The East Carolinian, July 28, 1993







Opinion
Watch the movie first
Student responds to
Jumnist, citing blatant
ws in film criticism.
Story page 6.
Today
4
A High 95�
i
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 6S No. 44
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 28, 1993
8 Pages
College Hill Drive to
be completed by fall
Culvert damaged because of heavy rains
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Construction at the bottom of College Hill Drive continues as workers await delivery of � Jhe
old culverts were damaged because of heavy rains last spring. Construction should be t.mshed bv fall.
By Molly Perkins
Staff Writer
Road construction at the
bottom of College Hill Drive is
scheduled to be completed be-
fore the fall semester begins in
August.
The construction crew is re-
placing a culvert under the road
that was damaged by the heavy
rains of this past spring. The cul-
vert consists of two large corru-
gated steel pipes that allow the
Green Mill Run Stream to run
under the road
fter noticing a hole in the
road, Physical Plant officials in-
vestigated and found a larger
hole in the culvert. Water from
the stream had rusted the steel,
causing the hole. Because of risks
to electrical and power lint s that
also run under the road, ECU'S
Business Affairs team reacted
promptlv to the problem of struc-
tural damage to College Hill
Drive.
"We received approval to
perform an emergency project,
engaged a designer and as-
sembled the funds to replace the
culverts said Richard Brown
in the July 8 Chancellor's report.
As the result of an engi-
neering study, it was decided to
replace the culverts with new
culverts made of pre-cast con-
crete, that should last as long
as 50 vears The construction
crew has removed the old cul-
verts and are awaiting the de-
liverv of the new ones.
Brown said the cost of
the project is estimated at
$450,000 and that the funds
came from re-allocation of last
year's state appropriations.
For pedestrians, an at-
tractive footbridge over Green
Mill Run stream has been built
in the woods next to College
Hill Drive.
If all goes as planned,
the construction should be
completed before school be-
gins on August 23.
service
By Warren Sumner
Assistant News Editor
A memorial service for Richard Cecil
Todd,anECl benefa tor and faculty advi-
sor for Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity was
held on Wednesday ulj 21
The beloved em ritus passed away
last Sunday night after a long battle with
cancer. The service, held at Wilkerson Fu-
neral Home, was attended by a collection
of friends, colleagues and former students
ofTodd.
Tlie 2 p.m. service allowed three men
who knew Toddwell to share their memo-
ries of him. I he first to speak was Dr
Robert Gowen, a longtime friend ofTodd's
and his colleague in the history depart-
ment. Gowen's speech recounted Todd's
inspirational life and patriotism.
"Dickwasoneofthoseextraordinary
individuals who did indeed become a part
of all he met Gowen said. "All it took was
just one meeting and you could never for-
get him.
"Helived thehfeot a champion in the
Researchers test
humans, not rats
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK.
N.C. (AP) � Researchers seeking clues to
environmentally-caused diseases soon will
be able to test their theories on humans
instead of just lab rats.
A contract for clinical services was
announced Monday between the National
Instituteof Environmental 1 lealthServices
and medical schools at Duke University
and the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
Under the first year ot the 10-year
contract,the schools willgetabout$600,000
to study research findings in human pa-
tients, said IMIEHS Director Kenneth
Olden.
Up to $30 million could be spent
during the life of the contract. Olden said.
The firstactivity under the contract will be
creating an administrative staff and train-
ing doctors and nurses.
The environmental institute based
here is part of the National Institutes of
Health in Bethesda, Md where Nil I op-
erates a huge hospital for clinical resean h
NIEHS is the only part of NIH located
away from the Maryland facility.
The medical schoolsalready re i ive
about S million a year each from Nil i to
operate clinics for other projects Duke's
i linichasl7bedsdevotedtoNIHresearch
andUNC - 1! has 12.
Now those clinics will be used foi
the environmental health studies, )lden
said.
classic Ameri an sense. In a period v here
cynicismabounds,andwedesperatelylook
tor role models of the American dream,
DickToddisdefinitelyone,aman proud to
be an American and a mar ol wl
America can be justly proud.
Remembrances of rodd contii
with Rev. Paul Allen, a representativ
Phi Sigma Pi who graduated from E I in
1969. Allen recounted Todd's interest in
the personal livesofall heencountered and
his ability to recount the details oi those
lives.
"He had the remarkable and i
able capacity of remembering everybody
and everything tor once he knew you, he
knew vourfatherand mother and grandfa-
ther and grandmother, your aunts and
uncles and sometimes your second cous-
ins, but surely our wives, husbands and
children. Boyfriends and girlfriends too
Allen said.
The last remembrance of Todd was
offered by ECU Chancellor Ri hard Eakin.
See TODD page 2
�� -

Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Members of the Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity gathered outside Joyner Library after
the ceremony to pay tribute to Richard Todd, to whom the flagpole .s ded.cated.
Even with improved deficit picture,
Clinton still scrambling for dollars
See RESEARCH page 2
WASHINGTON (AP) � Look at
it this way.
You've put together the family
budget for the year. It's tight but you
can make it. Then in one ugly week the
refrigerator goes on the blink, termites
are discovered under the eaves and
Junior backs into a BMW.
Look at it through Bill Clinton's
eves
1 le puts together the federal bud-
get for the year. It's tight but he can
make it. Then the Midwestern rains
come. Not to mention having to save
starving Somalis, retrain Northwest
lumberjacks and ease the pain for hun-
dreds of communities losing their mili-
tary bases
Normally, a president should
have an easier time of it than a
homeowner in meeting unexpected
bills. There's no steely-eyed bank loan
officer telling Clinton he's reached his
credit limit.
With a S4 trillion national debt,
what's a few extra billion dollars in
borrowing7 T Ins year tor a hange, the
news (n the debt trout has been good.
Instead ot the $332 billion defi it
i linton proje ted when he released his
economh plan in February, theadmin
istration now estimates the defh it foi
this fiscal year, which ends Sepl 0,
will b - :s2s million bi � ear s
record $290.4 billion deficit.
Clinton cited this development
in rain-soaked Des Moines, Iowa, when
he unveiled his flood relief package.
While he conceded it would make the
deficit larger, he said Congress had
plenty of wiggle room because of the
new, lower deficit estimate.
In vears past, such a politically
popular effort as aiding flood victims
would have been a cinch to win quick
congressional approval.
Not flu- ear. t ongressional lead-
er had to regroup after the I louse on
Thursday voted down the expedited
handling of the $3 billion flood bill
with 45 Democrats joining 171 Repub-
licans in opposition.
Many ol the opponents argued
that instead of classifying the funds as
"emergency" spending, they wanted
to offer amendments to force spending
cuts m other programs to offset the $3
billion.
I rider I ; i I law, a president
can declan an emergency for unex-
pec ted spending needs, such as hurri-
canes or flood- oi military operations,
s agrees, the money is
ithout w oi rying about
i prev iousl appro ed
i r the defh it.
�- month. C ongress fi-
! i S3.5 billion catchall
,nA it t ong
appropi it.
what il
I ai
nailv appro
supplemental spending bill for this
year that included money for Somalia
relief operations. However, deficit
fighters insisted that the $3.5billion be
offset by S2.T billion in cuts in other
programs, mainly in lower-priority
defense operations.
The new deficit-cutting fervor
hasn't stopped the administration from
coming forward with new or repack-
aged initiatives.
Often those programs have been
vastly scaled down from the grand
ideas floated last war by candidate
Clinton or the administration has been
vague about exactly where the offset-
ting money will be found to pay for the
proposals
It isn't iust new initiatives that
Clinton is having trouble funding. The
administration is waging what one of-
ficial described as "hand-to-hand com-
bat" in congressional committees to
preserve even a sealed-down version
of the investment program Clinton
campaigned on last year.
A recent administration tally
showed that Clinton has been able to
win approval in I louse committees of
just hall of the 55.9 billion the presi-
dent as seeking as a first-year install-
ment for what once had been a $200
billion, four-year effort to rejuvenate
the economy
ECU offers
rural
residency
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Medicine has
adopted a new residency program de-
signed to service rural communities.
Directed by Dr. Dana King, an ECU
faculty member, the program will b&-
gin training in Ahoskie and
Williamston sometime this summer.
According to an article published
in the ECU Medical Review, four medi-
cal school students will be chosen to
take part in this program during the
second and third year segments of their
required three-year residency.
After having spent a year at the
University Medical Center, of Eastern
Carolina-Pitt County, the four students
will be sent to either Roanoke-Chowan
Hospital in Ahoskie or Martin General
Hospital in Williamston for the remain-
ing two years. Supervising the medical
students in Ahoskie will be Dr. Colin
Jones, a local family physician. Dr.
James Nicholson, also a local family
physician, will supervise the students
located in Williamston.
According to King, Williamston
and Ahoskie were chosen as sites for
the rural residency because of the com-
mitment to the local hospitals and the
availability of local physicians.
"We're committed to the idea of
residents training in an environment
that resembles actual practice to the
largest extent possible King said.
King, as well as others involved
in the residency program, believes that
rural training will alleviate the stu-
dents' dependence on the extensive
medical knowledge and adv anced tools
found in an academic medical center.
"In rural areas, you have to get
along with fewer resources and fewer
specialists King said.
A new two-way television link
between the two communities and the
Medical Center will be a great advan-
tage in conducting educational activi-
ties between the four residents located
in Ahoskie and Williamston and the 36
remaining residentsat the medical cen-
ter.
The hospitals selected tor the resi-
dency will be responsible tor paving
the salaries of the residents, as well as
paving other cost, tor their education
According to the I CU Wdical Revie
the president and chief executive of-
ficer of Roanoke-Chowan Hospital,
Peter N.C leilich.said that the expenses
Sec MEDICAL page 2





June 28, 1993
4UI
announcf u his uecisioi
MP program
�� University of North
tol Radio, Television
I iartment Communication
eg� of Arts and Sciences
Monday. In effect, this new department will
absorb all broadcast responsibilities formerly held by the RT MP
department which, according to university Provost Richard
McC ormick, w ould allow "Carolina a remarkable opportunity to be
innovative and at the cutting edge of an extremely exciting field
There is a group of students, faculty and alumni that is displeased
with the change, however, including H. Taylor "Bud" Vaden, an
alumnus of the program and former president of the National
Broadcasters Promotion Association. Vaden said "I think the Univer-
sity has failed miserably in trying to communicate with students
enrolled in the department. (Birdsall) failed to bring anybody in who
knows anything about production in radio, television or motion
pictures
Students adopt alternative healing
The Naropa Institute, a small Boulder, Colo, college, has had
trouble keeping an open phone line since a Bill Movers TV series on
"Healing and the Mind" aired this year. The college touts itself as a
Buddhist-inspired non-secretarian institution where faculty mem-
bers weave "contemplative practices" into students' lives. More than
600 students, when not studying in textbooks, participate in every-
thing from cross-legged meditation to Japanese archery and martial
arts. The school also offers a program in healing arts that includes
programs in massage therapy. Since last year, applications at the
school have increased by 22 percent and officials are rushing franti-
cally to keep up with inquiries. School spokesperson Sue Seacof said
that the program offers a unique program for unique students. "Our
students are independent, creative and they know what they want to
do. One of the reasons they are here is that they want to nourish
themselves in work that is meaningful to them
Student newspaper plagiarized
Student journalists at Michigan State University were sur-
prised when they saw one of their exclusive articles reprinted word
for word in a professional newspaper, spelling errors and all. The
MSU paper, The State News, had released a confidential list of candi-
dates for the president's position at MSU, publishing the information
in the April 7 edition of the paper. The student editorial staff was
appalled to see their work represented verbatim in the Lansing State
journal, a professional paper near the university.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
MEDICAL
area great investment tor the hos-
pital
"Any time you have formal
oi clinical teaching going on in
your hospital, thequality of care is
going to improve Geilich said.
"That's just a given at teaching
hospitals
According to Nicholson,
RESEARCH
Continued from page 1
their hospital has a shortage of
primary care physicians; therefore,
the residents are much needed.
Several programs are being
worked on at the ECU School of
Medicine in an effort to increase
the number of rural physicians in
eastern North Carolina a nd to sup-
port those already in practice.
Continued from page 1
The lab is likely to work in
the near future with the hospitals
on studies of environmental causes
of asthma, reproductive hormone
problems and degenerative nerve
disease.
"If you can prevent disease
and disorders, that makes sense"
and reduces health care costs,
Olden said. The agreement allows
researchers to "more d irectly tra ns-
late out basic science discoveries
into the realm of human health
TODD
Clinical studies on human
patients mean researchers will
know what effect a chemical or
other pollutant will have in low
doses. Until now, studies were
done using high doses in lab rats or
using workers in industrial settings
who were exposed to high doses of
a pollutant.
Olden said the program will
be flexible. If a study doesn't pan
out, it can be stopped without more
expense.
Continued from page 1
Eakin recounted a story of a history
class Todd taught that responded
to his plea for blood needed by his
wife, affectionately known asSweet-
heart, during a hospital stay. Eakin
said that the class' response was
typical of the closeness Todd felt to
his students.
Gowen perhaps best repre-
sented Todd's connection with
young people when he told of ad-
vice Todd had given his own son in
the weeks before his death.
He told the audience that if
Todd were in attendance, he
would tell them: "work hard and
play the game of life to win, but
also do what is right; be fair so you
never have to worry about your
past coming back to haunt you.
And when you've made a success
of yourself, remember others who
are less fortunate. Share yourgood
fortune with them. Remember that
as God blessed you, so you shou Id
give generously of yourself for
the sake of others. To Dick Todd,
that was the meaning of life
News writers needed for the
fall semester. Communica-
tions majors preferred. Call
Karen or Joe at 757-6366 for
more information.
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Christopher cuts trip short
SINGAPORE (AP) � Secre-
tary of State Warren Christopher
cut short his visit to Asia today to
return immediately to Washing-
ton and confer on escalating vio-
lence in the Middle East before
heading there next weekend as
previously planned.
The change came as Israeli
forces launched a third day of air
and artillery attacks on suspected
guerrilla positions in south Leba-
non. More than 42 people have
been killed and at least 195
wounded, most of them Lebanese,
since Israel began assaults Sun-
day in retaliation for attacks on its
troops.
"I have been following the
dramatic escalation of violence in
southern Lebanon and northern
Israel with great concern and I
will be discussing the impact of
these events on the peace process
Christopher said in a brief an-
nouncement distributed to report-
ers shortly before his hastily ar-
ranged departure.
At the White House Tues-
day, a senior administration offi-
cial said that Christopher had
called the president on Monday:
"We all agreed it would be useful
to talk before he goes to the Middle
East.
"Everybody still wants him
to come and Christopher will
keep to his schedule of going to
the Middle East this weekend, said
the official, speaking on the condi-
tion of anonymity. Theoffirial said
it would be "a terrible irony" if
the peace process was to break
down at this point.
A senior official traveling
with Christopher said the secre-
tary spoke by telephone with
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and Syrian Foreign Min-
ister Farouk Sharaa before firm-
ing up his decision to return to
Washington.
The official, who spoke on
condition of not being identified
by name, said Rabin asked Chris-
topher not to cancel his trip to
the Middle East and Christopher
replied that he had no intention
of doing that.
He said Christopher would
head for the Middle East as
planned over the weekend, prob-
ably arriving Sunday or Mon-
day in Egypt and visiting Israel,
Syria and Jordan as previously
scheduled.
The conversations with
Rabin and Sharaa had "con-
firmed in the secretary's mind
his decision" to travel to Wash-
ington for consultations, and
President Clinton concurred
with that thinking, the official
said.
He said Christopher wants
to spend "more concentrated
time on this issue than he would
have been able to do had he con-
tinued with his meetings in Asia
and Australia. In Washington,
he will meet with the team of
experts overseeing the Mideast
peace talks as well as with
Clinton.
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Information about the ECU Pirate Footbal Team and
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V-�t ��

,� w Y





as ECU
Opinion
Watch' the movie first
Student responds to
columnist, citing blatant
flaws in film criticism.
Story page 6.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 44
Circulation 5,(KM)
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 28,1993
8 Pages
College Hill Drive to
be completed by fall
Culvert damased because of heavy rains
Photo by Cedrtc Van Buren
Construction at the bottom of College Hill Drive continues as workers await delivery of new culverts. The
old culverts were damaged because of heavy rains last spring. Construction should be finished bv fall.
By Molly Perkins
Staff Writer
Road construction at the
bottom of College Hill Drive is
scheduled to be completed be-
fore the fall semester begins in
August.
The construction crew is re-
placing a culvert under the road
that was damaged by the heavv
rains of this past spring. The cul-
vert consists of two large corru-
gated steel pipes that allow the
Green Mill Run Stream to run
under the road.
After noticing a hole in the
road. Physical Plant officials in-
vestigated and found a larger
hole in the culvert. Water from
the stream had rusted the steel,
causing the hole. Because of risks
to electrical and power lines that
also run under the road, ECU's
Business Affairs team reacted
promptly to the problem of struc-
tural damage to College Hill
Drive.
"We received approval to
perform an emergency project,
engaged a designer and as-
sembled the funds to replace the
culverts said Richard Brown
in the July 8 Chancellor's report.
As the result of an engi-
neering studv, it was decided to
replace the culverts with new
culverts made of pte-cast con-
crete, that should last as long
as 50 years. The construction
crew has removed the old cul-
verts and are awaiting the de-
livery of the new ones.
Brown said the cost of
the project is estimated at
$450,000 and that the funds
came from re-allocation of last
year's state appropriations.
For pedestrians, an at-
tractive footbridge over Green
Mill Run stream has been built
in the woods next to College
Hill Drive.
If all goes as planned,
the construction should be
completed before school be-
gins on August 23.
Memorial service held for Professor Todd
By Warren Sumner
Assistant News Editor
A memorial service for Richard Cecil
Ti dd. an Ed' benefac t r a nd faculty ad vi-
sor for Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity was
m Wednesday, uly 21.
The beloved emeritus passed away
last Sunday night after a long battle with
cancer. The service, held at Wilkerson Fu-
neral Home, was attended by a collection
of friends, colleagues and former students
of Todd.
The 2 p.m. service allowed three men
who knew Todd well U i �-hare their memo-
ries of him. The first to speak was Dr.
Robert Gowen, a longtime friend of Todd's
and his colleague in the history depart-
ment. Gowen's speech recounted Todd's
inspirational life and patriotism.
"Dick wasoneof those extraordinary
individuals who did indeed become a part
of all he met Gowen said. "All it took was
just one meeting and you could never for-
get him.
"Helived the lifeof a champion in the
Researchers test
humans, not rats
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK,
N.C. CAP) � Researchers seeking clues to
environmentally-caused diseases soon will
be able to test their theories on humans
instead of just lab rats.
A contract for clinical services was
announced Monday between the National
Instituteof Environmental HealthServices
and medical schools at Duke University
and the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Under the first year of the 10-year
contract, the schools will get about $600,000
to studv research findings in human pa-
tients, said NIEHS Director Kenneth
Olden.
Up to $30 million could be spent
during the lite of the contract. Olden said.
The first activity under the contract will be
creating an administrative staff and train-
ing doctors and nurses.
The environmental institute based
here is part ot the National Institutes ot
Health in Bethesda, Md � here NIH op-
erates a huge hospital tor clinical research.
NIEHS is the only part of NIH located
away from the Maryland facility.
The med k a 1 schools a 1 read v recei ve
about S3 million a year each from NIH to
operate clinics tor other projects. Duke's
clinic has 17 beds devoted toNIH resea rch
andUNC-c H has 12
Now those linus will be used tor
the environmental health studies, Olden
said.
See RESEARCH page 2
classic American sense. In a period where
cvnicismabounds. and wedesperatelv look
for role models of the American dream,
Dick Todd isdetinitelv one. a man proud to
be an American and a man of whom
America can be justly proud
Remembrances ot Todd continued
with Rev. Paul Allen, a representative of
Phi Sigma Pi who graduated fin m EC L in
19. Allen recounted Todd's interest in
the personal lives of all he encountered and
his ability to recount the details ot those
lives.
"He had the remarkable and em i-
able capacity of remembering everybody
and everything, for once he knew you, he
knew your father and mother and gra nd fa -
ther and grandmother, your aunts and
uncles and sometimes your second cous-
ins, but surely your wives, husbands and
children. Boyfriends and girlfriends too
Allen said
The last remembrance ot Todd was
offered bv ECU Chancellor Richard Eakm.
See TODD page 2
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Members of the Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity gathered outside Joyner Library after
the ceremony to pav tribute to Richard Todd, to whom the flagpole is dedicated.
Even with improved deficit picture,
Clinton still scrambling for dollars
WASHINGTON (AP) � Look at
it this way.
You've put together the family
budget for the year. Its tight but you
can make it. Then in one ugly week the
refrigerator goes on the blink, termites
are discovered under the eaves and
Junior backs into a BMW.
Look at it through Bill Clinton's
eyes.
He puts together the federal bud-
get for the year. It's tight but he can
make it. Then the Midwestern rams
come. Not to mention having to save
starving Somalis, retrain Northwest
lumberjacks and ease the pain tor hun-
dreds of communities losing their mili-
tary bases.
Normally, a president should
have an easier time ot it than a
homeowner in meeting unexpected
bills. There's no steely-eyed bank loan
officer telling Clinton he's reached his
credit limit.
With a S4 trillion national debt.
what's a few extra billion dollars in
borrowing? This year tor a change, the
news on the debt Iront has been good.
Instead ot the $332 billion deficit
Clinton projected when he released his
economic plan in Februai v. the admin
istration now estimates the deficit lor
this fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30,
will be $285 million, below last year's
record S2L0.4 billion deficit.
Clinton cited this development
in rain-soaked Des Moines, Iowa, when
he unveiled his flood relief package.
While he conceded it would make the
deficit larger, he said Congress had
plenty oi wiggle room because of the
new, lower deficit estimate.
In years past, such a politically
popular effort as aiding flood victims
would have been a cinch to win quick
congressional approval.
Not this year. Congressional lead-
ers had to regroup after the I louse on
Thursday voted down the expedited
handling of the $3 billion flood bill
with 45 Democrats joining 171 Repub-
licans in opposition.
(Many ot the opponents argued
that instead ot i lassifying the funds as
"emergency" spending, they wanted
to lifter amendments to force spending
i. uts in other programs to offset the S3
billion
Under budget law, a president
can declare an emergency lor unex-
pected spending needs, such as hurri-
canes or floods oi military operations,
,nd if Congress agrees, the money is
appropriated without worrying about
what il does to previously approved
spending caps or the defi it
1 ar.lier tins month, Congress fi-
nally approved .i $3.5 billion catchall
supplemental spending bill for this
year that included money for Somalia
relief operations. However, deficit
fighters insisted that the $3.5 billion be
offset by 52.5 billion in cuts in other
programs, mainly in lower-priority
defense operations.
The new deficit-cutting fervor
hasn't stopped the administration from
coming forward with new or repack-
aged initiatives.
Often those programs have been
vastly scaled down from the grand
ideas floated last year by candidate
Clinton or the administration has been
vague about exactly where the offset-
ting money will be found to pay for the
proposals.
It isn't just new initiatives that
Clinton is having trouble funding. The
administration is waging what one of-
ficial described as "hand-to-hand com-
bat" in congressional committees to
preserve even a scaled-down version
of the investment program Clinton
campaigned on last year.
A recent administration tally
showed that Clinton has been able to
win approval in House committees of
just half of the $5.9 billion the presi-
dent was seeking as a first-year install-
ment tor what once had been a $200
billion, foui year effort to rejuvenate
the economv
ECU offers
rural
residency
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Medicine has
adopted a new residency program de-
signed to service rural communities.
Directed by Dr. Dana King, an ECU
faculty member, the program will be-
gin training in Ahoskie and
Williamston sometime this summer.
According to an article published
in the ECU Medical Review, four medi-
cal school students will be chosen to
take part in this program during the
second and third year segments of their
required three-year residency.
After having spent a year at the
University Medical Center of Eastern
Carolina-Pitt County, the four students
will be sent to either Roanoke-Chowan
Hospital in Ahoskie or Martin General
Hospital in Williamston for the remain-
ing two years. Supervising the medical
students in Ahoskie will be Dr. Colin
Jones, a local family physician. Dr.
James Nicholson, also a local family
physician, will supervise the students
located in Williamston.
According to King, Williamston
and Ahoskie were chosen as sites for
the rural residency because of the com-
mitment to the local hospitals and the
availability of local physicians.
"We're committed to the idea of
residents training in an environment
that resembles actual practice to the
largest extent possible King said.
King, as well as others involved
in the residency program, believes that
rural training will alleviate the stu-
dents' dependence on the extensive
medical knowledge and advanced tools
found in an academic medical center.
"In rural areas, you have to get
along with fewer resources and fewer
specialists King said.
A new two-way television link
between the two communities and the
Medical Center will be a great advan-
tage in conducting educational activi-
ties between the four residents located
in Ahoskie and Williamston and the3b
remaining residents at the medical cen-
ter.
The hospitals selected lot the resi-
dency will be responsible for paying
the salaries oi the residents, as well as
paying other costs tor their education
According to the E( 11 Medical Review,
the president and chief executive of-
ficer of Roanoke-Chowan Hospital
PeterN. leilich, said that theexpenses
See MEDICAL page 2





June 28, 1993
ktouncf Other Camp
MEDICAL
Continued from page 1
UNC dissolves RTVMP program
After i troubled debates, the University of North
Carolina h � lve its Department of Radio, Television
and Motion Pictures and form a new Department of Communication
Studies. Stephen Birdsall, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
announced his decision Monday. In effect, this new department will
absorb all broadcast responsibilities formerly held by the RTVMP
department which, according to university Provost Richard
McCormick, would allow "Carolina a remarkable opportunity to be
innovative and at the cutting edge of an extremely exciting field
There is a group of students, faculty and alumni that is displeased
with the change, however, including H. Taylor "Bud" Vaden, an
alumnus of the program and former president of the National
Broadcasters Promotion Association. Vaden said "I think the Univer-
sity has failed miserably in trying to communicate with students
enrolled in the department. (Birdsall) failed to bring anybody in who
knows anything about production in radio, television or motion
pictures
Students adopt alternative healing
The Naropa Institute, a small Boulder, Colo, college, has had
trouble keeping an open phone line since a Bill Moyers TV series on
"Healing and the Mind" aired this year. The college touts itself as a
Buddhist-inspired non-secretarian institution where faculty mem-
bers weave "contemplative practices" into students' lives. More than
600 students, when not studying in textbooks, participate in every-
thing from cross-legged meditation to Japanese archery and martial
arts. The school also offers a program in healing arts that includes
programs in massage therapy. Since last year, applications at the
school have increased by 22 percent and officials are rushing franti-
cally to keep up with inquiries. School spokesperson Sue Seacof said
that the program offers a unique program for unique students. "Our
students are independent, creative and they know what they want to
do. One of the reasons they are here is that they want to nourish
themselves in work that is meaningful to them
Student newspaper plagiarized
Student journalists at Michigan State University were sur-
prised when they saw one of their exclusive articles reprinted word
for word in a professional newspaper, spelling errors and all. The
MSU paper, The State Neivs, had released a confidential list of candi-
dates for the president's position at MSU, publishing the information
in the April 7 edition of the paper. The student editorial staff was
appalled to see their work represented verbatim in the Landing State
Journal, a professional paper near the university.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
art ,i great investment for the hos-
pital.
"Any time you have formal
or clinical teaching going on in
your hospital, the quality of care is
going to improve Geilich said.
"That's just a given at teaching
hospitals
According to Nicholson,
RESEARCH
their hospital has a shortage of
primary care physicians; therefore,
the residents are much needed.
Several programs are being
worked on at the ECU School of
Medicine in an effort to increase
the number of rural physicians in
eastern North Carolina and to sup-
port those already in practice.
Continued from page 1
The lab is likely to work in
the near future with the hospitals
on studies of emironmental causes
of asthma, reproductive hormone
problems and degenerative nerve
disease.
"If you can prevent disease
and disorders, that makes sense"
and reduces health care costs,
Olden said. The agreement allows
researchers to "moredirectly trans-
late out basic science discoveries
into the realm of human health
TODD
Clinical studies on human
patients mean researchers will
know what effect a chemical or
other pollutant will have in low
doses. Until now, studies were
done using high doses in lab rats or
using workers in industrial settings
who were exposed to high doses of
a pollutant.
Olden said the program will
be flexible. If a study doesn't pan
out, it can be stopped without more
expense.
Continued from page 1
Eakin recounted a story of a history
class Todd taught that responded
to his plea for blood needed by his
wife, affectionately known as Sweet-
heart, during a hospital stay. Eakin
said that the class' response was
typical of the closeness Todd felt to
his students.
Gowen perhaps best repre-
sented Todd's connection with
young people when he told of ad-
vice Todd had given his own son in
the weeks before his death.
He told the audience that if
Todd were in attendance, he
would tell them: "work hard and
play the game of life to win, but
also do what is right; be fair so you
never have to worry about vour
past coming back to haunt you.
And when you've made a success
of yourself, remember others who
are less fortunate. Share yourgood
fortune with them. Rememberthat
as God blessed you, so you shoi lid
give generously of yourself for
the sake of others. To Dick Todd,
that was the meaning of life
Christopher cuts trip short
News writers needed for the
fall semester. Communica-
tions majors preferred. Call
Karen or Joe at 757-6366 for
more information.
ATTIC
752-7303
209 E. 5th St.
Greenville, NC
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SINGAPORE (AP) � Secre-
tary of State Warren Christopher
cut short his visit to Asia today to
return immediately to Washing-
ton and confer on escalating vio-
lence in the Middle East before
heading there next weekend as
previously planned.
The change came as Israeli
forces launched a third day of air
and artillery attacks on suspected
guerrilla positions in south Leba-
non. More than 42 people have
been killed and at least 195
wounded, most of them Lebanese,
since Israel began assaults Sun-
day in retaliation for attacks on its
troops.
"I have been following the
dramatic escalation of violence in
southern Lebanon and northern
Israel with great concern and I
will be discussing the impact of
these events on the peace process
Christopher said in a brief an-
nouncementdistributed to report-
ers shortly before his hastily ar-
ranged departure.
At the White House Tues-
day, a senior administration offi-
cial said that Christopher had
called the president on Monday:
"We all agreed it would be useful
to talk before he goes to the Middle
East.
"Everybody still wants him
to come and Christopher will
keep to his schedule of going to
the Middle East this weekend, said
the official, speaking on the condi-
tion of anonymity. Theoffirial said
it would be "a terrible irony" if
the peace process was to break
down at this point.
A senior official traveling
with Christopher said the secre-
tary spoke by telephone with
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and Syrian Foreign Min-
ister Farouk Sharaa before firm-
ing up his decision to return to
Washington.
The official, who spoke on
condition of not being identified
by name, said Rabin asked Chris-
topher not to cancel his trip to
the Middle East and Christopher
replied that he had no intention
of doing that.
He said Christopher would
head for the Middle East as
planned over the weekend, prob-
ably arriving Sunday or Mon-
day in Egypt and visiting Israel,
Syria and Jordan as previously
scheduled.
The conversations with
Rabin and Sharaa had "con-
firmed in the secretary's mind
his decision" to travel to Wash-
ington for consultations, and
President Clinton concurred
with that thinking, the official
said.
He said Christopher wants
to spend "more concentrated
time on this issue" than he would
have been able to do had he con-
tinued with his meetings in Asia
and Australia. In Washington,
he will meet with the team of
experts overseeing the Mideast
peace talks as well as with
Clinton.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OFFICIAL PIRATE FOOTBALL TABLOID
1003j
� Over 15,000 copies printed
� Target market of football fans,
including students, alumni, and the
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� Valuable reference resource
for the entire season.
Information about the ECU Pirate Football Team and
its opponents including team profiles, season
prospects and interviews with the team's outstanding
players.Check the profitable benefits from advertising
in the Football Tabloid.
I Ad deadline August 23 I
C
WELCOME BACK
AUGUST 25, 1993
Issue aimed directly at new and returning students
to ECU. A must for any business that targets
students as their market.
Call 757-6366 and ask for an account executive to
reserve your space new. Deadline is August 18.
The following positions are available for
fall 1993 with ECU Recreational Services:
Reporters (2 positions):
Persons interested in writing sports related articles for
departmental publications. Prior experience helpful.
Assignments during afternoon and evening hours
Sunday-Thursday. 5-10 hours weekly.
Marketing Assistant - S.H.LP.Rec (3 positions):
Assist with promotion of departmental programs. Creative,
out-going, "go-getters" needed. No experience necessary. 5-10
hours weekly. Great way to meet people!
Statistician (1 position):
Person will be responsible for entering data from various
assessment projects. Evening hours required. No prior
experience necessary but helpful. 5-10 hours weekly.
Work Study and Self-Help may apply. Pick up an application in 20 i
(hristenbury Gymnasium. Call Joannettc Roth for more details at 757 638"





i
M1 �.�� �,
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 3
Lollapalooza '93 continues diverse tradition
By Kris Hoffler
Photo courtesy of Interscope Records, Inc.
Staff Writer
How many times have I heard
someone say "that was when alter-
native was alternative?" Is it just ex-
ploring musical frontiers that makes
somethingaltemative, isithow popu-
lar the band is, or is it the crowd the
band attracts?
Lollapalooza, a slacker's
Woodstock, is now in its third year
and spreading the alternative feel
from sea to shining sea. Along with
the diversity of musical talent, there
were booths full of ethnic jewelry,
legalize marijuana campaigns, body
piercing, concert T-shirts (of course),
temporary tattoos, Dead parapher-
nalia and many other things that
would make your parents scratch
their heads with wonder.
At two o'clock, Rage Against
The Machine took the main stage. I
heard some say tha t this was the best
band of the day, which is disputable,
but they certainly did rage. Their
sound is severe and fierce, an amal-
gam of hard-core punk and politi-
cally charged rap.
They definitely gave the show a
From left to right, Tim Alexander, Les Claypool and Larry Lalonde of Primus headlined Lollapalooza this year.
Their goofy antics pleased the Walnut Creek audience and wrapped up a successful festival.
Hollywood glitz fizzles line of Fire'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Clint Eastwood's persona
made him the top box-office draw
of the 70s and early '80s. Over the
past few years, before Unforgiven,
his Hollywood star seem to have
dimmed. Films like White Hunter
and Black Heart forced him to play
against his typecast and even when
he fell intoa "Clint Eastwood role
like in The Rookie or The Dead Pool,
thepicturesrhemselvesprovedless
than entertaining.
What many Eastwood fans ne-
glect to see is thai Eastwood's em-
phasis is now on directing. His last
three directorial efforts, including
White Hunter, Black Heart and
Unforgiven , have been critical, if
not always commercial successes.
Bird was Eastwood's directorial
highlight before Unforgiven. Yet
few people know of it and even
less have seen it
The Eastwood thatHollywood
embraces is still the Eastwood of
heroic roles. With his latest star-
ring role, Eastwood was not as-
signed the directing chores. In In
the Line of Fire, a sure-footed if some-
what retreaded thriller, Eastwood
once again argues for his reputa-
tion as one of the biggest action
stars in the history of cinema. Few
actors have survived so long at the
top of the game.
Interestingly, In the Line of Fire
tells the tale of secret agent Frank
Horrigan (Eastwood) who feels
that, even at his age (Eastwood is
63, but Horrigan's age is never re-
vealed), he can compete with the
best at the top of the secret service
game.
A psychopath named Mitch
Leary (John Malkovich) wants to
raise the stakes of the game to thei r
highest limit. He calls Horrigan to
let him know that he will be assas-
sinating the president. Leary tells
Horrigan that the only reason ei-
ther man has to live is to play the
game. So Leary wants to make it
interesting.
In the Line ofF ire spirals toward
its dizzying conclusion with as-
sured timing. Wolfgang Petersen,
whose most famous directorial
work was on Das Boot, keeps the
thrill in this thriller. Even when
directing a scene of conversation,
the tension can be felt just beneath
the surface.
Horrigan meetsa femaleagent,
(Rene Russo of Lethal Weapon III
fame) for whom he develops an
affection. Although the romance
plays a minor part of the film, it
adds a decidedly human touch to
Horrigan's character.
Malkovich's Leary is a gim-
micky Hollywood creation, but it
worksquitewell.Peoplelike Leary
do not seem to exist outside the
silver screen; the sheer evil he es-
pouses makes theaudience squirm.
Like The Firm, In the Line of Fire
boasts a plethora of good perfor-
mances. Russodownplays her part
nicely so that her character is im-
portant but not pivotal. John
Mahoney and Fred Dalton Tho-
mas add great support and are a
pleasure to watch. Malkovich fits
his slimy role perfectly.
A recent trend in action heroes
is to make them vulnerable. In the
Line of Fire accentuates Horrigan's
problems and thus exposes his
vulnerability.
While running in a motorcade
next to the president's car, the cam-
era focuses on Eastwood's brow,
covered with perspiration. Also,
several references are made about
Horrigan's age. In addition,
Horrigan makes several poordeci-
sions like thinking he sees a gun in
a crowd of people when all that
occurs is that a balloon pops. This
vulnerability makes Horrigan's
later heroics even more impres-
sive.
In the Line of Fire provides first
rate entertainment. As long as you
expect pure Hollywood entertain-
ment, you should not be disap-
pointed. Unlike Eastwood films
that he directs, In the Line of Fire is
not an artistic success. So while
being a good film, In the Line of Fire
isnotgreat.Itsuffersfrom the same
woes as The Firm : it has too much
Hollywood in it and not enough
art.
Still, when you realize thattwo
top-notch original thrillersareplay-
ing in theaters at the same time, (I
refer to In the Line of Fire and The
Firm) moviegoers cannot help but
smile. The situation is much better
than usual, because summers usu-
ally mean the multiplexesare filled
with sequels and sometimes se-
quels of sequels.
Clint Eastwood, the actor, can
still carry an action picture. Go see
In the Line Fire, and you will see
what 1 mean.
Allgood delivers grass
roots of southern rock
By Danial Willis
Staff Writer
Once again, a really encourag-
ing album has been released by a
band out of Athens. This time, it's
Allgood with their second release
titled Uncommon Goal. It was also
their first release with A & M
records.
They have
an unmistakably
southern, back-
woods type of
sound. What sets
them apart from
other southern
rock 'n' roll
bandsisthatthey
add a lot of
funky, psyche-
delic tones to
their music.
Allgood isoneof
the few new
bands that plays
hard-core southern rock and still
caters to college audiences. It's a
truly original sound, and refresh-
ing to hear.
The debut album, Riding the
Bees, which came out two years
ago, was released under a smaller
record label and granted the band
remarkable acclaim. Last summer,
they toured with the Allman Broth-
ers and this summer, they're in the
amazing lineup in the H.O.R.D.E
festival.
Their first two albums were
Allgood
definitelyinfluenced by the Allman
Brothers and Stevie Ray Vaughan.
The latest album, Uncommon Goal,
was dedicated in memory of Stevie
Ray Vaughan. Songs such as
"Mornin and "Open It Up" fea-
ture long drawn-out guitar solos
reminiscentofmany Vaughan songs
The band's lyrics on the latest
release are" relatively simple but no
less effective.
Songs like "Fists
"EaseOnMyWay"
and "Nickel and
Dime" speak of re-
lationships that
have gone sour,
while songs like
"Deeper" and "It's
Alright" talkabout
dealing with per-
sonal insecurities.
If you like
southern rock, but
are tired of listen-
ing to 20 year old
bands, Allgood will leave a deli-
cious taste in your mouth. Allgood
usestheirtalentand theever-present
roots of southern rock to produce
an album with this much appeal.
Uncommon Goal may prove to
be the album that establishes
Allgood as one of the top college
bands. It could very well put them
in thesamecategory as Widespread
Panic.
It'srefreshingtoseeaband with
more than average talent move into
the music world with such grace.
Today: Urinary Infections
Answered by Linda Sanderson, FNP, Student Health Services
a
QUESTION: What causes uri-
nary tract infections, and how can
I prevent one from occurring?
ANSWER: Urinary infections
occur when bacteria are intro-
duced into the urinary tract. Uri-
nary tract infections occur most
frequently in females. It is esti-
mated that one in four
women will experi-
ence a urinary V
tract infection
sometimeduring
her lifetime. The
most important (
reason for this is
probably
anatomy. Once bac-
tena get into the vagi-
nal area, entry into the
bladder is easy because of the
close proximity of the female ex-
cretory and genital organs.
Pain and discomfort of ten ac-
company urinary tract infections
and could become a serious prob-
lem if not properly treated.
There are a number of ways
to prevent urinary tract infections.
� Proper hygiene � daily
bathing is important.
� Good toilet habits � al-
ways cleanse from front to back
. after using the toilet to
f avoid contamina-
f tion.
� Urinate fre-
00- quently � drink
" plenty of liquids
and urinate every
th ree to fou r hou rs.
� Clothing �
avoid wearing con-
K strictive clothing such
" as bodysuits, pantyhose
and tight slacks for long periods
of time.
� Take proper precau tions be-
fore and after sexual intercourse.
Wash genital area and urinate be-
fore and after intercourse.
Photo courtesy ot Sire Records
Dinosaur Jr.
good jumpstart and thewords"Fk
you! 1 won't do what you tell me"
rang in my head all day.
The next band to take the stage
was Tool.Theirsetwasan onslaught
of guitar that some have compared
to Helmet, but they are probably
more kin toa group like Ministry for
the intensity of their style. Tool dis-
plays a typeof naked aggression in
their live shows; ironically their
largest influence is a book called A
Joyful Guide to Lachrymology.
LycruynxJogyliteralhrneans"the
study of crying Go figure.
Front242 describes their form
of music as "Electronic Body Mu-
sic " They were the only Eu ropean
act to play this year and helped to
bring the variety that is the spice of
Lollapalooza. They certainly were
achangeof paceafter Rage Against
the Machine and Tool. They are
mainly a techno type group,a syn-
thesis of images and sound, re-
cycled from the media and Front's
own interpretation of other artistic
disciplines. Rave on!
Next to appear on the main
stage was Arrested Development,
the first band to have props on
stage. They had little wooden
shacks, an outhouse, pots, pans,
bongos, and lots of color, mostly
red, gold, black and green. A.Ds
message is a positive one, they are
devoted to nudging folks in the
direction of freedom and spiritual
See FESTIVAL page 4
Prime, one of
three titles that
the new comic
company
Ultraverse has
debuted with,
starts a new
generation of
comics.
Cover art courtesy ot
Malibu Comic
Ultraverse comics
debuts with Trime'
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Whena newcomiccompany
begins, it has to make an imme-
diate impact on readersif it wants
a chance to survive, and that's
justwhatMalibu's Ultraverse has
done.
Tom Mason, editor-in-chief
of Ultraverse,puttogethersome
impressive names tocreate char-
acters for the Ultraverse. Among
them are Adam Hughes, Darick
Robertson, Norm Breyfogle, Len
Strazewski, Gerard Jones, Mike
Barr, Steve Englehart and Rick
Hoberg. The talents of the cre-
ators have given Malibu and the
Ultraverse titles a good running
start.
Hardcase is by James
Hudnall,RickHobergand Norm
Breyfogle and is a story about a
tough, strong, impervious hero
that was part of a supergroup
until they were killed by myste-
rious means in front of Hard case,
who was the only real survivor.
He gave up crime fighting until
shown just what he did for the
police and how he helped mem.
Prime is by Norm Breyfogle
and Gerard Jones. Prime is a-
story about a high school kid
that gets the perfect male body,
with special ultra-abilities, like
flight. Best of all he wants to
fight crime, problem is that he
doesn't know exactly how
strong a man he is. The art and
story are nice, but his transfor-
mation from Prime to his nor-
mal body is quite disgusting.
Strangers unites six people,
who previously didn't know
each other (Strangers, get it),
brought together by a peculiar
coincidence that gave them all
special powers. Unsure of the
transformation and what it
means, the Strangers band to-
gether torightwrongs,etc,unuT
they can make heads or tails of
their current dilemma. Their
story is chronicled by Steve
Englehart, Rick Hoberg and
Tim Burgard.
Thesearethecore titles mat
the Ultraverse will stem from.
Other titles that are forth com-
ing include Freex, Exiles, Man-
tra, Prototype and The Solution.
If the first three are any indica-
tion, the Ultraverse will be
around for a long time.
State �airgronnds exhibit, educate on horses statewide
Art and horse enthusiasts are
invited toartend an intemationaldres-
sage competition September 2
through 5 at me Hunt Horse Com-
plex at the North Carolina State Fair-
grounds in Raleigh. Professional rid-
ers and their horses will compete in
the CDI-W Raleigh NCDCTA Sport
Horse Breeding Show and Fall Clas-
sic,aneventthatwillbenefitmeNorth
Carolina Museum of Art
Dressage is a system of skilled
horsemansh i p which stresses the fun-
damentals of riding and teaches the
horse to be obedient, willing, supple
and responsive. It requires the horse
and rider tocombinemestrengthand
agility ofgymnastics with theelegance
and beauty of ballet The graceful
movements performed in competi-
tion may look effortless, but are the
result of years of training. The high-
light of dressage competition is the
musical freestyle in which the rider
creates and choreographs to music
an original ride of compulsory fig-
ures and movements. On Saturday
evening, riders in the prestigious
World Cup Qualifying musical
freestyle class will compete to repre-
sentthe United States inEuropeatthe
World Cup Final in March 1994.
Admission to theshow is free on
Thursday, Fridav and Sunday. Tick-
ets will be required for admission to
the show on Friday evening, all day
Saturday and Saturday evening.
Ticket prices are $5 in advance, $6 at
the gate. Children under 10 will be
admitted free when accompanied
by an adult All proceeds from ad-
mission sales will be donated to the
Museum.
Each evening will begin with
an introduction to dressage which
offerstipsonjudgingarHiscoringso
that spectators may better under-
stand and appreciate the perfor-
mances. A special demonstration
will also be held at 5 p.m. on Sun-
day,July4,on theMuseumgrounds.
Admission is $3 per car.





July 28, 1993
- the guy who
jandevenmore
is?" Dinosaur Jr
ange of paceafter Fishbone,
�t w unwelcome change. De-
the si7e of the stage and audi-
hey still managed to sound like
i and grungy garage band. Di-
nosaur Jr played some old and new
ny perxmal favorite was their
of The Cure's hit "Just Like
Heaven Although their pace was a
little slower than the previous bands,
thev delivered their musical punch
with all the volume and distortion
thatwould please eventhemostskep-
tical.
In between Dinosaur and Alice
InChains, thesecond stage was taken
over by the ugliest ass contest. The
female contest was won bv a brave
an who removed most of her
i s. Ihen themalecontest,which
seemed to turn everyone's stomach,
uidudingmvown.ltisamazingw-hat
pw
ill do when they get a little
daink. The winner got to break a
: of Jesse Helms with a night
stk k. It was niltxl with condoms and
candy that showered the audience
after it broke. Truly amazing.
J ust as the sun was going down,
Alice In Chains took the stage. There
from page 3
that
" ii- au-
- mgs, the
. ked up
- n and
popular
ind had
�. � rocking IC came
- : �r an encore and played
Exit Alice In Chains.
ter Primus. Just after the re-
ieoftheirnewestalbum,fW:Soda,
Primus finds itself as the headliner of
Lollapa kxva 93. Les Claypool, singer
and bassist, gave a warning after the
first song.
"It's just gonna get weirder and
weirder and weirder quoth the
Claypool. He was right, they have
taken technical mastery of musicand
bizzarity to a new level. Each of the
members of the trio are extremely
aca-implishedvviththeirinstruments,
butdonot settle for the ninofthemill.
rrimus tries to push theei i velope just
a little further.
Being a former Trimus skeptic, I
finally understand what the deal is,
Primusissuperiorbecause they suck.
Anyway, "My Name is Mud" and
"Jerry was a Race Car Driver" were
the most enjoyable runes, but I was
disappointed that "Tommy theCat"
was omitted. Fish on, fish on.
This year's Lotiapakwza was a
success and most enjoyable tor those
who enjoy the strange and bizarre. I
felt right at home among my fellow
Generation Xer's,orslackersorwhat-
evervou wanttocall us. It seems as if
our numbers are growing; 1 have
never seen so many tattoos, bald
heads, green hair, pierced txxiy parts
and open displays of decadence. It's
enough to bring a tear of joy to this
twenty something's eye.
Widespread assist Midwest
audience beyond music
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Capricorn Records record ingart-
ist Widespread Panic is donating ap-
proximately $2,000, mostof their pay-
heck from the July 14 St. Louis per-
formanceof The H.O.R.D.E. Festival
Tour, to the Red Cross Flood Relief
Fund to aid victims of the current
Midwest devastation. The rest of the
band's $2,500 performance fee was
distributed to a number of the tour's
support performers-dancers, jug-
glers, etc.who could not be paid be-
cause of the small turnout in St. Uiuis,
due in rum to the bad weather.
The H.O.R.D.E. Festival Tour,
whichstandsfor"Horizons Of Rock
Developing Everywhere has been
hitting cities during the past week
that have been battling against the
rising waters.
"We've had some bad rain in
the last week or so, but what really
brought it home to us was seeing
the Mississippi River in St. Louis
slid Widespread Panic's John Bell.
The band's Riverport Amphithe-
aterdateinSt.Louiswasineyesight
of the river. "The band hopes our
donation might inspire others todo
the same. We just felt it was the right
thing to do he added.
)
The East Carolinian
is currently accepting applications for
Lifestyles editor and Asst. Lifestyles
editor. Applicants must be currently
enrolled in school, have at least a 2.0
GPAand be serious-minded. Interested
persons should stop by our offices at
the Student Pubs buildins (located
between Joyner and Mendenhall) and
fill out an application.
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
APARTMENTS
1108 E. 10th Street, 2 Blocks from ECU campus. Brand new-
completion date: July 93.
2 Bedroom, 2 Hill bath units,Central Heat & Air.
We Furnish Cable TV, Water, Dishwasher, Disposal,
Washer & Dryer.
Office On Site.
Open 8:30-5:30 M-F
10:304:00 Sat & Sun
752-8900
Summer Break Service Specials
j�bjmbs �.j� snansi�h� Banana�
, Your Choice of. QjJ Front Disc
r'i n'i Brake Reline
Oil � lll6r I (Including Machining Rotors)
and Lube $49.88
Reg. $24.95 II MbrcigniodDiaelSllgtilly Higher I
(S -g ft fv �� with this coupon
T&Ly.yS irnanj2F-il
Summenzed
Computer Balance i Higher l Air Conditioner Check
$42 95 ncludesFREE Battery &Chargc
s5�gbfS HCharging SystemCheckl $5.00 OFF .
with this coupon J with this coupon with this coupon l
COGGINS CAR CARE
320 W. Greenville Blvd. Greenville, NC
Phone 756-5244
I Iours:8am-5:30pm Monday-Friday 8am-1:00pm Saturday
Used Tires
JpO.OOandup
with this coupon II
' SSfJKJKS! ll 10W30 Pennzoil
and 4 Wheel Rotate & J 'Foreign and Diesel Slightly
Financing
Available
No Money
Down
90 Days
Same
As Cash
"Greenville's
ONLY
ILVEtjl �? )) Exotic
fiuJT Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
f Center
TUESDAYS
- Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
SiHrer fiui'et Sa'ierde-
j I ECU1
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
S2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:3UDm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
JULY 28
3:00 PM. - 4:30 P.M.
(UNTIL SUPPLIES RUN OUT)
UNIVERSITY MALL
COME AND ENJOY THE FUN!
Dickinson Av�.
I
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
Kjt i s iv m nw
FOR INFORMATION
CALL 757-6004
FROM THE FOLKS WHO BRING YOU BAREFOOT
LAST
DAYS!
MACHI
SALE ENDS SUNDAY
MOTION
Other styles
for WOMEN
available at
SPECIAL
PRICES!
'Not valid with any other promotional offer.
RACK ROOM SHOES
i "A Unique Concept in Shoe Retailing"
BUTOMARKBT�MEMORIALDRIVB�355-2519





� �
�m .L
Juh
For Rent
WYNDHAMCOUR1
Zbedroomsread)
taking applications
month. Lease and �
Duffus Realty, Inc. 756-2675
ired
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS.
New 2 bedrooms on East 10th Street
Ready for fall semester. Now taking ap-
plications. $385.00 pm. Lease and de-
posit required. Duffus Realty, Inc 756-
2675.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
apartment 12 block from Art Bldg 3
blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for Art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947.
RESPONSIBLENONSMOKERfemale
needed ASAP to share 3-BR duplex 3
blks from campus. $130 per month and
13 utilities. Deposit required. Call 758-
7879 for more informatio l
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED at
Eastbrook Apts. Two bedroom. $185,
plus 1 2 utilities. Leasebegins in August.
Please contact AND1 at (804) 463-1454,
ANYTIME!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED-
nonsmoker, 3BR townhouse - Sheraton
Village,$230month1 3utilities,ready
for August 15. Call 756-8459.
For Rent
ROOMMATE -Christian nonsmoker to
re2 bed rim 1 -1 r2 bath townhouse
with piiol. $140' mu. 1 3 utilities. Call
April at S5-88989orJenniferat752-T752.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share four
bednxim house. $80 a month 14 utili-
ties. Close to ECU campus. Contact: Bill
at 752-6947.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED toshare
2 BR Apt. Available August 22nd. Rent
$162.50, plus 12 utilities. Call 756-9027
after 5 PM.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 3 BR townhouse. $200 month1
3 utilities. Located in Sheraton Village.
Please contact Victoria or Ashley at 355-
1861.
NEED A ROOMMATE by August 15 to
livewithtwoothersina3-bedroomhouse
across from KRISPY KREME. Non-
smoker Grad studentstudious pre-
ferred. Call Mark at 321-3481.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
fl Help Wanted
For Sale
POSTAL JOBS available! Many posi-
tions. Great benefits. Call 1-8004364365
ext. P-3712
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
semble products at home. Call toll free 1-
80O467-5566 ext. 5920.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT�
Make money teaching basic conversa-
tional English abroad. Japan and Taiwan.
Make up to $2,000-4,000 per month.
Many provide room & board other
benefits! No previous training or teaching
certificate required. For International
Employment program, call the Interna-
tional EmploymentGroup: (206)632-1146
ext.J5362.
RECREATIONEXERCISEPARTNERS
- Recreational Services needs students to
serve as Adapted Recreation Assistants
for students, faculty and staff with dis-
abilities. The Partners in Well Being pro-
gram provides one-on-one programs for
disabled individuals. Contact David
Gaskins at 757-6387 or complete an appli-
cation form in 204 Christenbury Gym.
LIVE-IN, driving student needed to take
care of ambulatory 82 yr old gentleman.
No housekeeping. Call 355-1399 between
9 AM and (PM only. FREE mastei bed-
roomandbath,allfoodand$100Monthly.
German and plus, but not necessary.
For Sale
FOR SALE: 1984 Honda Civic. 4-dr,
5-spd, AM-FM stereo. Serviced ev-
ery 3,000 miles, new clutch put in
recently. Asking $2250, price nego-
tiable. Great gas mileage, good for
around town. Call 752-5899; ask for
Joe or leave message.
GOOD COLLEGE FURNITURE �
Cheap 2 couches, bed and frame,
chests, lamps, TV stand, etc Must
sell IMED 758-5312.
EARLY AMERICAN oak finish bed-
room suite includes full queen
headboard, 5 drawer chest and 2
drawer nightstand. Practically new,
$225.00. 321-1708. Leave message.
TASTY SUGAR DELIGHTS Cook-
book: 96 page wirebound with pho-
tographs and wipe clean cover. Al-
low 6-8 weeks for delivery. Send
$19.95 to: J. Wright, PO Box 4124,
Greenville, NC, 27836-2124.
RACING 1 SPORT Bike for sale.
22" frame - Cobalt blue. Excellent
condition. Exage Action compo-
nents. Bioplane and round crank
sets. Look 56 clipless pedals.
Diandora racing shoes, size 11. Plus
more. $375 O.B.O. Must sell Call
Greg at 752-0421 - Leave message.
TOP DOLLAR FOR
USED:
�T.Vs
�VCR's
�Camcorders
�Stereo's
�Other Video
Equipment
We're Buying Too!
Used furniture and
Announcements
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
ECU Cooperative Education of-
fers students opportunities to com-
bine earning and learning. Students
interested in securing oop work ex-
perience this fall are ur$, d to contact
the co-op office now for an early start
with the job search. Students may
also inquire about jobs that are avail-
able for the remainder of the sum-
mer. For more information, call Co-
Op at 757-6979 or scop by the office at
2300 General Classroom Building.
INSTTTUTF OF MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNTANTS
The Eastern NC Chapter of the
IrtstituteofManagementAccountants
invites the ECU community to join us
at our monthly technical meetings
held the third Wednesday, Sept. thru
Mav, at the Three Steers Restaurant,
Greenville.
For more information, call our
Student Affairs Director, Joe Kraus,
756-9064.
rTni nFNi KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
Golden Key Members � Meet-
ings are still the 3rd Wednesday of
each month in GC3006. The time has
been changed to 7:30-8:30 PM. This
includes our Sep. Pizza Party. If any
member wants to go to Florida Aug.
11, contact V.P. at 355-2654.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services Office in-
vites seniors and graduate students
who will graduate this summer or
December, 1993, to attend an orienta-
tion meeting on Tue August 3rd at
2:00 PM, Mon Aug. 9th at 3:00 PM,
or Tues Aug. 17th at 2:00 in Bloxton
House.
The staff will give an overview
of careerservicesand distribute forms
for students to register with Career
Services.
They will also discuss the proce-
dures for establishing a credentials
file and participating in employment
interviews on campus.
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 wads or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
kused men's clothing.
r
i
r
I
" HOP
If you are selling you must be
18 with a picture ID.
TUDENT
WAP
c
752-3866
I&VANS STREET MALL
K Park behind Globe Hardware
K & use our new rear entrance
1 MON-FRI 10-12,1-3
Page 5
i 3 Services Offered
JOBHUNTINGisnowobsoleteHave
employers call you and give you the
job you really want. Call between 8
AM and 6 PM for free recorded infor-
mation. 321-1674 Ext. 100.
ACADEMIC FELLOWSHIP
InterdisciplinaryRuralHealthTraining
Program
EastCarolinaUniversity
Intanfecpinary Rural HaoRti Training Program (4
ECU it odertig � oneyeer Wbwshfc to a pottgraduae
gludent Interested In an andante career In any ot the
decipines In the program: heath education, medicine,
nunlng, nutrition, pharmacy a sodal tuxK The fetawshfe
wil provide MpfcaMfMata and irterdtecfclinary dnical
research, adminislrativa skits kiprcvkiing interdscipUnary
heath care and training In rural areas. For tother
Hormation, contact Doyle M. Cummings, Phatm. D. Dept
dFanily Medicine. ECU School of A�oSohe,GreerK�e,
NC Z78S&4353,919-816-2387, or your dtociplne's
graduate advisor.
El
Personals
KELLY F Hope you're talking soon,
it's getting real boring in class. Good
luck on the final and have a HAPPY
BIRTHDAY next week Don't get too
trashed and thanks for finally picking
up the paper. See you soon! - LF.
LOST - Set of keys on a keychain with a
pink metal shark. Keys include 2 Volvo,
3 house. If found, please call 757-1164.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events ooen to the public two
tirrJreeofdtge.DuetouTelimitedarnount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Monday 4 p.m. for
Wednesday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelledbeforelOa.m.thedaypriorto
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
Demon Seed
By Grubbs

MHWMHH-WmMaMn
S





The East Carolinian
993
Opinion
Page 6
WednesdayOpinion
Joyner Library awaits
Riding the Mobius
Bond referendum could provide
the money needed for expansion
and renovation
Well, here we are. The end of summer session.
Thank goodness, too, because it vou've been here
the whole time, you're ready to take a vacation. If
only it could be longer than three weeks. Hey,
beggars can't be choosers.
Before that can happen (vacation, that is), be-
fore we edge closer to those glorious fa 11 mon ths and
18-semester-hour weeks, you need an update on
that poor, poor dilemma known as Joyner Library.
Ah, yes, the place we visit diligently to gather and
ingest information; that beacon of inspiration where
(ahem) there is never enough up-to-date informa-
tion for that special paper or project.
Does this sound familiar? Don't lose all hope,
just yet. The General Assembly has approved a
bond referendum that might provide the long
awaited money needed to expand and improve
Joyner. It's about time.
So now that a collective sigh of relief can be
heard from Mendenhall to the Hill, a few details
must be, well, detailed. University officials say that
the real work is yet to come. The real test will be in
convincing voters to approve the (yikes!) $740 mil-
lion package.
The approved package includes $310 million
for state universities, $250 million for community
colleges, $145 million for water and sewer projects
and $34 million for state parks. Lovely. So how
much do we get?
East Carolina University has two projects in
the package, $28.9 million to expand and renovate
Joyner Library and $5 million to purchase the old
Rose High School property from Pitt County schools.
This bond package will be on the ballot in the
November elections and voters will either approve
or reject the entire $740 million. Do vou know what
this means? If you are an avid political spectator,
you know that packages like this always receive
some criticism and re-structuring and never end up
looking the same as when they are proposed.
As many of you know, ECU has tried very
unsuccessfully for years to get the library money, to
no avail. It's sad, really, that an institution such as
this doesn't seem anxious enough to put something
concerning the library into motion. It should be the
number-one priority, considering it's importance.
Unfortunately, at many universities, that is
easily lost sight of with the emergence of a sports
program. East Carolina received $2.5 million from
the construction budget to help pay for renovations
at Minges Coliseum, and yet student fees will end
up footing the $9 million bill. Books before ball,
huh? These are words to live by, but they're never
taken seriously.
A library is the crux of any university. It is what
defines the beliefs and interests of a school and is
what allows us an opportunity to excel, since we
will all one day lead the pack. Many times that is lost
sight of with the commotion of college life. So take
a second out of your day and think about what a
library means to you, as a college student. One thing
is true, you'd never make it through a freshman
English class without it. The real question comes
when you consider the quality of a library. That's the
issue no one seems to care enough about. Other-
wise, something would have been done long ago.
Joyner just doesn't cut it.
On that note, have a great vacation
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Warren Simmer Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Julie Totten, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Spoils Editor
Misha Zonn. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amy Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Cop Editor
Tonya Heath, Acoema Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decencv or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Hditor. The Eat Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call 9ls 757-6366
Printed on
w
100 recycled
paper
By Jason Tremblay
Lollapalooza proves annoying, mostly enjoyable
So I go to Ticketmaster and
shell out $33.50 for my Lollapalooza
ticket with dreams of a day full of
music,companionshipand fun. Igot
these things as I wished, bu 11 also got
a few other tilings in the bargain, not
all of them pleasant.
The show I happened to be in
attendance for was at the IFK Sta-
dium site in Philadelphia, PA. It's
referred to as a "site" because the
actual stadium has been levelled,
and the area where the concert was
held was basically a big dustbowl
that had thankfully been mostly cov-
ered with humongous tarps tositon.
It was almost as if the area had been
constructed (or "razed" depending
on how you look at it) with the spe-
cific purpose of the festival in mind.
It was almost completely flat, more
than spacious, not to mention that
the day was absolutely beautiful.
Upon entering the gates of the
site, my eyes were greeted with a
myriad of small tents and stands,
each con taining their own little piece
of commerce. My girlfriend Jen and
I wandered over to the stands, basi-
cally because thev stood between us
and the main stage.
The first one we happened
upon was a Snapple stand, and I'd
just like to take this time to stand up
and say, "Hi, my name is Jason, and
I'm a Snappleholic That said, it
should come as no surprise to any-
one that I willingly paid two bucks
foronestupid,16-ouncebottleoftea,
and I did soat least four timesduring
the day.
That was the thing that pissed
me off the most, I think. I know that
l' ealreadyspokenabouthowmuch
movie snacks cost, but concert stuff
is at least twice as much, if not more.
Jen paid $2 for a 16 ounce bottle of
water (water!) at the show�the ex-
act same kind that we sell for a huge
profit at the theater for $1.
Even better thanthat, we en-
countered several stands that raised
their prices as the day progressed.
They wen t from high to higher for no
apparent reason other than greed,
and it really annoyed me. We were
there to have fun, not to be mon-
etarily raped. But, such is commerce
in the big city
As far as the lineup was con-
cerned, 19 bands on two stages for a
comparably low ticket price was re-
ally cool. I even wanted to see about
half of those bands. So I was pleased.
But I, as well as just about everyone
else in the crowd around me, were
kind of pissed about the first act that
came out.
A group called Rage Against
the Machine was slated to appear
first on the main stage, and I was
pretty psyched about seeing them
live. So there I was, crammed in a pit
about 30 feet from the stage for 45
minutes, watching the roadies set
their stuff up, tune it and all the
normalstuff thatroadiesdo. Finally,
these four guys walk out with their
faces painted black. Not too, too
shocking in itself, but they were all
totally naked.
Each one of them had a differ-
ent letter on his chest so that they
collectively spelled out "PMRC All
the while, this really heinous feed-
back was blasting from the three-
story high stacks and piercing into
our skulls. Everyone cheered for the
firstminute; theirmessagehad obvi-
ously been understood by thecrowd.
But they just stood there like naked
statues for a full 10 minutes, feed-
back blasting the whole time, fi-
nally walking off stage, leaving their
roadies to tear everything down
again. That was it for them.
We all just kind of stood
around looking at each other for a
minute, trying to figure out what
had just happened. The crowd be-
gan chanting what sounded like,
"Assholes! Assholes and I would
be inclined toagree. I mean,I totally
agree with what they were trying
to say and Iadmire them forsta ting
it in such a daring way, but cheat-
ing us out of an anticipated perfor-
mance simply wasn't cool.
On the whole, the experience
was definitely worth the time and
load of money that went into it.
This, kids, is culture. If you get the
chance,go nomatterwhatthecost.
It's kind of a modern-day
Woodstock, without the volume of
drugsand thankfully, withoutjerry
Garcia.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza and watch
some cartoons
QuoteoftheDay:
hope life isn 't a big joke, because I don 'tget it.
Jack Handey
Letters to the Editor
Blatant, negative labelling dehumanizes others
After reading T. Scott
Batchelor's opinion column on
July 21 ("Recent events in U.S.
generate reflection"), I feel the
need to inform Mr. Batchelorthat
before a person can reflect upon
anything,sheor he needs to have
examined the situation thor-
oughly a first time.
To compare the term
"redneck" with the term
"nigger" implies that both are
equallydamaging.Theessential
difference between the two is
that "redneck" is a term that is
used to embody the behavior
andideologiesofaspecificgroup
of people. (Both males that try to
mtirnidate women with whistles
and catcalls and males that pick
figh ts while d runk to prove their
"manhood" are representative
of the redneck faction of society.)
Whereas "nigger when used
by whites, is a term that refers to
skin color alone. One is just a
negative term based upon avoid-
able behavior, while the other
is an example of blatant rac-
ism, created to dehumanize
blacks. "Rednecks" are white
people that use words like
"nigger" to describe blacks.
Despite the fact that
Batchelor's discussion of homo-
sexuals in the military would
have us believe that only men
serve in the armed forces and
only men are gay (a homo-
sexual person could serve in the
armed forces as long as he didn't
tell anyone he was a homo-
sexual), thereare also straight
and lesbian women serving in
the armed forces. I guess this is
often overlooked in part because
women seem to be less threat-
ened by d ifferences in sexua 1 ori-
entation. It is necessary to credit
women with military service.
I would like to know why
no one "from the other camp"
writes for the opinion page. This
is to say that both liberal and
conservative ideas should be
voiced in order for the pa per not
to appear politically biased. By
only presenting extremely con-
servative opinions, you risk be-
ing perceived as very one-sided.
Laura Wright
English
Grad Student
Menace II Society depicts reality of ghettos
This letter is in response to
Jason Tremblay'sarticle, "Movie
violence perpetuates race-rela-
tion problem" (July 21,1993).
Your opinion of Menace 11
Society is a statement of igno-
rance. I've seen the movie, which
you described as "a gang-type
film aimed mainly at a black au-
dience I strongly disagree with
your statement. The film is tar-
geted toward a black audience,
but it in no way glorifies the
gangs of California. It depicts
blacks living in a California
ghetto.
All the violence(asgraphic
and unnecessary as it may seem)
in the movie is probably not ex-
perienced by people such as you
and me, but it has, does and will
continue to occur. This movie is
just trying to tell society not to
look the other way.
You leaped a great distance
ou tside the "boundaries of good,
tasteful journalism" by giving
an opinion of a film you' ve never
seen. You described one scene,
.this guy wasabout to blow his
friend's head off because he for-
got to order cheese on his extra-
large burgeratthedrive-up win-
dow Actually, the guy with the
gun jumped in thecarand was in
the process of robbing the driver
when he figured that heought to
get something to eat since they
were in the drive-thru.
You were way off target
when you described the scene in
which two white cops have two
black criminals in the cop car. If
you had seen the movie, your
description would have been
similar to this�the policeman
stopped two black teenagers be-
cause they were driving a nice
car, handcuffed them, beat them,
took them to another neighbor-
hood and threw them out of the
car. I also find it hard to believe
that the audience was laughing
when the store owners were
killed. No one laughed at that
particular scene when I saw the
film.
Even though I think your
article was written out of igno-
rance, I must commend you on
your paragraph using the Coke
and Pepsi analogy. The next time
you wish to express your opin-
ion on a subject, make sure you
have some knowledge of the
subject.
Michael A. Taylor
Senior
Business
By Allen Freemont
Modern-day
work ethics
face extinction
Ever been in one of those really generous
moods, when your head hurts from the weight
of a bloated halo? Where you undertake tasks
that have Mother Teresa reaching for the
Excedrin? Well, I was. Lef s face it, I could have
taken on the world, moved planets and
balanced the economy as an afterthought.
Instead, my superiors asked if I could
writeanarticle,whereuponIarguedthatdoing
the difficult and achieving the impossible are
two different things. Damn it, Jim! I'm an
artist, not a writer! The only training I received
in school that related to journalism was how-
to use words like "Oedipal space and "linear
movement I don't know what they mean,
but use them when you give an opinion on
someone's artwork and watch 'em swoon.
I'm sitting here at someone else's space
(possiblyOedipal's) wondering why I'm Here
instead of There, drawinga strip for this week's
edition. Then it hit me. The reason I'm writing
this article is because no one else can will do it
for reasons ranging from the understandable
to the unforgivable. Which all boils down to
something that I thinkconcemseveryone. I'm
talking about the big four letter word that
sends many scurrying for the security of their
unemployment checks. Yes folks work.
I've done it. Our parents have done it.
Odds are that you too have done it. Whether it
was slaving over a vat of grease-fried potato
sticks, chucking newspapers till your arm
rotted off or standing non-stop for 30 bazillion
hours while selling outdated fashion wear to
Attila the Hun's mother-in-law. It's a fact of
life. We ve been working since the dawn of
time, striving to improve our lives and giving
our offspring something to hope for.
Well, it appears to me that the Age of
Work is dead, or has been holding its breath a
mighty looonnnng time. Before you get bent
out of shape, allow me to elucidate.
My parents decided to give the
homefront a face-lift. Repairs were needed
anyway, so what could go wrong? Ha.
Modern-day work ethics, for a start. What
started asanip-and-tuck has turned into major,
triple-highway-bypass-hold-the-mayo-this-
ain't-no-sippintea surgery.
Thanks to shoddy craftsmanship and
some fine woolly thinking, we now have a
lawn that Mary, Mary,quite contrary couldn't
get in a row and a drainage system that spews
chunks 'o bark into the garage. The family is
still shelling out money � now we're into
repairing the repairs. Go and rent Tlie Money
Pit starringTom Hanks (Mr. Sleepless himself!).
The title alone tells the story.
It's not just at home. No matter where
Iwork constantly find increasing disregard
for doing a job well and, sometimes, at all.
Some people are forgetting one of the reasons
we ha ve jobs. I thought the reason for going to
work was to well, work! I'm told I get hyper
and that I should try to slow down and relax.
Sorry man, I'm just doing my job.
Where is the pride? The feeling of
accomplishment from a job well done? When
did people stop worrying about how well it
worked and start wondering how well off thev
could get by working each other over? Does
anybody care?
Okay, I've given my little lecture for the
day. You can go back to the good stuff now,
and I'll slip back to the Comics Page. It's true,
I'm no writer. At least I'm working on it.
� �





. i Tii fc. � . rlii
The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 7
McPhail running strong
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Jerris McPhail will add another arsenal to the Bucs' potent offense
when he joins Running man Junior Smith in the backfield.
ByMishaZonn
Assistant Sports Editor
A change of location can
make all the difference in the
world when things are not going
perfectly in the early stages of a
fragile, young football career. In
the case of jerris McPhail, the
choice of location is now East
Carolina, not Wake Forest.
McPhail believes that his trans-
fer was definitely a step in the
right direction.
McPhail rushed for over
1,500 yards and 34 touchdowns
as a senior at Clinton High
School. He then made the move
into the ACC as he started his
college football career as a De-
mon Deacon a t Wake Forest Uni-
versity. However, the football
atmosphere was lacking at the
basketball-rich university and
McPhail decided to test his op-
tions. McPhail said the fan sup-
port for the football team at ECU
was one of the main factors in his
decision to make the switch.
"The main reason for leav-
ing was the atmosphere around
Wake Forest McPhail said. "I
really didn't fit in there and I
wanted to get a little closer to
home. I also wanted to play in
the offensive scheme of ECU. I
think that at East Carolina, the
fans get into it more. At Wake
Forest, the fans were kind of
dead. They don't support the
football team as much as they do
the basketball team. I think that
the whole atmosphere of foot-
ball is a lot better here at East
Carolina
McPhail
immediately
impressed Pi-
rate fans with
a strong
showing in
the annual
purple-gold
scrimmage
with a touch-
down and a
two-point
conversion.
McPhail
has found his
rebirth at ECU
to be positive,
despite the
challenge of
learning a
new, more ex-
pansive offense.
"East Carolina's offense is a
whole lot more complicated
McPhail said. "Wake Forest was
more of the basic type offense.
At Wake, the H-back would nor-
McPhail and Smith
mally catch passes, but here at
ECU they are blocking, running,
and catching the ball. For my
ability, I think that I fit in better
here. I like to catch the ball and I
also like to run the ball, and block
if I have to
Even though it will only be
McPhail's first season with the
Pirates, he al-
ready has an
idea of where
he belongs in
the offensive
attack.
"I'm go-
ing to do my
best and try
and fit in
where Cedric
Van Buren
left off, like in
the third
down situa-
t i o n s , "
McPhail said.
"I feel that I
can come out
of the back
field and
make the big catch if necessary
The presence of 1,000 yard
rusher Junior Smith in the back
field doesn't seem to bother
McPhail at all. He doesn't look
at the situation as being overly
competitive.
'There is really not that
much tension because I learn
from (Smith) and he sometimes
learns from me McPhail said.
"Whenever I need some ques-
tions answered, he will help
me out. I think that it will work
out fine. I don't get out there
and try and compete against
anybody. I just try and give my
all, and so it really doesn't mat-
ter who else is out there with
me.
McPhail's first game as a
Pirate just happens to be
against national powerhouse
Syracuse on ESPN.
'There is a little tension
because it's on national televi-
sion McPhail said.
"I'm more excited than
anything else. I'm going to get
my first college football game
on national T.V. against a
highly ranked team, so that
might kind of affect the way I
go out and play
After a year of sitting out,
McPhail seems happy to be
playing football again.
He also seems excited
about doing it wearing the
purple and gold of ECU in-
stead of the black and gold of
Wake Forest.
Stackhouse says he 'doesn't want tc
be like Mike despite comparisons
SAN ANTONIO (AP)�Sorry
Madison Avenue.
It was a good pitch, but it just
didn't work with Jerry Stackhouse.
He doesn't want to be like Mike,
even though lots of people think he
is.
"Yeah, I've heard people say I
have some moves like Jordan
Stackhouseadmitted. "Idon'twant
to be a second Jordan or anyone
else. I want to be the first jerry
Stackhouse. I think that's exactly
what I'll be
Stackhouse, who spent his high
school career racking up honors
and stacking up college catalogs,
will play for North Carolina this
fall. This summer he's hoping to
help the men's East team win gold
at the U.S. Olympic Festival.
Stackhouse grew up figuring
he'd be a basketball star. For one
thing, he grew up. And up. And up.
And he did it early. By the time
school opened when he was in sev-
enth grade, Stackhouse was 6'3
"I had a pretty good idea by
then I had a chance to maybe play
Stackhouse said.
So did a lot of other people.
By the time he wrapped up his
senior year, Stackhouse was 6'6
218 pounds and had set the North
Carolina state prep record for the
most points scored as a high school
freshman and sophomore, spent
two straight years taking Parade
All-American accolades, averaged
23 points a game his last two years,
and been named the state's co-Most
Valuable Player in 1993.
College recruiters came early
and often to the Stackhouse home.
"Recruiting in a lot of ways
was hell Stackhousesaid. "It went
on and on and on. People calling,
writing, telling me what I should
do
Stackhouse had a good idea of
whathe wanted todoall along. But
he kept his options open, trying to
make sure that what he wanted
was really what was best.
He decided it was and signed
with North Carolina.
He.knew the program. He'd
grown up watching not just the
teams, but the way the community
around the school took the pro-
gram to heart.
"Where I come from, North
Carolina basketball is part of
everyone's life Stackhouse said.
More importantly, however,
Stackhouse knew if he played for
the Tar Heels, his biggest fan would
be able to attend regularly.
"It was important for me that
my mother could come to the
games he said. "Now she can not
only see the home games, but a lot
of the away games like Duke and
(North Carolina) State
Stackhouse hopes Mom will
be able to see him in action right
from the start, but if not, he's cer-
tain she won't have to wait long to
watch.
"I hope to start right away, but
if I don't, I'll be disappointed but
notdespondentbecauserilstill con-
See STACKHOUSE page 8
ACC football
almost underway
Coleman may face
criminal charges
LOS ANGELES (AP)�Vince
Coleman could be in deep trouble
because of the firecracker he
threw in a Dodger Stadium park-
ing lot over the weekend.
A decision was expected
Tuesday on whether charges re-
lated to the incident would be
filed against the New York Mets
outfielder, according to Suzanne
Childs, the director of communi-
cations for the Los Angeles
County District Attorney's office.
Arson inspectors met with
the district attorney's office Mon-
day to discuss the incident. Three
people, including a 1-year-old
girl, were injured Saturday, ap-
parently from the firecracker.
Those injured were treated at the
scene and later hospitalized.
Childs said Monday night
that if a felony charge is filed, the
Los Angeler District Attorney's
office gets the case. If a misde-
meanor charge is filed, the Los
Angeles City Attorney's office
would handle it.
"We haven't been formally
presented a case yet Childs said.
"It hasn't been formally pre-
sented to anybody. It's too pre-
mature to comment
On the advice of his attor-
neys, Coleman, 31, has refused to
speak with reporters. Mets
spokesman Jay Horwitz said the
team would have no comment.
This is the second time
Coleman has been investigated
by law-enforcement authorities
since he joined the Mets in 1991.
In spring training in 1992,
Coleman and two teammates
were accused of raping a woman
during spring training the previ-
ous year. Horida prosecutors said
they did not have enough evi-
dence to press charges.
Eric Davis of the Dodgers
said Sunday that Coleman and
Mets outfielder Bobby Bonilla
were with him as he drove his
1991 Jeep Cherokee from the
parking lot a day earlier. Davis
said the firecracker belonged to
Coleman.
"We were laughing about it
when we drove off Davis said.
"Every time somebody lights a
firecracker, you laugh. At least, I
do
However, Davis sounded re-
morseful Monday in a statement
released by the Dodgers.
"The statements attributed
to me by the media are both inac-
curate and misleading he said.
"Although I had no warning and
did not know that a passenger in
my car was about to do some-
thing that might injure someone,
I deeply regret that the incident
occurred.
"As the father of two young
children, I know the danger as-
sociated with fireworks and I
have the utmost concern for any-
one who may have been injured
Davis said earlier that
Coleman threw the firecracker
only about six feet from the car,
and the crowd was much farther
away.
See COLEMAf page 8

1 CBlLkiOWhere's
the
Embbbf H Hk' '�" Imbeef?
LVF J9 � tBThese ECU students
� Win ?iH P mare trying there best to shape up like running backs Jerris McPhail and Junior Smith.
HHHHPhoto by Cedric Van Buren
BUFORD, Ga. (AP) �
Given a choice between the
hard way and any other way,
Bobby Bowden will inevita-
bly choose the hard way.
The hard way to win a
national championship is to
play the Florida State sched-
ule, a collection of top oppo-
nents that tends to get in the
way of undefeated seasons.
Florida State had an 11-1
record last year but finished
second in the nation, behind
Alabama.
So what does Bowden do
after last year's near miss? He
adds a trip to Notre Dame.
"If you look around the
country, do you see another
team that plays three Top 10
teams on its non-conference
schedule?" Bowden said, re-
ferring to Florida, Miami and
the Irish.
Bowden said he wants a
national championship "as
bad as anybody, but I'm try-
ing to build a winning pro-
gram that's clean and that will
glorify the university. I don't
think any school's primary
goal is to win the national
championship
Bowden was among the
nine coaches of the Atlantic
Coast Conference gathered at
Lake Lanier Islands Monday
for the annual ACC Football
Kickoff.
Bowden, whose team
joined the ACC last year, said
his players still don't fully ap-
preciate being in a conference.
"I don't think you can get
a true sense of what a confer-
ence is like until someone
beats you and you hate them
for it and you can't wait to
play them again he said.
To strengthen one of the
Seminoles' few weak spots,
Bowden recruited place-
kicker Scott Bentley, who
kicked seven field goals of
50 yards or longer in his high
school career in Aurora,
Colo
"He doesn't need to im-
prove at all Bowden said.
"All Task for is 38 and
straight
Virginia coach Georgia
Welsh said Florida State is
good for the conference �
even if they're undefeated.
"I like playing teams like
that George Welsh said.
"That's good for our pro-
gram he said.
"They're a step ahead of
everybody else said North
Carolina coach Mack Brown.
"It's great for the league that
we're all chasing them
A new NCAA rule mov-
ing the hash marks two
yards closer to the middle of
the field is expected to make
kicking 3-pointers a bit
easier.
"That will be the big-
gest thing to make a differ-
ence in the ballgame this
year said Clemson coach
Ken Hatfield.
New North Carolina
State coach Mike O'Cain
shuttled into the job when
seven-year coach Dick
Sheridan resigned on June
28. He said his predecessor
SeeACCpage8
Earnhardt not trying to match Petty's record
TALLADEGA, Ala. (AP) �
Dale Earnhardt knows he' 11 never
match Richard Petty's record for
NASCAR Winston Cup victories.
"I'm not going to win 200
races with only 30-something
races a year Earnhardt said Sun-
day after taking the DieHard 500
for his 59th career victory. "I can't
live that long
But there's another mark the
42-year-old Earnhardt has his eye
on.
"I'm racing for seven cham-
pionships he said, referring to
the record number won by Petty.
Earnhardt tightened his
stranglehold on a sixth champi-
onship with his six-inch victory
Sunday. He now has a 234-point
lead over Dale Jarrett � a com-
fortable advantage in a sport
where last year's title was decided
by just 11 points.
Earnhardt already has en-
sured his place alongside Petty,
David Pearson, Cale Yarborough,
Bobby Allison, Darrell Waltrip
and the other greats of stock car
racing. But he has no plans to
retire in the near future.
"I was planning to drive till
1996 he said. "Now, I'm think-
ing that maybe I'll drive to the
year 2000 if I stay healthy I ain't
hanging up anything as long as
I'm healthy
The racing fates can be fickle,
but at his current pace Earnhardt
would wind up with about 85
Winston Cup victories by the end
of the century. That would sur-
pass Allison (83) and Yarborough
(84).
But it may not catch Waltrip,
who also has 84 victories but no
designs on retirement. Petty and
probably Pearson (105) are unat-
tainable, but they also raced in an
era when there were many more
eventsand only a handful of domi-
nant teams.
The Earnhardt era has been
marked by supposed parity, but
somehow "The Intimidator" al-
ways seems to find his way to the
top with a hard-charging style that
makes him oneof the most popu-
lar drivers on the circuit, but
undoubtedly the most unpopu-
lar, too.
A sign at Talladega summed
itup: "Anybody But Earnhardt
Many times, though, it is
Earnhardt. He already is the all-
time leading money-winner
with $17.4 million during his 19-
year career. Even more impres-
sive is Earnhardt's remarkable
consistency since he joined the
Winston Cup circuit fulltime in
1979.
In addition to his six cham-
pionships, he has finished
See NASCAR page 8
BB�





July 28, 1993

STACKHOUSE
Continued from page 7
ACC
Continued from page 7
abou
records � Stackhouse isn't pav-
ing much attention to them.
His goals right now are
COLEMAN
. and get hi
m planning to see mv
. anymore, I'd better get
te said. "I hope to
in the pros, but there will
r me from Chapel
Hill in tour or five years
Then he wants to unleash
something new on the NBA.
Not the second anyone. The
first Jerry Stackhouse he said. "I
think that's really going to be some-
thing
Continued from page 7
"Yeah, he threw a firecracker
out of the car Davis said Sun-
day. "Those people were behind
a gate 20 feet away from my car
Fans said Coleman lobbed the
firecracker.
"It was Coleman witness
Salvado Hernandez said. "He
was in a car with Davis and some
other guy. He just tossed it cut
the window . Right after they
threw it, thev drove off real fast,
laughing
Jim Wells, a spokesman for
the arson unit, said Sunday the
infant girl had suffered second-
degree burns to her cheek, along
with a finger injury and damage
to an eye. Wells said a 33-year-
old woman was treated for an ear
in juryandan 11-year-old boysuf-
fered a bruise on his leg.
Henry overcame bum knee at
Olympic Festival to win gold
SAN ANTONIO (AP) � At 6-
foot-2, 375 pounds, Mark Henry
wasn't about to let something like a
bum knee keep him from winning
a weightlifting gold medal at the
U.S. Olympic Festival.
The giant from Silsbee, Texas,
lifting in front of a raucous crowd
that included several friends and
family members, struggled a bit
Monday night, but wound up with
the gold medal in the
superheawweight division.
The fourth day of the festival
saw swimmer Rachel Joseph of
Springfield, Ore pick up her fifth
gold medal in as many races, while
roller skater Dante Muse of West
Des Moines, Iowa, added to his
record number of festival medals.
It also featured the final round
of pool play in basketball and the
first day of baseball.
Henry sprained his right knee
during a workout two weeks ago
and came into the competition sim-
ply hoping to win instead of setting
any records.
He lifted 37434poundsin the
snatch, then failed on his first try at
440 34 in the clean and jerk.
"I wasn't warmed up right
he said. "The long wait between
lifts was the longest I ever had. I
think that was part of it
He came back on his second try
and made the lift, then limped off
the stage as the crowd cheered.
On his third lift, Henry suc-
ceeded with 45134 pounds. Then
he motioned like he was shooting
at the crowd, and holstered his gun.
He wasn't the only athlete to
get big cheers. Joseph won swim-
ming gold medals Monday in the
200-meter individual medley �
setting a festival record in the pro-
cess �and in the 400 medley relay.
In all three of her individual
ictories, she set meet records.
"I just wanted to get best times
and maybe win a medal she said.
"I didn't even know if I'd win my
backstrokes
Her time in the 200 IM was 2
minutes, 19.89 seconds, which bet-
tered the mark of 2:19.91 set in 1981
by Patty Gavin of Syracuse, N. Y
At the roller skating rink, Muse
collected three more medals Mon-
day, giving him six this year and
raising his career total to 32. That
puts him first on the all-time festi-
val list, ahead of canoe-kayak com-
petitor Jim Terrell of El Toro, Calif
who has 27.
Muse's victory in the 1,500-
meter race Sunday night gave him
22 career gold medals, more than
anyone in festival history.
Competing in his sixth festival,
Muse, 26, won silver medals in the
500 and the 1,000 meters, with
bronze medals in the 3,000, the 4,000
mixed relay and the men's 4,000
relay.
In a preview of the gold-medal
men's basketball game, the North
forced 30 turnovers to beat the West
117-102. RoneyEfordof Marquette
led the North (3-0) with 22 points
and nine rebounds, while Jeff
Mclnnis, who is headed to North
Carolina, scored 19. The West (2-1)
got 16 points from Burt Harris of
Southern Cal.
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may have just burned himself
out.
"He's an intense person
O'Cain said. "He puts all his
energy and effort into every-
thing he does.
"He's done it for 30 years. I
think that might have taken a
toll on him
in the country.
"I think there's too much go-
ing on in this country to let the
issue of race die Caldwell said.
"I think the drumbeating
has to continue until we see
some significant change
Jim Caldwell, the first-year
Wake Forest coach, talked about
being the only black head coach
in the ACC and one of only three
NASCAR
Georgia Tech coach Bill
Lewis is counting on redshirt
sophomore Donnie Davis to
handle the quarterbacking du-
ties with the departure of four-
year starter Shawn Jones.
Davis threw only two passes
last year, but he'll be protected
by one of the biggest offensive
lines in the country. The Yellow
Jackets' line averages more than
300 pounds.
"He has all the qualities to
be an excellent college quarter-
back Lewis said.
"He's physically blessed,
his arm continues to get stron-
ger, he continues to get bigger,
and he's faster than people
think
Duke's opener against
Florida State has coach Barry
Wilson worried, but not as
worried as he'd be about fac-
ing them late in the season.
"When would you
rather play them? I'd just as
soon play them first Wil-
son said.
"If they've had any
weakness at all in the last 10
years, it's shown up early in
the season
Continued from page 7
among the top 10 in the point
standings in 12 of the previous 14
seasons.
Last year, Earnhardt slumped
to 12th after winning titles in 1990-
91. He has returned with a ven-
geance in 1993, winning six of the
first 17 races.
It was vintage Earnhardt on
Sunday.
There were a half-dozen cars
with a shot to win, but he dived to
the bottom of the track with three
laps to go and passed Kyle Petty
on the backstretch. Ernie Irvan
made a strong charge on the final
lap, but Earnhardt's Chevrolet
Lumina took the more desirable
high line into the trioval and
touched the line a half-foot ahead.
"I've got all the confidence in
the world in Dale Earnhardt on
the last lap said Richard
Childress, his car owner for the
past decade.
"I saw Dale coming on that
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last lap, and I knew what he was
going to do. I've seen him do it
before
Earnhardt described the last
turn of the race.
"Ernie beat me a little into the
trioval, but I sucked down to him
and beat him by inches he said.
"We were fortunate to do that
because I didn't think or plan or
anything
He makes it sound so easy. In
fact, you get the feeling that
Earnhardt is just entering his
prime.
"When we got out of the
cars after the red flag (a wreck
by Neil Bonnett that forced a 1-
hour, 10-minute delay to repair
a fence) I saw all those kids over
there getting oxygen said
Earnhardt, apparently not fazed
by the 100-degree heat.
"I felt great. I said to my-
self, 'I've got 20 more years in
this sport

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Title
The East Carolinian, July 28, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 28, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.953
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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