in varieties
ranging from lights to darks,
See BEER page 12
By Stephanie Tullo
Lifestyle Editor
The Films Committee for the
Student Union has altered the nor-
mal program of movies by creating
promotions to attract more view-
ers, such as Pennies from Hendrix.
The current attendance count for
Pennies from Hendrix as of April 4
of this year is 30,466.
The door attendants account
for the number of people whocome
through the door, and the 35,000th
person through the door will re-
ceive $350 in cash. "There will be
numerous give-aways during the
season, such as lottery-coupons and
shows said Franco Sacchi, a mem-
ber of the Films Committee.
"We started keeping track of
numbers last year, this year's atten-
dance is varied in number, but last
year's total was 31,000 said J.
Marshall assistant director of Stu-
dent Activities.
"Last year's attendance
dropped a lot because the Film Com-
mittee had a lack of money so not
always the more popular films were
shown said Marshall.
"This year, there are more cur-
rent releases and a wide variety of
movies and we hope the numbers
will be better than last year's said
Marshall We are attempting to get
the movies before they get on
video
The Film Committee meetings
are open to all students and they
can vote on films to come to Hendrix
Theatre.
There will be several other
movies this semester including
"Three Musketeers" starting on
April 6-9.
"We gave away Robert
Fulghum tickets, as promotion, and
we are planning to schedule
theRoc&y Horror Picture Show for
Barefoot on the Mall. Hopefully,
this will appeal to students and en-
courage them toattend the free films
wehaveatHendrix'said Marshall.
Riders
day out
Bicyclers appear out of
no where to take a ride
and enjoy the glorious
weather mom nature
has sprung on us. There
is no better way to enjoy
a spring day than riding
bikes across campus!
Photo by Cedric
Van Buren
m
r
CD Reviews CD Reviews CD Reviews
J Don't Buy
ss
00 Take Your Chances
m
an
Worth A Try
Definite Purchase
Reg. E. Gaines
Please Don't Take
My Air J or dans
RegE.GainescomesfromMTV.
This tells us more about him than
any geographic point of origin ever
could. Being from New York means
at least a passing familiarity with
crime and urban decay. Being from
MTV, however, means that you're
young, hip and trendy. It means
you're a rap star from the ghetto, or
a self-destructive prophet of grunge,
or a cute girl singer with a hit movie
or that you know one of these
people. It means you wear certain
clothes and talk about certain things
and are easily sold to a certain mar-
ket (the young, hip and trendy, or
rather those who want to be young,
hip and trendy). It means you fit
whatever arbitrary version of cool-
ness MTV is selling at a given mo-
ment. Reg E. Gaines comes from
MTV. And yet, I still kind of like the
guy-
Gaines is what they're calling a
"spoken word" performer these
days (he would have been called a
poet in years past, but now I'm just
splitting hairs).
He traveled with MTV's Spo-
ken Word tour last year to good
response, so now someone's gone
and given him a record contract.
Gaines takes a lot of his style from
rap, from black story-tellers like
Rudy-Ray Moore (of Dolemite
fame), and from the white beat po-
ets of the '50s. Of course, the beats
were borrowing rhythms from black
jazz artists, so I guess it's just a case
of some wayward pigeons coming
home to roost.
On Please Don't Take My Air
Jordans, Gaines' first album, he talks
about a lot of trendy issues. In the
title track, he goes into the mind of
a ghetto kid who kills to get a pair of
tennis shoes. While Gaines does a
good jobof ill us tratingthe mind-set
and social situations that bring
people to murder for footwear, this
track is a good example of what I
don't like about his work. Like ev-
erything else involved with MTV,
this stuff is too trendy. He exploits
big media issues too often for my
taste; Gaines has a flair for language,
but ultimately, I've heard it all be-
fore.
Having said that, however, I
must admit that this album is not all
bad. One track in particular, "Wa-
termelon, Lox & Bagels which
deals with relations between the
black and Jewish communities, is
clever enough to transcend its "is-
sue of the week" mentality. Also
scoring points in the cleverness de-
partment is "When I Grow Up I
Wanna Be Just Like John Gotti a
sarcastic indictment of gangsterism.
Similarly, Gaines' jabs at Michael
Jackson in "Off Da Wall" strike
home with a weird finesse. Gaines
is a good enough poet to sometimes
impress me so much with his ap-
proach that I forget to be cynical
about his choice of subject matter.
Overall, Please Don't Take My
Air jordans is a fairly entertaining
spoken word album. I enjoy all of
the material that's influenced Reg
E. Gaines, and he meshes them
rather well. A couple of tracks had
me wondering what would hap-
pen if Jack Kerouac had been a mem-
ber of Public Enemy instead of a
white intellectual. Gaines is also a
good poet, and the backing music
he's chosen to read over (mostly
jazz and hip hop) keeps things from
getting boring. I just wish he could
break out of tha t MTV loop of trendy
topics and get down to something
real.
� Mark
Brett
Voices color
'Sister! Sister
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Women of many colors and
cultures will find their voices in
Vinie Burrows' one-woman
show, "SisteriSister which is to
be performed here Saturday,
April 9.
The performance is sched-
uled for 8 p.m. at the Rio in the
Hilton Inn and is presented in
conjunction with the 18th annual
Southeastern Women's Studies
Association Conference hosted
by ECU. The "Sister! Sister
show is free and open to the pub-
lic.
One of seven one-woman
shows in Burrows' repertoire,
"Sister! Sister includes words
from writers and speakers in the
United States, Ireland and South
Africa.
The performer, an African
American and native New
Yorker, began her career as a
child actress on Broadway with
Helen Hayes and has appeared
in seven Broadway productions.
Later, Burrows assembled he'
solo productions because of the J
lack of quality roles for black
actors. She has performed on
numerous Americancampuses
and toured widely in Europe
and Africa.
In addition to her stage ca-
reer, Burrows has writing and"
producing credits in radio, TV
and film. She has also partici-jj
pated inmany U.N. conferences;
and has been involved with ��
sues of apartheid, women's
rights, sustainable development
and youth. She chairs the U.N
Non-Governmental Organiza-
tions Committee on Southern
Africa and serves as interna-
tional secretary for Women for
Racial and Economic Equality.
Among her honors has been
the National Organization for
Women's Susan B. Anthony
Award.
Further information about
Burrows' Greenville perfor-
mance is available from the
Women's Studies Office at ECU,
phone (919)-757-6268.
Hiking opportunities for
adventurous volunteers
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
The American Hiking Society
has created a program called the
"1994 Helping Out in the Out-
doors" which offers a variety of
volunteer opportunities. The need
for volunteers in a national or state
park is at an all-time high.
A directory is available
with more than 2,000 volun-
teer jobs from campground
hosts to trail crews. Susan
Henley of AHS said, "It is a
chance to meet new
people, see great scenery,
get valuable experience
and learn more about
America's outdoor trea-
sures while making a dif-
ference for public parks
and forests
AHS is also offering
a "Volunteer Vacations
program this summer. This
sends teams of volunteers on a
10 day vacation to some beau-
tiful parts of the country. Last
year, 350 volunteers worked
in locations that range from
the exotic, such as Maui in
Hawaii, to the pristine Ad-
miralty islands in the Alas-
kan Pacific. Working projects
can range horn trail maintenance
to bridge building. Volunteers
should be experienced hikers, 18
years of age and up, who are com-
fortable in these settings and
physically able to backpack in and
work hard said Susan Henley.
Since 1979, volunteer vacation- �
ers have helped make some of
the country's most spectacular
recreation areas safer and moreJ
accessible.
The American Hiking Soci-
ety is also sponsoring the second
"National Trails Dav Last year,
the first Trails day had more than
750,000 outdoor enthusiasts!
attend 2,500 public!
events. Like
America's trails and I
green ways, National
Trails Day offers some
thing for everyone
says AHS President:
Bruce Ward.
i
' "Whether your plea
sure is walking, riding j
a bicycle or horse, or if
you're looking foranac
cessible pathway to
wheel a wheelchair, there
will be a National Trails
Dayeventnearby Theday
is also promoting the estab-
lishment of an intercon- �
nected, nationwide network -
of trails across America. The
day also celebrates Ameri-
can volunteerism, because
a majority of the nation's 1
300,000 miles of trails I
are maintained by vol-
unteer crews. The
events will be held on June 4.
For more information about
the AHS summer programs, write
to American Hiking Society, P.O. I
Box 20160, Washington DC
2 0 0 4 1-2160.
Broadway hosts English drama
LONDON (AP)�The year was
1968, the play was "Loot and British
actor Kenneth Cranham was out of
work on Broadway after five weeks.
Twenty-six years later, Cranham
is heading back to New York in a
London hit, J.B. Priestley's 1945 "An
Inspector Calls in the title role of the
morally inquiring Goole.
Cranham hasn't performed in
New York since that quick failure in
Joe Orton's subversive farce. "I've
tended to borrow the charisma of
friends who have played there he
joked.
This time Cranham is signed for
nine months, and the prospects look
good. Co-starring Rosemary Harris
and Philip Bosco as a posh Yorkshire
couple � the Birlings � whose el-
egantworld literally collapses around
rhemAnInspectorCalls"opensApril
27 at the Royale Theater.
In London, Stephen Daldry's
Olivier Award-winning revival turned
an English theatrical warhorse into
political theater�abetted by a set (by
IanMacNeil)rhatconstituteditsown
must-see. Small wonder, then, mate
after 400 detections, Cranham re-
fusedtohangupliislrispector'scloak.
"When youha ve very vital writ-
ing to perform in the theater, you I
never want to stop doing it theN 1
actor said in an interview backstage j
attheAldvvychTheateronthedayof J
hislasttwoWestEndperformances j
"It's like a painting you've i
worked and worked on he saida ;
poster of the 1954 film at "Inspect ;
tor with Alastair Sim, above his J
dressing room bed. "The whole text J
is covered in scar tissue
Serious plays are dicey on,
Broadway, but Daldry keeps,
Priestley'sclassic morality play crack
ling, as the investigation of a young-
woman's death blows open the in- 3
sularity � and cruelty � of an old,
privileged order. J
The success of this "Inspector
took London theater folk by suj.

See THEATRE page 12





10 The East Carolinian
April 7. 1994
Actor Thewlis improvises
LOS ANGELES (AP) � For de-
cades screenwriters have screamed
every time an actor declares he in-
vented some of his dialogue. Here's
one actor who can safely make that
claim: David Thewlis.
The British actor says that he
improvised all his dialogue as the
erratic, anti-social Johnny in Naked.
The role brought �MHMiHHH
him best-actor
awards from the
Cannes Film
Festival, New
York Film Crit-
ics, National So-
ciety ofFilmCrit-
ics,LondonFilm
Critics Circle
and several in-
dividual critics.
3 Thewlis en-
thusiasts were mmmmmmm
disappointed when he was over-
looked foran Academy Awardnomi-
riation. Thefilm'slimited releasemay
have contributed to the oversight. Or
perhaps more conservativemembers
df the academy's acting branch were
put offby the often despicable Johnny.
Thewlis himself seems an ami-
able fellow, pencil-thin with unruly
hir and a leprechaun smile.
� Whenaskedabouthisnewfound
cfelebrity, Thewlis provided the po-
litically correct answer: "I think ac-
tors mainly seek to do good work
rgther than seeking fame or celebrity.
Ybu want to work with good direc-
tors and keep on doing good perfor-
mances.
"In Britain (celebrity) is nothing
new because I've been on television.
But Naked has elevated it. You like to
go to a bar or a restaurant and have a
good time, but you can't really relax
when people know who you are and
eavesdrop on your conversations
��i�� Mike
��Anarchy? No, it's
actually very
structured and less
anarchic than
ordinary methods of
filmmaking.
99
Mike Leigh
Film Director
Leigh di-
rected Naked
in his unique
style.Thewlis,
who previ-
ously had
worked with
Leigh in a
shortfilmand
Life Is Sweet,
talked about
how the new
mmmammmmmmmmm film came
about.
"Mike asked me if I wanted to be
in his next film he recalled. "I didn't
knowwhatitwouldbe,nordidMike.
I immediately said yes, because 1 ad-
mire his work and the way he works.
He gets the money, casts as many
actors as possible, sits down on the
first day and says, 'OK, what'll we
do?'
"Anarchy? No, it's actually very
structured and less anarchic than or-
dinary methods of filmmaking. We
spend four months of improvisation
and investigation. We begin by intro-
ducing characters, then we impro-
vise on them. The fruit of those impro-
visations become the substance of the
film. By the time we start shooting, we
know what we're going to do
Thewlisconceded thatsuchmeth-
ods would be impossible in the Holly-
wood scheme of things.
"You'dhavetopaybig-namestars
for seven months and ask them to do
a job when they don't know what
they're playing he said. "And they
might end up with two scenes in the
film. When I worked with Mike in Life
k Sweet, that's what I had: two scenes
Growing up in Blackpool the son
of shopkeepers, Thewlis didn't have
the foggiest notion of becoming an
actor: "From my own background it
wasn'tan orthodox thing todo. Itwas
a northern working-class town. You'd
watch television and films, but you
wouldn't say, 'I'd like to do that' I
didn't know how you did that. I
wanted to be a racing-car driver
Instead, he joined a rock band.
When two of his fellow musicians
auditioned at the Guildhall School of
Music and Drama, Thewlis went
along. All three were accepted.
His acting career followed a low-
key course, with roles in films and
plays. His biggest notice came in tele-
vision, especially in "Prime Suspect
IHwimHelenMirren,seenthismonth
on PBS' "Mystery He'll appear this
summer in the remake of Black Beauhj,
directed by Caroline Thompson (Die
Secret Garden).
Actress Betty Furness dies at age 78
NEW YORK (AP) � Bett
Furness, a B-movie actress who be-
came a household name hawking
refrigerators in the early days of tele-
vision, then assumed the role of a
consumer advocate and reporter,has
died. She was 78.
Furness died Saturday at Sloan-
Kettering Memorial Hospital, where
she was being treated for stomach
cancer, said her husband, Leslie
Midgley.
Her career began in the 1930s as
aHollywoodactress,butsheachieved
widespread fame overnight in 1952
when she did an ad during the first
televised Republican and Democratic
conventions.
A front-page cartoon in the In-
dianapolis News during the GOP
convention had a character asking,
"Who's winning, Pop? Taft? Ike? or
Betty Furness?"
"You can be sure if it's
Westinghouse" was her tag line in
countless live spots for refrigerators
and vacuums.
Presidentjohnsonappointedher
as his special assistant for consumer
affairsin l7despiteskepticismfrom
consumer groups who feared her
association with Westinghouse
would make her pro-industry.
She won over critics with her
energetic advocacy on issues such as
hidden interest rates, credit regula-
tion and federal meat inspection.
"She pioneered consumer TV
news reporting, and she pursued it
withintelligence,inquisitivenessand
irrepressibilitv said fellow advocate
Ralph Nader when NBC let her go in
1992 at age 76.
Elizabeth Man'Furness was bom
Jan. 3, 1916 in New York City, the
daughter of a Union Carbide execu-
tive.
At age 16 she took a screen test
and for thenextsixyearssheappeared
in 35 movies, most of them low-bud-
get B flicks.
"They were appalling shesaid
later, "except for two � Swing Time
with Fred Astaireand Ginger Rogers,
and the first Magnificent Obsession'
withRobertTay lor and Irene Dunne.
She appeared on stage in vari-
ous summer stock and road produc-
tions, and was spotted by
Westinghousewhenshetookasmall
part in a 1949 drama on CBS televi-
sion.
CONTEST
Ladies, Show Off Your Tan. The Winner
Will Advance To The Emerald Isle Beach
Music Hot Tan Contest!
� Rio preliminaries held Saturday,
April 9th, 16th and 23rd.
?FINALS ON SATURDAY, APRIL 30th.
� Doors open at & PM with FREE
admission til 9-ZO PM.
� $3.00 cover
Drink specials: Slue Hawaiiane and
Bahama Mamas for $3.00
V Greenville
A Step Above The Rest.
f INN Z07 sw Greenville Blvd. � Greenville. NC 27S34 � 355-5000
iexican Delivery & Grillei
We're
Here!

FREE DELIVERY
($6.00 Minimum Order)
JOW SERVING BEER!
LOOK FOR OUR DAILY SPECIALS
,414 Charles Blvdl
"(Corner of 14th & Charles)
758-JACK
(5225)
FREE
Homemade
Chips & Salsa
or our Homemade
Santa Fe Ranch w any
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FREE Delivery: 758-JACK
Not valid w any other offer
Expires 42594
LUNCH FOR
2 ONLY
$7.99
DINE IN ONLY.
2 Quesadillas or Burritos.
2 Sides of rice or refried
beans.
FREE Delivery: 758-JACK
(Not valid w any other offer)
Expires 42594
fc Late Lunch
Buy 1 Entree, Get'
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4 Tacos & Jack's
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Expires 42594
DOWNTOWN. GREENVILLE �
THURSDAY
Ladie's Night
Ladies free admission
25t draft
Friday, April 8
4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
College Hill field
All �h�Uts. (acuity, and �uff are welcome to Jrop in tlirooliool Ine nit.
RAIN DATE: FRIDAY. APRIL 15
SAME TIMESAME LOCATION
FR( 8c SAT
Enjoy the Best of Both Worlds "�
w 70's, 80's 8c classic rock -
downstairs
and your favorite dance jams
upstairs!
'ft w w
Live remote with:
Tnunder 99.5 WTND
TI)
taces

Free Food Prizes 3 Legged h
Lasso Contest watermelon Seed Spittin
Cow Clip Throwing Horseshoes Quick Draw
Tliis Natural Life Event is offered by Recreational Service.
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April 7, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
1wZMb 1. Pavement
Cut Your Hair
�fifl 12. Nine Inch Nails
111 1 fclHDead Souls 3. Rollins Wire 4. Beck Pay No Mind 5. Rage Against The Machine
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Actresssinger Ross returns to screen
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209 S Evans St
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NEW YORK(AP)�Diana Ross
has often been criticized tor Hie way-
she left the Supremes, pop music's
most famous girl group since the
Andrews Sisters, and for being arro-
gant and insensitive.
Her memoirs, "Secrets of a Spar-
row which waspublishedbyVillard
inOctober,attempted toanswersome
of tha t criticism. The book bombed.
But Miss Ross, who turned 50 on
March 26, was highly praised for her
first television movie, "Out of Dark-
ness which was shown in January.
Sheproduced the movie in which she
played a paranoid schizophrenic.
Thesinger's personal life also has
been subject to public scrutiny. Her
second husband is Norwegian ship-
ping magnate Ame Naess, who lives
in London while she remains in this
country.
"He has tried to work from here
and I've tried to work from there she
says. "I like raising children in
America.
"I'm looking at the career,
whether I want to travel and tour the
way I've always done. Packing and
unpacking, I find that really hard, and
leaving my children is very difficult.
"I like being on the stage. If I
didn't work, I think I would find it
hard just waiting for him to come
home. But I may have to move there.
Otherwise we keep it like this, which
is not healthy for either one of us
They get together every month,
Ross says, and run up huge telephone
bills.
Miss Ross has been widely criti-
cized in print, with allegations that
she rode roughshod over fellow
Supremes Mary Wilson and Horence
Ballard, that she's an unreasonable
employer, the queen of perks among
pop singers.
Did she write her memoirs to
offset that criticism?
She says no, then adds, "I tried to
do some of it. It makes a balance.
People have a chance to hear my
thinking. If Ineversaidanything,what
hasbeen said becomes theonly truth
As for claims of her elaborate
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backstage protection and demands
for certain food and a special brand of
cognac, she says, "Police cars, secu-
rity guards, people not supposed to
look at me � I've heard that one.
People can't look at me. That's the
silliest. In my dressing room I don't
have any food.Ihavehot decaf coffee,
Equal and skimmed milk and that'sit.
Cognac? No. I don't even like cham-
pagne. I like red wine and chablis. I
don't have that either.
"My temperamental side? Do I
get upset for no reason? I don't think
so. I can get angry. I think I'm nor-
mal
The book idea came about, she
says, when she listened to her old
records, to choose 80 � from 1963 to
1993�for the four-CDset titled "For-
ever
"I started trying to remember
what I was doing then, with each
song she says. "I started putting
thoughts on tape When 1 first met
Barry Gordy (president of Motown
Records), that first audition, things
like mat. We seem to remember firsts.
I had memories of being called Spar-
row asachild. I hadn't thought about
that in many years.
"Certain thingshookyourmemo-
ries. What I liked about writing mem-
oirs instead of a biography was Ididn't
have to get stuck in time. Now is
combined with vesterday and my
dreams for tomorrow and all that
Ross is a little surprised by the
bad press her txxk received.
"Ididn'tthinklwaswritingsome-
thing incredibly profound she says.
"I wanted to have my thinking and
point of view. A lot of people are
finding it interesting
Thebookdoesn'tsay muchabout
her romances, including her relation-
ship wimBarry Gordy. In answer toa
question, she says he's the father of
heroldestchild, Rhonda. It'snotin the
book she savs, "because it's nobody's
business. Rhonda can write a book
Asked about the possibility of
marryingGordyatmetime,shesays,
"Even if he had asked, I don't think
so.
"People are so interested in that.
Only the sensational side of things. I
wasn't trying to do that. I like what I
wrote. I like thinking about my
mother and my family and upbring-
ing and I love having pictures of
children and family in there. That s
probably a bigger part of who I am
than the years with Motown.
"I was with the Supremes for 10
years. fVe been singing for 30. They
were very nice girls. What is this that
people keep asking me about that
time.
"I'vedoneextremely good work
since then. I've had a lot of hit records
and sung some beautiful songs. I
raised wonderful children. That's
more important than any of the crap
people want to talk about
Her three daughters use Ross
as a last name instead of the name
of her first husband, publicist Rob-
ert Silberstein. She had hoped
they'd be lawyers or doctors but all
want show business. Her sons by
Naess, ages 5 and 6, like to dance.
It's in their genes she says.
Ross, whose movies include
hhiu Sing tlic Blues Mahogany and
Tfw Wiz, wanted to play Josephine
Baker in a movie but couldn't get
financing.
"It would have been expen-
sive she says. "The time wasn't
right. There may still be an oppor-
tunity sometime. Maybe one of my
daughters will do it
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72 The East Carolinian
April 7, 1994
THEATRE
Continued from page 9
"prise, not least because the play has the
sort of shopworn, over-familiar status
of,sayThomtonWilder's"OurTovrn"
in the United States.
On tour to the northern England
city of Bradford, Cranham was told
that"70percentoftheaudiencewould
liaveplavedtheInspeior"inamateur
stagings, he said with a smile.
"When we were rehearsing,
peopiesaidWhy are they doingthat?'
with real contempt in their voice re-
called Cranham with a low, explosive
laugh,hisowncraggy features belying
his immediate warmth.
'They were really disappointed
that the play was being done
Whatno one predicted was direc-
tor Daldrv's visually expressionistic
�and highly politicized�takeonthe
material.
Set amid a vast, nibble-strewn
landscape upon which the Birling
house uneasily perches, the play was
blasted ou t of any realist framework to
become an ode to the virtues of the
welfare state and of society at large.
The program pointedly cites
former Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher's 1987 remark, "There is no
such thing as society" � an opinion
the production attacks with vigor.
Its angry sub text struck a nerve in
a country still absorbing Mrs.
Thatcher's individualist ethos, and
Priestley's clever craftsmanship did
the rest.
(.Opening in September 1992 on
the Royal National Theater's Lyttelton
stage, the production moved later that
season to the larger Olivier audittv
num.
It won three Olivier Awards �
London's equivalent of the Tony �
and last August made yet another
move: to the commercial West End,
whereithas recouped its$450,000cost.
The New York revival will cost SI.5
million
Bevond Broadway, "Inspector" is
beingmooted for Hungary andjapan,
among others. That makes it the first
socialist drama to embark upon the
wide-ranging theatrical course of
"Cats
Had Cranham anticipated such a
response?
"Ithinkit'squiteanextraordinary
playinthatit'sfantasticallysimpleand
vet mysterious; it's quite a thing to
cam-off.
"It's usually set in a room, bu t if it's
set in a wasteland, something else hap-
pens to it he said, referring to de-
signer MacNeil's bleak, cobbled, ulti-
mately calamitous set.
Cranham's success in a part cre-
ated by the late Ralph Richardson typi-
fies an actor who has made his name in
contemporary,notdassical,playssince
he left London's prestigious Royal
Academy of Drama tic Arts (RAD A) in
1966.
Whilecolleaguesnotcheduptheir
Shakespeare, Ibsen and Shaw,
Cranham was forging his reputation
in new plays and nuxiern revivals �
Aston in Harold Pinter's "The Care-
takeroppasiteJonathanPrvce;Trevor
Griffiths' "Comedians and seven
vearsat the Royal Court in plays by Joe
Orton ("Ruffian On the Stair"), Ed-
ward Bond ("Saved") and Caryl
Churchill ("Owners").
"I love being in things that com-
municate strongly hesaid. "I get very
distressed doing Jacobean or Restora-
tion plays where I know the audience
doesn't know what I'm talking about.
It's very difficult
So, too, is making a living in the
theater, whichexplainswhyCranham
for much of the past decade has stuck
to television and the (xxasional film�
'UnderSuspidoa"withLiamNeeson,
for example.
"I got wheelclamped by a mort-
gage, and if you do that, you actually
can't afford to do theater said the
actor, who lives in a conservation area
of north London's Islington with his
Irish wife, actress Fiona Victory, and
their baby, Cathleen.
'This is unusual, this situation�
to be in a successful run of 'An Inspec-
tor Calls' in the West End
Thesonof an English civil servant
father andaScottishmother,Cranham
was bom in Scotland and brought to
London at the age of 4.
He received little formal educa-
tion �he's the only man in his imme-
diate family without an advanced de-
gree � but takes comfort in the idea
that "acting is an education
Continued from page 9
lagers toales. Consumers select their
beer according to the time of day
and to complement the food they
eat.
In those places, customers
would no more say "Gimme a beer
than they would "Gimme a din-
ner
Beer flavor, according to
Crouch, is too rich and varied to be
limited to a selection of brands that
taste nearly the same.
The professor teaches courses
on running restaurantsand manag-
ing food and beverage selection.
When it comes to beer, she has more
than a sampling interest. She says
she doesn't care much for the trendy
brews�thelightsand "ices Ameri-
can specialty beer made by
microbreweries are her favorites
because the brew makers pay par-
ticular attention to taste.
The subject so intrigues her that
Crouch once worked ata small brew-
ery in England just to learn how to
makea finebeer. Shealso worked in
product marketing for a large Ameri-
can brewery.
With this background, it's no
wonder she chose beer as the sub-
ject for her doctoral dissertation at
Cornell University. This year she
completed her Ph.D.
The academic question for
Crouch involved looking at how
people acquire a taste for stronger
beer flavors. Some social and cul-
tural factors come into play here,
and it appears that people in some
regions of the country enjoy beer
flavors that people in other parts of
the country don't care for very much.
Let's face it. The first taste that
most people remember about beer
is bitter.
"It isanacquired tasteCrouch
explained. "Few people like it the
first time, but most are willing to
learn to like it
In Syracuse, N.Y where she
conducted part of her study, she
discovered that beer drinkers fol-
lowed the mainstream and picked
the mild American pilsenerbrands.
However, in Seattle, Wash where
she also conducted research, most
beer drinkers favored the stronger
flavor of specialty beers.
Interestingly, the beer consum-
ers in Seattle have virtually the same
taste recognition towards the bitter-
ness in strong flavored beer as the
drinkers in Syracuse. The difference
is that the Seattle consumers chose
to learn to like the stronger beer
while those in Syracuse did not.
She also found a person's taste
tor beer carries to food. Someone
whoenjoysa strong, flavorful beer
usually enjoys flavorful fixxl hx�.
Those that drink for flavor, ac-
cording to Crouch, also demon-
strate a greater sense of curiosity
and enjoyment of adventure.
Her study survey in-
cluded 194 beer drinkers in Syra-
cuse and 242 in Seattle.
She said when a population
in one region of society changes
its tastes, such as what she found
in Seattle, it is important to try to
find out what things brought
about these changes.
"Laying down rules: telling
people that some foods are good
for them while other foods such
as bacon, eggs and buttered toasts
are not, doesn't work said
Crouch. "There is such a social,
cultural ant' emotional involve-
ment with food that it is hard to
change eating behavior
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MMMMBMMNI � ht - -ii tjuil i
The East Carolinian
April 7, 1994
Sports
Page 13
What's On Tap?
Thursday, April 7
W. Tennis
at Peace College, Raleigh,
N.C 2:30 p.m.
Friday, April 8
Softball
at UNC Tournament, Chapel
Hill, N.C.
M. Tennis
at UNC Wilmington,
Wilmingon, N.C, 2:30 p.m.
W. Track
at Duke Invitational, Durham,
N.C.
Golf
Hosts CAA Conference
Championship, Wilson
Country Club, Wilson, N.C.
Saturday, April 9
Baseball
vs. William & Mary, 2 p.m.
(DH).
M. Track
at Florida Four Team
Invitational, Gainseville, Fla.
Te4ll
Monday, April 4
M. Tennis
lost to Old Dominion 3-4.
Tuesday, April 5
Softball
split a doubleheader with
Cambell3-2, 1-3.
Men's CAA Leaders
(Through April 3)
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB
ODU 10-2 .833 �
UR 6-3
UNCW 5-4
JMU 6-6
ECU 4-5
W&M 5-7
GMU 0-9
.667
.556
.500
.444
.417
.000
2.5
3.5
4
4.5
5
8.5
Overall
27-3 .900
20-10.667
18-16.529
17-11 .607
24-9 .727
16-14.533
5-15-1 .267
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Saiiif
Average
Matt Quatraro, ODU.418
Kevin Gibbs, ODU.405
Dan Almonte, ODU.400
Brian Yerys, ECU.400
Battle Holley, UNCW.400
Triples
Matt Quatraro. ODU7
Kevin Gibbs. ODU5
Brian Fiumara, ODU4
Jeff Dausch, ODU3
Ryan Wilson, W&M3
Home runs
Jeff Dausch, ODU11
Sean Casey. UR10
Chad Tripplet, ECU9
Scott Birmingham, ECU8
Jon Higman, JMU8
Runs Batted In
Jeff Dausch, UR43
Sean Casey, UR38
Brian Yerys, ECU37
Matt Quatraro, ODU35
Rick Britton, ECU34
Stolen Bases (sbsba)
Jamie Borel, ECU2841
Kevin Gibbs. ODU2326
Shawn Knight, W&M1821
Jeff Kaufman. JMU1111
Maika Symmonds, ODU910
.PHshilmi
Wins
John Smith, ODU8-0
Johnny Beck, ECU7-1
Brett Wheeler, ODU6-0
Anthony Eannacony, ODU6-1
Bobby St. Pierre, UR5-1
Earned Run Average
Brett Wheeler, ODU1.17
Lyle Hartgrove, ECU1.58
Greg Whiteman, JMU1.59
Anthony Eannacony, ODU2.03
Richie Blackwell, ECU2.38
Strikeouts
Bobby St. Pierre, UR62
Bryan Smith, UNCW53
John Smith, ODU53
Scott Forster, JMU51
Richie Blackwell, ECU50
Saves
Denis McLaughlin, ODU5
John O'Reilly, ODU3
Dixon Putnam, UNCW2
Dalton Maine, UR2
'r-i-iiu i!ii!s:is3
Batting Average
Old Dominion.344
James Madison.331
East Carolina.318
Richmond.311
William & Mary.284
UNC Wilmington.279
George Mason.233
Earned Run Average
East Carolina2.43
Old Dominion2.45
UNC Wilmington3.74
James Madison4.06
William & Mary4.35
Richmond4.85
George Mason4.99
ECU, Campbell split
(SID) �Campbell and East
Carolina split a softball double-
header on Tuesday afternoon at the
Eakes Athletic Complex. ECU
scored all three of its runs in the first
inning and held on for a 3-2 deci-
sion in the opener. Campbell
notched a 3-1 victory in the night-
cap.
Campbell improved to a 27-13
on the year, just two wins shy of its
school-record 29 victories set last
season. The Lady Camels return to
action this weekend with Big South
doubleheaders at Marylan Balti-
more County on Friday (2:00 p.m.)
and Towson State on Saturday
(12:00 p.m.). East Carolina tipped
its mark to 33-11 this season head-
ing into the Lady Tar Heel Invita-
tional this weekend at Chapel Hill.
In the opener, the Lady Pirates
scored three runs, two unearned, in
the top of the first. Lisa Corprew
singled with one out, then stole
second and scored on Leann Myers'
two-out single. Sherri Allen then
reached on an error that allowed
Myers to score and was singled
home by John Eckman.
Campbell's Sara Goodman
tripled home Denelle Hicks to out
the score to 3-1 in the fourth. Denise
Simmon's RBI hit brought CU
within 3-2 with one out in the sev-
. enth, but ECU's Jill Rowlands re-
tired Andrea Nardolillo and Robin
Marshall to end the game.
Rowlands improved to 15-2 on
See SOFTBALL page 17
Photo courtesy of Garret Killian
This weekend the team will play: FSU, UNC, GT, GMU, UNC-W, UNC-
C, Virginia and Coastal Carolina.
Golf sets hopes to 5-peat
File Photo
The Pirates have captured the last
six of seven CAA Championships.
(SID)� The Pirates had the
week off in order to get ready to host
the CAA Championships to be
played April8-10. ECUhasLaptured
the title four years in a row. The
tournament will be played at Wilson
Country Club in Wilson, N.C.
Last week, ECU competed in
the Furman Intercollegiate Tourna-
ment in Greenville, S.C. finishing in a
tie for fourth place with Maryland
(298-293 591). The field of 24 teams
saw play cut short when the final day
wascancelled duetosevereweather.
Freshman Rob Anderson shot
an impressive two-under par in the
two-day event (72-70 142). He fin-
ished tied forthirdwithGarrettWillis
of East Tennessee State for the indi-
vidual title. 130 golfers competed in
the event.
1994 Pirate Golf Individual
Results
Treyjervis
Imperial Lake-222 (61st)
Sheraton-Emerald-73-73-
77223 (5th)
Furman Inter74-75149(t27th)
Josh Dickinson
Imperial Lake-214 (11th)
Sheraton-Emerald-81-80-
79240 (t22nd)
Furman Inter75-72147(tl4th)
Rob Anderson
Imperial Lake-215 (15th)
Sheraton-Emerald-77-74-
79230(12th)
Furman Inter72-70142(Brd)
Brent Padrick
Imperial Lake-217 (26th)
Sheraton-Emerald-81-82-
73236 (tl8th)
FurmanInter77-77154(t58th)
Dave Coates
Imperial Lake-223 (65th)
Sheraton-Emerald-77-78-
78233 (tl5th)
Furman Inter78-76154(t58th)
Monarchs use singles to sneak out win
(SID)�The EastCarolina Uni-
versity Men's tennis team fell 4-3 to
CAA foe Old Dominion
on Monday. The Pirates
swept the doubles action
but were unable to pick
up the decisive third
singles victory to claim
the match. For the Mon-
archs Christian Dalzell
defeated East Carolina's
Markku Savusalo
(Ylivieska, Finland) 6-0,
7-6 (7-2) at the number
one seed. Also dairning
victories for the Monarchs was
Miguel Rosa over Tal Frydman
(Woodbridge, CT) 6-2,6-2, Reuben
Burke over Jaime Holt (Hickory,
NC) 6-1, 7-6, and Farhad
Tadayon upended Dave
Wallace (Sanford, N.C.) 7-
6,7-6.
The Pira tes swept the
doubles action but due to
strong singles play by
ODU came up one point
short of the victory.
Tommy
McDonald
Doubles Results
SavusaloHolt
(ECU) d. RosaBurke
(ODU) 8-5
McDonald Wallace (ECU) d.
DalzellValor(ODU)8-2
FrydmanAtkinson (ECU) d.
TadayonSmith (ODU) 9-7
Singles Results
Christian Dalzell (ODU) d.
Markku Savusalo (ECU) 6-0,7-6 (7-
2)
Tommy McDonald (ECU) d.
Diego Valor (ODU) 6-1,6-3
Miguel Rosa (ODU) d. Tal
Frydman (ECU) 6-2,6-2
Rueben Burke (ODU) d. Jaime
Holt (ECU) 6-1,7-6
Farhad Tadayon (ODU) d.
Dave Wallace (ECU) 7-6,7-6
Ben Atkinson (ECU) d. Jamie
Smith (ODU) 6-7,6-3,6-2
Children to benefit from 3-on-3 basketball event
Compiled by Dace Pond
(RS)�"The Battle of the Weekend Warriors"
will take place in Greenville on Saturday, April
23 at Carolina East Centre.
The "Braggin' Rights 3-on-3 Basketball Se-
ries" makes its first appearance in eastern North
Carolina, benefitting Greenville's Adventures in
Health Children's Museum. Over 100 teams rep-
resenting 400 plus amateur basketball enthusi-
asts ranging in age from 13 to 50 will take part.
The all day outdoor event begins at 8:00am with
competitive divisions for all levels of ability.
Sandra Stroehmann; executive director of the
Children's Museum, stated, "This will be a great
activity for participants and spectators alike as
well as a fine opportunity to inform the general
public of the Children's Museum's programs
and facilities. Being part of the 10 city Braggin'
Rights 3 on 3 Series also means that we will be
attracting visiting players from across the state
and EastCoast. Weareexcited to be bringing this
See BASKETBALL page 17
Indians victor
in exhibition
Editors Note: This is a special
from the Kinston Free Press.
If Tuesday's exhibition
game with East Carolina is any
indication, the Kinston Indians
could be a hitting machine in
1994.
Kinston pounded out lOhits
as the Tribe defeated ECU in
their annual 7-inning duel, 7-3.
Patricio Claudio led
Kinston's 10-hitattck withapair
of singles and three stolen bases.
Nobody else had more than one
hit for the Tribe.
Juan Andujar and Sam
Hence each had a triple and Todd
Johnson had a run-scoring
double.
Indians starter JoseCabrera
and three relievers combined to
limit East Carolina to a total of
four hits. Cabrera worked the
first two innings to get the win.
He allowed just one hit and
struck out three.
Following Cabrera to the
mound for the Tribe were Pep
Harris, Carl Johnson and Bo
Magee.
ECUstarterMikeJacobswas
tagged with the loss. ECU's
lineup included none of its
regulars, but Eddie Loesner
and Grant Harman had run-
scoring doubles for the Pirates.
Kinston played its final
exhibition gamelast night
when the Indians toke on
Mount Olive College in an-
other 7-inning game that be-
gan at 7 p.m.
The Tribe opens the 1994
season Thursday night against
the defending Mills Cup
champion Winston-Salem
Spirits. Game time is 7 p.m.
Aspecialrededication cer-
emony wil be held at 5 p.m.
featuring Cleveland Indians
and local officials.
The first 2,500 fans enter-
ing Grainger Stadium that
night will receive a magnetic
schedule. All fans will be
treated to a post-game fire-
works display.
Kinston's four-game se-
ries with the Spirits continues
throughSunday. Following an
open date on Monday, April
11, the Tribe his the road for a
six-game trip to Prince Will-
iam and Lynchburg.
File Photo
File Photo
Reliever Mike Jacobs was used as a rare starter against the Tribe.
ODU dominating
CAA regular season
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
The CAA has been domi-
nated by the Old Dominion
University Monarchs, who
have compiled a 27-3 overall
record through April 4. Their
10-2 conference record puts
them in first place, ahead of
second place Richmond.
ODU southpaw John
Smith upped his perfect record
to 8-0 last week by beating C. W.
Post and William & Mary.
Smith's start is the best by a
Monarch since 1986. Freshman
Brett Wheeler leads the CAA
with a 1.17 ERA. At the plate,
the Monarchs have been led by
Matt Quatraro (.418), Kevin
Gibbs (.405) and Dan Almonte
(.400), who hold the top three
batting averages in the confer-
ence.
The bats of Richmond Spi-
ders (20-10,6-3 CAA) have kept
them in the title hunt this sea-
son. They lead the CAA in
homeruns with 39 through
their first 30 games. Senior Jeff
Dausch leads the CAA in home
runs (11) and runs batted in
(43). On the mound, the Spi-
ders are led by Bobby St.
Pierre's 62 K's in just over 57
innings.
The suprise to date in the
CAA has been the UNCW
Seahawks. Outfielder Derek
Williams has led the charge,
and batted .500 last week, go-
ing 9-for-18 at the plate. Third
baseman Battle Holley batted
.397 last week with two hom-
ers andfive RBIs. Hurlers Brian
Smith and Chris McBride are
both in the top five in CAA
strikeout leaders, with 53 and
50, respectively.
James
Madison
University's Joe Higman hit
four home runs last week
while hitting .529 (9-of-17).
Pitcher Greg Whiteman
upped his record to 5-2 after
being moved into the closer's
role for the Dukes. Since start-
ing the season 7-1, JMU has
vaulted their record to 17-11
after a short slide in the stand-
ings. A six-run JMU come-
back over Radford was their
biggest since 1988.
East Carolina DH1B
Brian Yerys batted .421 last
week, with two homers and
six RBIs, while 3B Rick Britton
blasted two homers of his
own against Richmond. Last
week, Pirate lefthander
Richie Blackwell struck out
10 batters in eight innings of
work, for his fourth double-
digit strikeout game of the
season. The East Carolina
staff leads the CAA with a
2.43 ERA.
William & Mary SS
Shawn Knight is 18-of-21 in
stolen bases in 1994. Senior
OF Mike Rubieri is batting
.340 and leads William &
Mary in doubles and hom-
ers, with six a piece.
George Mason Univer-
sity is in the Colonial cellar,
with a horrific 5-15-1 record
(0-9 CAA). Freshman Joey
Goodwin leads the club with
a .324 batting average, bat-
ting .364 last week. Patriot
catcher J.J. Picollo added a
.300, three HR, eight RBI per-
formance for the week of
March 28-April 3. GMU bat-
ters ha�e hit ten homers in
their last seven games. Se-
nior Alex Roth and freshman
Scott Lavendercombined on
a three-hitter in a 3-0 victory
over NY Tech.
Ml
t





14 The Last Carolinian
April 7. 1994
Is that the guy
who para-
chuted into
that Bowe-
Holyfield fight
a few months
ago?
Shula could be next to go
(AP) � The fallout from the
jerry Jones-Jimmy Johnson-Barry
Switzer affair is being felt from
coast to coast. And not only with
the bemusement with which many
NFL people view football's an-
swer to Billy Martin and George
Steinbrenner.
Don Shula isn't exactly over-
joyed that Johnson is being men-
tioned as the Dolphins' future
coach.
Shula didn't get a ringing en-
dorsement from Wayne
Huizenga, the team's new owner,
. whosaidhewouldwaituntilafter
next season to talk about a new
contract for the NFL's winningest
coach.
Most coaches of Shula's stat-
ure usually get a chance to rene-
gotiate before their contracts ex-
pire and most decide on their own
terms when to retire.
But Shula, 64, doesn't seem
worried.
He plays golf with Hu enga
and doesn't seem inclined to re-
tire. His new marriage seems to
have revitalized him as a coach.
During the long illness of his first
wife, he often was preoccupied.
Moreover, people around the
Dolphins feel Huizenga implv
didn't know NFL protocol when
he made his comment about wait-
ing on a new contract.
Perhaps Johnson goes West,
although he's not reallv a Califor-
Equivalency
test a knockout
(AP) � OK, wiseguy, think
you're smarter than Mike Tyson?
Then tell us: If the equation of a
circle is X-squared plus Y-squared
equals 34, what is the length of
the radius?
Don't know? Neither did
Tyson. It's one of the questions
that KO'd the former heavv-
weight champ when he failed his
high school equivalency test last
month.
The Daily News obtained five
of the math questions that Tyson
got wrong and printed them in
Saturday's edition. The newspa-
per said the questions came from
Bert Sugar, publisher of Boxing
Illustrated. Sugar did not divulge
his source.
According to Sugar, Tyson
did well in the reading compre-
hension, world history, language
and social studies sections of the
test, but couldn't connect with
the math.
No surprise, Sugar sa id. Anv-
one who could answer the math
questions "could probably
qualify as a nuclear scientist
Tyson is serving a six-year
term at the Indiana Youth Facil-
ity for raping a beauty pageant
contestant. If he had passed the
test, he would have shaved three
months off his sentence.
Because Tyson failed only one
section, he can take the test every
90 days until he passes.
By the way, the answer to the
question above is the square root
of 34.
And for the record: The equa-
tion of a circle refers to plotting a
circle on a graph which has axes
of X and Y. The "equation of a
circle" is XX plus YY equals RK.
(i.e. the square of the length of the
X axis plus thesquareof the length
of the Y axis equals the square of
the radius of the circle.)
nia kind of guy.
It's no secret that Edd
DeBartolo was enamored ol
Johnson before he hired George
Seifert to replace Bill Wakh in 1990.
Seifert's crime is not winning the
Super Bowl since his first season,
although he's 62-18 in the regular
season and has been to three NFC
title games since.
If Johnson wants to stay in
Florida, there's always Tampa
Bay. It's unlikely Sam Wyche will
survive another 5-11 season.
Wyche has predicted that the Buc-
caneers, losers of 10 or more ga mes
for 11 straight seasons, will make
the playoffs next year.
You can probably scratch
Carolina. The Panthers feel that
JoeGibbs will make himself avail-
able when the time comes. E en if
he doesn't, Johnson and Bill Polian,
the new general manager, aren't
exactly a match made in heaven
Polian, one of the NF1 - shrew ti-
es! presonne!eeiiiti es, wants to
control his own front office, some-
thing hecouldn'tdo . ith ohnson
But (ohnson will land on his
feet. It's hard to pas up a
who,over fn eyears, turned a 1-15
team intotwostraightSuper Bowl
winners
Most p �� e came away from
the NF1 nil. tings believing thai
Carolina is far ahead of Jackson-
ville in the expansion race.
i he t o teams are taking op-
. iproaches.
I he Panthers are building
the top down, with Mike
Mc( ormack and Bill Polian, two
experienced NFL executives and
one of the NFL's top public rela-
tions men; and Charlie Davton,
who left the Washington Redskins.
I hey also have the framework of a
scouting staff in place, and a sound
philosophy: "Assuming we'll play
a lot in the north, we want a team
that can go into cold weather and
win late in the season
The Jaguars a re building with
Tom Coughlin, their coach, but a
front office headed by David
Seldin and Wayne Weaver, who
have no real experience. The two
top front office people, Michael
Huyghue and John ones, are re-
spected around the league, but
their experience is more in busi-
ness than in personnel.
"I think Tom Coughlin is an
excellent coach Polian says of
the team with which his Panthers
ha e already built up a rivalry.
But Coughlin, from Boston
t ollege, has never been a coordi-
nator in the NFL, and mav be over-
loaded m ith both scouting and per-
sonnel duties. He's also likely to
be in a warm weather division
with ,i old-weather offensive
philosphy: heplayed in college at
Syracuse and coached in Green
Bav, Boston and New York.
Still looking for that perfect
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summer job?
Come hear about the best kept
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SUMMER
Also a good opportunity to
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Keserve fhe Right io Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stumps





tammmammmm
mmhhh
April 7, 1994
The East Carolinian 15
Floyd wins Tradition
(AP)�Tournaments like The
Tradition re supposed to demand
extra effort from the winner, and
Raymond Floyd had the right stuff
this year.
"I play to win golf tourna-
ments Floyd said Sunday after
his first-hole playoff victory over
Dale Douglass in the Senior PG A's
counterpart of The Masters. "Yes,
the money is wonderful, but I re-
ally and truly play because I love
competing, and I love the thrill of
victory
He said he could commiserate
with Douglass, who missed a
chance to win in regulation when
his 40-foot chip for an eagle rolled
over the cup, hit the flagstick and
came out.
Douglass, who shot a 6-under-
par final round of 66 to Floyd's 68,
said he was only looking for the
birdie it would take to match
Floyd's birdie-4 and get into the 6-
year-old tournament's first plav-
off.
"I wasn't trying to chip it in
Douglasssaid. "On the playoff hole,
I was, but you see what happens
when 1 try. The shot on the 72nd
hole was an excellent shot.
Raymond was going to make birdie,
and I had to make birdie
After bogeys on Nos. 13 and 14,
Floyd got back into position to win
witha35-footbirdiechiponNo. 16.
Then he went for the green on
the 531-yard 18th hole twice and
birdied it twice in 20 minutes �
once to keep up with Douglass and
again to win the playoff. As it turned
out, Douglass bogeyed the playoff
hole.
Floyd and Douglass finished a t
17-under 271 on the 6,869-yard
Cochise Course at Desert Moun-
tain.
Colbert shot a 70 for the round
and was alone in third at 274.
Nicklaus, Tom Weiskopf and
Jimmv Powell were next at 278,
with Gibby Gilbert and Mike Hill
paired at 279.
Olson's Trivia Quiz
Q. What professional baseball team's media
guide is a collector's item from the 1993
season?
-�6. u; sjaAed
jo sseaiaj ensnun ue pei sajped am japeai urn aiuoii am sew jjugoiM pue uojduieip
Guiueq 26, am sen piaijjaijs asneoaq aies seA ijOnoij) se uaj uojiezmefuo am apeji e
jo aES joj 'J3A03 am uo siaAEd md jaAau weai am sjeaA joj uoseas aqj Buunp papejj sjsm
oiM Pi3!J3MS Aieg pue jjugoiAl paid pajnieaj apmO am jo jsaod auj. sajped Q'S 9M1 V
Burton makes name for himself with record performance
(AP) � Kris Bruton came into
college basketball's slam dunk con-
test looking for acceptance as much
as victory.
The 6-foot-8 senior from
Benedict College in Columbia came
away with both Sunday, becoming
the first player in the six-year event
to register three perfect scores.
"When I first came into the hotel
all the guvs knew each other and I
was the misfit said Bruton, the only
contestant in the seven-man field
from a small NA1A school. "But af-
ter the first shoot-around I knew I
won their acceptance because 1 was
doing all my dunks fairly easy.
"My dunks are with power,
charisma and style and (the other
players) really liked that
Bruton, last in the order of seven
players, also quickly became the
crowd favorite at Winthrop Col-
lege, which is near Charlotte, N.C,
site of this year's NCAA Final Four.
He pumped up his Reebok shoes
before each dunk, and then let the
air out in the lane after his perfect
scores.
Contestants got three first-
round dunks and the best two scores
were counted.
His first slam in the opening
round set the tone. Bruton took a
running start and left the air at the
foul line, soaring and slamming the
ball one-handed as he looked away.
Former Chicago Bulls star Michael
Jordan was one of the first to make
that dunk famous.
"I have been blessed with tre-
mendous leaping ability he said.
"I think it vvasappropriate for me to
showcase it right here
Judges whittled the field down
to two finalists. Fans then had to
wait about 45 minutes to have the
winner declared bv television iew-
ers voting by phone, but most fig-
ured Bruton clinched the title with
his last of five dunks.
After fumbling the ball during
his approach on his first dunk in the
showdown with the 6-6
Mohammed Acha of Coastal Caro-
lina, Bruton brought the crowd to
its feet after dunking one-handed
over a rack of balls he had placed in
the center of the lane.
Heended upgetting4,950votes
(66 percent) to 2,550 (34 percent) for
Acha in an all-South Carolina final.
Bruton said he practiced his
winning dunk many times.
"But usually I let one of my
friends stand at the free throw line
and I jump over them he said.
"But since they said I couldn't use
anyoneljustdecided toelevateover
(the balls) without help
"Sometimes I look a t television
and see all the (NBA) guys doing
these dunks and I say, 'Man, I know
I can do a better dunk than that My
time is coming. All I have to do is
wait Bruton said.
Acha's two final-round dunks
were unspectacular reverse slams.
The only other perfect score
before Sunday came last year, when
champion Isaiah (J.R.) Rider of
UNLVdiditonce.
The panel of judges included
Charlotte Hornets Alonzo Mourn-
ing and Rumeal Robinson, and
coaches Billy Tubbs of Oklahoma
and Rick Majerus of Utah.
Wesley Person of Auburn hit
13 of his last 15 attempts to win the
men's 3-point shooting contest over
Oklahoma State's Brooks Thomp-
son 20-14.
Karen Powell of Southern Illi-
nois edged Oregon's Missy
Croshaw 16-14 in the women's 3-
point shooting contest.
Register for these END OF THE SEMESTER activities!
Frisbee Disc Golf
April 13 & 14
This is a two day tournament on the Frisbee Disc
Golf Course located by Harrington Field.
Men's and women's divisions are offered.
Golf Singles
April 22 & 23
Register Tuesday, April
12 at 5:00pm in Bio ioj.
This tournament will be
held at the Wedgewood
Golf Club in Wilson, NC.
"Green fees vary and are
paid at the course.
ABOVE
Tlte Sports Department is desperately seeking writers for this and
summer semesters, fust drop by and fill out an application.The TEC is
located across from Joyner library in the student publications building.
�rim
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OUTDOOR
3-ON-3
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT APRIL 18
ENTER YOUR TEAM BY
5pm FRIDAY APRIL 15 IN
204 CHRISTENBURY GYM
For details call ECU Recreational Services at 757-6387
The dictionary has at
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Giving people more value for their money has made Macintosh the best-selling
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16 I The East Carolinian
April 7, 1994
Gooden relates to Strawberry's problems
Doc expects star to return
Editors Note: This ai:
printed in the USA Today on April
6 1994 in Kit Stier
New York Mets pitcher
Dwight Gooden finds it hard to
believe that Darryl Strawberry,
liis friend and former teammate,
lias a substance abuse problem.
" There were definitely signs,
but the way it came out was
strange Gooden said "uesday
before the Mets faced the Chi-
cago Cubs.
"There's more to this story
than we're hearing
Cooden wouldn't elaborate
much, but said he found it odd
that the Los Angeles Dodgers'
outfielder was using drugs at the
same time he was giving such
positive interviews during spring
training and working so hard to
rehabilitate his injured back.
Strawberry, who as a Met had
treatment for alcohol abuse at the
Smithers Center in Manhattan in
thespringof 1990,admitted Mon-
day to having a drug problem
1 he 1 todgers ha e placed him
on the disabled list and Straw-
berrv plans to enter a treatment
center.
"I think he'll play again said
Gooden, who had treatment for
drug use in 1987.
Gooden said for Straw berry
to overcome his problem, it will
take hard work and an iron will.
"If he has a problem, you can't
get angry with him Gooden
said. "They teach you that. It's a
disease. The biggest test is that
when vou're inside, you're sur-
rounded by good people and out- Mian Lans, the Mets' team psy-
side, you're dealing with real chiatrist and director ot their
people employee assistance program.
ust facing the fact that you "It didn't happen right away
have a problem, Cooden said, with him Gooden admitted. Tt
isn't easv. tooka whiletoclick. It took awhile
"I still don't take it for to trust him, for things to open
granted he-said. "I know what I up
went through. Going in is the first Cooden said he plans to con-
step. Coming out. the first yearis tact Strawberry.
very tough "Probably later when every-
Gooden said the person who thing has calmed down the
helped him the most was Dr. pitcher said.
Dream Team II coming
to N.C. over summer
Be a Carolina Tar Heel!
Session I: May 19-June 24,1994
Session II: June 28-August 2,1994
Students from any college or university, teachers, rising high s hooi seniors, and
other tudents wh arc not enrolled .it I t C 11 ma) apply a Visiting Summer
Students fen first, second or both sessions.
UNC-CH offers during two 5 1 2 week sessions, over 900 courses in 4s
discipline A t pica! course load per session is 6 semester hours.
S)me evening and night courses and three-week short courses are ottered Spac
still available in three-week Summer School Abroad programs
Approcimate Cos; per Session: tuition and tees ol si Is PLUS S4" per en lit hour
tor NC resident undergraduates or S2 per credit hour tor nonresident
undergraduates
When requesting a catalog and application, please mention seeing this m. in The
EostCarvii v,
Summer School
CB 3340, 200 Pertierew 1 lall
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Mil
Chapel Mill, NC 27599-3340
Phone: 1-800-UNC1-123 or 919-962-1009
Fax:919-962-2752
(AP)-TheNBA team that will
compete in this summer's world
championships will plav exhibition
games July 26 in Charlotte, .C,
and Jury 31 in Oakland, Calif.
Dream Team II, which will train
from July 20-30 at Moody Bible In-
stitute in Chicago, will plav the
C ierman national team in Charlotte
and the USA Goodwill Games team
in Oakland.
The L.S. team is coached bv
)on Nelson of golden State and
imposed ot 13 players: Derrick
CotemanofNew Jersey, Joe Dumars
of Detroit, Tim Harda wavofGolden
State, Larry Johnson of Charlotte,
Shawn Kempof Seattle, Don Majerle
ot Phoenix, Reggie Miller of Indi-
anaAlonoMourningof Charlotte
ShaquilleCTWal of Orlando, Mar k
Price of Cleveland, Steve Smith of
Miami, Isiah Thomas of Detroit and
Dominique Wilkins of the Los An-
geles Clippers.
The work! championships are
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Ontario.
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Aprril 7. 1994
The East Carolinian 17
Baldwin defends Lemieux's
uncharacteristic on ice actions
Editors Note: 77ns article was
printed in the USA Today on April 6,
1994 by Kevin Allen.
If the NHL suspens Mario
Lemieux for Monday's tirade, Pitts-
burgh Penguins owner Howard
Baldwin vows to do "whatever it
takes" to get it rescinded.
"He had better not be sus-
pended Baldwin said. "What
would you suspend him for? He
didn't go after the referee. He came
out of the penalty box
Lemieux received a game mis-
conduct Monday during the game
against the Tampa Bay Lightning
after he exited the penalty box and
mounted an angry charge atreferee
Kerry Fraser. He was grabbed by
teammate Ron Francis.
Moments before, Lemiuex re-
ceived a two-minute penalty for
high-sticking Tampa Bay
defenseman Roman Hamrlik.
He left the penalgy box after
Fraser gave him a misconduct pen-
alty for tossing his stick over the
glass.
"He was fustrated, and he
showed his frustration Baldwin
said.
Baldwin said Lemieux had been
held and roughed by two
defensemen earlier in the period.
"The first time he goes out on
the ice, he gets bearhugged and
tackled to the ice Grands said.
"That's the kind of thing tha t causes
back injuries
"A guy of his stature and his
ability has to put up with the stuff
he does. He's had two back surger-
ies, and he was on the brink of
retirement earlier this season
Lemieux, who has missed 61
games misseasonbecauseof chronic
backproblems,hasbeenvocalabout
seeking a crackdown on the harass-
ment.
"I think he's right Baldwin
said. "If Mario had it to do over
again, he probably wouldn't do it
the same away. But he wants the
league to (address) this issue
Baldwin said the league must
do more to protect stars so they
don't have t take matters into their
hands.
"Do you want to see players
like (Jaromir) Jagr and Mario play
the game?" Baldwin asked. "Or do
you want to see more of this clutch-
ing and grabbing?"
Baldwin doesn't fault the offi-
cials. "I'mnotcriticalof them. It'san
impossible task we give them he
said. "We have to do something
about the systme. Maybe we have
to allow linesmen to call penalties
or whatever it takes
Baldwin said he had received
no word from the league about
whether a suspension was likely.
"But count on this: I'll take
whatever appeal process that is
available if he is suspended
Baldwin said.
Indians move to new park and era
Editors Note: This article ivas
printed in the USA Today on April
6,1994 by Mike Dodd.
A fan paraded through the
grandstand at Jacobs Field Mon-
day carrying a sign that read, "The
Giant is Awake
In more ways than one.
The fulfillment of a 30-year
wait for a stadium could coincide
with the end of the Cleveland
Indians' 39-year pennant drought
and the "mistake on the lake"
jokes about the city. The three go
hand-in-hand.
"This club just didn't have
the bucks to play the game (in the
old stadium) says general man-
ager John Hart, noting the team
went from a small-market club to
mid-sized with its 1-mile move
uptown. "Now, this franchise is a
factor
Combined with the adjacent
basketball arena that opens in the
fall, it's part of a downtown rede-
SOFTBALL
velopment changing Cleveland's
image.
"We think 4.5-to-5.5 million
people a year will come to the
ballpark and the arena says Tom
Chema, executive director of
Gateway Economic Development
Corp.
"Already nine new restau-
rants opened their doors
Jacobs Field has the same feel
as Baltimore's Camden Yards, but
with a more modern architectural
design and Cleveland touches.
Instead of the bricks, intri-
cate steelwork symbolizes and
blends with the city's bridges and
trusses.
In the concourses, huge mu-
rals depict Indians players in ac-
tion, and billboards picture 25
different great moments in Indi-
ans history.
Sluggers can take aim at the
scoreboard above the left-center
bleachers, a shot akin to hitting
Camden's warehouse in right
field.
If the first two games are any
indication, Cleveland could lead
the league in doubles and
misplayed pop-ups.
The Indians hit four doubles
Monday, two off the 19-foot high
wall in left and center.
The swirling winds ga ve ou t-
fielders fits in Saturday's exhibi-
tion game.
"The winds are going to af-
fect it a lot more than anybody
thought manager Mike
Hargrove says. "I think you'll get
a lot of circling winds inside the
ballpark It's something we're
going to have to constantly
watch
The atmosphere inside the
park has players excited, too.
"The old place was so big,
you'd have 40,000-to-50,000 and
it still seemed empty says out-
fielder Wayne Kirby.
"In this stadium, you can hear
a lot. You can hear everything
Continued from page 13
the year, scattering six hits and one
walk. Campbell started Christine
Homack , who saw her personal
winning streak end at eight games
and dropped to 13-4 on the year
despite allowing just four hits and
striking out four.
In the second game, Angie
Beech tripled and scored on
Marshall's sacrifice fly for a 1-0
Campbell lead after four innings.
ECU tied the score wirhan unearned
run on Eckman's two-out RBI hit in
the top of the fourth.
The Lady Camels, however,
reclaimed the lead for good in the
bottom of the framewhen Goodman
walked and later scored on Melissa
BASKETBALL
Mullins' triple. CU added an insur-
ance run in the bottom of the sixth
on Michelle Little's squeeze bunt
that scored Nardolillo.
Nardolillo (9-8) scattered six
ECU hits to earn the victory for
Campbell. Teryn Ford (10-8) was
the tough-luck Lady Pirate loser
despite giving up just four hits.
Continued from page 13
outstanding event to Greenville
and Eastern North Carolina
Stroehmann added, "This tour-
nament is open to all levels of
ability. Although many top area
prep, college, and former college
players are expected to enter, the
majority of teams will be Week-
end Warriors, men and women
who just enjoy playing recre-
ational basketball. There is a com-
petitive division for all levels of
ability. There is no admission
charge for spectators
Entry fee is $80 per team with
entry forms available at partici-
pating area Burger Kings and
River Park North. Entry deadline
is April 15.
Adventures in Health
Children's Museum is a non-
profit organization promoting
healthy lifestyle choices for chil-
dren and their families in Eastern
North Carolina. The museum is
located at 1000 Mumford Road,
River Park North in Greenville.
ECU's Intra-Fraternity Coun-
cil has agreed to help sponsor
this event by providing the vol-
unteer staff. This will be the en-
tire greek system working to-
gether to help us out.
For additional information
for individuals or corporate par-
ticipation, or individuals wish-
ing to volunteer to assist with the
event, contact the museum at
(919)752-7231 in Greenville.
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Attention, voters!
It's time to get to the nitty-gritty,
folks. With a runoff, the emphasis on
issues is paramount. The East
Carolinian hereby invites the student
body and faculty of ECU to a
presidential debate. This will be an
open forum panel discussion
regarding the SGA runoff elections.
Time and location will be
announced in the next issue of The
East Carolinian.
Presidential candidates are urged
to attend.
� M� � m WDMVMMNMVWVM
s
WE WANT YOU!
(And you and you. You , too, and you.
You. You, as well. And you on the left.)
The East Carolinian's is a'hirin' and we
mean bidness!
Position! available include:
Lifestyle Editor and Asst. Editor
Cover the entertainment, extracurricular
activities and fields of interest of the
students and faculty of ECU. Assign
stories of such and work with publishing
deadlines.
Account Executive
Represent the pappr to potential
advertisers and work with Creative
Directors to insure the patron's ideas can
work in an a

-
Creative Director and Asst. Director
Compose and design ads based on
customer's ideas and publication
feasibility. Macintosh experience is crucial
for both positions.

Writers
Work with direct sources and public
record to insure integrity and objectivity
of articles, while educating readers in the
subject. English and Communications
majors preferred, but solid writing ability
will not be overlooked in other applicants.
Copy Editors
Correct articles and amend for both AP
and house styles. Good editing and critical
review ability necessary.
All applicants must have 2.0 GPA and Macintosh
experience is preferred.

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Title
The East Carolinian, April 7, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 07, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1003
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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