The East Carolinian, July 29, 1992






Dinner theatre is back
Entertainment and dinner all for $15.00.
IS
Olympics questioned
What sports mean to the average Joe.
6
Stye iEaHt (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.39
Wednesday, July 29, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
WZMB banned from downtown
Students learn computers
Eleven Navajo Indian students are
attending ,i six-week pilot program at
the University of California, Irvine, as
part of the Computer Science Summer
Institute. The Institute was recently
awarded a grant by the National Science
Foundation to fund the program for the
next two years. Along with taking aca-
demic courses, the students will spend
two days per week in corporate intern-
ships.
Czech program teaches film
Sixteenl mversitvof Miami filmstu-
dents are learning the art of filmmaking
at the Academy of Performing Arts in
C zechoslovakia this summer. The stu-
dents will study East European film-
making at the Prague Summer Program
in I ilm, and will earn six credits for their
intense course work.
Front-row students do well
According to an informal study at
the King's College psychology depart-
ment first-year college students who sit
in the front oi the class are cool under
pressure skip class less, and get higher
grades than those who sit in the back.
"The more motivated, confident, and
scholasticallvoriented students will gen-
erally choose the front said Charles
Brooks, chairman of the psychology de-
partment. Brooks also noted that his fe-
male students sit in the front of the room,
and the malt's sit in the back
College changes name
lasshomStateCollege will soon be
known as the Rowan College of New
jersey in howr of a husband and wife
who recently donated $100 million to the
school. 1 lenry M. Rowan, chairman and
founder of Inductotherm Industries, Inc
and his wife, Betry, stipulated that the
college guarantee free tuition to the chil-
dren oi their company's employees, and
the college build an engineenng school.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from
CPS and other campu� newspapers.
Radio station not allowed to
affiliate with clubs, alcohol
By Tony Rogers
News Writer
Aftera legal debate thai dates
back to February 19M2, WZMB is
no longer permitted to affiliate
itself with nightclubs downtown
or any events where alcohol is
served.
University Attorney Ben
Irons said there is risk of a law-
suit against ECU with respect to
the radio station sponsoring ,n
event where alcohol is permit-
ted.
"The potential for a lawsuit
is too great, if anyone is injured,
10 allow WZMB to sponsor any
events where alcohol is being
served Irons said.
Under Irons' advice, Tim
Johnson, the general manager of
WZMB, was told the morning of
July 21 to cancel a WZMB pro-
moted concert at the Attic that
evening.
Johnson did not cancel the
event, saying the last minute no-
tice made it impossible.
in a letter signed by Mary
Beth Morde. media board chair-
person, fohnson was told the
advice "is based on the conclu-
sion WZM B is a co-sponsor i if the
event and therefore shares any
liability
Irons said the notice should
not have been necessary at all
"We had discussions about a
similar situation with WZMB in
February Iron said. "Since our
position has remained the same,
this was not anything new to
WZMB
According to Greg Brown,
student media advisor, the uni-
versity attorney's office advised
Morde that activities at the Attic
maybringuptheissueof liability
again.
"The university attorneys
contacted us (at the media board
office) to get in touch with Ms.
Morde Brown said. "She was
thenasked to notify WZMBabout
the potential for a lawsuit if any-
one is injured
According to Greg Hassler,
assistant university attorney,
Browncontacted him in regard to
the possible liability issue.
"We got notification from
Greg Brown that WZMB intended
to engage in an activity at the
Attic similar to the situation tli.it
occurred last February Hassler
said. "Since the situations were
so similar, I advised Mr. Brown to
issue an updated version of the
letter we sent Mr lohnson ear-
lier
Brown said a written opinion
from the attorney s office would
need to be reviewed by the media
board before an official policy
could be drafted.
Until then, the media board
has a verbal understanding with
the radio station.
"WZMB has been told they
shouldn't have anything to do
with the bars down townBrown
slid.
Johnson said the university's
attorneys have no basis for their
advice.
"As far as they (the
universes attorney and the me-
dia board)can tell me, there is no
legal precedent forthisdecision
ohnon said.
fohnson also said WZMB's
relationship with bars in the
downtown area has been benefi-
cial to the radio station.
"The only way people will
know about us is if we get out and
promoteourseives lohnson said.
"One way oi promoting the sta-
tion is bv having promotions at
clubs
Johnson also said the restric-
tion may hurt the financial ben-
efits of keeping a cooperative re-
lationship with downtown bars.
According to fohnson, the Elbo
Photo by Dail R�d � Th� East Carolinian
The campus radio station, WZMB, frequently co-hosted parties at downtown clubs The university has
ended this tradition due to the possible legal risks involved with sponsoring alcohol related events.
donated $400 to the radio station
last year, the Attic donated $700
and O'Rockefeller's made a $tHK)
donatk n to WZM B last February.
"Bet ause the bars are a major
contributor to WZMB's trust fund,
1 feel like it's a slap in the face to
the bars and unfair to WZMB
lohnson said.
lohnson proposed a contract
Stating the bar owners are fully
liable for any injuries during
WZMB sponsored events. The
owners of the Attic,
O Rockefeller's and the Elbo
agreed to sign such a contract.
" That may be helpful, butour
advice would remain the same
lnns said.
(�DM said if a lawsuit were
filed, ECU would be the party
most able to pay since many pri-
vate organizations are not finan-
cially able to compensate the vic-
tim.
"In these situations, the uni-
versity is the deep p�ket Irons
said. "The injured party will seek
compensation from thosedirectly
and indirectly involved
Photo by Dail R�d � Tha East Carolinisn
WZMB associated with police and alcohol is a picture the university
does not want to see.
Republicans, Democrats seek young voters for future
Parties prioritize voter registration for students
(CPS) � Voter registration is
shaping upas the major battle line
at colleges, this fall, as Democrats
and Republicans try to woo young
voters, particularly those left in
limbo bv Ross Perot's sudden exit
from the political campaign.
"Young people support this
president and this party said Tony
Zagotta, national chairman of the
College Republicans, who hopes
to unveil a fast-paced, "MTV-like"
recruiting video aimed at young
voters when the Republicans con-
vene Aug. 17 in Houston, Texas.
An estimated 1,000youngrep-
resentaties were expected to at-
tend the Republican National con-
vention, although it was uncertain
how many would be voting del-
egates.
College Republicans were pre-
pared to work hard this fall to reg-
ister voters and persuade young
people that the nation would be
better off with the incumbent team
of George Bush and Dan Quayle.
Zagotta said voters ages 18-24
were "the most Republican of any
age group And conservatives
hope to continue to draw on sup-
port from young people who voted
for George Bush in 1988 and Ro-
nald Reagan in 1984.
If Bush
wins re-
election in
1992, "we
lock up this
generation
for the Re-
publi-
cans
Zagotta
said.
Tafel
Shah,
chairman
of the
United
States Stu-
dent Asso-
cia ti on,
said her
group is
heading an
extensive
voter regis-
tration pro-
gram on
350 cam-
puses
through-
out the country called "Students
Are Voting Everywhere
CPS photo by Jo Burbank
Both parties are after the large student voter population
Student volunteers are active in both candidates' groups
to the foreground she said.
"Voting because it is a nice
'It's an extensive push, it's thing, a civic responsibility, isn't
called "SAVE" and it's about sav- going to do it. Students will vote
ing education and bringing issues because it means power Shah
said
USSA does not endorsecandi-
dates, she said.
Another college voter regis-
tration initiative will be kicked off
this fall by college Democrats. The
goal is to register 50,000 students
by the election.
That's in addition to the music
industry's Rock the Vote cam-
paign, a non-partisan effort to reg-
ister voters in the 18-26 age group.
With the convention finished,
Outreach Director Terry Northrup
said College Democrats will begin
heavy campaigning for the
Clinton-Gore ticket on their col-
lege campuses this fall.
"We're hoping Clinton and
Gore will campaign on college
campuses said Adam Kreisel, a
junior at Trinity College in Con-
necticut, and coordinator for the
College Democrats National Voter
Registration Program.
There are two Democratic or-
ganizations for young adults: Col-
lege Democrats (18-26) and Young
Democrats (26-35).
"We have more of a focus
said Northrup. "Nowgraduatestu-
dents can be included in college
democrats, who said the previous
age ceiling was 22 years old
Student issues supported
(CPS) � So what's in the Republican and Democratic political
platform for college students?
Jamie Harmon, a Harvard University junior, convention del-
egate and president of College Democrats, said the Democratic
platform supports the big issues that affect students.
"I think the main issues � student loans, abortion and the job
market � were pretty well emphasized. The Clinton student loan
program is the most specific it's ever been in terms of the platform.
It's a real breakthrough Harmon said.
Gin ton has proposed making aid available to anyone who
wants to attend college, with loans being repaid through community
service or a percentage of future income.
Tony Zagotta, national chairman of College Republicans, said he
believed young voters would be more interested in the greater
economic opportunity offered by the Republican platform, as well as
its promises to reduce government regulation and maintain strong
defense and foreign policies.
"This generation is more distrustful of government than any
generation in a long time Zagotta said, adding, "Young people
really identify with and support the foreign policy of these two
presidents (Bush and Reagan)
Because the environment is the top issue among college stu-
dents, Terry Northrup said she believed Gore would be a tremen-
dous asset to the Democrats. Northrup is outreach director for
College Democrats.
The Tennessee senator, author of the book "Earth in the Bal-
ance is known as a strong advocate of the environment
"They are comfortable relating to young people said Adam
Kreisel, a junior at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn and coordina-
tor for the College Democrats National Voter Registration Program.
"That's something you can't fake
Tajel shah, chairman of the United States Student Association,
said members of her organization have met with Clinton campaign
to discuss issues such as affordable higher education, abortion
rights, the environment and race relations are the issues most impor-
tant to college students, she said.
FINAL SUMMER ISSUE - LOOK FOR WELCOME BACK EDITION AUGUST 26T11





Dinner theatre is back
Entertainment and dinner all for $15.00.
5
Olympics questioned
What sports mean to the average Joe.
16
Sire iEant (Eamltman
Serving the East Carolina eampus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.39
Wednesday. July 29. 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
WZMB banned from downtown
Students team computers
Eleven Navajo Indian students are
attending a six-week pilot program at
tlit' I niversity ol California, Irvine, as
part of the Computer Science Summer
Institute rhe Institute was recently
awarded a grant by the National Science
Foundation to fund the program tor the
next two years Along with Liking aca-
demic courses the students will spend
two days per week in orporate intern-
ships
Czech program teaches film
Sixteen I niversityot Miamifilmstu-
dents ore learning the art of filmmaking
.it the Academy of Performing Arts in
( zechostovakia this summer, rhe stu-
nts will stud) last European film-
making at the Prague Summer Program
in I ilm, and will earn si . redits tor their
se ourse work.
Front-row students do well
V cording to -in informal study .it
� � - � oilege psychology depart-
rro ' first-year college students who sit
in thf trout ol the class are cool under
iure kip i lass less, and get higher
des than those who sit in the back.
Phe mi ire motivated, confident, Mtd
st holastkally oriented students will gen-
eral 1) choose the front slid Charles
Brooks, chairman of the psychology de-
partment. Brooks also noted that his fe-
male students sit in the front of the room,
essit in the Kick
College changes name
,sboro State College will soon be
known as the Rowan College of New
Jersey in honor of a husband-and-wife
vvho recently donated $100 million to the
school 1 lenry M. Rowan, chairman and
founder of Inductotherm Industries, Inc
anil his wife, Betty, stipulated that the
trantee free tuition to the chil-
dren ol their company s employees, and
the college build an engineering school
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from
CPS and other campus newspapers.
Radio station not allowed to
affiliate with clubs, alcohol
Bv Tony Rogers
News Writer
Aftera legal debate that dates
back to February 1992,WZMBis
no longer permitted to affiliate
itself with nightclubs down town
or any events where alcohol is
served.
University Attorney Hen
Irons said there is risk of a law-
suit against ECU with respec t to
the radio station sponsoring an
event whore alcohol is permit-
led.
rhe potential tor a lavs suit
is too great, if anyone is injured
to allow WZMB to sponsor am
events where alcohol is being
served Irons said
Under Irons' advice. Tim
Johnson, the general manager of
WZMB, was told the morning of
Jury 21 to cancel a WZMB pro-
moted concert at the Attn that
evening.
Johnson did not cancel the
event, saying the last minute no-
tice made it impossible.
In �i letter signed h Man.
Beth Morde media board chair-
person, Johnson was told the
advice "is based on the conclu-
sion WZMB isa co-sponsor of the
event and therefore shares any
liability
Irons said the notice should
not have been necessan at all
"We had discussions about a
similar situation with W.MB in
February Iron said Since our
position has remained the same,
this was not anything new to
WZMB
According to Greg Brown,
stuiient media advisor, the uni-
versity attorney's oiiwe advised
Morde that activities at the Attic
may bring up the issueof liability
again.
"The university attorneys
contacted us (at the media board
office) to uet in touch with Ms.
Morde Brown said. "She was
th isked to notify WZMBabout
the potential for a lawsuit if any-
one is injured
According to Greg Hassler,
assistant university attorney,
Brown a tntacted him in regard to
the possible liability issue.
"We got notification from
C keg Bn w n that WZMB intended
to engage in n activity at the
Attic similar to the situation that
occurred last February Hassler
said. Since the situations were
so similar, I advised Mr. Brown to
issue an updated version of the
letter we sent Mr. Johnson ear-
lier "
Brown said a written opinion
from the attorney's office would
need tobere lewedbn-themedia
board before an official policy
could he drafted.
Until then, the media hoard
has a verbal understanding with
tlie radio station.
"WZMB has been told thej
shouldn't have anything to do
with thebarsdowntown Brown
said.
Johnson said the university's
attorneys have no basis for their
Ad U c
"As far as they (the
university s attorney and the me-
dia board t an tell me, there is no
legal precedent for mis decision
lohnson said.
Iohnon also said WZMB's
relationship with bars in the
downtown area has been benefi-
cial to the radio station.
'The only way people will
know about us isifwegetoutand
promoteoursolves lohnson said.
"One way of promoting the sta-
tion is b having promotions at
clubs
lohnson also said the restric-
tion may hurt the financial ben-
efits of keeping a cooperative re-
lationship with downtown bars.
According to lohnson, the FJbo
Photo by Dail Reed � The East Carolinian
The campus radio station, WZMB. frequently co-hosted parties at downtown clubs The university has
ended this tradition due to the possible legal risks involved with sponsoring alcohol related events.
donated $400 to the radio station
last year, the Attic donated $700
and (Rockefeller's made a SH)
donation to WZMB last February.
"Because the bars are a ma (or
contributor to WZMB's trustfund,
1 feel like it's a s,ip in the face to
the bars and unfair to WZMB
lohnson said
lohnson proposed a contract
stating the bar owners are fully
liable tor any injuries during
WZMB sponsored events. The
owners of the Attic,
O'Rockefeller's and the Elbo
agreed to sign such a contract
I hat mav be helpful, butour
advice would remain the same
Irons said
Irons said if a lawsuit were
filed, ECU would be the party
most able to pay since manv pri-
vate organizations are not finan-
ciallv able to compensate the vic-
tim.
"In these situations, the uni-
versity is the deep pocket Irons
siid. " I he injured partv will seek
compensation from thosedirectlv
and indirectlv involved
Photo by Dail RNd � Tha Eaat Carolinian
WZMB associated with police and alcohol is a picture the university
does not want to see.
Republicans, Democrats seek young voters for future
Parties prioritize voter registration for students
(CPS) Voter registration is
shaping upas the major battle line
at illeges, this tall, as Democrats
and Republic ans try to woo young
voters particularly those left in
limb b; Ross Perot's sudden exit
from the political campaign.
Young people support this
president and this party said Tony
Zagotta, national chairman of the
ege Republicans, who hopes
to unveil a fast-paced, "MTV-like"
recruiting video aimed at young
voters when the Republicans con-
vene Aug. 17 in Houston, Texas.
An estimated 1,000young rep-
resentatives were expected to at-
tend the Republican National con-
vention, although it was uncertain
how many would be voting del-
egates.
College Republicans were pre-
pared to work hard this fall to reg-
ister voters and persuade young
people that the nation would be
better off with the mcu mbent team
of George Bush and Dan Quayle.
Zagotta said voters ages 18-24
were "the most Republican of any
age group " And conservatives
hope to continue to draw on sup-
port from young people who voted
for George Bush in 19H8 and Ro-
nald Reagan in 1984
If Bush
wins re-
election in
1992, "we
lock up this
generation
for the Re-
publi-
cans
Zagotta
said.
Tafel
Shah,
chairman
of the
United
States Stu-
dent Asso-
c i a t i 0 n ,
said her
group is
heading an
extensive
voter regis-
tration pnv
gram on
350 cam-
puses
through-
out the country called "Students
Are Voting Everywhere
"It's an extensive push, it's
called "SAVE" and it's about sav-
ing education and bringing issues
CPS photo by Jo� Burbank
Both parties are after the large student voter population
Student volunteers are active in both candidates' groups
to the foreground she said.
"Voting because it is a nice
thing, a civic responsibility, isn't
going to do it. Students will vote
because it means power Shah
said
LSS A divs not endorse candi-
dates, she said.
Another college voter regis-
tration initiative will be kicked off
this fall by college Democrats. The
goal is to register 30,000 students
by the election.
That's in addition to the music
industry's Rock the Vote cam-
paign, a non-partisan effort to reg-
ister voters in the 18-26 age group.
With the convention finished,
Outreach Director Terry Northrup
said College Demixrrats will begin
heavy campaigning for the
Clinton-Gore ticket on their col-
lege campuses ihis fall.
"We're hoping Clinton and
Gore will campaign on college
campuses said Adam Kreisel, a
junior at Trinity College in Con-
necticut, and coordinator for the
College Democrats National Voter
Registration Program.
There are two Democratic or-
ganizations for young adults: Col-
lege Democrats (18-26)and Young
Democrats (26-35).
"We have more of a focus
said Northrup. "Now graduate stu-
dents can be included in college
democrats, who said the previous
age ceiling was 22 years old
Student issues supported
(CPS) � So what's in the Republican and Democratic political
platform for college students1
lamie Harmon, a Harvard University junior, convention del-
egate and president of College Democrats, said the Demivratic
platform supports the big issues that affect students.
I think the main issues � student loans, abortion and the ob
market � were pretty well emphasized. The Clinton student loan
program is the most specific it's ever been in terms oi the platform.
It's a real breakthrough Harmon said
Clinton has proposed making aid available to anvone who
wants to attend college, with loans being repaid through community
sen ice or a percentage of future income.
Tony Zagotta, national chairman of College Republicans said he
believed young voters would be more interested in the greater
economic opportunity offered by the Republican platform, as well as
its promises to reduce government regulation and maintain strong
defense and foreign policies.
"This generation is more distrustful of government than anv
generation in a long time Zagotta said, adding, "Young people
really identify with and support the foreign policy oi these two
presidents (Bush and Reagan)
Because the environment is the top issue among college stu-
dents, Terry Northrup said she believed Gore would be a tremen-
dous asset to the Democrats. Northrup is outreach director for
College Democrats.
The Tennessee senator, author of the book "Earth in the Bal-
ance is known as a strong advocate of the environment.
"They are comfortable relating to young people said Adam
Kreisel, a junior at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn and coordina-
tor for the College Democrats National Voter Registration Program.
"That's something you can't fake
Tajel shah, chairman of the United States Student Association,
said members of her organization have met with Clinton campaign
to discuss issues such as affordable higher education, abortion
rights, the environment and race relations are the issues most impor-
tant to college students, she said.
FINAL SUMMER ISSUE - LOOK FOR WELCOME BACK EDITION AUGUST 26TH
.
4





2 Ei?e Eaat (Earolinian
July 29, 1992
Fund misuse cited by auditors
According to the Office of the
State Auditor, Pitt Community
College misused $19,247 in fed-
eral funds appropriated for dis-
advantage students on mentally
retarded students enrolled in job
skill development courses.
The state auditor notified the
Department of North Carclina
Community Colleges of the find-
ing and recommended that PCC
refund the money and follow fed-
eral regulations in the future.
In the report, PCC rebutted
the auditor's finding stating the
money was spent on students who
were both handicapped and dis-
advantaged.
"A plan of action in our local
application for these funds that
was submitted to and approved
by the Department of Commu-
nity Colleges explicitly describes
that the funds will be used in the
local sheltered workshop the re-
port stated. "As such, the college
acted in good faith based on a plan
that was approved by the fiscal
and program agent for these fed-
eral funds
Also in the report, PCC stated
that federal laws do not prevent
red pients who are mental ly handi -
capped from qualifying for disad-
vantaged funds.
Tim Underhill, state audit
manager, said he agreed that fed-
eral regulations do not prevent an
individual from qualifying as ei-
ther handicapped or disadvan-
tage. However, he said individu-
als must be treated as handicapped
for PCC's Vocational Education
Program.
"PittCommunity College's in-
terpretation of the federal law was
different than ours Underhill
said.
Gary Moore, dean of students,
said PCC administrators stand by
their decision but will reimburse
the federal government with state
funds at no loss to the university.
"If we had drug this out into
the next fiscal year, and if we had
lost the battle, we would have to
pay it out of this year's budget
Moore said. "We elected to pay
back the money
According to Moore, new fed-
eral regulations have been imple-
mented that will avoid similar
problems in the future.
College costs
In percent increase
from 1980-1990
Inflation
Median income
Public college costs
I
Private college costs
3

0 25 50 75 100 125150
SOURCES Chicago Tribune. National
Commission on Responsibilities for
Financing Postsecondary Education
LOOK!
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for The East Carolinian this fall. Apply at our
office on the 2nd floor of the Publications
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Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
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Carolinian:
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news, and some
other stuff, too.
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Housing is best at Ringgold Towers
Several units for sale at Below Market prices
Look at these before you rent anything!
Extra Great Buys Parents will love it
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ATTENTION RETURNING STUDENTS!
If you plan to live off-campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by
arranging your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable
time - and possiblv money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At vour parent's request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just
pick up a "Request for Utility Service"
application from room 211 in the Off-
Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities' main
office at 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized)
and mail to GUC, PO Box 1847,
Greenville, NC 27835-1847, attn:
Customer Service.
Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your
parents power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service
put in your name, a deposit will be
required. Deposits are as follows:
OPitftsu! llicf I it or
em pa.r heating
with f!t,tni or ma
spae halting
Electric only $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric, Water, & Gas $110 $85
Electric & Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in
advance. Be sure to include your name, where ser-
vice will be required, when service is to be cut on,
and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
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8am at the N
ter.
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and sewer paid, washerdryer
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WANTED Roommate for Fall
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nished apartment. ECU bus ac-
cess nearby. Call Tim at 758-
5207.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
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MALE ROOMMATE
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poolside apt. at Pinebrook.
Aprox $125 plus 13 utilities.
Please call Dock at 931-9182, af-
ter Friday call 638-6216, Please
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great money, unbelievable
tips. Work Thursday, Fri-
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Call Sid 919-735-7713 or
Paul 919-736-0716.
Mother'sPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
NOW HIRING STU-
DENTS: ARA Services is
looking for students to
work with ECU's Campus
Dining Service. Enjoy a
fun work atmosphere, free
meals, and flexible sched-
ules. Full and part-time
positions begin August
19th. Apply now at the
Wright Place or Croatan.
JOB ANNOUNCEMENT:
The School of Education
is seeking a Peace Corps
Campus Recruiter to con-
duct recruitment activities
on East Carolina
University's campus and
in surrounding communi-
iir.i.rw w ii i
ties. The position is for 20
hours per week and will
start August 1, 1992. Re-
turned Peace Corps Vol-
unteers and graduate stu-
dents are encouraged to
apply. For more informa-
tion contact Belinda
Blinkoff at 757-6061 or
Jean Garris at 757-6172.
HELP WANTED: Imme-
diately! Personal care at-
tendant needed for dis-
abled student. Mornings
$5hr. Call Mark at 758-
9098. Leave message if no
answer.
FALL SOCCER COACHES:
The Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches
for the fall youth soccer
program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and
have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able
to coach young people
ages 5-16, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3
until 7pm with some night
iii i r will)
and weekend coaching.
This program will run
from September to mid-
November. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For
more information, please
call Ben James at 830-4567
or Micheal Daly at 830-
4550.
SI U l(
:rii
TYPING: Error-free, quick
and dependable at reason-
able cost. Excellent typing
and proofreading skills
(grammar, punctuation,
sentence structure, etc.)
Call Pauline at 757-3693.
WORDPROCESSING:
Resume term papers, the-
sis, psychological assess-
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2522.
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks friendship and
correspondence from like-
minded lady. Photos and let-
ters to M V PO Box 8663, Gre-
enville, NC 27835.
PERSONALS
IF you get confused, lis-
ten to the music play
LATER, WILDWOOD: I
enjoyed the view. Thanks
AS and WB for all the help.
ARV and JB you know
where I am at. Jim, lighten
up. Bill, good music,
eh?Let's here for the re-
turn of Halloween to ECU.
Could we be so lucky?
GOODBYE, GOODBYE.
To Mike Martin, Julie
Roscoe, Locke Monroe,
and Scott Maxwell. You
are so loved and surely
missed here at TEC. Good
luck and much success in
your lives! All my love,
5, the one and the only
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Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic
Student Center invites you
to worship with them.
Sunday Masses: 11:30am
& 8:30pm at the Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th St
Greenville. Weekdays:
8am at the Newman Cen-
ter.
STUDENT SERVICES
Employment opportuni-
ties are available to stu-
dents who are interested
in becoming personal care
attendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers and tu-
tors. Pastexperience is desired
but not required. Applications
will taken for employment for
fall semester, 1992 and spring
semester, 1993. If interested,
contact: HANDICAPPED
SERVICES Brewster A-l 14 or
A-l 16 at 757-6799 or 757-6729.
RISFXUALGAY-LESBIAN
A1L1ANJ2
Social support, activism and ac-
tivities. All interested and caring
people welcome. Call 757-6766
from 1 l:15-1230Morr-Thurs. for
utformation on time and place.
Fnends and family of gays-lesbi-
ans-bisexuals, and heterosexu-
als who support civil rights re-
gardless of sexual orientation,
are welcome to attend the Bi-
sexual-Gay-Lesbian Alliance.
PLAY PALL!
Pete's Softball in Washing-
ton, NC is sponsoring a men's
open tournament scheduled
for August 1 and 2. First, sec-
ond, and third place team
and individual trophies as
well as other individual
awards. Deadline to enter is
72992. For additional in-
formation contact: Pete Wil-
son (946-1314) or Chas
MitchT (757-0763).





Stye Sast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, Genera Manager
J. William Walker, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel , Seratary
The East Carolinian has served the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. During summer sessions, The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view Letters should be limited to 150 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reiect letters for publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, July 29, 1992
Clef lM5f ?if flcTIC
ofcpeR. p'iK&rir irwo wn -w
p�.mi5� whM cam Be NoM-UN-
Pirate's Booty

p
Maxwell lays silver hammer down Long-time editor says good-bye
J ��������. Rm(hu,ii�nuiimmi.t, and rewarding While most sti
Newspapers have always been a big part of my life
When I was voung, I spent a lot of time in the offices of
Rocky Mount's The Evening Telegram. The woman who
gave birth to me wouldn't blow money on a sitter, and
since she worked at the paper, I trooped in after her on
many a day
Being so young, I spent most of my time converting
office supplies into toys, which probably explains a lot
about the way I am. I also taught myself to type But my
strongest memory of the Telegram is my memory of the first
day I saw the pnnting presses.
I was maybe eight Probably six A genial man who
worked at the Telegram � I don't rememberhis name, only
that he was always very nice to me � led me by the hand
downstairs and into the very center of the world
They were these gigantic black cylinders � at rest,
for the moment � stretching seemingly out of sight into
the distance I remember looking up at them, wide-eyed,
and feeling power, I think, as if here lay the forces that
moved the earth
All right, so it was a reaction totally out of proportion
to seeing the dinky printing presses of a third-rate small-
town newsrag Buteverythinglooksdifferentwhen you're
eight �or six �and the impression left by that brief visit
was indelible
Until that day, 1 wanted to be an astronaut After that
day 1 wanted to work for a newspaper
And it is in that sense that working for The East
Ca'jlmiar. nas been a dream come true
Working for this newspaper has been good for me in
�lot fotherways, too There s no better way to leam about
. writing than by writing, and I've written a full newspaper
page and more per week, at times � on top of classes
That gotten somehardlessonsabout writing even through
mv th.uk skull
i ve learned something else, though, and this is what
1 wanted to talk to you about I have learned that most
people are cowards, blindly following the path of least
resistance no matter where that path may lead Somehow
these people seem to end up as general managers and
managing editors
I've spent a lot of time fighting spineless general
managers and managing editors for the nght to print
matenal thev were afraid of. There have been fights Bitter,
vicious fights involving threats and tears and the whole-
sale destruction of inanimate objects There are people
who have worked for TV East Carolinian, and people who
work elsewhere in the building, whom I will never again
speak to even at the cost of my life
Mostly, I won Eventually I would manage to con-
vince my opponent that continuing to disagree with me
was going to be a lot more unpleasant than anything angry
readers could dish out. It took work.
Now, it's nothing like it used to be. The people
currently in charge are sensible and honest That hasn't
always been the case But the turnover here is high, and in
all likelihood it won't be very long before another one of
those spineless bastards is in charge again
So why am I telling you all this7 Because I'm leaving,
that's why 1 graduated, and I'm leaving, and 1 need you to
do me a favor.
See, ever since that day I stared in awe at those
gigantic (to me) printing presses, I've understood that the
press is one damn powerful monster Working here, I've
seen what damage that monster can do in the hands oi
people who are driven solely by their fear of your wrath
It's not overt damage, it's more pernicious than that
Under their control, the printing press sings thesoft lullaby
of complacency, not the harsher song of truth; the mur-
muring of sameness, not the jangle of dissent The very
worst thing the press can do is to tell you only what you
want to hear
Unless, that is, you make it unmistakably clear that
you only want to hear the truth The truth, and the widest
possible spectrum of opinions, for opinions are windows
into fact It is not enough merely to be tolerant; you must
actively demand truth and dissent � including views you
despise
You can't get nd of the cowards I couldn't either,
and Cod knows I tried They're here to stay But you can
turn their cowardice to good purpose, by making them
scared to do anything less than the nght thing
I won't be here to take part in it I have done my
share So I'm asking you: please, keep an eye out When the
press lies or hides or distorts or dissembles, they betray
you. Show them how mad it makes you when you are
betrayed
And let them know from time to time when you
think they're doing a good job, too The ones who do their
jobs properly, the Matt Joneses of this world, deserve your
praise as much as the cowards deserve your scorn
Finally, while you're keeping a sharp eye on this
newspaper, keep an even sharper eye on the nefarious
doings of the media board The media board is composed
mainly of people who know nothing about the media and
whose commitment to free speech runs about as deep as
Joseph Stalin's They work for you They represent you
Keep them honest
Thomas Jefferson said: "I have swom on the altar of
God Eternal to resist every tyranny over the mind of man "
Me, too Lots of people out there think you're too dumb
and childish to handle stuff that challenges you. I never
agreed with that, and I fought those people every chance
I got. I hope it mattered
Your rum.
-30-
By Michael
Martin
The East Carolinian
Education is probably the big-
gest choice I have ever had complete
controlofinmylite Deciding whether
or not to take honors courses in high
school was just the beginning, then
came the task of deciding where to go
to college East Carolina was, you
might sav, the only choice for me.
My dad (a 15 alumnus) nei-
ther twisted my ma nor was i : fact
that no other school accepted me I
wanted to come to East Carolina This
school was the only place I wanted to
tome� I didn't even apply anywhere
else
It wasn't for the partv image
(even though I attended many over
the past five years) It wasn't for any
athletics team In fa:t, it wasn't for
anything specifically I just felt a call-
ing � a feeling inside that told me
something verv special awaited me in
Creenvilie
Five and a half years later, I now
know what that feeling was It's hard
to explain, but I have to try
You see, people that know me
know that when I get involved in
something, I give it 110percent While
the finished product may not have
alwavs met the eve of cnhcs, the end
result was always better than when I
started
Back in the fall of 1988,1 met a
woman named Knsten that influenced
the rest of my life � she was a writer.
As we sat in front of the Student Store
between classes one day, I found out
that she was a desk editor at The East
Carolinian Awed, I had to meet her.
She told me about the job, and need-
less to say, I took the first step toward
the rest of my life
It was a cold November day as
I walked into the upstairs office of the
Publications Building Little did I
know at the time, I would spend the
rest of my college career in this fa-
mous (or infamous) building � often
sleeping on a sofa or on top of a desk
Ehinng the next three years, I
moved around the newspaper doing
various jobs spor.s editor, editorial
columnist, news writer, designer
the most memorable being managing
editor in 1990 I made a lot of mis-
takes (so I've been told), but no more
than any other who had the job. The
newspaper got better and so did the
feelings of those who worked for it.
Manv, many sleepless nights
were spent in the Publications Build-
ing Too often, that sleeplessness led
to cutting classes, which sent my
grades plum meting�like an airplane
falling to the earth without running
engines
I was out of control, and I had to
regain mv composure That's when 1
joined a fraternity It was one way for
me to put my priorities back in order
Lake TV East Carolinian, I gave
the fraternity 110 percent dedication,
and I was elected to serve as president
for a year That too, was challenging
and rewarding While most students
at ECU do not like or agree w ith Creek
bfe, it introduced me to fnends that I
will have for the rest of my life�most
of whom are not m my organization
Two weeks ago, 1 realized that I
was finally going to graduate The
situation reminded me of a weekend I
spent with Kristen in Nags Head some
two years ago, when she broke into
tears about the fear of graduation and
the real world The stress, she said,
was unbearable
Not knowing how to comfort
her, I borrowed the storyline from "St.
Brno's Fire It's one movie, that in
my opinion, all college students
should watch when graduation finally
a.nves To be brief, seven recent
Georgetown graduates, all best
fnends, find life fwrd m the real world,
and the movie focuses on how each
one deals with their problems It was
the St Elmo's fire legend that guides
one of the individuals from goingcom-
pletely crazy
Every time I watch that movie,
I see mvself in all seven characters.
And I guess that's the only true way to
describe that calling I had for ECU.
It's like St Elmo's hre
While most of you readers have
either gone through this before, or
will go though this in the future, 1 feel
that putting it on paper will somehow
keep the feeling intact forever � for
everyone to enjoy
So to all the professors, friends
and associates I've.met over the past
five years, thank you
Good-bye East Carolina � I'll
never forget you
A View From Above
Doublespeak plays on ignorance
Walk's Words
By T. Scott
Batchelor
Editorial
Column tat
Legalization offers alternative
ByJ. William
Walker
Editorial Columnist
It's a simple idea, really Give
the people what they want
It's economical, it's constitu-
tional, and above all, it's practical
Whoever decided that declaring a
"war" on drugs would remove them
from this country was not thinking
clearly. The removal of a substance (a
plant in most cases) that offends or
could harm someone is exactly what
our constitution protects
We have spent millions of dol-
lars and thousands of hours to what
end? Cocaine, a front-line enemy, is in
fact moreavailable and cheaper today
than it was at the beginning of mis
"war Marijuana use is increasing in
high school students. The only thing
this "war" has given us is crack, an
even deadlier form of cocaine. That's
right, crack(the low-cost-easy-to-
smuggle-easy-to-sell-one-hit-addic-
tion -mach ine) is a product of this war.
Maybe I'm crazy, but shouldn't we
consider an alternative approach,
maybe one that works?
The common response to a prob-
lem is to try to find a solution to that
problem. If the first solution does not
work, doesn't it seem logical to try a
different solution?
Let's consider some facts:
1) The demand for illegal drugs
is high.
Economics tells us if a product
is demanded, it will be supplied. Ille-
gal drugs make people want more
drugs Now, we can call this a major
problem, or we can cash in on the
realities of the situation. The govern-
ment refuses to apply reason to this
dilemma The same thing happened
in the 1920s with the prohibition of
alcohol Granted, that's an overused
argument, but if we can't leam from
our mistakes, what can wedo? People
in the 1920s thought a world with
alcohol would create a chaotic
stumble-zone of lushes and alcohol-
ics But it didn't.
Applying a dose of realistic hu-
man behavior tells us that most people
naturally don't want to be useless
bums in a constant drug-induced daze.
Making drugs legal will not create a
massive wave of first-time druggies.
2.) Illegal drugs are available
The illegal drug industry is lu-
crative enough that dealers will con-
tinue to deal as long as it's illegal.
Drugs' illegal status provides dealers
incredible incentives A single kilo-
gram of cocaine can provide a $24,000
reward With those incentives, who is
going to turn down a $100,000 dollar
per week career as opposed to a $4.25
an hour job flipping burgers? The
"war" has inflated the business to the
extent mat the benefits exceed the
costs.
3.) Our methods aren't work-
ing
Illegal or legal, the message has
been sent loud and clear; people will
use drugs. Despite constant efforts to
cast out the filthy drugs, they are here.
Every day, the demand for drugs gets
higher and higher and higher
Our police are out-gunned and
out-manned Thousands have died,
and thousands more will die. Method
A will not get us to objective A.
Through a system of careful
control, we can put a lid on this prob-
lem. Government regulated drug
stores, like ABC stores, would create
millions perhaps billions of dollars in
annual revenues. An age limit could
be enforced, as with alcohol and to-
bacco, quality control could be regu-
lated, and dosages could even be con-
trolled. Revenues could be directly
pumped into education about drugs
and rehabilitation from drugs. All it
takes is a little logic, reason, and fore-
sight, and this pointless "war" could
be over.
The system doesn't work, if s
not going to work, so let's find a solu-
tion that will provide an acceptable
outcome. I don't think legalization is
the only way, but at least it's a differ-
ent way.
Control rather than prohibition
is a much more realistic concept when
dealing with an epidemic such as
drugs. Think about it
Allow me to get right to the
point. I recently came across a marvel-
ous book entitled Deufekspeajk. by the
editor of the Quarterly Review of
Doublespeak. William Lutz.
In Doublespeak. Lutz pins down
and exposes a prevalent, though often
ignored, application of the English lan-
guage As Lutz puts it, "Doublespeak
is language that pretends to commu-
nicate, but really doesn't. It is lan-
guage that makes the bad seem good,
the negative appear positive, the un-
pleasant appear attractive or at least
tolerable
We all have encountered
doublespeak at one time or another.
Television advertisements offer "real
counterfeit diamonds" (without the
slightest hint of embarrassment, adds
Lutz), or brag about goods made out
of "genuine imitation learner" or "vir-
gin vinyl
Doublespeak of the kind men-
tioned above is usually funny to us.
Yet some forms of double speak can be
quite frightening, serving to delude,
obfuscate, or misrepresent important
facts. Lutz writes that "It is only by
being aware of the pervasiveness of
doublespeak and its function as a tool
of social, economic and political con-
trol that we can begin to fight those
who would use language against us
That is precisely why I decided
to write about this book now. Unless
you've been in a coma for the past
several weeks you are no doubt aware
that this nation is in the midst of a
presidential campaign. And as with
all political functions, speeches are
abound. Therein lies the potential for
egregious examples of doublespeak.
The following are some ex-
amples of doublespeak propagated
by government administrations, agen-
cies and politicians as cited in
Doublespeak
We have all heard of taxes eu-
phemistically called "revenue en-
hancements but did you know that
there was no such thing as an eco-
nomic recession? It's simply "a pe-
riod of accelerated negative growth"
according to the Reagan Administra-
tion
An acid rain isn t that either,
says the Environmental Protection
Agency. It's just "atmospheric depo-
sition of anthropogenetkally-denved
acidic substances " Whew, that's a
relief!
According to the New Jersey
Division of Gaming Enforcement,
Atlantic City doesn't have any gang-
sters, mobsters, Mafia, or La Cosa
Nostra; these folks are just "members
of a career-offender cartel I think
that might have been a title for his
novel that Mario Puzo only briefly
considered.
I first became aware of double
speak when I was very young. I was
watching a news story about a soldier
in Vietnam who stepped on a land
mine (or anti-personnel device) and,
according to an army surgeon, had
suffered "traumatic amputation of his
leg In other words, I remember
thinking, his leg was blown off.
The military thrives on
doublespeak. In the armed forces it's
not a shovel but a "combat emplace-
ment evacuator If you stand up
when you ought to be ducking, you
may wind up with a "ballistically in-
duced aperture in the subcutaneous
environment a bullet hole.Thus, in
military parlance, a toothpick becomes
a "wood interdental stimulator a
pencil a "portable, hand-held com-
munications inscriber They may be
bombs to us, but to the army they're
"Vertically deployed anti-personnel
devices anjd a parachute becomes
an "aerodynamic personnel decelera-
ted " We may be able to purchase an
ordinary steel nut at the local hard-
ware store for twenty or thirty cents,
but a "hexiform rota table surface com-
pression unit" will set you back about
$2,000.
While some examples of mili-
tary doublespeak can be a bit discom-
forting, it is even more troubling to
reflect that it is politicians who control
the armed forces. Pobticians are mas-
ters of doublespeak, being able to talk
for several minutes without saying a
thing.
When Governor Nelson
Rockefeller was running for president
he was asked his opinion on the Viet-
nam War He answered, "My position
on Vietnam is very simple And I feel
this way I haven't spoken on it be-
cause I haven't felt there was any major
contribution that 1 had to make at the
time I think that our concepts as a
nation and that our actions have not
kept pace with the changing condi-
tions. And therefore, our actions are
not completely relevant today to the
realities of the magnitude and the com-
plexity of the problems that we face in
this conflict Pure gobbledygook
The next time you listen to a
politician speak, analyze what he is
saying. If you are confused by the
rhetoric, chances a re it's doublespeak.
As Lutz points out in his book,
"Doublespeak has become so com-
mon in everyday living that many
people fail to notice it What's worse,
he says, is that when people fail to
notice it. We don't question politi-
cians who speak of slums as the "in-
ner city or use euphemisms such as
"substandard housing and "disad-
vantaged
Check out doublespea k from the
library or purchase it from a book
store. Read it from cover to cover and
I guarantee you it will prove to be an
enlightening experience Especially
the next time Bush and Clin ton take to
the stump along the campaign trail.
Entertainment
'A Leagu
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The All American Women's
Baseball League emerged to keep
baseball alive while manv male ball
players fought in World War 11. A
League of Their (Jam, a new film bv
Pennv Marshall, pavs homage to
this league bv i K usin; on their in-
augural season.
The story revolves around Kit
and Dottie Both work hard at the
dairy, but onlv Dottie is content
Dome waits patiently fur her hus-
band Bob (Bill Pullman) who is
fighting overseas, but Kit feels the
restless drive to do more with her-
self than provincial life woui
low.
The ironv of the situation
Dome is a better ball plaver tha
and it is Dottie who Ernie wants.
Ernie onlv reluctantlv buys Kit a
train ticket once Dottie agrees I
with her to Chicago.
Conflict1- between the siblings
anx' throughout theentire film. Kit
constant feels inferior to Dottie
and onsequently resents her for
her abilitv.
Kit feels unat
the overwhelmi
Dottie casts
Spun
the potpour-
encounter while
Rock ford P
The most ins
of the teiirr. i
llanks.i, the m.ina
ents being givi
buteventua j
players, find I
enjoved, n i
The rest j
includ j
Mordi I
personal it
laughs witr
lies
The '
film
Marsh
4 Dottie ai j
second rate
Ho!

North
Pholo cov�r court��y Aort" Jjcd
NCLR
The North Carolina Review made its debut this wl
is the newest publication to come out of the Enqj
of ECU The publication focuses on N C wnter
and many other subjects related to the state
WE want you News
needed apply ASAP at
- 2nd floor publications
The Rowing PosWoi
No� Available.
�STANT �.EWS EO(
�ss�STA�rrSPORTSro-
eorron
WRITERS
Apply at- (
oScSil fading Ub"Ca"�





4fcts
5 VYlOSf
rvficTIc
I- DM &
Ml

says good-bye
l.iv 1 nd
i �
�vembei
� � b Th
� . � � �����
� - Build-
rvcas pn
and rewarding Whilf most students
� kl ' tgrec to t .reek
� introduced me to friends that 1
m ave for the test of my life � most
'm are not m my organization
'tvk�� I realized th.it 1
a a? � � all) v � graduate The
reminded � � " a w eekend I
Krister in Nags 1 lead some
n j � . when she broke into
h ars about the fear of graduation and
� il world The stress she said,
was unbe.
N � � w ng how to comfort
rro ed the storyline from St
! f ;re It one movie, that in
ill college students
I m atch when graduation finally
es To be brief seven rev'ent
luates .il! best
rd in the reel world,
i � � ises on how each
it their problems It was
I � fire legend that guides
. f the individuals from goingtom-
. . kely craz)
i very time I watch that movie,
1 see myself in all seven characters
g wss that's the only true way to
ribe 1 ng 1 had tor ECU
t Elmo's fin
Whilem �� f you readers have
� ���� me through this before or
this m the future, 1 feel
ttingii � paper will somehow
� ng intact forever � tor
evry one to enjoy
- to all tiie professors, friends
issociates I've.met over the past
� ire years tl ank j ou
d bye East C aroiina � I'll
� � � � rget you
rom Above
ys on ignorance
tg are some fu-
ll � � � I igated
� i �es eu-
ftnue en-
u know that
9 simpl)
negative .
Iministra-
It either
�� tion
��
derived
ew 1� � �
Bng Enl �rcement
have any gang
tafia Of la (
areiust member
tl cartel " I think
a title for his
i only briefly
le aware of double
very voung 1 wa�
nyabouta soldier
Itepped on a land
rnne! device) and.
(mv surgeon, had
imputation of his
kds I remember
is blown off
(rv thrives n
armed forces its
'combat emplace-
lt you stand up
be ducking, you
la "ballistically in-
the subcutaneous
illet hole Thus, in
rothpick becomes
�1 stimulator a
hand-held com-
w " They may be
the army they're
anti -personnel
irachute becomes
nxivnarruc personnel develera-
� - Ve mav be able to purchase an
ordinary steel nut at the local hard-
w ire store tor twenty or thirty cents,
but a "hexiformrotatablesurfacecom-
presston unit" will set you back about
$2.1 m
While some examples of mili-
tary doublespeak can bea bit discom-
forting, it is even more troubling to
reflect that it is politicians who control
the armed forces Politicians are mas-
ters of doublespeak, being able to talk
for several minutes without saving a
thing
When Governor Nelson
Rockefeller was running for president
he v as asked his opinion on the Viet-
�" Wai He answered, "My position
� V etnam is very simple And I feel
'his w n 1 haven't spoken on it be-
cause I haven t felt there was anvmaior
contribution that I had to make art the
time I think that our concept! as a
nation and th it our actions have not
kept pact with the changing condi-
tions And therefore ur actions are
not completely relevant todav to the
reah ties of the magnitude and the com-
plexity of theproMems that wefacein
this conflict " Pure gobbledvgook
The next time you listen to a
politician speak ana've what he is
saying If you are confused by the
rhetoric, chances a re it s doublespeak
As Lutz points out in his book,
"Doublespeak has become so com-
mon in everyday living that many
people fail to notice it What's worse,
he says, is that when people fail to
notice it We don't question politi-
cians who speak of slums as the "in-
ner city or use euphemisms such as
"substandard housing and "disad-
vantaged "
Checkout doublespeak from the
library or purchase it from a book
store Read it from cover to cover and
1 guarantee you it will prove to be an
enlightening experience Especially
the next time Bush and Clin ton ta ke to
the stump along the campaign trail
Entertainment
ultre iEaat Carolinian
July 29, 1992
'A League of Their Own' hits homerun
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The All American Women's
Baseball League emerged to keep
baseball alive while many male ball
players fought in World War EL A
lttgue of Their Oiim, a new film by
Fenny Marshall, pays homage to
this league by foe using on their in-
augural season
The story revolves around Kit
and lUtie. Doth work hard at the
dairy, but only Dottie is content.
Dortie waits patiently for her hus-
band Bob (Bill Pullman) who is
fighting overseas, but Kit feels the
restless drive to do more with her-
self than provincial life would al-
low.
rhe irony of the situation is that
Dottie is a better ballplayer than Kit
and it is Dottie who Ernie wants.
Irnie only reluctantly buys Kit a
train ticket once Dottie agrees to go
with her to Chicago.
Conflicts between the siblings
arise throughout theentirefUm. Kit
constantly feels inferior to Dottie
and consequently resents her tor
her ability.
Kit feels unable to escape from
the overwhelming shadow that
Dottie casts.
Spicing the story of the sisters is
the potpourri of personalities they
encounter while playing for the
Rockford Peaches.
The most interesting member
of the team is jimmy Dugan (Tom
Hanks), the manager. Atfirstjimmy
resents being given girls to manage
but eventually comes to respect the
players, finding that baseball can be
enjoyed, no matter who is playing.
The rest of the supporting cast,
including Madonna as May
Mordivido, each have their own
personalities. They elicit many
laughs with their distinct idiosyn-
crasies.
The main problem with this
film is the cliched script and
Marshall's handling erf it The story
(f Dortie and Kit plays more like a
second rate sitcom than a first rate
Hollywood film.
The final twenty minutes of A
League o' Then Own practically de-
stroy all th.it has come before.
Dottie's decision to return home
before the World Series seems con-
Photo cov�r courtesy North Ctrolint Literary Rtvttw
NCLR
The North Carolina Review made its debut this week. The review
is the newest publication to come out of the English Department
of ECU The publication focuses on N.C. writers, N.C. literature
and many other subjects related to the state
WE want you News writers
needed apply ASAP at our office
- 2nd floor publications building.
The blowing Positi�
ASS'ssp0BT8E0m3B
c?PveorroR
"WWTERS
Apply a(-
trived since every single viewer
knows that she will return trium-
phantly later on in the film.
The confrontation of the sisters
on the Diamond plays likea strained
melodrama. The moral of the story
seems to be that one winning mo-
ment, in this case Kit's heroics in the
seventh game of the World Series,
can compensate for a lifetime of
resentment.
The huge rift between Kit and
Dottie is bridged by toothpicks in
the denouement, yet the filmmak-
ers would have the audience be-
lieve that the siblings will now live
happily ever after.
But in A League of Their Own,
which lauds itself for its realistic
portrayal of a chapter in the history
of sports, the lapses in credibility
damage the final product.
Still, this film scores on many
other levels, most notably as a hi-
lanous comedy.
If only Marshall could have al-
tered the artificiality of the main
Story of Kit and Dottie, this film
would have been a home run.
On a scaleof one to ten, A League
of Their Own rates a seven.
Photo courUsy Columbia Picture
A League of Their Own pays homage to a league of women baseball players who struggled to keep the game
alive while the vast majority of men in the game went off to fight in World War II.
Dinner theatre alive and well
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Dinner theatre has been a
long-standing tradition in
America. The joy of eating a fine
meal coupled with the pleasure
of seeing a finely acted play are
two things that will continue to
be the high point of evenings to
come.
Anglers Cove Restaurant, in
Hertford, N.C, marks another pe-
riod tn this long-standing tradi-
tion with their hosting of the Boot-
strap Acting Company's produc-
tion of "Broken Up written by
Nick Hall.
"Broken Up" is the story of a
middle-aged couple going
through the trials of marriage and
divorce. Tom, the husband, has
had an affair with one of his En-
glish students. Meg, his wife, de-
cides she's had enough of his mid-
life crisis, and moves out. Com-
plicating matters is a fast-talking
blind date named Roger and the
apartment complex's handyman,
George.
Watching this performance
gives one the feeling of a down-
home, simplistic view of life.
Character development is not re-
ally stressed; the thrust is for en-
tertainment, not meaning. All the
actors give earthy performances
that leave the audience with a
feeling of camaraderie and sym-
pathy The grass-roots sets, light-
ing and sound all emphasize the
overall effect of being at home
and comfortableness.
The highlight of the perfor-
mance comes in the second act
when the three men engage in a
drinking spree, matching each
other with tequila shots. Phil
McM ullan, as Tom, gives a hilari-
ous performance, walking on his
knees and giving the well-recog-
nized drunken slur. Merlin Baker,
playing Roger, also delights au-
diences with his mouth full of
cotton speech, stumbling around
the room and generally making
an ass out of himself. Even the
proverbial lampshade-on-the-
head trick appears at the end of
the scene.
So if a night of humor with
friends and family appeals to you.
Anglers Cove Restaurant is the
place to go. Performances run on
July 24, 25, 31 and August 1, 2, 7
and 8. For $15.00 a person, one
can get a friendly atmosphere,
along with excellent food, and a
night of laughs to round out the
evening.
For reservations, call (919)
426-7294, evenings, and (919) 426-
9295, days.
DAPPER DANS
"Where Lost Memories Are Found"
Vintage Clothing, Jewelry, Collectibles, Antiques, and
Furniture
Summer Hours
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri-Sat
10-5
Closed Wed & Sun
There's plenty of FREE parking at our rear entrance
off of Cotanche.
417 Evans Street Mall
Downtown
752-1750
Monday
20 WINGS
Wednesday
20 MINI TACOS
Friday
$1.25 HIGHBALLS
Saturday
50 DRAFT
Tuesday & Thursday
$13 MARGARITA
PITCHERS
1400S. CHARLES BLVD.
(old Shatops)
GREENVILLE, NC
jj-
WEDNESDAY
Dance Part a
OC DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
ifYTYTNi
Lull
Kingston
Place
THURSDAY
Studentgl Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Tees
�LADIES FREE
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSDISHESSILVERWARE
DISHWASHERPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE-CLUBHOUSE
LAUNDROMAT�SWIMMING POOL
& LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
T





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: 4Kls '
5 yyiosfjmw
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hTflcR
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ients

h �
I � . � I
novie,
i,
truev
n n I had I � 1 :


- . �
et o vi
I'll
rom Above
ys on ignorance
�� � � i � �
n � m an
t at the k ca h.ird-
. for rty cents
. � . ick a

�e some i �an ; ��- t mih-
� �� . an bea bit d
� i � more tf
itii iansw 1 i i
'� � ,
.
. I '
I wa�;
i
I rcmen �
H
krv thrives
combat emp �
� y itM I up
�� dw king you
la "bailietkally in
I the subcutanwu1.
let hole Thus, in
i�'thpick becomes
It timulahir i
nand-hUI OOOI-
pr " Th��v rruv he
the army they're
1 a nti-personnel
ir.n hut becomes
� k, being able to talk
� � � � � minutes without saying a
iVhei veri � Nelson
�-���� erwasruru ng for president
pinion oi tl �
He answered
�� II feel
� t spoki
� vi t therv ��
it 1 had � � � t the
k that uir � ts .is a
e not
kepi .����� . . -ndi-
And thtrvtnrv ns ,irv
. . �. , rdc � � day to the
"hvmagr ItTMCom-
. . ��. the pro! � tl i ve face in
flict" Pun . , .k
rhe next � - i istan to a
politician speak ana w wh.it he is
si bv the
� .� 'ii. chant esare � - loublespe.ik
As Luta points o if in his book,
D, tbietpeak has become so com-
mon in every lay living th.it m.iny
people fail to notice it " What's worse,
ve s.u s is that when people fail to
notice it We ion't question politi-
cian who speak of slums ,is the 'in-
ner city or use euphemisms such as
substandard housing and "disad-
vantatied
( hai k out doublespeak from the
library or purchase it from a book
store Read it from cover to cover and
I guarantee you it will prove to be an
enlightening experience Especially
the next time Bush andlinton fake to
the stump along the campaign tr,nl
Entertainment
CIIIic itaut (Sarolinimi
July 29, 1992
'A League of Their Own' hits homerun
By Ike Shibley
st.itt Writer
lhe Ml American Women's
Baseball I eague emerged to keep
baseball alh e w hile many male ball
players fought in World War II. A
League of Their I kvn a new film by
Penny Marshall, pays homage to
tins league by hx. using on their in-
augura) season.
Ihe story revolves around Kit
mx Dottie Both work hard at the
dairy, but oruy Dottie is content
Dottie waits p.itiontK tor her hus-
band IV'b dWI Pullman) who is
fighting overseas, but Kit feels the
restless drive to do mote with her-
sell than provincial life would al-
low
rhe irony ot thesihiation is that
Dottie is a better ball player than Kit
and it is Dottie who Ernie wants.
Ernie onl) reluctantl) buys Kit a
train tu ket once I ottie agrees to go
with her tohi. ago
I . ntiu ts between the siblings
arise throughout the entire film Kit
constantly feels interior ti' Dottie
and consequently resents hei t i
hei abilitx
Kit feels unable to escape from
the overwhelming shadow that
Dottie casts.
Spktng the story of the sisters is
the potpourri of personalities they
encounter while plaving for the
Rockford Peaches.
The most Interesting member
ot the team is limmv Dugan (Tom
1 lanks), the manager. At first limmv
resents being given girls to manage
but eventually comes to respect the
players, finding that baseball can be
enjoyed, no matter who is playing.
Ihe rest ot the supporting cast,
including Madonna as May
Mordivido, each have their own
personalities 1 hev elicit many
laughs with their distinct idiosyn-
crasies.
Ihe main problem with this
film is the cliched script and
Marshall's handling of it I he story
of Dottie and Kit pla s more like a
second rate sitcom than a first rate
1 lollywood film
lhe final twenty minutes of A
League fTh m . �� practk ally de-
stroy all that has come before
Dome's decision to return home
before the i rld Series seems con-
Photo cover courtesy North Carolina Litarary Heview
NCLR
The Nor: . ew made its debut this week. The review
is the no iblication to come out of the English Department
of ECU : hcation focuses on N.C writers. N C literature
-objects related to the state
WE want you News writers
needed apply ASAP at our office
- 2nd floor publications building.
ASS'r�EwSEOlTOR
EDITOR
c�py EOITOB
WRITERS
APPiy at
-rv The fac n
trived since every single viewer
knows that she will return trium-
phantly later on in the film.
The confrontation of the sisters
on the Diamond plays likea strained
melodrama, lhe moral of the storv
seems to be that one winning mo-
ment, in this case Kit's heroics in the
seventh game of the World Series,
can compensate for a lifetime of
resentment.
The huge rift between Kit and
Dottie is bndged by UxUhpicks in
the denouement, vet the filmmak-
ers would have the audience be-
lieve that the siblings will now live
happilv ever after.
But in A Leacf Their Own,
which lauds itself for its realistic
portrayal of a chapter in the history
of sports, the lapses in credibility
damage the final product
Still, this film scores on many
other levels, most notablv as a hi-
larious comedy.
If only Marshall could have al-
tered the artificiality oi the main
stone oi Kit and LX'ttie, this film
would have been a home run.
. n a sea le of one to ten League
of I heir (rum rates a seven
Photo courl�sy Columbia Picture
A League of Their Own pays homage to a league of women baseball players who struggled to keep the game
alive while the vast majority of men in the game went off to fight in World War II
Dinner theatre alive and well
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Dinner theatre has been a
long-standing tradition in
America. The joy of eating a fine
meal coupled with the pleasure
of seeing a finely acted play are
two things that will continue to
be the high point of evenings to
come
Anglers Cove Restaurant, in
Hert ford, NIC, marks another pe-
riod in this long-standing tradi-
tion with their hosting of the Boot-
strap Acting Company's produc-
tion oi "Broken Up written bv
Nick Hall.
"Broken Lp" is the store ot a
middle-aged couple going
through the trials ot marriage and
divorce. Iom, the husband, has
had an affair with one of his ln-
glish students. Meg, his wife, de-
cides she's had enough ot his mid-
life crisis, ,ind moves out. Com-
plicating matters is a fast-talking
blind date named Roger and the
apartment complex's handyman,
George-
Watching this performance
gives one the feeling of a down-
home simplistic view of life.
( haracter development is not re-
ally stressed; the thrust is for en-
tertainment, not meaning. All the
actors give earthy performances
that leave the audience with a
feeling ot camaraderie and sym-
pathy. The grass-roots sets, light-
ing anil sound all emphasize the
overall effect of being at home
and comfortableness
Hie highlight of the perfor-
mance comes in the second act
when the three men engage in a
drinking spree, matching each
other with tequila shots. Phil
McMullan,as Tom.givesa hilari-
ous performance, walking on his
knees and giving the well-recog-
nized drunken slur. Merlin Baker,
playing Roger, also delights au-
diences with his mouth full oi
cotton speech, stumbling around
the room and generally making
an ass out oi himself. Even the
proverbial lampshade-on-the-
head trick appears at the end of
the scene.
So if a night of humor with
friends and familv appeals to you,
Anglers Cove Restaurant is the
place to go. Performances run on
luly 24, 25, 31 and August 1, 2, 7
and 8. For S15.1X) a person, one
can get a friendly atmosphere,
along with excellent food, and a
night of laughs to round out the
evening.
For reservations, call (919)
426-7294, evenings, and (919)426-
u25, davs.
DAPPER DANS
"Where Lost Memories Are Found"
Vintage Clothing, Jewelry, Collectibles, Antiques, and
Furniture
Summer Hours
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri-Sat
10-5
Closed Wed & Sun
There's plenty of FREE parking at our rear entrance
off of Cotanche.
417 Evans Street Mall
Downtown
752-1750
Monday
20 WINGS
Wednesday
20 MINI TACOS
Friday
$1.25 HIGHBALLS
Saturday
50 DRAFT
Tuesday & Thursday
$13 MARGARITA
PITCHERS
1400 S.CHARLES BLVD.
(old Shafcops)
GREENVILLErNC
�- � � �- �- �� �� ��
'�wpm9mm �� �
GKXX-
WEDNESDAY
Dance Party
OC DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
THURSDAY
StudentPOLLAR Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
AI ,I - GLASSDISHESSILVERW ARE
DISHWASHERPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE-CLUBHOUSE
LAUNDROMAT-SWIMMING POOL
& LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!





Sports
Hire iEaat CUarolinian
July 29, 1992
Montana returns
to 49ers' line up
after year absence
(AD � ih Montana is still scheduled to start
for the San Francisco 9ers in their exhibition
opener against the Denver Broncos next week.
Montana, who had two days of rest, limited
his Monday morning passing drills to just 30
throws, and afterwards said his arm felt just about
the same
"It (right arm) still feels tired' said Montana
wnomssed theentireli season following right
elbow surgery It felt pretty good the early part,
then it jus! got a little tired "
Meanwhile, Houston OUersquarterback War-
ren Moon walked out of training camp and may
not make the team's trip to Tokyo for Saturday's
exhibition game. ESPN reported Monday night.
Moon's agent, Leigh Steinberg, told the net-
work 1ixmt left camp because of a contrad dis-
pute that ha- lingered for more than a vear.
deneral Manager Mike Holovak declined
comment and MiMin was unavailable late Tues-
day night. Oilers owner Hud Adams told KRIV-
TV said he was unaware of any walkout.
"That's news to me Adams said. "I really
don't want to comment on it. When you're nego-
tiating, you expect anything. I expect to see War-
ren making the trip
Fil� Photo
It's about that time
With memones of the 1991 Pirate football campaign still etched in the minds of fans everywhere. ECU starts the
1992 season in ust a few weeks Look for previews of the team and their schedule in our Sept 2 special issue
Commentary
Just how important are the Olympic games?
Bv Robert S. Todd
VsMsLint Sports Fditor
The Orymptcs arc usually .i great
source of pride for the nations around
tbeworld Dominance in Ihegameshave
come to symbolize world power the
former Soviet Union knew thw quite
well and focused great attention on pro-
ducing work! i lass athlete East Ger-
many followed suit (bv inv means nec-
essary)
Athletic 9 is never under the micro-
scope mere than during the Olympics.
Sports are a vita! part of this world's
society
While tans constantly .omplain
playersareover paid,thosesamepeople
buv the caps and watch games on cable
and pour more money into the players
pockets. lhe importance of sports in
society is undeniable It is big business.
It is entertainment It is an outlet for
people to release their frustrations, to
reminisce about what might have been,
and to live together with the accom-
plishments of others.
I was not alone in m back yard
when I counted aloud and mi�l the
winning basket at the buzer. But
wait' Hewashat ked unmercifully! Koh
sinks the first free throw. His second
shot is up . . . Oh mv! A lane lolation:
He'll get one more chance to win the
Championship of the Universe1
While those moment- are precious
to me as an adult, it is crucial that sports
are not taken more seriously than the
truly imp'rtant things in life. Rut. the
are not ut kids games It is simplv
wrong to sa people should not he paid
millions sit dollars to dii what others
claim thev wi wtdck 11(nfree Thet. lvm-
pksi not as important as world peace,
hut thev dominate the news and will
captivate the world for another week
Around the PvF.JsM �: the
sports page is erroneously considered
the least important of the three
sections .USA Today sells the maont
of their papers to people b�s auseof the
sports s,tion, and it is rm guess that
the ma. ntv of the papers pu ked up on
campusarequickk opened to the sports
section.
Mot onlv do sports provide our
country with big business it offers a
war for the big businesses to relate to
the common man. More and more in-
dustries are turning to athletes to pro-
mote their products Why? Americans
idolize athletes more than CEOs and
senior vice presidents. Most citizens
dream of playing one-on-one with lor-
dan or Magic Johnson Few dream of
sitting in a board meeting with Robert
( ouison of American Arbitration Cor-
poration
ports are the providers oi child-
hoodheroestoclay. lmavnot wanna be
like Mike, but 1 did want to be like Babe
Ruth and loe Montana Unfortunately,
without sports there mav be a lack of
htVOCS in this country Without heroes
we would not know ust how far we
could go or how high we could reach.
USA rolls over
Croatia, 103-70
despite injuries
BARCELONA, Spain (AD - Toint guards
Magic Johnson and John Stockton are hurt and
Charles Barkley is still making mis hief.
So what happens?
The U.S. Olympic basketball team beats medal
favorite Croatia H)3-70 Monday night, the c lowest
victory the Americans have had in nine games, but
still a blowout.
Thev did it without ohriMn for more than
three-quarters of the game because of a strained
muscle in his right knee .Stockton has been out with
a cracked bone in his right leg since lune 29.
For the Dream Team, wh(se previous closest
game was 38 points over Puerto Rico in the Or) m-
picqualifvangtourruiment.thegameagainstCroatia
was an opportunity to measure the size i I
dominance.
"It was giHHi for our team to be focused on a
challenge Michael lordan said
Croatia, with six placers from Yugoslavia -
1988 Olympic silver medalist team, figured t
one of the Americans' toughest test
Drazen Tetrovict f the New Jersey Net-st � .
I4 p Mntsand StojkoVranki uric i iftheBosti n Ceitk s
had 11 points and four blocked shots. DinoRadja,
a Cel tics d raftee, scored 14 points on 6-of-K) srw�t-
ing.
But the man Team USA concentrated on wa �
Tom Kukiv, considered bv manv to be the most
talented plaver in Europe.
Die absence of fohnsow and Stockton left the
U.S. team without a true point guard on the roster
But Chicago Bulls Jordan and Scottie Tippen did
theob anyway.
Tippen blanketed Kuki K for most ot the game
and then said the Croat superstar, who scored ust
tour points, is overrated.
"He's OK, not as great as people slid and
anticipated Tippen said. "I don't know he's even
the bet European player here hat s probabK
Drazen retrovic"
retrovic hit three 3-potnters in a one-minute
span late in the first half to lead a Cnvitia railv, but
he had toul trouble and scored ust two of his 9
points in the second half.
Kukoc, courted intensely bv the Bulls last year,
was defensed superbly by Pippen, who made just
his third start for Team USA. Pippen and lordan
both resented the attention given Kukoc bv Bulls
general manager Jerry Krause.
"I did this because I can't put Jerry Krause out
on the court Tippen said.
Kukiv missed four oi his first five shots and
was scoreless until )ust before halftime.
Rating & DrinkingvTv Saloon
CATCH ALL THE OLYMPICS ACTION HERE!
O'Cools is proud to be the official
sponsor of summer fun!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25C each Buffalo Wings
AIL DAY-EVERYDAY THROUGHOUT THE OLYMPICS
Located behind Qumcy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
Everything Else is the Same!
SILVER
s. "Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Aa I
jTSmUT TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
� . itcstanti m
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
Dickinson .y�.
?tfrmtfjrit Oul ttf ir��iwif9 9
I vcryThurday
College Night
99c Admission
before 10 pm
The
COMedY
2C�E
ATTIC
Wednesday.ul 2l
with Paul Kelly &
Joey Bennich
Tlnirsdax. .ul 30
lt�m r, f M' m .S-f. i
Every Sunday
SUMMER
DANCE
MADNESS 92
The
COMedY
2DWE
BILLY CLUBFEST
special guest The Peles
99� 32 oz Draft � 99tf ADMISSION � 995 Highballs
before 10 pm
aul M
Classic Rock n Roll
3 PAIRS of TICKETS to RICHARD MARX at Walnut Creek with limosine ride
from Class Act Lunosinc Service courtesy of THE HOT FM 103.7
Salurdax. uiM I
TH� �Mft�ftS
Beach Music's 2 Show
$2-32 ox Draft
is going to nave a
NEim LOoK
for the fall
Look for
The East Carolinian
WELCOME BACK ISSUE
hitting stands August 26
FOOTBALL PREVIEW '9!
I coming out September 2





Sports
2U?e iEaat QJarnlimnn
July 29, 1992
LU
Montana returns
to 49ers' line up
after year absence
(AP) � Joe Montana is still scheduled to start
for the San Francisco 49ers in their exhibition
opener against the Denver Broncos next week.
Montana, who had two days of rest, limited
his Monday morning passing drills to just 30
throws, and afterwards said his arm felt just about
the same.
"It (right arm) still feels tired said Montana,
who missed the entire 1991 season following right
elbow surgery. "It felt pretty gixxi the early part,
then it just got a little tired
Mean while, Houston Oilers quarterback War-
ren Moon walked out of training camp and may
not make the team's trip to Tokyo for Saturday's
exhibition game, ESrN reported Monday night.
Moon's agent, Leigh Steinberg, told the net-
work Moon left camp because of a contract dis-
pute that has lingered for more than a year.
General Manager Mike Holovak declined
comment and Moon was unavailable late Tues-
day night. Oilers owner Bud Adams told KRIV-
TV said he was unaware of anv walkout.
"That's news to me Adams said. "1 reallv
don't want to comment on it. When vou're nego-
tiating, you expect anything. I expect to see War-
ren making the trip.
It's about that time.
Fil Photo
With memories of the 1991 Pirate football campaign still etched in the minds of fans everywhere, ECU starts the
1992 season in just a few weeks Look for previews of the team and their schedule in our Sept. 2 special issue
Commentary
Just how important are the Olympic games?
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
The Olympics are usually a great
source of pride for the nations around
the world Dominance in the games have
come to symbolize world power. Ihe
former Soviet Union knew this quite
well and focused great attention on pro-
ducing world class athletes. East Ger-
many followed suit (bv anv means nec-
essary).
Athletics is never under the micro-
scope more than during the Olympics.
Sports are a vital part of this world's
society
While fans constantly complain
players are over-paid, those1 same people
buy the caps and watch games on cable
and pour more money into the players
pockets. The importance of sports in
society is undeniable. It is big business.
It is entertainment. It is an outlet for
people to release their frustrations, to
reminisce about what might have been,
and to live together with the accom-
plishments of others.
I was not alone in my back yard
when I counted aloud and missed the
winning basket at the buzzer. But
wait! He was hacked unmercifully! Rob
sinks the first free throw. His second
shot is up Oh my! A lane violation!
He'll get one more chance to win the
Championship of the Universe
While those moments are precious
to me as an adul t, i t is crucial that sports
are not taken more seriously than the
truly important things in life. But, they
are not just kids games. It is simply
wrong to say people shou Id not be paid
millions of dollars to do what others
claim they would do for free. The Olym-
pics is not as important as world peace,
but they dominate the news and will
captivate the world for another week.
Around the The East Carolinian, the
sports page is erroneously considered
the least important of the three
sections.LISA Today sells the majority
of their papers to people because of the
sports section, and it is my guess that
the majori tv of the papers picked upon
campusarequicklvopened to thesports
section.
Not only do sports provide our
country with big business, it offers a
way for the big businesses to relate to
the common man. More and more in-
dustries are turning to athletes to pro-
mote their products. Why? Americans
idolize athletes more than CEOs and
senior vice presidents. Most citizens
dream of playing one-on-one with Jor-
dan or Magic Johnson. Few dream of
sitting in a board meeting with Robert
Coulson of American Arbitration Cor-
poration.
Sports are the providers of child-
rxxxi heroes today. 1 may not wanna be
like Mike, but I did want to be like Babe
Ruth and Joe Montana. Unfortunately,
without sports there may be a lack of
heroes in this country. Without heroes
we would not know just how far we
could go or how high we could reach.
USA rolls over
Croatia, 103-70
despite injuries
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) � Point guards
Magic Johnson and John Stockton are hurt and
Charles Barkley is still making mischief.
So what happens?
The U.S. Olympic basketball team beats medal
favorite Croatia 103-70 Monday night, the closest
victory the Americans have had in nine games, but
still a blowout.
They did it without Johnson for more than
three-quarters of the game because of a strained
muscle in his right knee. Stockton has been out with
a cracked bone in his right leg since June 29.
For the Dream Team, whose previous closest
game was 38 points over Puerto Rico in the Olym-
pic qualifying tournament, the game against Croatia
was an opportunity to measure the size of its
dominance.
"It was good for our team to be focused on a
challenge Michael Jordan said
Croatia, with six players from Yugoslavia's
1988 Olympic silver medalist team, figured to be
one of the Americans' toughest tests.
Drazen Petrovic of the New Jersey Nets sc red
19 pointsandStojkoVrankovic of the Boston Celtics
had 11 points and four blocked shots. Dino Radja,
a Celtics draftee, scored 14 points on 6-of-lO shoot-
ing.
But the man Team USA concentrated on was
Toni Kukoc, considered bv many to be the most
talented player in Europe.
The absence of Johnson and Stockton left the
U.S. team without a true point guard on the roster.
But Chicago Bulls Jordan and Scottie Pippen did
the job anyway.
Pippen blanketed Kukoc for most of the game
and then said the Croat superstar, who scored just
four points, is overrated.
"He's OK, not as great as people said and I
anticipated Pippen said. "I don't know he's even
the best European player here. That's probably
Drazen Petrovic
Petrovic hit three 3-pointers in a one-minute
span late in the first half to lead a Croatia rally, but
he had foul trouble and scored just two of his 19
points in the second half.
Kukoc, courted intensely by the Bulls last year,
was defensed superbly by Pippen, who made just
his third start for Team USA. Pippen and Jordan
both resented the attention given Kukoc by Bulls
general manager Jerry Krause.
"Idid this because 1 can't put Jerry Krause out
on the court Pippen said.
Kukoc missed four of his first five shots and
was scoreless until just before halftime.

Karing & I linking
CATCH ALL THE OLYMPICS ACTION HERE!
O'Cools is proud to be the official
sponsor of summer fun!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25C each Buffalo Wings
ALL DAY-EVERYDAY THROUGHOUT THE OLYMPICS
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
Everything Else is the Same!
i Entertainment
r Center
"Greenville's
BULLET Nightclub"
Adult
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be there by 800. Competition is from 9 to I 00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
SCOTT
Silver Bullet BJ
cry Thurday
College Night
99c Admission
before 10 pm
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
Dlcklneon Ave.
�trm&ttt nut ofirwrtvtf rrttUsm ro ���� .Vforc
ATTIC
I.S�kSC
s(i;iiui :
Every Sunday
SUMMER
DANCE
MADNESS '92
C6&st with Paul Kelly& c
Joey Bennich 2DNE
BILLY CLUBFEST
special guest The Peles
99 32 oz Draft � 99 ADMISSION � 99 Highballs
before 10 pm
CtoMfc Rock'nRoll
3 PAIRS of TICKETS to RICHARD MARX at Walnut Creek with limosinc ride
from Class Act Limotine Service courtesy of THE HOT FM 103.7
. I (I 11 f I
TH� �MB�RS
Beach Musk's 2 Show
$2-32 ot Draft
is 301ns to nave a
SURPpISING
NEiu LOoK
for the fall
Look for
The East Carolinian
WELCOME BACK ISSUE
hitting stands August 26
FOOTBALL. PREVIEW U
coming out September 2





Last week you used it to write a paper while sitting
on Observatory Hill. Today you'll use it to do some
lab reports and catch some sun at the same time.
This summer you'll use it to write your thesis, and
you've decided to go someplace really inspirational





PowerBook.
It's from Apple.
It's not just a new computer.
It's a new idea.





PowerBook.
It's from Apple.
It's not just a new computer.
It's a new idea.





It will let vou run MS-DOS software
It will let vou run Macintosh software.
It will let vou run awav.
It's easv on vour eves.
It's easv on vour wrists.
It's easv.
It does more than you'd imagine.
It costs less than vou'd think.
It's the next thing.





It will let y u run MS-I)()S si )ftware!
It will Id you run Macintosh softwai
It will let v )ii run awav.
e
It d xs me re than y u cl imagine
It costs less than vou'd think.
It's easy on your eves.
0 4 �
It's easy on vour wrists.

It's easy.
Its the next thing.





. ��� .
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PowerBook.
The declaration of independence
Its the next thin;
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mAm
PowerBook.
The declaratk )n ()f independence
Irs the next riling
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Where's the best place for a student to get a Fowertok?
Y( air auth( irized Apple campus reseller can help y w sdeel the best
computer for you. You'll also find special student pricing on all
Apple products -including printers If you're interested in
financing y ur purchases, be sure t ask f r details ah ut the Apple
D miputer U ran, a financing pn )gram f( r the purchase (f Ajplc
products.
Discover how you ran fill all your computing next is. Visit your
Apple campus reseller Kxlay.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 29, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 29, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.887
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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