The East Carolinian, July 8, 1992






'Batman9 go back 5
The sequel's mania hyped by advertisers, not movie-goers.
Keeping it all in the family
Student Stores donates money to athletics.
6
�lie 3Ea0t QIartfltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.36
Wednesday, July 8,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
Election 92
Candidates voice education concerns
Fitness builds library
The students, faculty and staff at
Lewis & Clark College have raised $1
million for a new library by competing in
a fitness challenge. Dr. Robert Famplin
)r the school's boanl of trustees chair-
man, awarded cash amounts to those
participants who could meet or beat his
challenges, and the monev was then given
ID the fund for the new library
School increases security
The University of Arizona has in-
creased security in its registrar's office
after firing an employee for unautho-
nzed grade changing. Registrar David
Butler said four people had grades
changed by the employee but, with the
increased seruritv, it will now take sev-
eral people working together to change a
gradp.
Pepsi teams with Penn State
Cfficialsat Tenn State recently signed
a deal to exclusively market and sell only
Pepsi pnxiucts. The 10-year, $14 million
deal allows for the revenues to be used
for the building of an athletic coliseum as
well as making improvements at the li-
braries on all of the 21 campuses
Court rules on segregation
Fhe US Supreme Court recently
ruled that Mississippi colleges have not
done enough h remove segregatn n from
their systems Officials say the state has
separrt'e systems of black and white edu-
cation, with white schools receiving more
state money that the black schools. The
Court mandated that steps be taken to
end the discrimination.
RJR donates money
The RJR Nabisco Foundation con-
tributed $12,000 to North Carolina Agri-
cultural and Technical State University
to support education programs in the
School of Agriculture. The grant pro-
vides funding for undergraduates to
work with research personnel whileeam-
mg money to help pay for education and
finances scholarships. R.J. Reynolds To-
bacco Company recommended the con-
tribution. Reynolds Tobacco has given
more than $16 million to research and
programs at universities around the na-
tion.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shlmmat. T�k�n from
CPS and other campus nowepapora.
As the November election closes in, candidates are
introducing their policies on higher education. The variety
of different plans and ideas seem to always be aimed at
making college more affordable and accessible to middle
and lower class citizens.
Two key elections concerning North Carolina college
students are the North Carolina Governor's race and the
race for U.S. presidency. The three candidates for president
have developed higher education plans full of diversity,
often times including major spending increases. However,
each plan does promises to broaden the minority and lower
the economic level student base.
George Bush (R), the self-proclaimed "Education Presi-
dent plans to increase funding in existing programs without
changing the programs or creating new ones. However, the
president's "America 2000" does not mention how he plans to
change higher education. The plan does propose an increase in
the number of undergraduate and graduate students in math,
natural science and engineering programs. The president also
plans to increase the number of students, especially minorities,
who receive degrees from two-year scruxils.
President Bush's plan seems to be v ague about how
he hopes to accomplish his givils. Bush's plan carries a
heavy tax payers' burden of about $H50 million.
tt k
Bill Clinton (D) is
promising a national college
trust fund that would prac-
tically guarantee funding
for any student who needs
it. According to Governor
Clinton's plan, a federal loan
fund would be set up using
tax payers' money. After
graduation, students would
be required to pay back the
kwiby performing commu-
nity service or by reimburs-
ing the fund after finding a

Clinton's plan isexpen-
sive. The set-up costs will
likely be in the billions of
dollars. Clinton's biggest
problem could be raising the
funds.
Ross Perot's (I) plan is, at best, nonexist-
ent. Much like the rest of Perot's stands on is-
sues, there is nothing to consider as of vet. But in
his past record he has been very- influential in
changing education policies in Texas
During the mid-1930's, Perot led the fight to
persuade Texas football fans to adopt a "no pass,
no play" rule for high school athletes. He also
backed Governor Mark White's policv of compe-
tency testing for high school teachers. Perot also
campaigned to pass a bill giving the governor
control in appointing the state's school board
members.

The race for North Carolina's governor
Jim Hunt's (D) education record as governor from 1976 until 1984 was a strong one. His education plans do call for increased spending. In 1977, Hunt proposed a plan calling for a 65 percent increase in salary for university employees. Over 1980-81, the Governor budgeted $18.4 million for remedial programs at the elementary and high school levels. Hunt would like North Carolina's education statistics to speak for him. At the end of the Hunt Era, North Carolina ranked first in the nation in spending on higher education in relation to the percentage of total spending. Hunt spent 42.8 percent on state and kxral government spending toward education. Hunt also left North Carolina 10th in the nation in devotion to public schools.The race for North Carolina governor will play a more important role in the education of ECU students. Former Governor Jim Hunt is attempting to stand on his education record from his past two terms as governor. Lieutenant Governor Jim Gardner plans for drastic changes on some issues, which should cut state spending in areas.Jim Gardner (R) plans to cut waste spending in order to increase spending in education programs. Higher teacher pay, teacher tenure and smaller classroom sizes will all be paid for through "cutting the bureaucracy in Raleigh" Gardner's budget reform bill will ensure that the general assembly does not overestimate spending and be forced to make up for it with tax increases. Gardner would tike to see the N.C superintendent appointed by the state board of education. He also plans to allow parents more influence in their children's education. Under Gardner's plans, parents would choose where their children will attend school as well as what their busing situation would be. Profiles by Tony Rogers The East Carolinian

Alcohol cited as students' drug of choice
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writf
Drinking is the number one health
problem on college and university cam-
puses.
According to the Officeof Substance
Abuse Prevention (OSAP), between
240,000 and MQ,000 students will even-
tually lose their lives to drinking.
President Bush included alcohol in
the 1992 National Drug Control Strat-
egy, citing it as "the most abused sub-
stance by students
College students spend about $55
billion annually to purchase alcoholic
beverages, and alcohol consumption can
lead to dropouts, campus violence, risky
sexual encounters and death. Over half
of violent crimes are committed by per-
tons who have been drinking preceding
the crime.
According to a 1987 study, 285,000
serious crimes were committed on
America's campuses. In addition, there
were tens of thousands of incidents of
fighting rapes, vandalism and other acts
of violence that were never reported or
treated as crimes. A large proportion of
these were alcohol-related.
"Alcohol is our school's drug of
choice, and the number one addiction
substance said Dean of Students Dr.
Ronald Speier "We are not any different
from other colleges
Last year at ECU, four date rapes
involving alcohol were reported.
" Alcohol usually is involved in date
rape' said Lt. Keith Knox of ECU Public
Safety. "Date rape is usually set up
through alcohol
Last year at ECU, there were 35 li-
quor law violations, 43 disorderly con-
duct violations and 48 DWI's given on
campus.
"The majority of vandalism and dis-
orderly conduct violations involve alco-
hol Knox said. "Alcohol is the number
one contributor to all problems
Last year Greenville Police issued
104 DWI citations for people ages 18-24.
As of June 1992, Greenville Police have
arrested 22 people ages 18-24 for DWI
citations.
A majority of the tickets written for
students are underage drinking viola-
tions. A first-time offender of underage
drinking will receive a warning. A sec-
ond-time offender must visit a resident
hall counselor to see if he or she has an
alcohol problem. The third time a student
receives a warning, they are given a $25
ticket and must go to an alcohol abuse
class given on campus.
Some specific incidents of campus
alcohol abuse were cited in the OSAP
report
The father of an intoxicated 20-year-
old killed in a fall from a window of the
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity at Clemson
University is suing the university, the
l
fraternity and two downtown bars.
A student of the University of Mon-
tana in Missoula has been convicted in
the shooting deaths of two friends. Af-
ter travelling to a gravel pit to drink
beer, the youth shot his friends point
blank and then torched the car they had
ridden in.
Charges of rape against a Univer-
sity of Richmond student were dis-
missed last year when the victim testi-
fied that she was too drunk to know she
was being sexually assaulted and the
defendanttestifiedthathewassodrunk
that he did not realize at first that she
was not consenting.
A 1991 survey of high school se-
niorsandcollegestudents by Michigan's
Institute for Survey Research indicated
an increase in the number of "binge
drinkers (five or more drinks in a row)
and daily drinkers in the college-age
population.
One college study found that 15
percent of its undergraduates suffer
from alcohol-related injuries per year
and 29 percent had engaged in
"unplanned" sexual activity afterdrink-
ing.
Alcohol awareness programs are
frequently presented at ECU campus.
Some presentations actually have stu-
dents over 21 participating by drinking
and then performing skills tests. Thb
activity shows the students how quickly
alcohol affects a person.
t
Summer's celebration
Pholo by Dm
� hmemt
The Fourth of Jury found many students enjoying the femties at the town commons.
The fireworks finished just before the rain started.





2
She East(Darolintan
JllvS, 7992
marketing miracle
(C TS)�The rent is due, tuition
is late, mom and dad Mid the money
is in the mail, and vour checking
account is nearlv empty.
YOU may think you're leading
the life of a struggling student, but
to marketing firms and major cor-
porations, you represent a major
market � not only while you're in
school but as a savvy consumer
after you leave college.
College students, including
community colleges and four-year
publk and private institutions, rep-
resent I $30 billion market, indus-
trv figuMS show. There are an esti-
mated 13 million students nation-
wide, aixl each one has a monthly
disposable income of about $200 to
SAV, according to marketing firms.
Undergraduate students at
tour-year institutions have an esti-
mated $7 billion in discretionary
spending monev, said Stuart
Himmelfarb, with Roper College
Track in New York, and according
to Time magazine, higher educa-
tion represents a $100 billion busi-
ness, or 2.7 percent of the gross
national product
Traditionally, in a gixvl eco-
nomic period, corporation! looted
at students as people with income
potential when they graduated and
began to work, said Paul Tedeschi,
president of Collegiate Marketing,
a Boston-based college marketing
firm. Howerver, in a bad economy,
corporations market heavily to stu-
dents for immediate sales.
Big corporations already have
,i strong presence on campuses in
uch venues as research money. In
a new twist to raising money for
needed campus projects, Pepsi and
Penn State recently- signed a $14-
millionagmment to exclusively sell
Tepsi products Tnretum, the school
received revenue for buildings and
programs.
But many corporations are fo-
cusing on the students.
Consider Barnes & Noble Book-
stores, Inc. It leases and manages
250campus books tores nationwide,
including stores at Columbia Uni-
versity, Northwestern University,
Texas A&M and University of Ne-
vada-Las Vegas. Its presence may
not be known by most student or
academicians, but the company is
the largest campus bookstore op-
erator in the United States, in terms
of sales. Another large operator is
Follett, which is based in Chicago,
"ltbringsa sense of profession-
alism to bookstores, "Tedeschi said.
"And it guarantees revenue to the
college
It is estimated that campus
bookstores are a $6.5 billion indus-
try, and it is one that is growing
every year, said Steve Johnson, an
official with the National Associa-
tion of College Bookstores in
Oberlin, Ohio. More institutions are
contracting with institutions to
manage campus bookstores, he said.
'There is a trend toward a grow-
ing number of contract-managed
stores Johnson said. "Their pro-
posals can certainly be attractive
when they contact a school's ad-
ministration
Most companies agree to give a
negotiated percentage of sales back
to the school, which can then use
the money for academic programs,
scholarships and other needs, John-
son said.
�Burger King opened its first
campus restaurant this year at Indi-
ana State University atTerre Haute
and plans to open 10 more this su m-
mer, said spokesman Michael Har-
ris. Some of the restaurants will be
similar to a snack bar, and others
will be in kiosiks, he said. 'Cam-
puses are high-traffic areas, and,
basically, students have gtxxi de-
mographics for us he said
� Maryland-based Marriott
Management Services providescon-
tract food business to more than 400
college campuses, including restau-
rants, food courts, vending and ca-
tering.
�Barnes & Noble, in conjunc-
tion with Collegiate Marketing,
launched a festival this year that
travels to campuses for two-day
stints. The Campus America tour
has scheduled to go to 25 campuses
this fall,Tedeschi said,and will pro-
mote 12 companies, including
Barnes & Noble, Reebok, Citibank,
American Express and Marvel
Comics.
The firms have giveaways and
activities for students, so the stu-
dents have a bit of fun and get to
walk away with something; the
companies get exposure not only
for immediate sales, but for name
recognition and sales when the stu-
dents enter the work force after
graduation.
Eric Weil, editor of Collegiate
Trends, a journal that tracks college
marketing, said advertisers spent
about $150 million last year to reach
college students, which he said is
not a lot of money, considering the
market that this niche represents.
He said there are about 50 gen-
eral and specialty magazines tar-
geted for the college students are
making similar purchasing deci-
sions that working adults are.
"Many household marketers
fail to recognize that college stu-
dents are making household pur-
chase decisions just like anyone
else Himmelfarb said.
Every Thurday
College Night
w Admission
before 10 jm
ATTIC
758-7303
5th St
1 very Sunday
SUMMER
DANCE
MADNESS '9;
Veeliwsdav, Jul X
ggnUy with Robert York& TerrvDadd ,c3�dt
ZONE Special Guest
VICTOR HUDSON
ZONE
Thursday. July f
CHICKEN WIRE GANG
99 32 oi Draft � 99c ADMISSION � 99 Highballs
before 10 pm
Friday. Julv 10
Cold Sweat
Rockm' Rhythm and Blues
$2 2 M lrufi
SaturdayI uly 11
Classic Rock
S: )2oj Draft
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
C.reenville NC 8:30-3:30
rrNDJANS1
INDIANS
vs.
Frederick Keys
GAME TIME 7:00 PM
1-800-334-5467
$1.00 J
ADMISSION a
Thursday Night
.TdTans
vs.
Frederick Keys
I GAME TIME 7:00 PM
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
189� SEAFOOD
ECU SPECIAL
THIRSTY THURSDAY
75c for all 12 oz. beverages
JULY
8&
REDISCOVERS
FOSDICK'S
See our
coupon on
page 5
On behalf of The East Carolinian,
Good Luck to John Paige who's "Going to California.
tBudweteer
OiWHT OrWSr
The Amphitheatre At Carowinds
ONLY CAROUNAS APPEARANCE!
IN CONCERT
ON SALE NOW! ONDf
Aquarium Rescue Unit, Beta Fleck,
Blues Traveler Spin Doctors & Widespread Panic
Saturday, August 8 at 4:00 pm
THURSDAY
JULY 9
9-11 p.m.
ECU Central Campus Mall
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Concerts Committee.
WATERMELON
F EAST
���
IVJ'ioo icM �"�� 0O �rk oaatanaa lav
704-522-6500 nvMM, ,OI nK)�,
information call 800 87? ?
f�l ?6?8
wnfri
i�. ,Hi �o Boor- t
fim �"9t"r � w vent
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Call ?0� S?' 9650
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15
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ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
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04 h88 ?600 MWIll
Sponsored by tho ECU Studont Union Production Committoe
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
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locations in town. Carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
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hookups. Now taking applica-
tions for FalL Call 752915.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: 2bedroorn apt 11 2
bath 'onsmoker.$180moplus
12 utilities, dose to campus.
On ECU bus route. Furnished,
SUMMER RATES'
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M '� I ' " �
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No Ma or TTffm I rotm
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August for Fall
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Announcements
STUDENT SERVICES
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are
interested in becoming personal
care attendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers and tutors.
PastexpeneTxeisdesiredbutnot
required Applications will taken
tor employment tor fall semes-
ter, 1992 and spring semester,
1993. If interested, contact:
HAXDICAPPFJ
Brewster A-l 14 q
6799 or 757-72
CATHOLIC
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The Newman c
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with them. Sa
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fiL pEffES i E 4 ti c 9 in
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aw
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HMWHIMnH





She �nat(�arultnian
July 8. 1992
Students represent marketing miracle
(CPS) Iherentisdue tuition
is late momami dad said he manes
is in the mail, and your checking
account is nearly empt)
You may think you're leading
the lite of a struggling student but
to marketing firms and major cor
notations, you represent a major
market not only while you're in
school but as a saw) consumei
after you lease college
( ollege students including
communit) colleges .n.1 four-year
publk .m�.1 pri ate institutions rep
resent a $30 billion market, indus
try figures show rhere are an esti-
mated 13 million students nation
wide .mil each one has ,1 month!)
disposable Bcome ot about S2iH to
$300 according to marketing firms.
Undergraduate students at
four-year institution- have an esti
n-wihi S billion in discretionary
��nending money said Stuart
Himmeltarb with Roper College
1 tack in New i ork and according
to Time magazine, higher educa-
tion represents a SHX1 billion bust
mss, or 2.7 percent of the gross
national product
lraditionallv in a gixni eco-
nomic period, corporations looked
at students as people with income
p tential when the graduated and
began to work said Paul redeschi,
president ot Collegiate Marketing,
a Boston based college marketing
tum.Howerver; in a bad economy,
corporations market heavily to stu-
dents for immediate sates
Big corporations already have
a strong presence on vampusos m
such venues as resean h money. In
a new twist to raising money tor
needed. ampus projects, Pepsi ami
Penn State recently signed a $14-
million agreement fcex lush elv soil
)si products In return, theschool
�psip
received revenue for buildings ami
programs.
But manv corporations are fo-
cusing on the students.
C onsider Barnes & Noble Book-
stores, lnc It leases ami manages
2Wt.impus bookstores nationwide,
including stores at C olumbia Uni-
versity, Northwestern University,
Texas A&M and University of Ne-
vada Las Vegas Us. presence may
not be known bv most student or
academicians, but the company is
the largest campus hwkstore op-
erator in the United States, in terms
of sales Another large operator is
I'ollett, which is based in Chicago.
It brings a sense of profession-
alism to h(XkstnresTedeschi said
And it guarantees revenue to the
college
It is estimated that campus
bookstores are a $6J3 billion indus
try, and it is one that is growing
every year, said Steve lohnson, an
official with the National Assmia-
tion of College Bookstores in
Oberlin,Ohio. More institutions are
contracting with institutions to
rmimgecampusrxxkstjores,hesud.
"Then us a trend toward a gn w-
ing number of contract-managed
stores lohnson said. "Their pro-
posals can certainly be attractive
when thev contact SChooTs ad-
ministration
Most companies agree to give a
negotiated percentage of sales back
to the schixil, which can then use
tin' money for academic programs,
scholarships and other needs, John-
son said.
�Burger King opened its first
campus restaurant this year at Indi-
ana State University at Terre I laute
and plans toopen lOmorethissum-
mer, said spokesman Michael I lar-
ns. Some of the restaurants will be
similar to a sn.uk bar, and others
will be in kiosiks, he said ' am-
puses are high-traffic areas, and,
basically, students have gin1 de-
mographics for us he s.ud
� Marvland-based Marriott
ManagementServK es pro ides( on-
tractfood business to more than 4tM
collegecampuses, including restau -
rants, fixxi courts, vending and ca-
tering.
� Barnes & Noble, in conjunc-
tion with Collegiate Marketing.
launched a festival this year that
travels to campuses tor two-da)
stints. The Campus America tour
has scheduled to go to25 campuses
this fall,Tedeschi said, and will pro
mote 12 companies, including
Barnes & Noble, Reebok,ltibank,
American Express and Marvel
Comics.
The firms have giveau a) S and
activities tor students so the stu-
dents have a bit ot fun and get to
alk away with something; the
companies get exposun- not onlv
for immediate sales, but tor name
nvognition and sales w hen the stu-
dents enter the work tone alter
gTaduatron.
Eric Weil, editor otoltegiate
1 rends, a journal that tr.u ks college
marketing, said advertiser, spent
about$150miUionlastyeartorea �
college students, which he said is
not a lot of money, considering the
market that this niche represents
He said there are abt ut gen-
eral and specialty magazines tar-
geted for the college students are
nuking similar purchasing d
sums that working adults are
"Manv household marketers
tail to recognize that college
dents an making household pur-
chase decisions ust like anyone
dse Himmeltarb said
Everyjhurda)
(222)
Admission
ATTIC
759-7103 109 I. 5th St
Wednesday. July 8
vl'i Sinul.n
The . with Robert York& Terry Dadd r �e
COMedT
ZONE Special Guest
VICTOR HUDSON
CoMedY
"ZONE
Thursday. July 9
: i v K bj c
TT
3ANG
. �lr.iii 9H ADMISSION � 99�Highba!
Friday. July 10
Cold Sweat
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & CaunseSng
Carolina Pregnancy Center
1 1 1 i 3rd Strict Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 rVfonda - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD

andBlues
Saturday. July II
7H-
L
Mil
KINST0N INDIANS
INDIANS
vs.
Frederick Keys
GAME TIME 7:00 PM
1-800-334-5467
3100 M
.fcit
i. '
S3
ADMISSION
Thursday Night
ECU SPECIAL �rinviiNDiANS
THIRSTY THURSDAY
'5c tor all 12 oz. beverages
JULY
8&
vs.
Frederick Keys
GAME TIME 7:00 PM
REDISCOVER)
FOSDICRS
See our
coupon on
page 5
r-jis
On behalf of The East Carolinian,
Good Luck to John Paige who's "Going to California
N CONCERT
jBudweisera
The Amphitheatre At Carowinds
ONLY CAROLINAS APPEARANCE!
ON SALE NOW! 0N1Y
Aquarium Rescue Unit. Bela Fleck,
Blues Traveler Spin Doctors & Widespread Panic
THURSDAY
JULY 9
9-11 p.m.
ECU Central Campus Mall
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Concerts Committee.
al
Saturday, August 8 at 4:00 pm
gjurnw
Charge by phone
I 04 5?? 6500
11 a
,711415 7 '070
-OUXEI
AMmdt
� -

n� Charlettf CtenifT
WATERMELON
FEAST
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15
12:30 P.M2 P.M.
ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
�Cawnds $8 Concert Club ����
Carowmds Season Pass Holders can purchase tickets to all Paladium concerts and events lor only J8
for information on purchasing a Carowmds Season Pass call 704-588-2600
Jtvntft
nun
fcttz
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Productions Committee
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KI(,S ARMS PART- a
MENTS
� .�
� WANTED
and � . .
hod
til H �
FEMALE ROOMMATI WOULD Y
hJEEDET.2b � - -
� -

IMVKKMh M'XKIMKVIN
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�bc Cast Carolinian
July8. 1992
� gum
marketing miracle
( PS) rherenl isdue tuition
is late momand dad said the mane)
i- o the mail .n. youi checking
account is nearh empt)
You ma think vou re leading
life of a struggling student hut
to marketing tums and majoi coi
porations you represent a majot
�wtrkft notonl) whileyou rein
school hut as a savv) consumer
after 'Hi leave college
College students, including
. immunity colleges and four-yeai
iblk and pri ate institutions, rep
resent i $30 billion market, tndus
� h, rhere arc an esti
A ted 1 million Students nation
wide and iu h one ha- a monthl)
disposable income of about $200 to
io accordingtnmarketingfinns
I ndergraduate students at
,ir veai institutions have an osti
iatei1 $7 billion in discretionan
pending mone said Stuart
Himmelfarb with Roper c ollege
rack in New ork and according
hi rime magazine higher educa
tu-n represents a UH) billion busi
ness 01 2.7 percent of the ;rpss
national prinlui t
iraditionalK in a good eCO
nom� period, corporations looked
at students as people with income
potential when the praduatedand
began to work said Paul redeschi,
president of t ollegiate Marketing,
a Boston based college marketing
firm.l lowerver; in a bad economy,
corporations market hea ily to stu-
dents tor immediate sale
Big corporations alread) ha e
,1 strong presence on campuses in
iucb venues as research money, in
a new rwisl to rai 'ing money for
needed campus proje ts, Pepsi and
Perm State recenth signed a $14
millkm agreement toex lustveh sell
Pepsiprodu ts In return, theschool
rei �m ii revenue for buildings and
programs.
hut many corporations are fo-
i using on the students.
C onsiiicrlarnfS(l'obleBxk-
stores, Inc. It leasts and manage
! 0 ampus bookstores iiationwide,
iih luding ston-s at Columbia Uni-
versity, Northwestern University,
lexas r&M and University of Ne
,ui.i Las Vegas Its presenn may
not bo known bv most student or
academk ians, but the company is
the largest campus Nxkstore op-
orator in the United States, in terms
of sales. Another I a re operator is
Follett, whk h is based in Chicago.
"Hbringsa sense of profession
alism to bookstores redeschisaid
And it guarantees revenue to the
college
It is estimated that campus
bookstores are a $6 5 billion Indus
try and it is one that is growing
every year, said Steve lohnson, an
official with the National Associa-
tion of College Bookstores m
Oberiin, Ohio .More institutions, ire
contracting with institutions to
rrv�nav;et ampus h oksb rt"s, hesaid
"Ihereisatrond toward a grow-
ing number of cortfract-managed
stores Johnson said. "Their pro-
posals can certainly be attractive
when they contact a school's ad-
ministration
Most companies agree ti�gi e a
negotiated pen ent,ge of sales back
to the school, which can then use
the money for academic programs,
m holarships and other needs, John-
son said.
�burger King opened its tirst
campus restaurant this year at Indi-
ana State University at Jerre 1 iaute
and plans toopen lOmorethissum-
mer, said spokesman Michael I lar-
ris Some of the restaurants will be
similar to a sn.uk bar, and thers
will he in kh'siks, he said l am
puses are high-traffk ana- and,
basically, students have goixi de-
mographics tor us he said
�Maryland-based Marriott
ManagemontNTYHtja- ividescon
tract food business to rr I '
coUegecampuses, including restau-
rants, fixd courts, vending and a
tering.
�Barnes & Noble, in conjurw
tion with C ollegiate Marketing,
launched a festival this year mat
travels to campuses tor two-da)
stints Ihe Campus America tour
has heduled to goto25 campuses
this tall, Iedes hi said, and will pro-
mote 12 companies, including
Barnes & Noble, Reeb , I itibank,
American Express and Marvel
( omi s
The firms have giveaway
activities tor -indents so the stu-
dents have a bit of fu ! gel to
klk away with something. rJ
companies get exposun
tor immediate sales, but tor nat
recognition and sales when the stu-
dents enter the work force ai
graduation
Erk Weil edit r I
I rends a journal that tra kscolk
marketing, said advertisers spi
about $150 million last year ti rea
college students, whk h he said
not a lot of money, con
market that this niche n
He said thereareab ul 50gen-
eral and spe ialty mag � tar-
geted for the college
making similar pun ha
sions tii.it working
"Many household
fail to re se thai
dents are making houseto ild ;
(hase dei isii ms just I -
farbsaid
ATTIC
ten lfiurda "�:
it tirnission
Wednesday. July 8
The With Robert York& Terry Dadd rfS,Y
ZONE Spa i � ' VICTOR HUDSON! ZONE
i
I ilt
Thursday, July 9
99i ADMISSION �
Friday, July 10
Cold Sweat
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & (lonfidential
Services c Counsefing
Carolina Pregnanc) Center
111 E. 3rd Strict Hours:
"he Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Fridaj
irci n illc N(
8:30-3:30
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
I890 SEAFOOD
KINSTdN'INDIANS

� � .
Saturday, July 11


jm
INDIANS
vs
Fredenck Keys
GAME TIME 7.00 PM
1-800-334-5467
$1.00
'
ADMISSION ��J
Thursday Night
ECU SPECIAL ��1nd7ans '
THIRSTY THURSDAY
� ; � . 12 oz. beverages
JULY
8&
VS.
Frederick Keys
GAME TIME 7:00 PM
REDISCOVER
FOSDICRS
See our
coupon on
page 5

On behalf of The East Carolinian,
Good Luck to John Paige who's 'Going to California
Budw
I
IN CONCERT
The Amphitheatre At Carowinds
ONLY CAROLINAS APPEARANCE!
ON SALE NOW! ONH
Aquarium Rescue Unit, Beta Fleck,
Blues Traveler Spin Doctors & Widespread Panic
Saturday, August 8 at 4:00 pm
THURSDAY
JULY 9
9-11 p.m.
ECU Central Campus Mall
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Concerts Committee.
�81
WATERMELON
FEAST
fi AmTmt
Charge liy phone
I rot ?? Bfioo
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For information on purchasing a Carowinds Season Pass call 704-588-2600.
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ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL

Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Productions Committee.
FOR RENT
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liini I iiiiiinBi
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Announcement
STL




v. 1��
�'


tor 1Q
i
IF YOU 1 II
CAN T mi
TELL JWI
Art Chick
'V �
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.
UK) �r-jo n -(�ps ���: I MO � "�"
94fa.s s . umtuo - � ��� n THIS M t MI
I





tirade
and others
id C'am-
areas ffld,
e civh.1 de-
said
�d Marriott
ti' idescon-
re than 4X)
idingrestau-
I and ca-
Marketmg,
l- war that
day
ica tour
I tmpuses
� w ill pro-
including
. v � bank,
i id Marvel
ind
so the stu-
Classifieds
�tlt Eaat (Earoltntan
JULY 8, 1992
CD
dents have a bit of tun and get to
walk away with something; the
companies get exposure not only
tor immediate sales, but for name
n ogmtion and sales when the stu-
dents enter the work force after
graduation.
Eric Weil, editor of Collegiate
Trends a ournal that tracks college
marketing, said advertisers spent
about $150 million last year to reach
college students, which he said is
not a lot of money, considering the
market that this niche represents.
He slid there are about 50 gen-
eral and specialty magazines tar-
geted for the college students are
nviking similar purchasing deci-
sions that working adults are.
Main household marketers
fail to recognize that college stu-
dents are making household pur-
chase decisions just like anyone
else Himmelfarb said.
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
gl
EDISCOVEtf
FOSDICK'S
See our
coupon on
page 5
lOK RIM
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS1 and 2bedroom apart-
ments. Energy-efficient, several
locations in town. Carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups. Now taking applica-
tions for Fall Call 752-8915.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: 2bedroom apt 112
bathNonsmoker.$180moplus
12 utilities, dose to campus.
On ECU bus route. Furnished,
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES!
A Beautiful Place lo U�e
� AllNisv
� And Ready lo Rrnl �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
M�E- hi) Street
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United Oner S3K a month
Contact J.T or Tomnrv WiUJama
7J6-7�15orSXMvV7
Office Opro Apt 112-5 Morn
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Clean an quiet one bedroom furnished apartments, en-
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cable TV Couples or unites only $240 a month. 6
month tease MOBIL HOME RENTALS-couptes or
staglrs Apartment and mobile homes in Antes Gardens
near Brook Valary Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
I OR RIM
wd, dw. Avail Aug. 1st Call
321-O977or 757-2489 (leave mes-
sage).
WANTED. Roommate for Fall
Semester to share a fully fur-
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cessriearby.CallTimat758-5207.
WOULD YOU LIKE TO LIVE
in a nice house near the univer-
sity? Female housemate wanted
immediately. Lovely home on
HarxlingStreet Central Air,dish-
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l2utilities.Call 551-2261 (days)
or 752-9685 (evenings) Ask for
Pat
WANTED 2 male roommates.
Furnished bedroom with bath-
room, ECU bus access, available
August for Fall Semester, 175
rnon,inclsutilities.Call321-1848.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2br apt w2
other giris.OwnroorrL Rent$124
mo plus 13 utilities. Avail July
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15. Call Beth 75&6729. Leave
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FORRENT: Availableinjuneor
Julyoreartitwobedroomapart-
ments, located 412 miles West
of the hospital on Stantonsburg
Road. Quiet location, great for
graduatestudents.Pleasecall756-
4587 and leave message.
I OK S A LI
SEIZED CARS trucks, boats,
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THREE FREE CONDOMS!
Special introduction toour wide
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Order today! KBA, Box 13001,
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FOR SALE: 1991 Kawasaki EX
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FOR S l I
FOR SALE: Jamis Women's
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Must sell! $100 Call 752-2427.
CRUISE 7day6nightFt Lau-
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Vacation 2 tickets for $250. Call
75f4430.
HI FPU AM ID
Announcements
STUDENT SERVICES
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are
interested in becoming personal
care attendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers and tutors.
Pastexperierceisdesiredbutnot
required Applications will taken
for employment for fall semes-
ter, 1992 and spring semester,
1993. If interested, contact:
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free 1-800467-5566 ext
5920.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR-
DMG: Earn $2J00month and
world travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.) Holiday,
summer and career employ-
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gram call 1-206-545-4155 ext
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ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT: Fisheries. Earn
$5,000month. Free transpor-
tation! Room & board! Over
8,000 openings. No experience
necessary. Maie or Female. For
employment program call Stu-
dent toployment Services at 1-
206-5454155 ext 1649.
Ill IF W Will)
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext P-3712
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers
and cruiseships. Students also
needed Christmas, Spring, and
Summer for amusement park
employmentCall(800)338-3388
extF-3464.
STUDENTS FOR PART-
TIME employment with ECU
TransitSystem. Flexible hours
good pay. 7574724 or visitSGA
office.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error-free, quick
and dependable at reason-
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and proofreading skills
(grammar, punctuation, sen-
tence structure, etc.) Call
Pauline at 757-3693.
PERSONALS
WORDPROCESSING:
Resume term papers, the-
sis, psychological assess-
ments. Fast service, rea-
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2522.
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSO-
PHERMUSICIAN AND
POETIC SOUL seeks
friendship and correspon-
dence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to
MV PO Box 8663, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
GOING TO NAGS HEAD
THIS WEEKEND? I
would love a ride and will
chip in for gas. Call 931-
7750 and ask for Chantal!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
HANDICAPPED SERVICES
Brewster A-l 14 or A-l 16 at 757-
6799 or 757-6729.
CATHOLIC STUDENT
�EMER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship
with them. Sunday Masses:
11:30am & 8:30pm at the
NewmanCenter, 953 E 10th St
Greenville. Weekdays:
8am at the Newman Cen-
ter.
BISEXUALGAY-LESBIAN
ALLIANCE
Social support, activism and ac-
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people welcome. Call 757-6766
tTOmll:15-1230Mon-Thurs.for
information on time and place.
IBOOKTRADEK1
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Parking at complex
Short term leases
On-site resident manager
"S
Professionally managed by: REMCO EAST, INC.
1807 S. Charles Blvd. 355-1313





Maxwell's Silver Hammer
5HjE 3Ea0t (Enr0lttttan Fundamental freedoms taken away
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, Nnvs Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. Ncus Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Apam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bui lard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
The Fast Cawlmian has served the Fast Carolina campus community since 192.S, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes OHM a week with a circulation of 5.000. The masthead
editonal in each edition is the opinion of the Kditonal Board. Ihe Fast Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view I ettcrs should be limited to ISO words or less For purposes of decency and brevity. The Fast Carolinian reserves the
nght toedit or reject letters for publication I otters should be addressed lo The Editor, 7V Fast Carolinian. Publications Dldg .
ECU, Greenville. N.C 27134331 For more information, call (')) 7S7-Mnfi
Opinion
Page 4. July 8, 1992
Have patience with new freshmen
The three of them stand in the sh.idr of the
tree? in front of lovner Library. To ignore them
is impossible
Mom, D.td, and lohnny Freshman
Once again, droves of bewildered Incom-
ing freshmen have raided the ECU campus.
Thev carry with them the weight of unfamiliar
procedures, places and people. Orientation is
their goal and taking test after test and Standing
in line after line is their medium
But, to the untrained eye, some mav find it
hard to distinguish between these incoming
students and the rest of our fellow collegians
Here are three simple rules-of-thumb for spot
tmg orientation neophytes:
1) Watch for women carrying pocketbooks
The seasoned student knows there is no use for
&mm otwics, 1992. &wtion
a pocketbook on campus Back packs do the job
2) Look for any youngster followed closely
hv Mom and Dad. ECU professionals learn
quickly that it is not cool to hang out with
parents.
3) Check for the multiple-ECU-
paraphenalia-svndrome Any individual wear-
ing three or more ECU garments are sure to be
rookies of campus life.
Sure, they are all easy to spot, and at times
we may become annoyed by the continual ques-
tion: "How do I get to Spilman?" But, these
SOOn-tO-be freshman, will transcend into the
sparkling future of the school.
So, give them all some respect, try to keep
vour patience about vou,and remember that we
have all been there before
As we all know, blacks sometimes
say things that many other Americans
ckin't like Gmsequaitly, I propose that
the folkiwmg rvstncUons be placed on
blacks' speech
First if a black person wishes tnsw
anything publicly, a police officer should
inform him of thepnbableansecruences
at his statement by reading a set speech
prepared by the state legislature The po-
lice officer shoukl then suggest alterna-
tive, less offensive statements
Second: having been informed of
the probable consequences of his speech,
the black penon in quarttal should then
have to wait one hill day before making
his statement This is merely a axling-off
period, so we can tie sure the Mac k per m
wiTi't say anything rash
Third the proper authorities
should keep detailed records of every-
thing the Mack person siys � records
which may of course be rvleas�d to the
public at any lime
iNk te that none of these restrictxTis
prevents any black person from saying
anything he wants to say They're just
desigiied to nyulate sjuwh, not to pre-
vent it Whiff m re, such regulate MM
1 Iwirlv naCMMfV, MiKebLxksotten make
iH-ttwxsidered comments which they later
regret
Now, for the benefit of the irony
impaired: the preceding u�s irony No
(Tie � especially not I would ever
propose such restrictions with a straight
face, in part becauseour country properly
does not alkrw the populace to vote to
restrict the constitutionally protected
nghtsofasegmentofthepopulatKm Not
unless they want tr amend the Omstiru-
rjon,anyway,suchr�srnctionswouJd cer-
tainly never be permitted if imposed at
any lower level.
But the Supreme Court has rust
heJd that al most exactly those restrictions
may be placed on another nght it deems
fundamental the nght to have an abor-
tion
It's a ludicrous decision One can-
not simultaneously maintain that abor-
tion is a nght and that the nght is subject
to such extensive regulation by the states
Not unless other nghts are in for the same
degree of "regulation" � in which case
I'm leaving the country
Another deeply troubling aspect
of the court's ruling is its relocatxri of the
burden of pnxf Typically, in order to
interfere with a fundamental nght, the
KiTvemment must prove that it has an
overriding reastTi to restrict the nght For
instance, if I state wishes to limit free
speech, it must prove that the benefits of
the restriction tar outweigh the costs
The new "undue burden" stan-
dard rums that around, at least when it
aunestoabortnin Theatienvvhtsentfits
aretrampledcinhaskipn'vethattheaBts
of the restriction outweigh the benefits
It's as if the government amid
specify that votmgtx �ths w m id be open
cnly from Sam ki H-05 am in voting
day, and you had to prove m court that
you couldn't ma lie it at that time
Further, thepatemalis.nexpesfied
m the rulmg is maddening Wntmg for
the majonty, Ju.sticesO'G mnor, Kennedy
and Souter wrote, m part, "Though the
woman has a nght bo chc x se h terminate
or antrnue her pregnancy before viabil-
ity, it does not at all folk rw thai the state is
prohibited from taking steps to ensure
that this choice is thoughtful and in-
formed "
In other wc�rds, you may have �
nght to ha ve an abortion, but the sta te ha s
a nght to keep you from having it while
they tell you what a bad decision you're
making That's the essence of (Tie of the
restrictions upheld by the court, and it's
perfectly insulting
People sometimes buy airs they
shouldn't buy They place bets they
shouldn't place They say things they
shouldn't say But it would be absurd to
mvorvethegovemment in every'choiot .
person makes, simply because he may
make the wrong choice People have a
nghttomakemisrakes(and,T�ehoiiesi
learn from them) without the
government's participation
Anti-choice activists sometimes
claim that, all other cons idem h( ms asni
for was had law That may be true But it
Rir was had law, this is m rse
A View From Above
Remember, humans are animals too
By T. Scott
Batchelor
Fditorul ("olumnirt
Walk's Words
Media has become fourth branch
By J.William
Walker
Editorial Columnist
Good evening and welcome to
NCC news The president today used
three band-aids when hecut his hand
on a razor blade In Iraq today the
sheik Mohammed Al-Akbad du
Franahama sued People magazine
over allegations of slander against his
pet elephant In Oklahoma today, Fred
and Ethyl Srevensteve broke the world
record in marathon horseshoe pitch-
ing with 212 hours of straight pitch-
ing When asked about her marvelous
pitching phenomenon. Ethyl said "I'm
tired " And that's the news for this
Wednesday Stay tuned for more NCC
news at Eleven
The media is the fourth branch
of the government They feed the
masses with information on some of
the most useless topics The 'V2 presi-
dential campaign has been cluttered
with some prime examples Bill
Clinton, for instance, was asked nu-
menmsquestionsconcerning possible
(but not probable) adultery, draft
dodging, and marijuana smoking
(withoutinhaling) Noneoftheseques-
tions have anything to do with his
effectiveness as a leader
The scary thing is that portions
of the American public would rather
hea r about these worthless topics than
they would about Clinton's plans or
ideas ToloeQ Public,scamsofadul-
tery and drugs are much more entic-
ing. Mr Public can't even understand
some of the concepts on which the real
issues are based
Obviously, the media agrees
with me because they've noticed this
weak side of Americana, and have
capitalized on it The news today is
similar to daytime drama Every once
in a while a new character like Perot's
inability as a leaderor LA riots comes
onto the show, and people eat it up,
for a while. Then, that character gets
boring to Mr. Public, and the media
stops covenng it
The media gives us what sells
Stones of divorce and drugs are more
entertaining and better suited for tele-
vision than are stories of referendums
and House legislation. The problem
with the people is we allow them to
get away with it Nobody seems ready
to demand an answer to the questions
that really matter People are more
concerned with the Bush's dinner
menu for the fourth of July than they
are about who is being held account-
able for writing bad checks and what
legal action is not being taken.
With all of this muckraking
comesonlyone thing-more muckrak-
ing. The media has the American pub-
lic believing that ridiculous stories
concerning adultery and drug use are
more important man the real issues.
Not since this campaign began have
we een any deba te on the issues much
less any real talk about what the issues
signify
We now know all about the skel-
etons in Bill Clinton and Ross Perot's
closets, but we don't know what ei-
ther of them plan to do about the
deficit
And mat's the way JoeQ. Public
likes it He doesn't want stale charac-
ters on his six 'o clock soap opera, he
wants the latest, trashiest, tasteless,
prying, supermarket ragweed tabloid
info on the contents of George Bush's
garbage
Think of the impact of this prob-
lem We could conceivably elect a
president this November that has not
even addressed the issues confront-
ing America. As long as he is "elect-
able" and has a clean record, he's eli-
gible.
The simple fact is whether or
not Joe Politician smoked pot, screwed
his neighbor or spat on his mother
doesn't tell us anything about Mr.
Politician'sabilityasa leader. The heart
of the issues is being grossly ignored.
What about ol' King George?
There's no muckraking going on at
the oval office. Somehow, I have a
feeling that the Texas oil man has a
few dusty incidents from the past that
are being most graciously looked over.
But, that just goes to show that truly
the media is the fourth branch of the
government.
A few years ago syndicated id
umnist Lewis Cnzard. of whom lam
a loyal fan, underwent delicate sur-
gery to replace a heart valve that had
gonesour Cnardcamethrough the
operation awith flying colors and was
soon at his manual typewnter again,
banging out distilled bits of wisdom
and wit
Not onceduring this wholepro-
cedurv did I see any news hxtage of
animal rights activists protesting
CriZZafti'l operation, despite the fact
that his replacement heart valve came
from a pig
Now, fast forward to just last
week, to the University of Pittsburgh,
where a 3? year old man, (whom we'll
call John), dying from liver failure,
bravely agreed to be the first recipient
of a transplanted baboon liver
Remember Grizzard and his
pig? No protesters there But, you go
messing with a baboon, and brother
you've got tmuble!
Less than 4 hours after John's
operation, a legion of sign-carrying
zealots hit the sidewalk outside the
hospital where fie lay struggling tor
his life They picketed and shouted
and proclaimed that animals were not
to be used for spare parts for humans
Animals have rights, they said, and
are not here for us to abuse
Watching this vulgar display of
localized ignorance, (and seriously re-
considering the value of the first
amendment to the Constitution), I re-
alized that the only animal this group
didn't care about was Homo Sarirrt
The extreme insensitivity of the
protest was appalling To stage the
demonstration ust outside John's hos-
pital must have taken a remarkable
amount of callousness, not to mention
an equally remarkable lack of intel-
lect
1 can sympathize , at least on a
limited level, with John Last night ,1
was invaded with a nasty little virus
As I sit writing this column, I have a
fever of over 101 degrees 1 am expen-
encmg stomach cramps that must be
close to duplicating labor pains, and I
have 10 make a conscious effort not to
show everybody what 1 ate for break-
fast this morning And this is most
assuredly only a small fraction of the
pain and the complications a person
dying of liver failure goes though I
say bring m the baboon
Animals have no rights save
those we humans grant them We de-
cide what is ethical or not m our scien-
tific and medical dealings with other
creatures In so doing we have to be
careful that we don't confuse a dog or
a cat or a baboon with a human being
Our use of animals is dictated
by human need, always has been, al-
ways will be The same people who
protest the use of animal organs to
save human lives no doubt share the
same mentality of those who vandal-
ize fur coats, and who eschew eating
meat
While reducing the intake of
certain fatty meats does make good
health sense, ruling out meat alto-
gether ignores the fad that humans
are omnivorous, feeding on both ani-
mal and vegetable substances If you
s.iv it is wrong for humans to eat meat
you must flay the same for lions, bears,
eagles, and myriad .ther omnivores
and carnivores on the planet
As for the use of animal furs
and hides as clothing, a quick glance
at the history of man will reveal that
we have been doing this for thou-
sands of years
American Indians were mas-
ters of utilizing almost every part of
the animals they hunted, including
thehides, meat, and bones, yet 1 doubt
anyone would criticize them for this
practice
I agree that there are some in-
stances of animal use that border on
senseless abuse Testing a perfume's
reactivity by spraying it directly in to a
rabbit's eyes is an action nx'ted in
vanity, and as such, stretches most
ethical boundanes
On the balance, however, the
large maiority of experimentation
with, and medical uses of, animals is
highly beneficial to the human race
Getting back to the protesters,
and those m this column's readership
who share their philosophy, they may
see a happy end to their activist ef-
forts For it seems that other baboon
organs have been transplanted to hu-
mans in 33 operations since lsX)5�
and all of them have failed
Good Luck, John

PRrSTs
IS
Q
PARK

v
feDoV Of GVllE
reetXM OrrjXffaSSlOKf
Letters To The Editor
Is it too much
to ask?
To the Editor:
There is no question Pitt
County needs an ordinance to
regulate and control the devel-
opment and operation of shoot-
ing ranges At present, a shoot-
ing range may be located any-
where in Pitt County, next to a
school, a day care facility, or a
neighborhood. Our county is
growing and becoming more
densely populated As well, the
number of shooting ranges is
growing.
Given the hazards associ-
ated with .shooting ranges, we
can not allow them to be devel-
oped and operated without any
supervision. We as a county must
ensure they are developed and
operated safely, without being a
nuisance, environmentally re-
sponsible, and with consider-
ation for surrounding property
owners. Otherwise we are
doomed to repeat the mistakes
of other North Carolina counties.
We do not need a death lite
' i
Michele Sexton in Carrowinds or
a hazardous waste site like ths
Sir Walter Gun Club.
Every United States citizen
has the right to own and shoot a
firearm. But with that right
comes a responsibility to ensure
other's rights are not infringed
upon. Is it too much to ask Pitt
County shooting ranges to fol-
low nationally recognized safety
standards? Is it too much to ask
that these ranges be located in
less densely populated areas
away from neighborhoods? And
is it too much to require safety
zones, fencing and signs o iden-
tify the ranges?
Pitt County is in the final
stages of enacting a shooting
range ordinance to protect Pitt
County citizens while allowing
safe responsible shooting. But
there is one enhancement needed
in the proposed ordinance. To be
fair, this ordinance should require ex-
isting ranges to meet the same mini-
mum standards as a new range. We
hope the county will take quick action
to enact this ordinance.
David Moore
Ayden. N.C. I
Entertainment
Material Issue s latest album Destination Universe p
to cut an album Their 13-track endeavor falls asleet
Material Issue b
By Mark Brett
Staff Wnter
Contra to the beliefs of some,
love s� trigs are n t a festering hoi I � n
the ass of rink musk. Interesting
things can bo done v ith them, de-
spite the fact that even- band on
Earth has done ne. The reason that
most k we St ns smel l is that thev're
easy to write. Any song writer wor-
thv of the title can crank one out in
his sleep. No effort equals no qual-
ity, and the world is left with a unk
heap of crappv music.
That's where Material issue
comes in. Their newest release
tinahon Lm?pers?,ischock-fullofbad
songs about line. The music i- so
stale it could have been done by any
bad altv band in the last 10 years,
and theIvricsareonlvslightlv above
the level of Wilson Phillips Weigh-
ing in at 13 song- (ind 43 minutes,
the album is a lightweight effort all
the way around. Hopefully, Desa
nation Universe will skip lightly
along to an early, painful death.
Until then, the public should be
made aware oi how unbelievably
lame this album is. In the interest of
fairness, however, the three mcxier-
atelv decent tracks should be trot-
ted out for examination.
The first of these is the first
single, "What Girls Want" Aside
from being a little sexist, this is a fun
tune. With powerful, shouting vo-
cals hung over a truly infectious
guitar h(ok, this song rises above
nd de
status I .i
chorus like mis
lips just like 1
art's haii
stagger?
The ' �
Destinai nUi
Lonely Man i
grungv, this
seems to be the;
hearted man .d
tender. Thissorri
pattern take- J
left turn, h
man opens his
gun he used tn
woman. -i ou crc
man says 1 I
sure it's a b
vou knew me w
Ihefina
bum is "Next
truth be told ll
good-Musk :J
out from tfM j
thelvncsdo n
above the ma-
about meet
and listening toj
other patrons ui
leaes. cYil ar
"Next Big Thu
gixxi becau I
theclichesthet
songs here spo
Consider ti
ingryricfrom B
would giveevej
I'd save you rm
Farce debuts
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Farce in the theater is generally
used to define a particular form of
comedv. To quote lessica Davis,
farce is "a dramatic work (usually
short) which has for its sofeobject to
excite laughter Lend MeaTenor
the East Carolina riayhouse s next
installment in their 1992 Summer
Theater season, is a prime example
of this definition.
"Lend Me
ous StDT) of
when a theater-
pressed into ref
lan tenor in thl
Verdi's "Otetto
assistant win
the role, but he
be girlfriend
tenor.Slamrmrl
and Kxiiesintij
to create a zaml
of entertatnr
"Greenville's
' ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub'
V
Adult
Entertainment
rf Center
i
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be there fry 8O0. Competition �j
THURSDAYS -SATURDi
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic"
ECU STUDENT SPECIE
$2.00 OFF Admission Saturday
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Of
iegg Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
i
OleMraonAm.
tgr out ol QrmmmriMm �
T57





Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Stye lEaHt (EattmtUan Fundamental freedoms taken away
Julif Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Bhker, Asat. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Ant. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
ROBEM Toon, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bui Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Zeroing fto EM Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisfly, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Mciugmg Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Directorcf Advertising
Adam Rob, Staff Itiustntor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Builarp, Circulation Manager
Chanial Weepman, Layout Manager
LOCKE Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Daii. Reep, Photo Editor
Woom Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
By Scott
Maxwell
Fditorial Columnist
Ihe East Carolinian has served the Kast Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
Students luring summer sessions. Eht East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5.000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view I etters should be limited to 250 words or less lor purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication letters should be addi essed lo 1 he Editor, Ihe East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU. Greenville, N C, 27S58-4353 Lor more miomution. call (919) 7S7 6366
Opinion
Page 4. July 8. 1992
Have patience with new freshmen
The three ol them stand in the shade o( the a pocketbook on campus. Back packs do the job.
trees in front of foyner Library. To ignore them 2) Look for any youngster followed closely
is impossible. D? Mom and Pad ECU professionals learn
Mom, Dad,and Johnny Freshman. quickly thai it is not cool to hang out with
As we all kni m, blacks st meti mes
siy things that many other Americans
ckm't like Coaseirueiitry, I propose that
the following restrictions be placed on
Macks' speech
First if a bLick ptrs i wishes to say
anything publicly, a poiks officer should
inform himof tfiepnlvjblecinse.uences
of his statement by leading a set speech
prepared by the state legislature hepo-
lice officer should then suggest alterna-
tive, less offensive statements
Second having Kin informed of
the probable consequences of his speech,
the bin k psnon in question should then
liave to wait one hill day before making
his statement This is merely a cooling-ofi
period, so we can be suretheblackperaon
won't siv anything rash
Third the proper authorities
should keep detailed reootds at every-
tiling the black p�Tni says rvcurds
which may ot course be released to the
public at any time
,Vte th.it ticnieot these restricttis
prevents anv bl.uk p'rsnn tnnn suing
anything he wants to -iv they're just
designed to regulate speech, not to pre-
ventit Whafsmore such regulations are
ile�irlnMVvin sinceblacksoftenrnake
ill-a visidervd aim ments wh ich they Li ter
PSgM
Nknv, for the benefit of the irony
impaired, the preceding uus mny Nk
cue especially not I would ever
propose such restrictions with a straight
face, in part betauseourcountry properly
does not alk'w the popuLice ti) vote to
restrict the constitutionally protected
nghtsof a segment of the p ipul.itxm Not
unlessthev wanttiamend theOnstiru-
tiocvanyway,suchrestnctiotvs would cer-
tninly never be permitted it imposed at
.my lower level.
But the Supreme Court has just
held that almost exactly those restncnons
may be placed on another right it deems
fundamental the nght tn have an abor-
tion
It's a ludicrous decision One can-
not simultaneously maintain mat abor-
tion is a right and that die right is subject
tii such extensive regulation by the states
Nkit unless other nghts are in h tile same
degree of "regulation" � in which wise
I'm leaving the country
Another deeply troubling aspect
of thecourt's ruling is its relocation of the
burden of proof Typically, in Older to
interfere with a fundamental nght, the
government must prove that it has an
ovemding reason to restrict the nght For
instance, if a state wishes to limit free
speech, it must prove that the benefits of
tiie restriction far outweigh the costs
The new "undue burden" stan-
dard turns met around, at least when it
dimes tnahortnni Thecitieii whose nghts
an?trampWionhaseipnivemattheaits
of tfie restrk tii m outweigh the benefits
It's as if the government aiuld
specify that votingb�x)thswoukibeopen
(�ily hum Ham to K-05 a m on voting
dav, and vou had to prove in murt that
you couldn't make it at that time
Further, thepatemalis.nexprevd
in the ruling is maddening Wnting ft r
themajontyJusticvsO'Ciinnor, Kennedy
and Souter wrote, in p�irt, 'Though the
woman has a nght h chi se ti termuiate
or continue her pregnancy before viabil-
ity, it does nut at all ftilkiw that tiie state is
prohibited from taking steps bo ensure
that this choice is thoughtful and m-
ft irmed "
In other words, you may have a
nght tn have an abort m, but the sure ha
a right to keep you from having it while
they tell you what a bad decision you're
making That's die essence i i i ne if the
restrictions upheld by the court, and it's
perfectly insulting
People sometimes buy cars they
shouldn't buy They place bets they
sfiouldn't place They say things dwy
shouldn't say But it woukf be absurd to
involve die go emment in ever,
person makes, simply because he may
make the wrong choice People have a
nghthimakemistalceslaiid.iTiern'i ��
learn from them) without the
gi ivem men t s pa rticipa ton
Anti-choice activists - metimes
(laim that, ail I 'ther aTisideran iB aM.i.
Ror was bad law That may be true Butn
Rtr was had law this is w. -rse
A View From Above
Once again, droves ol bewildered incom-
ing freshmen have raided the ECU campus.
Thev carry with them the weight ot unfamiliar
procedures, places and people Orientation is
their goal and Liking test after test ami standing
in line after line is thetr medium
But, to the untrained eve. some may find it
hard to distinguish between these incoming
students and the rest ol our fellow collegians
Here are three simple rules-of-thumb tor spot-
ting orientation neophytes
1) Watch for women carrying pocketbooks
The seasoned student knows there is no use tor
parents
3) Check tor the multipIe-ECU-
paraphenalia-svndrome Anv individual wear-
ing three or more ECU garments are sure to be
rookies ot campus life.
Svire, thev are all easy to spot, and at times
we may become annoyed bv thecontinual ques-
tion: How do 1 get to Spilman?" But, these
soon-to-be freshman, will transcend into the
sparkling future ot the school
So, give them all some respect, trv to keep
your patience about vou,ami remember that we
have all been there before.
Remember, humans are animals too
By T. Scott
Batchelor
i ditorul Columnist
"7&kBngZ�fb�yatoe ti:
MtMNO ttYNPGS, 199Z Wm
Walk's Words
Media has become fourth branch
By J.William
Walker
Fditorial Columni
Good evening and welcome to
NCC news The president today used
three band-aids when he cut his hand
on a razor blade In Iraq today the
sheik Mohammed Al-Akbad du
Franahama sued People magazine
over allegations of slander against his
pet elephant In Oklahoma today, Fred
and Ethyl Stevensteve broke die world
record in marathon horseshoe pitch-
ing with 212 hours of straight pitch-
ing When asked about her marvelous
pitching phenomenon. Ethyl said "I'm
tired And that's the news for this
Wednesday Stay tuned for more NCC
news at Eleven
The media is the fourth branch
of thr government They feed the
masses with information on some of
the most useless topics The '2 presi-
dential campaign has been cluttered
with some prime examples Bill
Clinton, for instance, was asked nu-
merousquestjonsconcerning possible
(but not probable) adultery, draft
dodging, and marijuana smoking
(withoutinhaling) Noneoftheseques-
tions have anything to do with his
effectiveness as a leader
The scary thing is that portions
Mil
of the American public would rather
hear about these worthless topics than
thev would about Clinton's plans or
ideas To Joe Q Public, scams of adul-
tery and drugs are much more entic-
ing Mr Public can't even understand
someoftheconceptsonwhichthere.il
issues are based
Obviously, the media agrees
with me because they've noticed trtis
weak side of Americana, and have
capitalized on it. The news today is
similar to daytime drama tvery once
m a while a new character like Perot's
inability as a leader or LA riots comes
onto the show, and people eat it up,
for a while. Then, that character gets
boring to Mr Public, and the media
stops covenng it
The media gives us what sells
Stones of divorce and drugs are more
entertaining and better suited for tele-
vision than are stories of referendums
and House legislation The problem
with the people is we allow them to
get away with it .Nobody seems ready
to demand an answer to the questions
that really matter People are more
concerned with the Bush's dinner
menu for the fourth of July than they
are about who is being held account-
able for wnting bad checks and what
legal action is not being taken
With all of this muckraking
comes only one thing-more muckrak-
ing The media has the American pub-
lic believing that ridiculous stories
concerning adultery and drug use are
more important than the real issues.
Not since this campaign began have
we seen any debateon the issues much
less anv real talk about what the issues
signify
Wenow know all about die skel-
etons in Bill Clinton and Koss Perot's
closets, but we don't know what ei-
ther of them plan to do about the
deficit
And tnat's the way JoeQ Public
likes it He doesn't want stale charac-
ters on his six 'o clock soap opera, he
wants the latest, trashiest, tasteless,
prying, supermarket ragweed tabloid
info on the contents of George Bush's
garbage
Thinkof the impact of this prob-
lem We could conceivably elect a
president this November that has not
even addressed the issues confront-
ing America. As long as he is "elect-
able" and has a clean record, he's eli-
gible
The simple fact is whether or
not Joe Politician smoked pot, screwed
his neighbor or spat on his mother
doesn't fell us anything about Mr
Politician's ability as a leader. The heart
of the issues is being gnissly ignored.
What about ol' King George?
There's no muckraking going on at
the oval office. Somehow, I have a
feeling that the Texas oil man has a
few dusty incidents from the past that
are being most graciously looked over
But, that just goes to show that truly
the media is the fourth branch of the
government
A tew years ago syndicated i ol
ummst Lewis Grizzard, of whom lent
a loyal fan, underwent delicate sur-
gerv to replace a heart valve that had
irone sour Grizzard came through the
operation awith flying colors and was
soon at his manual typewnter again,
banging out distilled bits ot wisdom
and wit
Not once during this wholepro-
cedurv did 1 see any news footage of
animal rights activists protesting
Grizzard's operation, despite the fact
that his replacement heart valve came
from a pig
Now, fast forward to just last
week, to the University ol Pittsburgh,
where a 35 year old man, (whom we'll
will John), dying from liver failure,
bravely agreed to be the first recipient
ol a transplanted baboon liver
Remember Crizard and his
pig' No protesters there But, you go
messing with a baboon, and brother
you've got tumble'
Less than 4 hours after lohn's
operation, a legion of sign-carrying
ealots hit the sidewalk outside the
hospital where he lay struggling tor
his life They picketed and shouted
and proclaimed that animals were not
to be used for spare parts for humans
Animals have rights, they said, and
are not here for us to abuse
Watching this vulgar display of
localized ignorance, (and seriously re-
considering the value of the first
amendment to the Constitution , 1 re-
alized that the only animal this group
didn't care about was Homo Sapien
Theextremeinsensitivirvf the
protest was appalling To stage the
demonstration just outside lohn's hoa-
pital must have taken a remarkable
amount of callousness, not to mention
an equally remarkable lack of intel-
lect
I can sympathize , at least on a
limited level, with John Last night ,1
was invaded with a nasty little virus
As I sit writing this column, I have a
fever of over 101 degrees I am experi-
encing stomach cramps that must be
close to duplicating labor pains, and I
have to make a conscious effort not to
show everybody what I ate for break-
fast this morning And this is most
assuredly only a small traction of the
pain and the complications a person
dying of liver failure goes though I
say bring in the baboon
Animals have no rights sjve
those we humans grant them We de-
cide what is ethical or not in our scien-
tific and medical dealings with ether
creatures In so doing we have to be
careful that we don't contuse a dog or
a cat or a baboon with a human bem$
Out use of animals is dictated
by human need, always has been, al-
ways will be The same people who
protest the use of animal organs to
save human lives no doubt share the
same mentality of those who vandal-
ize fur coats, and who eschew eating
meat
Wrule reducing ;he intake
certain tatty meats l es make c I
health sense, ruling �' � '
gether ignore, the fact t) ins
mnivorous t ng
mal and vegetable substances If vou
say it is wrong for humans t eatmeal
you must say the same for li ns bears
eagles, and mynad other omnit res
and carnivores on the planet
As tor the use of animal furs
and hides as clothing, a quick glance
at the history of man wifl rev. a that
we have been doing this ror thou-
sands of years
American Indians -sere mas-
ters of utilizing almost every part
the animals they hunted, includii -
thehides, meat, and bones, yet I doubt
anyone would criticize them for this
practice
1 agree that there are some in-
stances of animal use that Kinder on
senseless abuse Testing a perfume s
reactivity bv spraying it directly into a
rabbit's eyes is an action rooted in
vanity and as such stretches most
ethical boundaries
On the balaru e howevei
large majority of experimental
with, and medical uses of, animals is
highly beneficial to the human race
Getting back to the protesters.
and those in this column's readership
who share their philosophy. th .
see a happy end to their activist ef-
forts For it seems that other baboon
organs have been transplanted to hu-
mans in 33 operations sme 1905�
and all of them have failed
Good Luck, lohn

y
PRATs

7T
Q
PARkJ

.
X.
tfeDcM of Oio'tCE
reeoor, Exffc�iurJ
Letters To The Editor
Is it too much
to ask?
To the Editor:
There is no question Pitt
County needs an ordinance to
regulate and control the devel-
opment and operation of shoot-
ing ranges At present, a shoot-
ing range may be located any-
where in Pitt County, next to a
school, a day care facility, or a
neighborhood. Our county is
growing and becoming more
densely populated As well, the
number of shooting ranges is
growing.
Given the hazards associ-
ated with shooting ranges, we
can not allw them to be devel-
oped and operated without any
supervision. We as a county must
ensure they are developed and
operated safely, without being a
nuisance, environmentally re-
sponsible, and with consider-
ation for surrounding property
owners Otherwise we are
doomed to repeat the mistakes
of other North Carolina counties.
We do not need a death like
Michele Sexton in Carrowmds or
a hazardous waste site like the
Sir Walter Gun Club
Every United States citizen
has the right to own and shoot a
firearm. But with that right
comes a responsibility to ensure
other's rights are not infringed
upon. Is it too much to ask Pitt
County shooting ranges to fol-
low nationally recognized safety
standards? Is it too much to ask
that these ranges be located in
less densely populated areas
away from neighborhoods? And
is it too much to require safety
zones, fencing and signs to iden-
tify the ranges?
Pitt County is in the final
stages of enacting a shooting
range ordinance to protect Pitt
County citizens while allowing
safe responsible shooting. But
there is one enhancement needed
in the proposed ordinance Tobe
fair, this ordinance should require ex-
isting ranges to meet the same mini-
mum standards as a new range We
hope the county will take quick action
to enact this ordinance
David Moore
Ayden. N.C
Entertainment
Material Issue s latest album Destination Ur . � -
to cut an album Their 13-track endeavor falls a
Material Issue b
By Mark Brett
staff V riter
Contrary to the tx I fsorne,
ioves wigs are n rt a festering boil on
the is of riKk musk. Interesting
things can be d me ��. ith them, de-
spite the fact thai -��� � rj band
Earth has done one. The reason tli.it
most love songs smell is that they're
easj to write. Any n ng w ritei -
th i �f the title can crank one out in
his sleep. No effort equals no qual-
ity, and the world is left with a junk
heap oi crappv musk.
That's where Material Issue
comes in. Their newestrek i �
hnation bin � rse ischoc k-fullofbad
songs ,ibout love. Hie musk is so
stale it could have been done by any
bad alty band in the last 10 years,
and thelyrks are mly slightly ab. r e
the level of Wilson Phillips Weigh-
ing in at 13 song- and 43 minutes
the album is a lightweight effort all
Ihe way around. Hopefully I
nation Universe will skip lightly
along to an earlv painful death.
Until then, the public should tv
made aware of how unbelievably
lame this album is. In the interest of
faimess, howe er die three moder-
ately decent tracks should be trot-
ted out for examination.
The tirst of these is the first
single, "What Girls Want Aside
from being a little sexist, this is a fun
tune. With powerful, shouting r
cals hung over a truly infectious
guitar hook, this song rises above

lips just
'an �
grungy, this on
. � �
� �
I
left � �
man
man
I
bum is
- -o V . :
out fn m n �
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abo e the n
about me j
and list
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iea es Only at
e!
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sot .
j
inglvrk ft
evea
Farce debuts
By joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Fditor
Farce in the theater is generally
used to define a particular form of
comedy. To quote Jessica Davis
farce is "a dramatic work (usually
short Hvhich has for its sole objectto
excitelaughter Lend Me a Tenor
the East Carolina Playhouse's next
installment in their 12 Summer
Theater seam, is a prime example
oi this definition.
ous stOl
when a theater
pressed into rej
tan tenor ii
Verdi's
assistant win
the role but he;
be girlfriend
tenor. SlammirJ
and Kviiesuv
to create a zany
ot entertainmej
'
SUVIE
v Aj
IV) Entertainment
Ji J Center
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
4
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be thtre r-v SOO Competition ispm
THURSDAYS -SATURDJ
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic"
ECU STUDENT SPECIE
$2.00 OFF Admission Saturday!
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors 0p
Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
Dtckln�on Ay.
Strmia' out of drmnvtHm
to �mrr,





ilver Hammer
Idoms taken away
ri outweigh the benefits
Its .is it the government could
specfy that verting tx�(hs would becpei
. row 8 a m to 8:06 .1 m on voting
,iu aid vou KkI to prove in court trut
vou couldn't rruke it at that time
Further thepaternalixne):wed
Img is mackkning Writing far
ustkesCConnor, Kennedy

. irtar wrote m part, Though the
- � ighttochoosi k) terminate
or cone i er pregnancy before viabtl-
in it does not at all follow tlvnthesutvix
� � � � -s , teps to ensure
- � oughtful and m-
iher words you ma) I
iborhon,butthestatehas
keep you from having it while
ledsion you're
, eesseni f one of the
.rt. .imt it's
. , � t � . can the
uy I"he . i wts they
, e Ftwv. say d gs ' � �
�� � av But it � n ibsurd to
, '� . �� en ma I
, . � .his1 tie may
2 dx v i n e i
s opes, to
ron w thout the
� ons aside
.n rha
lav this is worse
rom Above
s are animals too
� � �
k �
.i i

� t s 1' .
� res

srrul turs
dou a this for thou-
.
u �.���� loubt
m m .mid criticizo them for this
� ;
� �
.
� es
-

edical
ii.
jj back 1 esters.
ership
a ire their �
ie
ivn transplanted to hu-
lohn

PRATs!

f
FRetjDOM OfEXteSJlOrJ
too much to ask
n�es be located in
populated areas
ighborhoods' And
r to require safety
ind signs to iden-
tv is in the final
la ting a shooting
In .re to protect Pitt
�n I while allowing
safe responsible shooting But
there is one enhancement needed
in the proposed ordinance To be
fair, this ordinance should require ex-
isting ranges to meet the same mini-
mum standards as a new range We
hope the county will take quick action
to enact this ordinance
David Moore
Ayden, NC t
Entertainment
3Ue ifcast (Earolinian
July 8, 1992
'Batman Returns' falls
short of expectations
BylkeShibley
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Mercury Entertainment
Material Issue's latest album, Destination Universe, proves once again that some bands were ust not meant
to cut an album Their 13-track endeavor falls asleep in the land of mediocrity.
Material Issue bombs with latest
Many incredible sets.
A plethora of talented actors.
A visionary director.
One pitiful script
Thus describes ft?frrwn Returns.
Batman stormed into theaters
in the summer of 198� as one of the
most hyped films of all time. People
went to see Battmn not because of
positive word of mouth (although
that probably helped) but because
Warner Brothers convinced the
public that Batmivi was a major
event. Major advertisers bought into
the action. Batman was a media cre-
ated sensation.
Btitirum Returns hopes to create
tlie s.ime mania. The television is
littered with Batman ads, from
Happv Meals to dolls to soft drinks.
Ihecommercialismundermines the
film itself.
Tim Burton has been telling
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Contrary to the beliefs of some,
love songs are not a festering boil on
die ass of rode music. Interesting
things can be done with them, de-
spite the fact that every band on
Earth has done one. The reason that
most love songs smell is that they're
easy to write. Any song writer wor-
thy of the title can rank one out in
his sleep. No effort equals r�oqual-
ity, and the world is left with a junk
heap of crappy music.
That's where Material Issue
comes in. Their newest release, Des
Hnetim Universe, ischock-fullofbad
songs about love. The music is so
stale it could have been done bv any
bad altv band in the last 10 years,
and the Ivricsan-onlvslightK above
melevelot Wilson Phillips. Weigh-
ing in at 13 songs and 43 minutes,
the album is a lightweight effort all
the way around Hopefully, Desti
nation Universe will skip lightly
along to an early, painful death.
L'nti I then, the public should be
made aware of how unbelievably
lame this album is. In the interest of
fairness, howe er, the three mcxier-
atelv decent tracks should be Hot-
ted out for examination.
The first of these is the first
single, "What Qris Want Aside
from beinga little sexist, this is a fun
tune. With powerful, shouting vo-
cals hung over a trulv infectious
guitar hook, this song rises above
the crap and deserves classic single
status. How could anyone resist a
chorus like this: "I want a man with
lips just like Mick Jagger Rod
Stewart's hair and Keith Richards'
stagger1"
The other very gixxl track on
Destination Universe is "Ballad of a
Lonelv Man Hard, fast and even
grungv, this one starts out as what
seems to be the story of a broken-
hearted man, as told to his bar-
tender. This somewhat predictable
pattern takes a sudden gut-rwisting
left turn, however, as the lonely
man opens his jacket to reveal the
gun he used to kill his cheatiri
woman. "You got a tale to tell the
man savs to the bartender. "Make
sure it's a headline Tell em that
vou knew me well
(he final good track on the al-
bum is "Next Big Thing which,
truth be told, is onlv rrnxieratelv
gixxi.Musicalqualitvdoesn't stand
out from the crowd on this one, but
the lyrics do rise, however slightly,
above the mass of mediocrity. It's
about meeting an artsy girl in a bar
and 1 istening to her make fun of the
other patrons until she gets up and
leaves. Onlv an almost-love-song,
"Next Big Thing" mainly seems
gixxi because it's not riddled with
thecliches the more traditional love
songs here spout like geysers.
Consider, for instance, this sear-
ing lyric from "Everything "And 1
would give everything that I own
I'd give vou my heart and this skin
and theseN mes ITie sun. the moon,
the earth, the skv The motorcy cle
that 1 like to ride ' Note that not
onlv does this np off a couple oi
Motown tunes, but the final lines
don't even rhyme!
Or how about some deathless
poetry from "Whole Lotta Vou1"
"Don't cry or end it all cause I'll be
here for vou Sav goodbye to the
other one cause thev're nothing if
they're new Irten there's "Don't
You Think I Know "Hello starry
eves, it's just me And check out
well, never mind Finding bad lines
on this album is just tio easy.
In general, the lyrics that aren't
cliches are blatantly lifted from
other, better songs or else make no
sense whatsoever.
Occasionally an inventive line
or guitar lick sneaks in, but tor the
most part Material Issue follows the
mediocrity party line. I he most in-
furiating thing about it, more infu-
riating than the mediocrity itself, is
the band's attitude toward its stvle.
Lead singerguitarist lim
Ellison has been quoted as saving,
"l think it takes a lot more balls to
write songs with girl's names than
to am screwdrivers in the bridge ot
vourgmtar Tocopahipper-than-
thou attitude over such a diligent
pursuit of the mundane puts Mate-
rial Issue even lower on the focxl-
chainthan Destination Unxversedid.
And besides, at least screwdriv-
ers would be interesting.
repi irters for the past month that he
approached Batman Returns as an
onginal film versus a sequel. In
keeping with this idea, he created
completely new sets, radically dif-
ferent villains and even set the film
in winter to alter the time of year
from Batman. Yet the fact simply is
that Batman Returns is a sequel.
The tone has already been set
bv the previous film. The audience
knows to expect odd villains, a
mysterious hero and a dark atmo-
sphere. Warner Brothers knows this
is a sequel Thev greedily await the
dollars that are already coming in
because of the advertising dollars
thev have already corralled.
Biitman Returns succeeds only
in creating manv commercial ready
images. There are three, yes three
ma jor villains. Pen guin.Carwoman
and Max Shreak. The script spends
so much time making sure each
viMain gets enough screen time that
it forgets to tell a story.
Danny Devito's Penguin
waddles fnghteningly through his
wanes. With flippers for hands, a
beak-like nose and a penchant for
eating raw fish he looks every bit
like the animal from which he de-
nves his name. His parents threw
him in the sewer when he was a
babv because of his oddities � like
eating the house cat.
The Tenguin's appetite for raw
fish is matched bv his lascivious
one for yming females and his spite-
ful one for his parents. Healso plots
revenge on the young of Gotham
Photo courtesy DC. Comic
Michael Keaton stars in the latest summer sequel, Batman Returns The
movie makes up what it lacks in plot with commercialism
Farce debuts in 'Lend Me A Tenor'
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Farce in the theater is generally
used to define a particular form of
comedy. To quote Jessica Davis,
farce is "a dramatic work (usually
short) which has for its soleobject to
excitelaughter "Lend MeaTenor
the East Carolina Playhouse's next
installment in their 1992 Summer
Theater season, is a prime example
of this definition.
"Lend MeaTenor" is thehilan-
ous story of mistaken identities
when a theater-owner's assistant is
pressed into replacinga famous Ital-
ian tenor in their performance of
Verdi's "Otello Not only does the
assistant win the audience ewer in
the role, but he also beds his would-
be girlfriend impersonating the
tenor. Slamming doors, flying fruit
and bodies in the closet all combine
to create a zany and fun-filled night
of entertainment
John Sheann, director of "Lend
Me a Tenor has brought in out-
standing talent for this production.
William McNultv will play the tenor
Stupendo and Pans Teet will be
"Max the assistant. Both Peetand
McNulty have worked together in
lastsummer's"TheNerd" and their
combination is sure to be a crowd-
pleaser.
Tickets for "Lend Me a Tenor"
are on sale now at the McCinnis
Theater box office. Trices are $17.50
for adults, $1350 for senior citizens
and $750 for children under 12. The
pnxiuction runs from July 8 to the
18, with matinees on July 11 and 15.
A special ticket price for ECU
students is available�$750 with a
valid student I.D. if the ticket is
bought 15 minutes before that
night's performance. Tickets bought
beforehand are subject to the regu-
lar adult price.
Forcreditcard reservations, call
the box office at 757-6829.
Gtv to retaliate for his miserable
youth.
Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman
also plots revenge. Herrevengecen-
ters around Max Shreak (Christo-
pher Walken). Selina Kyle,
Carwoman's real name, worked for
Shreak. When she opened Mime
protected files Shreak becomes irate
and tossed Selina out the window.
Upon being revived by cats, Selina
becomes Catwoman.
Toovercompensate forSelina's
meekness, Catwoman dresses
kinkily in a btxly tight black suit
and brandishesa whip. When Selina
smashes all her "nice" possessions,
she is destroying her old self.
The third important villain,
who gets nearly the screen time that
Penguin and Catwoman do, is Max
Shreak. He plans to build a power
plantthatwillcaptu re energy which
can then be sold back to the city at
an enormous profit. Unlike the other
two villains, Shreak's mask is not
visible. Shreak's mask is his philan-
thropy. He pretends to help the city
financially so that he can fulfill his
master plan.
Thelonehemtocombatall these
villains is Batman. et Batman gets
no more screen time than anv one
villain. This film would have been
more appropriately titled: Lunahc
Villains Return.
Deyito,PfeifferandWalkenare
all magnificent. They really sink
their teeth into their roles. The
trouble is that not nun h is there for
them to sink their teeth into. Each
actor gets a few moments of glory
but nothing more. Having only one
villain in the story would have al-
lowed a much fuller treatment.
Too manv villains trulv can
spoil a movie. So much effort is
spent to explain each villain's moti-
vation that no energy is left to pro-
pel the plot. Indeed the scenes are
stitched together as badlv as
Carwoman's outfit.
Perhaps because Jack
Nicholson's presence could not be
recreated the filmmakers thought
three villains could compensate.
Perhaps the commercialism sub-
verted the filmmakers' belief in their
artistry. The end result is a showy
film with no substance.
On a scale of one to ten. Barman
Returns rates a six.
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I





iilver Hammer
Idoms taken away
1 K'hthevbter
tneflt 4 'he inTiv
as irony No
Dt i ivoukl I
auntrypropert)
ppulace Id von ID
maBy piuMLtaJ
I . pulatkm V
imend ihe Qffistitu-
; would cw
rt ha aist
- restrictions
team

lWtrampWimrw�fcpnwethatthecosts
d H restnctum outweigh the benefits
1ft i it the tpivemment amid
s�ttv th.it vi'tingbm-iwouklhecipen
- j from Ham to Sl6 am on voting
dw and vou h.v.1 o prov m court that
you couldn't rrvike it .it that time
Further, tbepatemalis.nexpres-�( 1
m the ruling ' rrvKilening Wnting for
themaiopfv furtkaaCComnvKOTMriy
hkI SoutW wrote, in part. Thtmgh the
m 'man has a right to . hoose ti term mate
i mtiTiue her pregnancy before viabil-
ity, it don nat all follow that the state H
. roNft4ted from taking ��f� IB ensure
that this choice is thoughtful and m-
Mmed
�her WOfds, you may have I
. ,r.iNrtKTi,rnitthetatehas
, I hMpycw fnm having it while
. you what a bid dacMon you're
riUOJ That s the essence of one oi the
restrictions upheld bv tie court, ami W
perfectly irouMng
People sometime buy CM thev
�ikin't buy Thev puKM bill thev
shouldn'i pk� nwy sy Auriga thev
diouktn t y But it would b� absurd to
etrunent in every choice a
ken, Mmplv because he mav
rrong dioke Peopk have i
lumkttk�(�rid,tfwhupe,trj
from them) Without the
.lit g parinpation
.hone activists sometime.
at afl other conwderatiorta wide
� law fli.it rn.iv !� true But it
� , aw, this is worse
:rom Above
s are animals too
imn, 1 have .1
- 1 am� �
inps that must be
m labor pains and 1

� rson
.h I
li
A- e redm ing 'he intake ot
. meats do� make goxl
� ruling out meat alto-
the t.ut that humani
feed th ani-
mal and vegetable sub tanoM It you
s,iv it is wrong for humans total meat
must say thMmeforlion�( bears,
. � ind myriad other omniv res
-� ivor9 on the planet
for the use t animal fun
I hides as clothing, .i quick guinea
e history of man will reveal that
we have been doing this for thou-
sands ot ve.irs
American Indians were mat
ter of utilizing almost every part ol
the animals they hunted, including
thehides, meat, and bones, yet 1 doubt
anyone would criticize them for this
�k e
I igree that mere .ire some in-
Mimal use mat border on
� � is abuse !�� � rfuri e i
re.u tivirv bv sp raving it directly into a
� es is an action rooted in
and .is Mich stretches moat
cal boundaries
- 'he bal.i:
�ge majority Of experimentation
m, and medical uses o(f, animals is
end i to the human race
� : g back to the protesters.
1 �hose in mis column's readership
who share their philosophy, thev i
lee i nappy end to their activist et-
� Mema thai other baboon
�. u ! have been transplanted SO hu-
mans in 13 operations situe llr
and all t them have failed
Good I ik k. lohn

Ws
0
PW

fekh
FWeoort ofExritesioKJ
it too much to ask
nges be located in
populated areas
nghborhoods7 And
h to require safety
and signs o iden-
nty is in the final
lading a shooting
jnce to protect Pitt
�ns while allowing
safe responsible shooting But
there is one enhancement needed
in the proposed ordinance To be
fair, this ordinance should require ex-
isting ranges to meet the same mini-
mum standards as a new range We
hope the county will take quick action
to enact mis ordinance.
David Moore
Ayden, N.C.
Entertainment
Oilie Saet Carolinian
July 8, 1992
'Batman Returns' falls
short of expectations
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Material Issue s
to cut an album
Photo courtesy Marcury Entertainment
latest album. Destination Universe, proves once again that some bands were just not meant
Their 13-track endeavor falls asleep in the land of mediocrity.
Material Issue bombs with latest
Many incredible sets.
A plethora of talented actors.
A visionary director.
One pitiful script
Thus describes Batman Returns.
Batman stormed into theaters
in the summer of 1989 as one of the
most hyped films of all time. People
went to see Batman not because of
positive word of mouth (although
that probably helped) but because
Warner Brothers convinced the
public that Batman was a major
even t. M ajor ad vertisers bought in to
the action. Batman was a media cre-
ated sensation.
Batman Returns hopes to create
the .same mania. The television is
littered with Batman ads, from
Happy Meals to dolls to soft drinks.
Thecorruriercialismuriderminesthe
film itself.
Tim Burton has been telling
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Contrary to the beliefs of Mime,
lovesongsarenotafestennboilon
the ass of rock music Interesting
things can be done with them, de-
spite the fact that every band on
Earth has done one. The reason that
most love songs smel I is that they're
easy to write. Any son writer wor-
thy of the title i.in crank one out in
his sleep. No effort equals no qual-
ity, and the world is left with a junk
heap of crappy music.
That's where Material Issue
comes in. Their new est release, Des
f!rMffpnUm:rrsoschiKk-full(ifbad
songs about love. The music is so
stale it could have been done by any
bad alty band in the last 10 years,
anduVlvncsan-onlvslightlyabove
the level of Wilson Thillips. Weigh-
ing in at 13 Mings and 43 minutes,
the album is a lightweight effort all
the way around Hopefully, Desti
nation Universe will skip lightly
along to an early, painful death.
Until then, the public should be
made aware of how unbelievably
lame tliis album is. In the interest of
fairness, however, the three moder-
ately decent tracks should be trot-
ted out for examination.
The first of these is the first
single, "What Carls Want Aside
from being a little sexist, this is a fun
tune. With powerful, shouting vo-
cals hung over a truly infectious
guitar hcxik, this song rises above
the crap and deserves classic single
status. How could anyone resist a
chorus like this: "1 want a man with
lips just like Mick Jagger Rod
Stewart's hair and Keith Richards'
stagger?"
The other very gixxl track on
Destination Unnvrse is "Ballad of a
Lonely Man Hard, fast and even
grungv, this one starts out as what
MOV to be the story of a broken-
hearted man, as told to his bar-
tender. This somewhat predictable
pattern takes a sudden gut-twisting
left turn, however, as the lonely
man opens his jacket to reveal the
gun he used to kill his cheatin'
woman. "You got a tale to tell the
man says to the bartender. "Make
sure it's a headline Tell 'em that
you knew me well
The final good track on the al-
bum is "Next Big Thing" which,
truth be told, is only rrwxierately
gixxj. M usical quality doesn't stand
out from the crowd on this one, but
the lyrics do rise, however slightly,
above the mass of mediocrity. Ifs
about meeting an artsy girl in a bar
and listening to her make fun of the
other patroas until she gets up and
leaves. Only an almost-love-song,
"Next Big Thing" mainly seems
good because it's not riddled with
thecliches the more traditional love
songs here spout like geysers.
Consider, for instance, this sear-
ing lyric from "Everything "And 1
would give everything that 1 own
I 'd give you my heart and this skin
and these bones The sun, the rrx x n,
the earth, the sky The motorcycle
that I like to ride Note that not
only does this rip off a couple of
Motown tunes, but the final lines
don't even rhyme!
Or how about Mime deathless
poetry from "Whole Lorta You?"
"Don't cry or end it all 'cause I'll be
here for you Say gxxJbye to the
other one 'cause they're nothing if
they're new Then there's "Don't
You Think I Know "Hello starry
eyes, it's just me And check out
well, never mind. Finding bad lines
on this album is just hxi easy.
In general, the Ivncs that aren't
cliches are blatantly lifted from
other, better Mings or else make no
sense whatMX'ver.
Occasionally an inventive line
or guitar lick sneaks in, but for the
most part Material Issue follows the
medi(XTity party' line. The most in-
furiating thing about it, more infu-
natmg than the medix:rity itself, is
the band's attitude toward its style.
Lead singerguitarist Jim
ElliMin has been quoted as saying
"1 think it takes a lot more balls to
write Mings with girl's names than
to jam screwdrivers in the bridge of
your guitar To cop a hipper-than-
thou attitude over such a diligent
pursuit of the mundane puts Mate-
rial Issue even lower on the food-
chain than Destination timtrscdid.
Andbesides,atleastscrewdriv-
ers would be interesting.
rep irters for the past month that he
approached Batman Returns as an
onginal film versus a sequel. In
keeping with this idea, he created
completely new sets, radically dif-
ferent villains and even set the film
in winter to alter the time of year
from Batman. Yet the fact simply is
that Batman Returns is a sequel.
The tone has already been set
bv the previous film. The audience
knows to expect odd villains, a
mysterious hem and a dark atmo-
sphere. Warner Brothers knows this
is a sequel. They greedily await the
dollars that are already coming in
because of the advertising dollars
they- have already corralled.
hVitirwri Returns succeeds only
in creating many commercial ready
images. There are three, yes three
ma jorvillains: Penguin, Catwoman
and Max Shreak. The script spends
mi much time making sure each
villain gets enough screen time that
it forgets to tell a story.
Danny Devito's Penguin
waddles frighteningly through his
scenes. With flippers for hands, a
beak-like nose and a penchant for
eating raw fish he looks every bit
like the animal from which he de-
rives his name. His parents threw
him in the sewer when he was a
baby because of his oddities � like
eating the house cat.
The Penguin's appetite for raw
fish is matched by his lascivious
one for young females and his spite-
ful one for his parents. He also plots
revenge on the young of Gotham
Photo courtesy D.C. Comics
Michael Keaton stars in the latest summer sequel, Batman Returns. The
movie makes up what it lacks in plot with commercialism
Farce debuts in 'Lend Me A Tenor'
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Farce in the theater is generally
used to define a particular form of
comedy. To quote Jessica Davis,
farce is "a dramatic work (usually
short) which has for its sole object to
excite laughter "Lend MeaTenor
the East Carolina Playhouse's next
installment in their 1992 Summer
Theater season, is a prime example
of this definition.
" Lend Me a Tenor" is the hilari-
ous story of mistaken identities
when a theater-owner's assistant is
pressed intoreplacingafamousltal-
ian tenor in their performance of
Verdi's "Otello Not only does the
assistant win the audience over in
the role, but he also beds his would-
be girlfriend impersonating the
tenor. Slamming doors, flying fruit
and bodies in the closet all combine
to create a zany and fun-filled night
of entertainment
John Shearin, director of "Lend
Me a Tenor has brought in out-
standing talent for this pnxiuction.
William McNulty will play the tenor
!l Stupendo and Paris Peet will be
"Max the assistant. Both Peet and
McNulty have worked together in
lastsummer's "The Nerd" and their
combination is sure to be a cawd-
pleaser.
Tickets for "Lend Me a Tenor"
are on sale now at the McGinnis
Theater box office. Prices are $1750
for adults, $1350 for senior citizens
and $750 for children under 12. The
production runs from July 8 to the
18, with matinees on July 11 and 15.
A special ticket price for ECU
students is available�$750 with a
valid student I.D. if the ticket is
bought 15 minutes before that
nighf s performance. Tickets bought
beforehand are subject to the regu-
lar adult price.
Forcreditcard reservations,call
the box office at 757-6829.
City to retaliate for his miserable
youth.
Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman
also plots revenge. Her revengecen-
ters around Max Shreak (Christo-
pher Walken). Selina Kyle,
Catwoman's real name, worked for
Shreak. When she opened some
protected files Shreak becomes irate
and tossed Selina out the window.
Upon being revived by cats, Selina
becomes Catwoman.
ToovercompensateforSelina's
meekness, Catwoman dresses
kinkily in a body tight black suit
and brandishesawhip. When Selina
smashes all her "nice" possessions,
she is destroying her old self.
The third important villain,
who gets nearly the screen time that
Penguin and Catwoman do, is Max
Shreak. He plans to build a power
plant that wil 1 capture energy which
can then be sold back to the city at
anenormousprofit. Unlike theother
two villains, Shreak's mask is not
visible. Shreak's mask is his philan-
thropy. He pretends to help the city
financially so that he can fulfill his
master plan.
Thelonehero tocombat all these
villains is Batman. Yet Batman gets
no more screen time than any one
villain. This film would have been
more appropriately titled: Lunatic
Villains Return.
Devito,PfeifferandWalkenare
all magnificent. They really sink
their teeth into their roles. The
trouble is that not much is there for
them to sink their teeth into. Each
actor gets a few moments of glory
but nothing more. Having only one
villain in the story would have al-
lowed a much fuller treatment
Too many villains truly can
spoil a movie. So much effort is
spent to explain each villain's moti-
vation that no energy' is left to pro-
pel the plot. Indeed the scenes are
stitched together as badly as
Catwoman's outfit.
Perhaps because Jack
Nicholson's presence could not be
recreated the filmmakers thought
three villains could compensate.
Perhaps the commercialism sub-
verted the filmmakers' belief in their
artistry The end result is a showy
film with no substance.
On a scale of one to ten, Batman
Returns rates a six.
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TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestnu need tot then by 00. Competition it from 9 Jo 11.00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotjc"Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
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Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
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Sports
�lie �aat (Earoitntati
July 8, 1992
Student stores
donates $25,000
to ECU athletics
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
The ECU Student Stores donated a handsome check to the
tune of $25,tXX) to the Department of Athletics. According to Dave
Hart, Director of Athletics at ECU,thedonation was well received.
"This generous gift from our student stores is a wonderful
acknowledgment of our Ladies First program said Hart.
The Department of Athletics is in the third year of a five-year
plan to increase the level of scholarship opportunities in women's
and non-revenue sports. "I t is our hope that this gesture will serve
as a springboard for future gifts of this nature, as we progress
through the 1992-93 academic year Hart said.
The gift from the Student Stores marked the second donation
received bv ECU Athletics. Two vears ago Parker and Becky
Overton of Greenville, N.C. gave a $90000 endowed scholarship
Agassi wins
Wimbledon;
earns respect
from critics
By M. Chantal
Weedman
5uff Writer
Photo courtosy ECU AINatic Oapartmonl
S6'EaTeArf'fal Layton Getsinger. M.ke Cos.en. Dave Hart, Wanda Scarborough and Dennis Young (from left to right) pose
which marked the first endowed pi �- y of a check for $25 0Q0 tQ the �CU Atnletics Department from the ECU Student Stores.
women s atnletics. r
Recreational Services
offers relief from blues
Agassi finally wins 'big one'
With first summer session behind us,
it's time again to register with Recreational
Sen ices' second session summer line-up.
Whether it'sintramurals,outd(Xrrecreation,
fitness classes or drop-in play, Recreational
Services has just the thing to relieve those
summer session blues.
Julv begins with beach volleyball Regis-
tration on the 6th at 4 p.m. For the golfer,
putt-putt golf registration is on the 13th also
at4 p.m. Participants will play at Greenville's
putt-putt golf course Unrated on Hwy. 33.
Register J uly 14 at 4 p.m. for one-on-one
basketball, and on July 20 at 4 p.m. for the
firstever BigSplash' BonanzaGolf Classic.
This event combines a driving contest at
Greenville's Big Splash Aqua Tark and 18
holes of golf at Indian Trails Country Club.
All registration meetings are held in Biology
N-102, so come on out and register as an
individual or a team. For more information,
call 757-6387.
If On tdoor Recreation is moreyour niche,
then Recreational Services has the trip for
vou. A windsurfing outing is set for I uly 7
leaving at 3 p.m. Participants will travel to
Whichard's Beach to enjoy the waterway
breezes and set sail. July 10-11 are the dates
scheduled for hangglidingwindsurfing
Tnp, which will be leaving at nHn for Nags
Head, NC. For the water person, a sea
kavakmg outing will tike place on Julv 17
followed bv a sailing tnp on the l'Hh. Call
757-611 or 757-6387 for more details.
Just because the summer sessions are
changingdies not mean that drop-in hours
will aba Hours for Christenbury weight
room, Minges weight rcxm, Christenbury
swimming pool, Minges swimming pool
and Christenbury Gym will still be the
same as thev were first session. For a sched-
ule come by Christenbury Gym Room 104.
With all the stress of summer school,
give yourself a break � with Recreational
Services.
(AP) � They said he couldn't win the
bigone�and certainly not by playing from
the baseline on grass. Andre Agassi proved
them wnwig on both counts.
In these days of pinver tennis, Agassi
illustrated that thundering groundstrokes
can be just as important as rxxMning serves.
For three years, from 1988-90, Agassi
hadn't even bothered to show up at
Wimbledon preferring to stay home in Las
Vegas. Back then, he didn't like grass or
Wimbledon's predominantly white dress
axle. If s a derision Agassi now regrets.
'1 am really kind of sad he said. "This
tournament has offered me and my life so
much. It's a shame tiiat I didn't respect it a
httie earlier
After Ivanisevic hit a backhand voDey
into the net on match point, Agassi col-
lapsed and lay face down on the grass for
several secitxls. When he got up, he was
crying. "So many things weregoingthrough
my mind�Wimbledon champion. Grand
Slam winner, a kit of months and years of
people doubting me he said.
The doubters abounded after Agassi
ftlded in his three previous Grand Slam
finals�losingto AndresGomezat the 1990
French Open, reteSamprasat the 19) US.
Open and Jim Courier at the 1991 French
Open
Sunday's final lived up to itsbillingas a
duel between the best serve in the game
against the best return.
The rVfixit 4-mch Ivanisevic fired 37
aces, a record for a Wimbledon final. His
total for the fortnight was 206, a record for
anvtvvvvveektiurnament But Agassi broke
Ivanisevic three times in the match, while
losing his own serve just twice. Ivanisevic
came to the net 91 times�only to be parsed
by Agassi an astounding 26 times.
In the final game, Ivanisevic made it
easier for Agassi by double-faulting on the
first two points. " didn't hear the fat lady
humming yet" he said. "But when 1 got to
the match point and his first serve went into
ttenetmyeyesbtuparxlivv'asawareofthe
fact it could be all ckr? with one backhand
return"
Agassi did hi t a good backhand return,
which Ivanisevic couldn't handle.
'IwasjustiA-erwhelmed'Agassisaki.
"All I was thinking was: Ifs a'er, it's over
Commentary I
Washington can only look back and remember
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Marc Washington is a huge man. He
can bench press over 500 pounds. Many
people thought he would be playing pro-
fessional football next season. Instead he
will probably be sitting in a jail cell think-
ing about what might have been. What a
waste.
He must bare the brunt of his actions
� nobody put a gun in his hand and
made him rob a bank. He has no one to
blame except himself.
However, he is in no way an indict-
ment of all theathleteswhoworkhard to
live honest and meaningful lives.
Washington may someday realize
what a cruel system ftxrtball can be.
Universities take young men outof high
school and promise them fame and for-
tune. Their course schedules are made
for them, their food, books and tuition is
paid for � in exchange for long, hard
hours on the field.
Football players are not allowed to
have jobs on the side. For players with-
out rich parents, this can cause envy of
those able to buy clothes, CDs, or even
visit family in a time of crisis.
The football program was respon-
sible f.r keeping him in school and that is
all. Washington was responsible for get-
ting by in class and pumping iron.
When his football career turned sour,
he apparently was not capable of dealing
with the pressure of a bleak future. He
seems to have gained nothing from ECU
except weight. This school has failed in its
promise to Washington. Not a promise of
football stardom, but a promise of a col-
lege education with the implication of a
better life.
Not all college graduates are saints
but society expects more from them than
bank robbery (at least insider trading).
Washington missed graduation by nine
hours.
Perhaps he felt the only thing in con-
trol of his future was football. When that
was gone, he lost all sense of the control in
his life.
it is truly unfortunate Washington
did not learn from the mistakes of his
brother, who is also in prison for bank
robbery. That he thought he could get
away with robbing a bank in broad day-
light in the heart of a large city is amazing.
What was he thinking?
He probably was not thinking at all.
Like him or not, you've got to give
Andre Agassi credit. The man who has
screamed "Image is everything" for two
years has realized that image isn't every-
thing, and maybe winning is.
Since he burst into professional tennis
in 1987, Agassi has been the rebellious,
sassy, bad-boy, but never the victor in a
Grand Slamevent. In the last rwoyears, he
has plaved in three Grand Slam finals, but
the trophv always bore someone else's
name.
Agassi seemed to step on the court as
the fans' favorite and walked off the loser.
His critics began taunting him three years
ago, saving he would never win a ma)or
tournament � not for lack of talent, bu t for
lack of maturity and focus.
Ironically, Agassi displayed both fo-
cus and maturity duringhis stunning fort-
night at Wimbledon. Even in his three five-
set matches, the champion remained fo-
cused, never regressing to his old, childish
antics. He tossed not a single racket in
anger and he kept his shirt on when the
championship match was over. Not once
did the cocky teen-aged antics of previous
years return.
When asked about his success
throughout the tournament, Agassi ac-
knowledged those around him: his coach,
his family, even his opponents. He thanked
John McEnroe numerous times for his ex-
pert ad v ice and en ticism on the grass court
game. When asked before the final what it
felt like to play in his fourth Grand Slam
final, Agassi responded that it wasn't his
fourth Grand Slam final, it was Wimbledon
and "that's where it begins and ends He
knowingly put the tournament in an elite
class of its own, and eventually, the cham-
pionship put Agassi in an elite class.
Agassi truly acted the part of the ma-
ture tennis pro, and that is what he became
when Goran Ivanisevic netted the final
ball in the championship match Sunday.
Years of trying to prove his worth in the
tennis world came to an end. As he lay
face-down on the grass at the All-England
club, the world could finally acknowledge
that the long-hai red ,earring-wearing rebel
was finally a man to be reckoned with.
While in dollars, he has been worth
millions for three years or more, his win
Sundav improved his wealth in the tennis
world immeasurably. After the presenta-
tion of trophies, Agassi told reporters that
he would give up everything he owned to
keep the title.
This new-found humility and appre-
ciation for the game are the major factors in
his new, more likeable image.
Not only has Agassi finally won a
Grand Slam tournament, but he has also
won the approval of many of his former
critics.
Perhaps that is his greatest winning.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 8, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 08, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.884
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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