The East Carolinian, June 10, 1992






Presidential candidates move to talk shows
What's next- Perot on "Saturday Night Live?'
4
Third time not a charm
Alien 3 tailed to score hie box office numbers.
5
�ij� iEafit (�ar0ltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community sim e I
Voi 66 No.32
Wf onesoay. June 10, 1992
GunNViut, North Caroiina
Circulation 5.000
6 Pages
Video yearbook becomes reality
Revenge pays oft
Mr' his i! in iend gavehimtheb n l
a( alPoh student decided to get even b
disenrolling her from .ill ot her classes.
ie student called a telephone registra
bon line and dropped the girl's sc hedule.
He is now being faced with disciplinary
a tion and possible riminal i harges
Elvis is back
i'nifessor Peter Nazareth of the Uni
if Iowa thinks students have a lot
n the nev tted
titled American Populai rts ElvisAs
Ant- , pnedti iteai h
students about the late stnger s influences
on music ami culture Students enrolled
hi the class sa) the) have learned a lot
about the Rock n Roll tegend and his life
as .i performer
Basketball coach resigns
I niversityof Alabama is for ing
then head basketball coach to resign be-
i iuse he allegedly hit a female assistant
nach hard enough to give her a black
eye Nan Watts has filed a sex discrimi-
plaint against I lead C oach
Sanderson after being struck by
nal V A touma-
Big bucks at bookstore
An investigatioi esat
r - book re has
the areenjen inga numberof
. . in other
ts m lude the use i A
i Kation home, comptete with hot tub
and satellite dish, a motor home, a ail-
boat ,wm at least eight expensive automo-
bites
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmei Taken
trom CPS and other national college
new�paper�.
Bv Tony Rogers
SUH Writer
Atter a two year absent e a
yearbook is finallv returning to
E I 'scampus. Insteadi t thetra
ditional Bui �� the student
body will get a glimpse at te h-
notogical advances as onl the
second video yearbook in the
state will begin produ tion in the
fall semester
lhe Advani ed Broadcasting
Productkmclass, which will pro
duce the yearbtxl tor the com-
municant department, Will fol"
low in the footsti
versitv as the onh othei ideo
yearbtxik in the state.
We're ahead of the game
said Pr I Harrell Mien, chaii
man of the communication de
partmenl " Mir due date is April
l andwehavealreadv begun film
ing at last May s graduation cer
emony "
lhe 10 to l"1 membet lass
comprised of juniors and seniors
will be supervised by a new pro
fessor, Dr. Xue mei Zhang Pr
hang and her students will be
working with new equipment
purchased bj the Media Board
in agreement with thecommuni-
. arJon department.
"In order to avoid having to
retrain a new �. lass in the �i
semestei thesame group will con
tinueprodu biviinaspei ialsemi
"The ripple effects
of owning this new
equipment will show
even greater advance
�Dr T. Harrel Allen
nars( lassand re ei eatotalol a x
hoursi reditm er both semesters
Mien said
he ideo w ill be edited in a
documentarv format giving a
chronologk al history ot the pa-t
year at E( I Musi and colorful
commentary will be added to the
highlights and uniqueevents that
take place concerning ECU and
it- t.K ulty and students.
We will sta fairly onsei
vative in our first year Allen
said. "This new equipment al
lows us to work in 3-D and ani-
mation, m we will get more and
more complex in the future
1 he equipment was pur
chased at a one time cost of
- lhe onh other produc
turn i osts w ill be a $2 harge for
each copy of the VI IS tape W ith
apredk teddemandof5 IXXltapes
the ti ital pnxluci
year will - - '�
"Butthe pri
ment is a one time e ire,
said '� er a
fiveyeai
of production will b
i heaper than a printe
According I
tion co
range from $ft
lhe tl
he sold at ust, .
Board hoosestoi
the future
lhe Me �
See Yearbook
Cancer in Greene Dorm
Pnoto by 0�H R�ed � Th� Eft CmrolmiMn
Workers are removing asbestos from the ceiling of Greene dorm's lounge area The work will finish in a few
days and then students will be safe from toxins once more
ECU student reigns
as Miss Greenville
nECL student will be repn
the Miss orth (Carolina
Kimberly I a is whi
Greenvilk
currenfjy lives ir v ilson but
she i- perusing her masti . � � n arts at
tainment
! Ia i- said -he
plan- toteai h atter
graduation.
" rts and en-
tertainment
should he empha
sized more greatly
in the education
tieid -he said
"Statistics -how
that children who
I irtu ipate in bm
tivitiessui h as d
ateranddara eper-
torm better in other
academic field-
Davis, who i-
Kimberlv Davis
Literacy Volunteers help others learn
sponsored bv the East Carolina Si holarship
tion. -aid she enters pageants that are more acad
calhy oriented m aUovs her to fulfil h irshi
requirements
WTXN-7wiflbroadcastthel992 Miss
at 7 p m. the night of the e i
By Kim Williams
Start Wraer
Litera olunteers ot
America- Pittounh (1 VA P i
�i re eh ed a 3 " � grant
from Burrough Wellcome - com-
munity sen ice program
I VA I' a non pi fit irgani
zation, provides onop, one tu
toring tor adult- in iunr
need help learnn ig to read
�rganization trains about Ml
mteers inea h of its tour tram
ing sessions held evei , yea
ised I
pur, hase a tele isii n ai id V( R tor
training new tutors during 1992-
93. LVA-P ha- currently been
borrowing the personal audio-
ideo equipment ot a tutor
'Weareexcited not to ha eto
depend on someone else for our
training equipment said Rena
Her exe utive director of 1 ,
PC
1 Her said that the money left
over from buying the television
and AC K will he used to pun hase
additional materials for tutor fram-
ing workshops.
LVA-PC . w huh gain- mo-t o(
it- financial support from the
I nited Way, relies on private do-
nations and grants from other lo-
cal businesses -m h as ' to 1 �
Reflector
1 Her said each tutor training
work-hop take- 15 hours and is
usually -pread out over a month-
long period.
1 A wek omes ECU stu-
dents who are interested in he
i liming tutors 1 Her-aid that thev
have several graduate level stu-
dents who are interested in work
ing w ith the illiteracy program.
"It is a pretty big commit-
ment Mler said. "A tutor has to
be a gixxl reader and has to have
the desire to spend at least three
hours per week volunteering his
or her rime
I Her said that in addition to
-pending time with actual tutor-
olunteers must also spend
time preparing lessons, she said
most tutors are not teachers by
profession but arepe plew hok e
to read and want to -hare that
lo e
Burroughs-Wellcome
founded the community service
program that awarded the grant
in 1988. The program supports
specific promts or events in rec-
ognition ot an employee's volun-
teer efforts
Crime reports concealed on college campuses
( PS) Private colleges east of
MississippiRiveraren orelikel
al rimeson their campuses
in order to prevent hd publicity
thati ouldhurt fund efforts
a rei ent report -aid
I lie report, COTldui ted K I
( ampus Safety and Se urity lnsti
tute(( SSl)inThorndale Pa anony-
m(ni-h surveyed polu e and s u
nt personnel at J36 colleges and
universities fheywerea ked about
compliance with new statistics ol
cTime n campus and various secu-
rity policies
We found that V pen ent of
the institutions we Surveyed were
fudging their crime statistics said
Bill Whitman, dins tor of the insti
tute For the most part, it- the
small, private colleges est of the
Mississippi that tend to be fudg-
ing "
�- manv as 62 peri ent of the
smaller institution- are perpetrat-
ing cover ups of crime, ranging
from sexual assault to drug and
akohol ii ilafjons, he s,mi
In manv cases, students were
dixouraged from reporting crimes
to campus police and told to go
through the campus judicial sys-
� �� �
"We found that 32
peitent of the institutions
we surveyed were rudg-
mg theircnmesfcibstics
� Bill Whitman
Director, Campus Safety And
Security Institute
tern ins teat! If the victim persisted
in adesire for criminal prosecution,
thev were encouraged to go to the
local police Father way, the crime
would not be reported as part of the
institution's official stabstics.
On some campuses, alcohol
violahons were concealed by en-
forcinga policy of notarreshng stu-
dents. Again, they were sent
through the campus judicial sys-
tem.
lhe responsibility for tabiry-
bngreportablecrimes usually rested
within high-leel administration
positions, according to the report.
In one widely puhlu ied case,
a vu e president at the University of
South Florida recently resigned at
tor he allegedly discouraged a stu-
dent from pressing sexual assautl
charges against a star basketball
plaver, even though university po-
liceconducted an investigation and
werereadv to prosecute theattacker.
The vice president said the student
had recanted thecharges, when she
had not.
Money is the main justification
behind the cover ups, the report
said. Those involved in hiding the
information often were afraid the
crimes, if made public, couid tar-
nish the institution's image enough
to rediu e fund raising and hamper
recruitment efforts
"People in admissions,endow-
ment and public relations tended to
have the greatest involvement in
the cover-ups Whitman said.
For their part, campus law en-
forcement officer- who ignored or
went along with these cover-ups
did so because thev had a sense oi
dutv to follow orders or because
Buy would be punished if they tried
to tell the truth
"I've had campus law ad minis-
trations tell me that thev had their
jobs threatened if thev divulged the
actual statistics Whitman said
Whitman said it was critical for
institutions that are hiding crime
statistics to correct the problem im-
mediately. By Sept. 1, the Federal
Crime Awareness and Campus Se-
curity Ac t wn 11 ma nda te tha tall cam-
puses release this information to
the public or nsk losing federal aid.
If campus administrators per-
sist in this deception, Whitman said
in the report, thev should "be held
accountable bv thecnmin.il and civil
courts
Monday, June 1
12:13 p.m hike rack between lenkins n building and larvi-
I lall - A -tudent reported the larcenyof bio cle parts ir
inch rear wheel and gear assembly.
5sG p m. Publications building Received a call from the
student Mores reporting a breaking and entering of a vending
machine.
Tuesd.iv, June 2
533 p.m. � First tlixr ot lovner Libran. student reported
the theft of a bixkbag. The Kx'kbag was later found in the elevator,
but the victim's wallet and checkbook were missing, lhe wallet w is
also found later but the monev was gone.
Wednesday, June 3
1150p.m. � 117Umstead � A studentreported sorneonebroke
into her room and stole her jewelrv while she w a in class
Thursday, June 4
rv55 p.m. � 202 Slav Hall� A student reported -he w as receh
ing harassing phone calls. The caller was identified as her e-
hovfnend, but no charges were filed.
Saturdav, June 6
2:45 p.m. � Bike rack west of lams Flail - A student reported
the larcenv of a 2h inch white Diamond Back T ran erse The chain
lock was cut to remove the hike.
Sunday, June 7
4 a.m. � Bike rack southeast oi Fetcher C apt. SB Kirtrell
observed an attempted larceny ol bicvele parts A male student was
attempting to remove the seat and rear wheel of a bicvele that wa-
locked to the bike rack. The subject was identified and charges are
pending upon contact of the bike's owner.
Crime Prevention Tip of the week: by Lt Keith Knox.
Lock it or loose it Bicycle theft can be prevented bv using a high-
security UTock and properly locking it to a bike rack or other solid
object The proper wav to lock your bike is to lift the front tire over the
top bar and kxk both the fnxit tire and the frame to the rack. An
additional U-kxk or case-hardened kvk and chain can be used to
secure the rear wheel to the frame. Always be sure to pull on the
belong mechanism to ensure the kvk is secure
Crim� Sc�n� is taken trom official PuWic Safety log.





2
$be East (Earnltnlan June 10, 1992
College Students take advantage of unusual summer programs
CTS- U.S. colleges are prepar-
ing for an onslaught of summer
scholars who will converge on cam-
puses to attend institutes, take semi-
nars. 01 take off for parts unknown
tor the pleasure of learning.
Whatever the passion�to track
wolves in the wild, climb the ruins
of ancient Greece, srudv computers
or debate Ave Rand most likelv,
there is a summer class just for that.
For example, more than 3(X) stu-
dents gameratComell University's
Ithaca, NY,campus, whichhasone
of the largest sumiwr programs of
it kiixl in the US to soak up cul-
ture and get awav from it all.
Gomel invi tes inquinng minds
to itudy with "Cornell's best pnv
feMOn" and to explore everything
fnmVCulturehV'lamesloyce"
to the "USSR. From Khrushchev
to the Commonwealth" and doz-
ens of other courses.
Whileon campus, students can
nMm freelv and are allowed access
toalmost all facilities free of charge.
All nonK&t courses last one week,
and begin the week of July 5-11,
with the last segment slated for Aug.
17.
For nxre philosophic tastes, the
Yearbook
Institute for Objectivist Studies, an
institute founded on the ideas of
writer Ayn Rand, is presenting the
third annual summer seminar titled
"Logic and Fhilosophy of Science"
on the campus of Hobart and Wil-
liam Smith Colleges in upstate New
York, July 25-Aug. 1.
Studentsare encouraged to hear
lectures, ask questions and enjoy
debate with guest professors. De-
signed for graduate students and
advanced undergraduates in phi-
losophy,history and the natural and
social sciences, seminar officials ask
that guests "have a familiarity with
objectivism
Southern Connecticut State
University, known for their exten-
sive study abroad programs, also
off erson-campus intensive summer
institutes covering subjects from
storytelling to Virginia Woolf to
human sexuality. The institutes be-
gin late May and continue thmugh
August.
For aspiring law students, the
pre-law LawCamp programs at
Loyola Marymount University in
California (June 28-July 11) and
Georgetown University in Wash-
ington, DC. (July 26-Aug. 8) will
prepare them to decide if a career in
law is worth theenergy and money.
For travelers who find the
world is their classnxim, may sum-
mer programs feature educational
tours with college credit available.
Never fear that you will be im-
mersed in books or lectures�most
of these courses offer lots of ti me for
sight-seeing and pleasure.
Art kwer, for example, can join
other devotees at Bridgewater State
College in Massachusetts, which is
offering an art-history tour of
France, Belgium and Luxembourg
with a pgolwaoc from the art de-
partment.
On the Big Island of Hawaii,
the International Women's Studies
Institute will focus on the lives of
Polynesian women past and
present, Aug.2-14.
A buzrword among summer
college travelers is "ecotourism
which means traveling to sites to
study ecological projects.
Earthwatch offers summer trips
for volunteer participants who may
find themselves strapping on back-
packs and searching for moose skel-
etons, embarking on archaeologi-
cal digs or tracking wildlife.
Teams of students are guided
by university professors, officers
with the American Wildlife Federa-
tion, or other experts for two-week
jaunts that are sponsored by orga-
nizations such as National Geo-
graphic.
Students, who pay their own
way, can choose trips with names
such as "Tracking Timber Wolves
"lemon Sharks or "Origins of Ur-
ban Europe Volunteers areplaced
in teams, share cooking and work
duties, and may find themselves
sleeping in a tent or a medieval
mansion.
The Smithsonian Institute also
offers an array of domestic summer
study trips such as "Native Cul-
tures of the Southwest "Grand
Canyon Rafting "Chicago Archi-
tecture and "California National
Park
Photo by R.J. Hwrtoon
Casper Johnson draws a section at
an archaeological dig.
Classifieds
Continued from pag� 1
ode hi raise the pnee in a couple of
vears m order to make rmmey for
new equipment Allen said. "But
it was student mooev that bought
this new equipment, so we see no
need to make a profit from stu-
dents"
After tive ears, the new equip-
ment becomes the property of the
communication department. At
tha t ti me. AI len ex pec t to enter into
a new production contract with the
Media B�v�al
The Media Board may want
Kl buv new equipment with up-
dated technology Allen said.
With a five vear contact, the Me-
dia Board B not saddled into equip-
ment that mav eventually be obso-
lete
The most exciting thing about a
Video yearbook production clas,
according to Allen, is the opportu-
nity for other video pnxluctions
that will open up.
Greenville's ONLY Exotic
Nightclub'
r
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
Adult
Entertainment
J Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
PtcMrfon rm.
mi �'i
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BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIAL DRIVE � 355-2519
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
?Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
11:30 am -1:30 pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association
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Carpeted, kitchen appliances, some
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WANTED 2 male roommates. Fur-
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LOOKING FOR TWO FEMALE
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ebe East Carolinian
June 10, 1992
College Students take advantage of unusual summer programs
CPS U S colleges are prepar-
ing tor an onslaught ot summer
sdwlarswhowaiconvergeoncam-
pusestoattend institutes, takes�ni-
nars oi take ott tor parts unknown
tor the pleasured learning.
hate er thepassion to track
wolves in the wild, climb the ruins
v it arx ient (ireece, study computers
or debate yeRand most likely,
there is a summer v lass just tor that
Few example, more than300stu-
den ts gather at Cornell University's
lth.ua Nt campus,whkhhasone
iM me largest summer programs of
its kind in the US to soak up cul-
ture and get away from it all.
( omell invites inquiring minds
to stud with "( omeH's best pro-
fessors" and to explore everything
from 50s( ulture"to lamesjoyce"
to the I s S K From Khrushchev
Commonwealth" and Joz-
ens ot other courses
Whileiwi campus, students can
roamfreeh and are allowed access
t all facilities freeof charge.
� � Lirseslastoneweek,
and - - k ot luk 5-11,
i ast segment slated for ug
w
1-
re phi'wisophk tastes the
Institute for Objectivist Studies, an
institute founded on the ideas of
writer Avn Rand, is presenting the
third annual summer seminar titled
"Logic and Philosophy of Science"
on the campus of Hohart and Wil-
ItamSmithCollegesinupsUteNew
York, jury 25-Aug. 1.
Studentsareencouragedtohear
lectures, ask questkns and enjoy
debate with guest professors. De-
signed for graduate students m
advanced undergraduates in phi-
losophy,history and the naturaland
social sciences, seminar officials ask
that guests "have a familiarity with
objectivism
Southern Connecticut State
University, known for their exten-
sive study abroad programs, also
offersonampusintensivesummer
institutes covering subjects from
storytelling to Virginia Woolf to
human sexuality. The institutes be-
gin late May and continue through
August
For aspiring law students, the
pre law LawCamp programs at
Loyola Marvmount University in
California dune 28-July 11) and
Ceorgetown University in Wash-
ington, DC. Quly 26-Aug. 8) will
prepare them to decide if a career in
law is worth theenergy and money.
For travelers who find the
world is their classroom, mav sum
mer programs feature educational
tours with college cmdit available
Never fear that you will be im-
mersed in btoks or lectures most
of thesecourses offer tots of timefor
sight-seeing and pleasure
Art lover, for example, can join
other devotees at Brkigewater State
College in Massachusetts, which is
offering an art-history tour of
France, Belgium and Luxembourg
with a professor from the art de-
partment.
(.i the Big Island of Hawaii,
the International Women's Studies
Institute will focus on the lives of
Polynesian women past and
present, Aug.2-14.
A buzzword among summer
college travelers is "ecotounsm
which means traveling to sites to
study ecological projects.
Earth watch offers summer trips
tor volunteer participants who may
find themselves strapping on back
packs and searching for moose sko
etons, embarking on archaeologi-
cal digs or tracking wildlife.
Teams of students are guided
bv university professors, officers
with the American Wildlife Federa-
tion, or other experts for two-week
jaunts that are sponsored by orga-
nizations such as Nabonal Geo-
graphic.
Students, who pay their own
way, can choose trips with names
such as 'Tracking Timber Wolves
"lemon Shirks or "Ongins of Ur-
ban Europe Volunteersare placed
in teams, share cooking and work
duties, and may find themselves
sleeping in a tent or a medieval
mansion.
The Smithsonian Institute also
offers an array of domestic summer
study trips such as "Native Cul-
tures of the Southwest "Grand
Canyon Rafting "Chicago Archi-
tecture and "California National
Park
Photo by R.J H�rrl�on
Casper Johnson draws a section at
an archaeological dig.
Classifieds
Yearbook
Continued from page 1
ode to raise the price in a coupled
years in order to make monej tor
new equipment Allen-aid But
it uas student nxnev that Bought
this new equipment, so we see no
need to make a profit from stu-
dents
After five years, the new equip-
ment becomes the property of the
communication department. At
that time Allen expects to enter into
a new pr d uc tion a ntract with the
Media Board.
The 1tiia Ikvmi mav want
to buv new equipment with up-
dated technology ' Allen said.
Five vear contract, the Me-
� i oard is not saddled into equip-
that ma eventually be obso-
lete
' rnostexcitmgthingabouta
- yearbook production class,
according to Allen, is the opportu-
�. for other video productions
that will open up.
SILVER
"Greenville's ONLY Exotic
Nightclub"

BULLET
Aduft
Entertainment
r Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
I
I
I $2.00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
I Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
I rrTiK Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
llckln�on Av � � � -��� '
l �
ADMISSION
,to the FILMS
UStudent 1 CardS a urrent Activity ard
I
1
I
HaHWMHAiiMH �� fiawwwi
NIKE � L.A. GEAR � REEBOK . ASICS � K-SWISS � KEDS � AVIA
TRETORN � BORELLI � ROCKPORT . SEBAGO � PROXY � MIA
PAPPAGALLO � PROXY . ELLESSE . SELBY . ETIENNE AIGNER
VAN ELI � JOYCE . IMRj gSB . DEXTER � MARIPE
NEW YORK TRANS �PK SAM & UBBY
station six. A RTTlmlpI oWHATSWHAT
BAND0LIN0 . ABgUflVAN
SOFT SPOTSjB IWl KASY STREET
TWB.0NE.JW f ft 1 fMV,9WEST
CALLISTO.IV i I I k Ml-REGENCY
irf 11 MMiFB
CAPEZIO � L 1 ' �fEL'�?N
SPERRY . D�BB7RfJ �
CONVERSE BUPMIH WOODSTOCK
HUSHPUPPIES oB fT T J TUEJ BG0 - OSH-KOSH
DANIEL GREEN . �IHB M9 ' MAINE W00DS
BRITISH KNIGHTS � KP �Rr � STEP AND STRIDE
GEORGIO BRUTINI � STACY ADAMS � JOHNSTON & MURPHY
FRENCH SHRINER � BALLY . BORELLI FOR MEN . COLE HAAN
NORTH COUNTRY CASUALS � FLORSHEIM � WHITE MOUNTAIN
Men's. Ladies' & Children's Shoes
plus Handbags & Accessories
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED FOOTWEAR
BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIALDWVE � 35S-2519
r
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
11:30 am-1:30 pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS I
and 2 hedn�m apartment- Erie
effibenl several locations in b
Carpeted, kitchen appliances - -
wa ter ami v er paid, washa
hookups ov takmg appbcal
for FalL Call 752-8915.
WAN IT D 2 male roommates i ur-
nished bedroom with bathro �
bu- , i ess. Available Augu
semester, $175 mn, itkN uti
Call 321-1848
FEMALE ROOMMATI NEEDED
to share. bedi � m apartma I
t campus new apart � -
effkient 1 � ;
Available August Call 757-09
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
bedroom h i �
5552
LOOKING FOR TWO Fl MAI I
nonsm kei
bedr
FOR REP

ONE BEDR( -
� �� impu-
.
FEMALE ROOMM
urti -
rrklrV�, �- I
- Lai n �

(,KA!)l Ml
FORSA
FOR RENT
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES!
IMYKRMTY Xi'AKIMKNh
-
��� t � .
I

� . -
�AZALEA GARDENS'
CktL B qaM m kedroos � �
at TV I ��:��� � - s"
-��r MOB11 �' �
�r.jUTJ ' � � t � r - r r
art: Brook Vtih
Contact J ! or tommy Williams
756-7815
THRU LRI 1 C
HIGHER ED
COSTS SC
-
j
Announcements
r.THOHC STUDENT wL.V
IL�L
Thf Newman Camolic student
Center in ites you towThip with
them. Sundav Masses: 11 30am &
8.30pm at the Newman Center
95? F. ItHh St . Greenville. VS � �
days: Ham at the New man C
HSBfllAlcGAXdLESBlAM
AUIANCE
Scxial suppcrt, activism and ac-
tivities. Ail interested and caring
The

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�bc Eaat(�araltntan
June 10, 1992
College Students take advantage of unusual summer programs
v ! I colleges are prepar-
� an onslaught ol summei
it who will convergeon earn
�uses to attend institutes takeserru
urs i takeoff tor parts unknown
, easureof learning
v hate ei thepassitw totra k
mii tin' wild climb the ruin
rvece stud) computers
'� Rand most likeh
, � i lassjust forthat
i example morethan300sru
thei d! v ornell I ni ersit) 's
� � pus v hi hhasone
mei pmgrams of
� soak up Oil
� �� from it .ill
�.����� ngminds
rnell's best pro
ver thing
turf ti' lames o e
rom Khrushchev
- i wealth' and doz-
� - ses
mpus, students can
Ian i lowed ac( i-s
� freeof harge.
' , M U'W �.vk.
- . � i!) 5-11,
tedfoi -m:
1 7
phi� tastes th
Yearbook
Institute tor Objectivist Studies, an
institute founded on the ideas oA
writer Avn Rand, is presenting the
thiid annual summer seminar titled
"Logk and Phiksophy of Science'
on the campus oi Hohart and Wil
liam Smith Colleges in upstate New
York, uly 25-Aug. I.
Studentsare encouraged to hear
lectures ask questions and enjoy
debate with guest professors. De-
signed tor graduate students and
advanced undergraduates in phi
losophy,histor) andthenaturaland
social sciences, seminar officials ask
that guests "havea familiarity with
objet tivism
Southernonnecticut State
I niversity known tor their exten-
sive stud) abroad programs, also
offerson campus intensive summer
institutes rovering sublets from
storytelling to Virginia Wool! to
human M.ulit Ihe institutes be
gin late May and continue through
ugust
For aspiring law students the
pre law Law( amp programs at
Loyola Marymount I niversit) in
I alifornia (June 2H July 11) and
Georgetown University in Wash
ington DC. (July 26 ug s) will
prepare them ti decide it a i areer in
l.iw is hirth theenergy and m� mey
For travelers who find the
world is their classroom, may sum
nuT programs feature educational
tours with college nniit available.
Never fear that you will be im-
mersed inbooksor lee tures most
ot thesecoursesoffer lots of timefor
sight-seeing and pleasure
Art lovtM fir example,can join
other devotees a tBridgewater State
i ollege in Massai husetts, which is
offering an art history tour of
France Belgiumand Luxembourg
with .i pmfessoi from the art de-
partment
( Hi the Big Island ol Hawaii,
the Intm.ition.�l Women's Studies
Institute will f(Kus on the lives of
Polynesian women past and
present, ug 2 14
A buzzword among summer
college travelers is 'ecotourism
which means traveling to sites to
study ecological projects
Earthwatchoffers summer trips
forvolunteei partu ipantswhomay
tirvl themselves strapping on ba k-
Teams of students are guided
bv university professors, officers
with the American Wikflife Federa-
tion, or other experts for two-week
Vaunts that are sponsored by orga-
nizations such as National Geo-
graphic.
Students, who pay their own
way, i an choose trips with names
such as 'Tracking Timber Wolves
"lemon Sharks or "Origins of Ur-
ban Europe Volunteers are placed
in teams, share cooking and work
duties, and may find themselves
sleeping in a tent or a medieval
mansion.
Ihe Smithsonian Institute also
offers an array of domestic summer
study trips svuh as "Nativeill-
tun's of the Southwest "l .rand
Canyon Rafting "Chicago Archi-
tecture and " alifornia National
Park
Photo by RJ H�rn�on
Casper Johnson draws a section at
an archaeological dig
Classifieds
packsand
foi moi isesk
etons, embarking on archaeolog
cal dies or tra king wildlife
Continued from page 1
. �, , � � : .1 couple ol
rtake mone fi f
nent Mien said But
"kiiv that bought
ment so ve see no
profit from stu-
�?w equip
pert) I the
At
� - tef into
� ��� tf '
nay want
� with up-
said
Me-
� i equip-
bso
- ita
- � i - i �
"Greenville's ONLY Exotic
y Nightclub"
SILVER tf
TTbciLLET
V Adult
Entertainment
t Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
JHJflLJIUL
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
I
I
I S2 00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
I Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
I i. . u Stage Time 9:00pm
1 i3p Call 756 6278
FREE
it . . � f D m
ADMISSION
to the FILMS
urrcnl I
I
.
NKE � LA. GEAR � REEBOK � ASICS � K-SWISS . KEDS � AVIA
TRETORN . BORELLI � ROCKPORT � SEBAGO � PROXY � MIA
PAPPAGALLO � PROXY . ELLESSE . SELBY . ETIENNE AIGNER
VAN ELI . JOYCE � IMP KB � DEXTER � MARIPE
NEW YORK TRANSjM �CK " SAM & LIBBY
STATION SIX � 4 EWTlTTlirl ifcwHATSWHAT
BANDOLINO . MWlHkEVAN
SOFT SPOTfJ iTlrrYWl �ASY STREET
TWB.ONE.J I fa 1 W i'E.9WEST
CALLISTO.IV i I I W ml. REGENCY
WESTIESoW ill KlilO- CALICO
esprit.41 � i I ��r-1CL!
cAPEzio.M� l � mHv4EU'0N
SPERRY . DdflmmAmmR" � 9 & CO.
converse � W H H rWOODSTOCK
HUSHPUPPIES fi Wt Ti I TJTfll BGO � OSH-KOSH
DANIEL GREEN SjMh10 MAINE WOODS
BRITISH KNIGHTS � KW KR � STEP AND STRIDE
GEORGIO BRUTINI � STACY ADAMS � JOHNSTON & MURPHY
FRENCH SHRINER � BALLY . BORELLI FOR MEN � COLE HAAN
NORTH COUNTRY CASUALS � FLORSHEIM � WHITE MOUNTAIN
Men's. Ladies' 8 Children's Shoes
plus Handbags & Accessories
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED FOOTWEAR
BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIAL DRIVE � 355-2519
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organizatior
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
11:30 am -1:30 pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
FOR RENT
KJM.s ARMS APARTMENTS

watei and �wa
hookup ' - � �. .
WAN II D . � �
nW i � '
H.MAI I ROOMMATI M I
to
ROOMMATI MIDI
LOOKIV .F K I �'�

FOR RE?
MA l
FOR
FOR RENT
UNIVERSITY 'KI M
�AZALEA GARDENS
- .
, r � r

� ,��'

HIGHBRED
COSTS SC
Announcement
( MmniLSTi PlMlLN-
IEE
The '
Cent.
their - '
pn it the N
9531 �� �
" �
Ml-IANL
Sh ial support �
tivities Ml I carii
Rich s Nuthouse
GIRL CALLED LEIGH
thiL4nooA 00

.
Y
I
fjete
Artf d6 nIcT
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association
UN SUCC eSSfUL?ATe
CeefL AMP SALT
ceeAL aJP &Ro!N: sAR CL "�'
0 cete � J3 BfwitU sjAft
ce�,e �rHplt 53
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he Caotv�arnlinian
June 10. 1992
College Students take advantage of unusual summer programs
� p.ir
�ummei
. MK im
m known
Instituted! Objectivisl Studies an prepare them toderkle if a careei in
institute founded on the ideas of law is worth theenerKy and mnne
� is who find the
, ro im ma sum
mei programs f ature edw ational
writei vn Rand is presenting the Fot tra
thini annual sumrnei seminar titled � irkl is th�
! 4v;u and Philosophy i�t Si ier i
iwi die campus of 1 lobart ami Wi
tours with i fllirrni a ail ible
tt.uk liamSmithCollegesmupstateNw Nevei feai that you will be im
imb tht' ruins
niters
ttoi that
mrt-d in h
nf the
I
i !
York luK 25 ug 1
Studentsareencouraged toheai
lw tures ask que ti �i ind enjo
debate with gue I lessors Pe
�igned fii graduate students and
�. � dergraduates in ,
�� , tors ami th� natural i
.ocialsciences,seminaroffuialsask France B
h,n!v have a familiarity with wit!
obje ti imia
Southernonnet tu ul State
! known foi their exten
sive studv abroad
tfiTson-campus intensive sun
institutes co ering sub(
storytelling I '� i i ' �H,lt to
human sexualil. i atitutes be
in lateMa andcontinui
ugust

law Law , at
ntL'niven.it
i � i rtta (June 28-juh 1 H and . i �
eorgel ml ni ersih
th
in y "n
therdevoti-e I late
, !� whu h is
tour ol

i v t!
the :

tud �
l.Htt
I earns ot students are guided
by university professors, officers
with trw Amerk an Wildlife Federa
tion of othei experts tor two week
unts that are sponsored hv orga
nizations such as National Geo
graphic
students who pa) their own
wav, can chcxse trips with names
�in has 1 r,n king I imberWolves
lemon Sharks oi l iriginsofl r
banl urope "Volunteersareplaced
in teams, share cooking and work
duties, and ma find themselves
sleeping in a tent or a medie al
mansion
Ihe Smithsonian Institute al i
offers an arrav ofdomesth summer
study trips suih ,is "Native ul
tures of the Southwest "Grand
( anyon Raftinghicago Archi
lecture, arid "( alifomia National
Park
Yearbook
rom page 1
'

none
.1' IV
silver
TTbcjllet
Adult

Ent I
SS jf Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exo' ' Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night i i Dancers
CASH PRIZE
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
1 S2 : Admission Sat . Night
I Open Tuesday-Saturday Doors Open
, , rgg Stage Time 9 00pm
I

I
I
L
A
Cull 756 6278
ri
Attention Student
MIAMI
WHIT
NIKE � LA. GEAR � REEBOK . ASICS � K-SWISS . KEDS . AVIA
TRETORN . BORELU � ROCKPORT � SEBAGO . PROXY � MIA
PAPPAGALLO . PROXY � ELLESSE � SELBY � ETIENNE AIGNER
VAN ELI � JOYCE . W& fcjWB . DEXTER � MARIPE
NEW YORK TRANSai KjPK " SAM UBBY
STATION SIX � ylMlllltlM8
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
BANDOLINC
SOFT SPOT
twb-one;
CALLISTO-
WESTIES .
ESPRIT . W
CAPEZK)!
SPERRY.DE
CONVERSE � I
HUSHPUPPIES
0
H
0
and more!
il&t STREET
� 9 WEST
REGENCY
K). CALICO
X .CLARKS
ELI .ONEX
� 9 & CO.
WOODSTOCK
GO � OSH-KOSH
DANIEL GREEN � rfl s � MAINE WOODS
BRITISH KNIGHTS � KW KR � STEP AND STRIDE
GEORGK) BRUTINI � STACY ADAMS � JOHNSTON & MURPHY
FRENCH SHRINER � BALLY . BORELU FOR MEN � COLE HAAN
NORTH COUNTRY CASUALS � FLORSHEIM . WHITE MOUNTAIN
Men's. Ladies' Children's Shoes
plus Handbags I Accessories
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED FOOTWEAR
BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIAL DRIVE � 355-2519
�Increase enrollment in your organization
Increase awareness of programs offered by your orgaf
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
11:30 am -1:30 pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the 5GA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association
Classifieds
kl'
i
FOR RENT
.is 'y
FOR REP
n mm i
worn.
FOR RENT
�JLUL
Announcement
�AUJ2L1� HL1
L�K




.
M�;fxi:al-gay-L�SEIAS
-UI.1AML
.

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GIRL CALLED LEIGH
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"�' v,
srxusorui by tfae ECU Student Films Committee
-norntmrrn r - � '
Student
h your organization
s offered by your organization
awarding activities ECU has to
them
8, 22, 29
6,9
-1:30 pm
GREAT ROOM
9 - Room 244)
to Reserve Your Booth
t Government Association
Classifieds
3Uie iEaHt (EarDlinian
June 10, 1992
I OR KIM
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS 1
and 2 bedroom apartments. Energy -
efficient, several locations in town.
Carpeted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer dryer
hookups. Now taking applications
for Fall. Call752-�915.
WANTED 2 male roommates. Fur-
nished bedroom withbathroom. ECU
bus access. Available August for Fall
semester, $l75mon, inds utilities.
Call 321-1848.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 2 bedroom apartment; dose
to campus; new apartments; energy
efficient $170mo. plus 12 utilities.
Available August Call 757-0933.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Two
bedroom house. Call Ginie 756-
5552.
LOOKING FOR TWO FEMALE
nonsmokers (preferably) to share
bedroom apt. beginning in Au-
I OR RIM
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES'
A Brimful Place to U�
� All New �
� And KmcJv to Rcoi �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
3� E. h Sown
�l-ociaMNwECV
� Nk M�K� Shoppinn (MM
� AaaM from tUftiwiv Parroi Staooo
I jmKl Offer � SJ W � month
Contact 1T or Tommy Wiihmn
OfBorOpen Apt I I2- Vipm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
(Van an quart one bedroom funathed apaftmrau. rt
crgv rfflcarM. few waaH and ararrr. waaneta. drwra.
cab TV' Coapara or aln�lea onhr iJ40 a tnonUY 6
ratntn ��� MOBIIF HOMF RENTAl.S-c��rlr� �
atn(tea AnartrratawlroooilehomeainAiaJeaGardroa
near Brook VaUy Coanary Ont
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
I ORRl.M
gust. $121.67 rent plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Julie ASAP 830-0984.
ONE BEDROOM AFT. available
row.CkfrsetocarripusanddownaOwn.
Dishwashar,frigstnve. Nkesiziebath
and bedroom. Call 7584701.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 1 2blockfromcampus,
2 blocks from downtown and super-
market Rent includes utilities, phone
and cable bills. Call 758-6418. ACT
NOW!
SOCIAL FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed ASAP! Village Green Apts.
On 5th St 112 bath 2 bedrms $180
moa 758-1547.
GRADUATE STUDENT or profes-
skxvil to share 4 bedroom house with
hospital reskient Separate entrance, 3
r�tfTrocxrK,fireplace,wixxistove,dish-
washov washerdiw,andmon?.804-
358457.
FORSA1.F
SEIZED CARS trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available in your area now. Call (800)
3383388 ext C-5999.
FOR SALE: 23" Schwinn Highplaias,
greatconditkxx$150.CallCraigat752-
4627.
THREE FREE CONDOMS! Special
introduction to our wide selection of
high airy,rw�mebrarKl Grooms at
HIGHER EDUCATION
COSTS SOURING
Locate private sector aid for
college students. Contact
AAA Student Scholarship
Service at 758-9501
lORSMI
low prices. Order today KBA, Box
13001, RTP,NC 27709.
FOR SALE: Jamis Women's Earth
Cruiser bike. Less than lyr. old- Excel-
lent condition. Lock included. $125
Must sell! Please call 752-2427.
IIFLPW WTF1
WANTED: Baseball players for the
1992 Carolina Bush League. For more
information contact Mark Honeycutt
752-4630 or Chas Mitthl 75rV0763.
Serious inquiries only please!
EASY WORK! Excellent pay! As-
semble products at home. Call toll free
1-800467-5566 ext 5920.
CRU1SESHIPSNOWH1RING: Earn
$2,000 month and world travel (Ha-
wau,Mexico,theCaribbean,etc.)Holi-
dav, summer and career employment
available. No experience necessary.
For empbvment program call 1-206-
5454155 ext C586.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: Fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation! Room &
board! Over 8,000 openings. No expe-
rience necessary. Male or Female. For
ernpknTnent program call Student
Empki)Tnent Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext 1649.
IIFI.rW VMM)
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positiora.Ctbenefits.CaU(800)338-
3388 ext P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships. Students also needed
Christmas, Spring, and Summer for
amusement park ernployment Call
(800) 3383388 ext F-3464.
BRODYS for Men is accepting
applications for additional part-
time Sales Associates. Must be
fashion forward have ability to
provide professional service. Flex-
ible schedulesalarydiscount.
Apply Brody's The Plaza Mon-
Wed 1pm to 4pm.
WAITRESS WANTED: part-
time, good pay and tips. Call
Shirley after 6pm at 355-0143.
SI.RMt FSOFFFRFI)
TYPING: Error-free, quick and de-
pendable at reasonable cost Excellent
typing ard proofreading skills (gram-
mar, punctuation, sentence structure,
etc) Call Pauline at 757-3693.
WORDPROCESSING: Resume
term papers, thesis, psychological as-
sessments. Fast service, reasonable
rates. Call 321-2522.
IMRSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN AND POETIC SOUL
seeks friendship and correspon-
dence from like-minded lady. Pho-
tos and letters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
HAPPY 22ND BIRTHDAY to
Shannon Bridges, my best friend
SONUS
(and favorite Gemini) on the
Planet. Just had to put Gemini in!
Ha Ha Cheers-MBM.
TO: My Unfinished Chapter (you
know who you are). Thanks for
the talk. Thinkin' of you. From:
Anticipation.
ECU STUDENT STORES invites
you to attend a reception on
Wednesday, June 17 at 300pm for
Dr. Gay Wilentz, in honor of her
recent publication Binding Cul-
tures. Dr. Wilentz will be signing
copies of the book.
St Paul's Pentecostal Holiness Church
presents
Exposing Witchcraft with Carol Kornacki
Hear her story of a search for popularity and power
As see on The 700 Club. TBN. Inspirational Network and
her own weekly TV Series "This Generation" - topics:
Satanism, Witchcraft and the New Age Movement.
Sanirdnv.Junel3at7:QODm
Sunday. June 14 at lOmim & 6:00 Dm
10th Street Extension, Greenville, NC752-5773
EDQETESDEE
BUY ANDTRADK
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CDS
CRITERIA FOR ANNOUNCEMENTS
Any organization may use the Announcements Section of The
East Carolinian to list activities and events open to the public
two times free of charge. All announcements are to be typed or
neatly printed. Due to the limited amount of space, The East
Carolinian cannot guarantee the publication of announcements.
It is not advisable to rely on these announcements as a sole
means of communication. Summer deadlines are: Monday at
4pm for Wednesday's publication.
fc WELLNESS
w ASSISTANTS
(Aerobic Instructors)
I'itt County Memorial Hocpi
lal has positions jvailahlt lor
Weilness Assistants to teach
aerobic cIjsms tor hospital
employees. High school
diploma and Cl'R certification
required: aerobic certification
preterred Hours may van he
taMCal �30ptTI and :Hlpm.
Competitive Satey For con
MJtr.iti'in call 551-4556 or
send resume to Employment
Office. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. P.O. Box 6028.
Greenville. NC 27835-6028.
K IE V
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
a constituent o(
University
Medical Center
County
Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT CEN-
m
The Newman Catholic Student
Center inv ites you to worship with
them. Sunday Masses: 11:30am &
8:30pm at the Newman Center,
953 E. 10th St Greenville. Week-
days: 8am at the Newman Center.
BISFXUAL-r.AV.l FSB1AN
ALLIANCE
Social support, activism and ac-
tivities. All interested and caring
people welcome. Call 757-6766
from 11:15-12:30 Mon-Thurs. for
information on time and place.
RFS1JMF WRITING WORK-
SHOP
The Career Services office an-
nounces a workshop on resume
writing to be held on June 10 at
3:00pm in the Bloxton House. Par-
ticipants will learn about format,
content and production of a pro-
fessional resume. Handouts will
be available. This workshop is es-
pecially designed for prospective
graduates, but is open to anyone.
M AMN1IA1 "OLD1E-
qpi OlFS" DANCE
ECU District 97, State Employees
Association of NC, will be spon-
soring their 3rd annual "OMie-
Gold ies" Dance, on Saturday, June
13,1992 from 830pm-12:30am. at
theGreenvilleCoun try Qub, with
a new DJ featuring music from the
'50s, '60s, and '70. There will
be door prizes, light hors
d'oeuvres,and cash bar, as well
as prizes for winners of cos-
tume and dance cor�ts. We
are expecting a surprise visit
from "Elvis Advanced tick-
ets at a cost oi $6person, may
be obtained by calling Nancy
Corbett, (757-4199) or Peggy
Nobles, (757-6012). A limited
number of tickets will be avail-
able at the door.
PFACF CORPS
Challenging and rewarding
caeffjexperierue-adverture-tTaveLafJ
to $400 after completion of
serviceCollege Loan Deferment
and partial forgiveness of some
school loans. Those are just some
of the benefits offered by Peace
Corps- Interested? Stop by and see
your on-campus Peace Corps Re-
cruiter-Belinda Blinkoff-at 112
Speight Monday through Wednes-
day between the hours of 9am-
3pm. Call Belinda at (919) 757-
6061 and find out what the
toughest job has in store for
you!
pRGAVWHENTZ
ECU Student Stores invites you
to attend a reception on
Wednesday, June 17 at 3pm for
Dr. Gay Wilentz, in honor of
her recent publication Binding
Cultures. Dr. Wilentz will be
signing copies of the book.
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(Hire iEaat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, Nervs Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. Netvs Editor
Lewis Coblf, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bill Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
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Dail Reed, Photo Editor
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Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East f'awhman has served the East Carolina Univers"y campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that
affects EC students During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all
pomLs of view letters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, NO. 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, June 10, 1992
ECU portrays 'stepping stone' image
When Harvard beta me the first college of the
United States in 1636, the age of education in this
country was pre-infantile, at best. Unbeknownst at
the time � since Harvard was religious in nature �
Turitan theology set forth a precedent that education
and educators were something to be valued.
In the 216-year history of the United States,
education has yet to become a top priority to our
government officials. Money isbeing carelessly wasted
an defense for enemies that neither want to fight nor
exist, and the trend continues to be: when we are safe
from communist aggression, then will money be
allocated to education.
This is wrong.
Our governments' policy on education can-
not continue on its current path. Qualified students
re being denied an education because they cannot
afford the continually sky-rocketing price of a college
education. They can only hope that somehow, some-
way the bills can get paid so they may one day make
a difference in the governing policies of this country.
The sad thing about our government's policy
on education is that it trickles down into the hierarchy
of the education system. Administrators have to get
the bills paid, so cuts have to be made. These cuts,
ironically, come from where they need to be cut the
least: hours of libraries, use and quantity of pa per and
the number of courses being offered.
Teachers, professors and doctors alike are
finding little reward for being overworked and un-
derpaid; it causes a sense of resentment to their cause.
TJiese educators' can only do so much when the
reward is so small. And with the increased pressure
ffom administrators to research and to publish books
arid articles, the spirit of these educators is being
quelled.
Educators are turning to others walks of life
that are less stressful and more rewarding. In essence,
tfce good or better teachers leave while the mediocre
(ties stay. While this does not hold true at every
college and university around the nation, the trend
has become more and more favorable in recent years.
Locally, ECU has long been noted for its
inability to lure and keep educators on this campus.
Fj-om the halls and offices of educators and adminis-
trators on the university grounds to coaches and
officials in the athletics department, ECU has become
a middle-man, or stepping stone for professionals to
move on.
While we do have our share of outstanding
professors and dtxrtors, schools and departments
within the university are beginning to show signs of
wear and tear. The communications department �
especially journalism � has completely changed
face over the past five years. One professor left tostart
the School of Journalism at the University of Ala-
bama, while another has gone back for a law degree.
The others left for unknow n reasons.
The communications department is recover-
ing though. New people have been hired, and their
spirits seem to be high. But the turnover seems to be
cyclical. It permeatesintootherareasof theuniversity
� like the chancellor and the athletics department.
Why did Chancellor Eakin even consider
assuming the presidency at Bowling Green? Was
ECU not enough of a challenge for him? There are
countless things that need to be rectified in our own
back yard, but he beckons to the call of hisalma mater.
Granted, our beloved chancellor stayed here at ECU,
but what's to stop him from assuming the next job
that opens up?
The athletics department is to be equally
reprimanded. There have been countless coaching
changes over the past 10 years � changes that make
building a "winner" impossible. Bill Lewis left
Greenville for Georgia Tech before the 1992 Peach
Btiwl victory celebration ever even made it back to
North Carolina. And Athletics Director Dave Hart's
name has popped up as a possible candidate for open
jobs throughout the country (the latest being Wake
Forest).
When are these administrators and coaches
going to understand that we have a need to build a
great reputation here at ECU. It's time we students
demand that we get what we are paying for. ECU
should not be a stepping stone � we should be a goal
that all educators want to achieve.
Remember, it's one thing to join a winning
team, it's another to build one.
Perot offers needed alternative
By
J. William
Walker
Editorial
. Columnist
With the speed of unandi-
diih? Ross Perot's campaign acceler-
ating fast, George Bush had better
start looking for a new home
Bush's campaign is in trouble,
ahd with the entry of a third man in a
traditionally two-man race, the "en-
vironmental, educational" president
i$ in deep The country is ready to put
a businessman in a politicians place
How could it possibly hurt?
Let's face some facts. Bush's
first boner was his "No new taxes"
lip-reading joke. The war in the Gulf,
that could have saved him, was never
finished. The "recovering" economy
is now floundering with increases in
uhemployment at a time when Bush
nfceds prosperity the most. The rude
awakening of the LA riots has also
sfnt an alarming wake-up call beck-
oning for change. That fresh breeze is
ajfve in Perot.
Students especially should sup-
port Perot. Bush offers us hia same
approach to economics that has cre-
ased a severely stagnant job market.
Perot represents an opportunity to
institute proven business approaches
�4 recovery
I Bush represents Pro-life (or
Phxhoice, well he's not quite sure).
Prot leaves the question where it
should always remain, with the
woman.
Arguments have been made
that Perot has no finite stand on any
issues. The problem with most politi-
cians has never been where they stand
on an issue, but rather where they fall
short of executing their positions.
Perot has not taken a clear stand, but
who cares? Bush's promises have
been so hollow that Perot, by not
taking a stand, actually improves his
situation.
With no impossible promises
to institute, Perot can not let the
American public down by failing to
realize his platform.
Bush, on the other hand, can
and most probably will fall way short
of his multiple idealistic promises.
The problem with
most politicians has
never been where
they stand on an
issue, but rather
where they fall
short of executing
their positions.
There is no reason to believe that
Bush will change his stale ways ahd
conclude his term with the fulfill-
ment of his promises. If elected for
the second leg of a possible eight-
year tenure. Bush win have no politi-
cal incentive to execute anything for
the good of his constituents.
The election itself has been the
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Candidates in your living room?
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Column iat
center of much concern lately. People
are talking of the "constitutional cri-
sis" pending the lack of an electoral
majority. Politicians and analysts are
wont to label the twelfth amendment
as a crisis. Let's clear this confusion.
In the event that no candidate
receives a majority (173) of electoral
votes, the presidential election goes
to the house with each state delega-
tion having one vote. The vice-presi-
dential race goes to the Senate in the
same manner. If a tie occurs in the
house, the speaker of the house be-
comes president until the tie is bro-
ken. If a tie occurs in the senate, the
Senate Majority Leader Pro Tern be-
comes vice-president until the tie is
broken.
This is hardly a crisis. The
twelfth amendment was constructed
for mis purpose. Labeling this a "cri-
sis" is a prime example of Washing-
ton bureaucracy. The logical chain of
events would be: The House elects
Clinton president, and the Senate
elects Quayle vice-president (crisis).
However, Washington's probable an-
swer would be an eight month el-
ephant-ass stall resulting in Presi-
dent Foley and Vice-President Byrd
Americans have three choices
this year.
Elect Clinton or Bush and con-
tinue the ridiculous political song and
dance with blatant lies to the people
or elect Perot and revitalize the stag-
nant American pride and faith in a
Democratic system.
Ross Perot may not be able to
save the American political system,
but he sure can't screw it up any
worse than it is now.
Yet another process is wending
its way towards an ugly and seem-
ingly inescapable end This election
year, the American press has all but
erased the already blurry line between
the "respectable" mainstream press
and schlocky in fotainment-type trash.
The New York Times' decision to
treat as real news Gennifer Flowers'
allegations of adultery � which were
paid statements, youll recall � set
the tone for the political season
Since then, it has gotten worse
It used to be that celebnbes announced
muck candidacies, both to get them-
selves some attention and to satinze
the process Everyone from Dave
Barry to Bill the Cat has done it at one
rime or another
Now, in an unwelcome reversal
of the trend, presidential candidates
are trying to make themselves into
celebrities, weaseling their way into
the cult of personality Right and left,
"serious" candidates for the presi-
dency are lining up to appear on. Cod
help us, talk shows.
It's happened before. Robert
Kennedy and Richard Nixon both
appeared on The Tonight Show back
when Johnny Carson was still wet
behind the ears. But back then, such
appearances were very much the
exception. Now they're becoming
the rule
Bill Clinton (remember him?)
donned dark glasses for a sax-play-
ing gig on Arsenvo Hall, the next night
he was schmoozing with Larry Kong
Larry King's program was the
launching pad for un-candidate H
Ross Perot, too Jerry Brown had to
settle for Dennis Miller
And though it's not quite the
same tiling � not quite � President
Bush was so desperate for media
attention that he recently called a
prime-time press conference. I'm
sure he'd have preferred Geraldo
Larry King isn't so bad, since
he's used to interviewing political
figures on occasion Besides, he asks
fairly good questions: pomt-blank,
he asked Gin ton, "Why are you run-
rung third?" And callers can make
his guests' lives uncomfortable, too
The other guys pitch sof tballs.
And the candidates know they will,
that's half the reason they're there
In fact, it's a cozy arrangement
all around. The shows' hosts get good
ratings and a pumped-up ego. They
feel important. What's more, they
can use footage from the interviews
to promote the show in general, even
when the actual guests are trans-
sexual Nazi Eskimos
The candidates get help with
their images. By appearing on a talk
show, they can't help but seem
warmer and fuzzier. Besides, talk
shows make candidates seem to be
Right In Your Living Room in a way
that press conferences ust don't
The candidates' main desire is to
get air time without having to answer
any tough questions But, frankly their
concern isexagge-ated, they don't have
that much to fear jm the regular press
any more When the president called
his recentpressconference, for instance,
it was already on record that he'd
coddled the heck out of Iraq and had
bed to Congress in order to get away
with it. The press corps asked him about
H Ross Perot.
It's nice, in a way, to have the
candidates seem like regular guys. I
understand the attraction. But ulti-
mately, we lose At a time when a grow-
ing plurality of the Amencan electorate
is setting its sights on a blank sheet of
paper titled H. Ross Perot, it's more
important than ever that we have a
ngorous, demanding examination of
the candidates And it's more impor-
tant than ever that that examination be
conducted by professionals who aren't
afraid of research and who care more
for truth than ratings
The cold fact is that we're not
likely to get that More likely, the sys-
tem will readjust in some other way.
Either talk-show hosts will start asking
tougher questions, as Larry King does,
or going on talk shows will lose its
novelty Or, better yet, both. In any
event, the "real" press has all but writ-
ten itself out of the script, and we are
left, for the time being, to depend on the
likes of Arsenio Hall for our political
information.
The Usual Suspects
HORTLY BEFORE HER
guerrilla invasion of the
Warner Bros lot, where
she tried to terrorize Tim Burton
into casting her in the sequel to
Batman, jittery madwoman-
actress Sean Young attended a
videocassette-distributors'
convention for the purpose of
publicizing the video release of
her recent flop A Kiss Before
Dying Spotting a poster for
another springtime clunker
already out on video�The Hard
Way, starring her psychological-
torture victim and ex-lover James
Woods�Young bounded up to
the poster, defaced Woods's
likeness with a Hitter mustache
and other unflattering scrawls
and then skulked away, giggling
like an inpatient.

ON A WARM EVENING NOT
long ago, guitarist Slash
emerged alone from The Ritz-
Carlton hotel on West 59th
Street, presumably to re-
oxygenate his bourbon-soaked
brain While he was swigging
from a half-empty bottle of
whiskey Jim Morrison-style,
brushing his hair out of his face
and trying in vain to prop himself
up against the hotel's facade, a
middle-aged couple walking by
vaguely recognized him as some
kind of celebrity The wife
shouted, "Excuse me, are you in
a rock band3" Amazingly, the
former junkie replied lucidly
"Yeah, Guns n' Roses he said
"I've never heard of that band
parried the skeptical matron
Slash produced a small duffel
bog bearing the band's logo,
pointed to it and said, "Look:
Guns n' Roses " The woman, still
not entirely satisfied, asked, "So
who would that make you?"
"Slash the guitrrist replied,
annoyed but still helpful "I'm
Slash, man At that point, a
handler came out of the hotel's
lobby and piloted the guitarist
back in.

5
Entertainment
Singer
crosses
Canadian
border
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
Exuding the i mpish innocent e
of PiaZadora, but flaihing the out-
right sexiness of Mad nna, M its u,
a French Canadian pop linger, at-
tempts to capture the ears of
America with her first musical col-
lection released in the states
Her self titled album feature-
four English song- and six songs an
French � but the language is not a
barrier since the purpose of her
music is to enable people to dance
As dance music, the songs
could easily be heard emanatr
from downtown bars this summer
Her voice is strong, and clearer
than Madonna's, but less suitr as
well. The rhthm ot the music is
adequate � nothing revolution
ary, but nothing too bonng either
Nlitsou'slvricsareusiialh, con-
troversial � she tends to be a bit
too sexy for herself; however the
lyrics on this album are not offen-
sive. The lyrics are merely sugges-
tive, almost like a hormone car-
bonated teenager
For instance, the first cut on
the album, "Deep Kiss, could run e
been much more explicit before it
set off the censor's warnings
Lines such as"Babv, vourdeep
kiss touches every part of me 1 gc
crazy, boy Your deep kiss gves to
the very heart of me" are amusing
rather than seductive
Of course, the French SOTlfB
may be more erotic but mam
Americans would ne er know
Of the English sngs their is
an eclectic vanet Heading West"
is an interesting song that is sou
and dreamlike, an excellent song
to showcase Mitsou's voice (her
one true talent). Lvric's like "I
dropped mv hat to a restless wind
Ooh, this time I'm not gonna chase
it again In a jigsaw dream with
soft spoken words I woke up cry-
v �
Dor
eepet eni
But
obliterates a
Met
themus
As danc i
album is pkd
a little on the
But for these
tor of music
must-buy
with an
lopiin ma not
grave, but she s p
ing tor earplugs
Thebigthn
audience will pnf
Mitsou releases h
MTV.
In Canada Mj
explicit ideos
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coddled the heck out of Iraq and had
lied to Congress in order to get away
with it Ir press corps asked him about
H Ross iv
It s nice in a way to have the
candidates seem like regular guvs
unc � h Utfaction But ulb-
matt y.wi - At a time when a grow-
ing p!ural:tv of tht an electorate
- si �� ng is s c" on a blank sheet of
wr titled H Koss lVnt it s more
- -riant than ever that we have a
2 lamination, of
� - more impor-
it that examination be
fessionals who aren't
f rest rch and who care more
ratings
The cold tact is that we re not
� J � c� that More Iikelv the sys-
tem wrill readjust in some other wav.
Eithi � - iswi start asking
tviugher questions as Larry King does,
or going on talk shows will lose its
noeirv Or, better vet both In anv
event, the real" press has all but wnt-
ten itself out of the script, and we are
- 'he time being, to depend on the
likes of Arsenio Hall tor our political
information
iuspects
sed
- - � �
Jim Morrison
- f his 1 -ce
vam to prop himstjN
t the hotel's ocade a
.� " H,ple walking bv
- '
kind ' v "��.
a rock bar � ng v .te
kie repied lucid .
in Guns n Roses ' He said
� never heard of that band
parned the skeptical
Slash produced a sma'l duffel
bag bearing the band s logo,
pointed to it and said, Look
Guns n' Roses " The woman, still
not entirely satisfied asked. So
who would that make you?"
Slash the guitarist replied,
annoved but still helpful "I'm
Slash, man' At that point, a
handler came out of the Hotel's
lobby and piloted the guitarist
back in
-i

OUfe SaHt (Jlaroltnian
June 10, 1992
H
Singer
crosses
Canadian
border
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
Exuding the impish inm verve
of Tia Zadora, but flashing the out-
right sexiness of Madonna, Mitsou,
I French Canadian pop singer, at-
tempts lo capture the ears of
America with her first musical col-
lection released in the states.
Her self titled album features
tour English songs and six songs in
Trench � but the language is not I
hamer since the purpose of her
music is to enable people to dance.
As dance music, the songs
could easily he hoard emanating
from downtown bars this su mmer.
Hervoueisstrong.aixl dearer
than Madonna s hut less sultry as
well. The rhythm of the music is
adequate nothing revolution-
ary, but nothing ho boring, either
Mirsou sivncsateusiialK con-
troversial � she tends to he a bit
too sexv for herself; however the
lyrics on this album are not often
si e. The lyrics are merely sugges-
tive, almost like a hormone car-
bonated teenager.
For instance, the first cut on
thealbum, TVep Kiss could have
been much more explicit before it
set off the censor's warnings
Lines such as "Babv, vourdeep
kiss touches even part of me I go
cra?v, boy Your deep kiss goes to
the very heart of me" are amusing
rather than seductive.
Of course, the French songs
mav be more entic, but many
Americans would never know.
Of the English songs, their is
an eclectic varietv. "Heading WeM
is an interesting song that is soft
and dreamlike, an excellent song
to showcase Mitsou's voice (her
one true talent). Lyric's like "I
dropped my hat to a restless wind
Ooh this time Ti.i not gonna chase
it av?ainln a jigsaw dream with
soft spoken words f 1 woke up crv-
Alien 3 rehashes old scripts
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Photo by Patriot Mass
Mitsou makes the difficult crossing between the US. and Canadian
borders with her self-titled debut album
ing. and no one hoard "hint toward
a deeper entertainment ability.
But, then Mitsou completely
obliterates an American classic �
Mercedes Benz" � bv revamp-
ing the music and adding a rhvthm
As dance music, the
album is pleasing, if not
a little on the fluffy side.
But for the serious collec-
tor of music, this is not a
must-buy release.
reminiscent of juveniles playing
with an electronic keyboard, lanis
loplin may not be turning in her
grave, but she is probably search-
ing for earplugs.
The big thrill for the American
audience will pnbably be when
Mitsou releases her first video for
MTV.
In Canada, Mitsou s sexually
explicit videos featuring nude
scenes (albeit tastefully done) have
helped stirenoughcontroversvand
interest to push her album to the
gold chart and her personal appeal
to major star status.
Slowly this interest is crossing
the border; she has already been
profiled by the sleaze patrolling
news magazine shows in which
she has been labeled as an incred-
ibly sensuous performer with X-
rated videos and hormone entic-
ing songs, which is, of vourse,
slightly exaggerated.
Mitsou's music is somewhat
sexy, and the songs in French un-
doubtedly are sultry because of
her accent and chi Id li ke voice whis-
pering in a romantic language.
Even though her videos are
revealing, they are certainly not as
obnoxious as the heavy metal mu-
sical version of women presented
on MTV.
As dance music, the album is
pleasing, if not a little on the fluffy
side. But for the serious collector of
music, this is not a must-buv re-
lease.
Why?
Why would Si goumey Weaver
consent to making a third Alien
movie when she had said that Aliens
would be her last?
Why would the people at
Twentieth Century Fox allow a
first-time director to take the reins
of a multi-million dollar sequel?
Why does the need for money
make greedy filmmakers push a
good idea to exhaustion?
Better yet, why does the movie-
going public allow this exploita-
tion?
Why?
The answers to these questions
concerning Alieni remain some-
what elusive.
Alieni betrays the first two
films. There is nothing original
about this sequel. No new ground
is broken, the old soil simply gets
turned over.
Alien packed quite a wallop at
the time of its release. The tag line
became famous: "In space, no one
can hear you scream
Ridley Scott crafted a first rate,
artistic, suspense-filled horror
movie. The concept of locking a
monster inside your house fright-
ens everyone.
Alien carried that terrifying
thought farther by locking a mon-
ster in a space ship where neither
escape from the craft nor the beast
was possible. James Cameron knew
mat he would never recreate the
suspense of Alien.
The taut script could not be
artfully rewritten so that an alien
became trapped aboard a different
spaceship. So when Cameron was
asked to direct the sequel to Alien
he decided to trade quality for
quantity in terms of the aliens,
hence the sequel became Aliens.
Aliens achieved a remarkable
feat by bettering the original. The
roller coaster ride thrilled audi-
ences in ways the original never
could.
Aliens tackled different issues
than the first film and also created
a completely different atmosphere
for the viewer.
The suspense in Aliens ema-
nated from the insurmountable
odds of facing so many creatures.
When one of the Marines looked at
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his motion scanner and screamed,
"They're all around us, man the
viewer felt the sheer frustration of
the situation. In short. Aliens be-
came a masterpiece because of its
originality.
Again the question looms:
Why?
Why make a third installment
that maladroitly combines the first
two films withoutaddingany origi-
nality? Did the lesson of Aliens go
unheeded? A company interested
in money surely shouldhavesensed
that a different film again had to be
invented in order to succeed.
The answer to some of these
enigmas could be that Twentieth
Century Fox knew that the first two
films exhausted the possibilities of
these aliens. Yet greedy executives
pushed to make a trilogy just to
utilize the clout of the first two
films.
Alien3 lacks suspense, it lacks a
plausible story, and it lacks cohe-
sive structure. In short, it lacks al-
most everytfung tfvat a fum requi res.
The sets of Alien3 look remark-
ably like the ones for Aliens. The
Alien3 lacks suspense,
it lacks a plausible
story, and it lacks
cohesive structure.
In short, it lacks almost
everything that a film
requires.
prison con tains numenusdark cor-
ridors. The underground tunnels
seem endless.
The story of one alien system-
atically killing of f the inhabitants of
an isolated penal colony parallels
the systematic annihilation of the
crew of the Nostromo in Alien.
Androids, used in both of the
first two films, still play a minor
role in the new one. Al iens popping
out of chests are still used. Every
minute of screen time has been bor-
rowed from better films.
David Fincher did music vid-
i os before Alieni. He directs this
film much like a video. There are a
lot of interesting shots combined
with some snappy editing that look
great but do nothing to propel the
story. This type of direction suits a
four minute pop song but it de-
stroys a feature length film.
The script boggles the mind.
Three people are credited for the
screenplay. All three minds com-
bined could not muster enough
wit to elevate the script above such
hackneyed line as : "Let's go for
it and "Where are you when I
need you?" The latter quote be-
longs to Ellen Ripley (Sigoumey
Weaver). She utters it while search-
ing for the alien.The finale com-
bines a weak script with ineffec-
tual direction for a truly disap-
pointing climax.
There has been much written
about the viciousness of the script.
There is no concern shown for any-
one in the film. Newt, the little girl
who Ripley worked so hard to save
in Aliens, is killed in the opening'
credits. That death sets the tone for
whU lies ahead.

Because of this savage script
r ocompassionisgenerated for any
cf characters, not even Ripley-
Fjpley's strength was her greatest
asset in Aliens. In the new film she
tpifies hopelessness. The charac-
ter loses all her former power.
The acting can barely be as-
sessed. All that appears on screen
are quick speeches here and there.
Critiquing the acting in this film
would be like trying to do so for a
Michael Jackson video.
No actor gets a chance to do
much except take up space while
Fincher composes shots to please
his own sensibilities. Fincher holds
no regard for the story, only for the
construction of each shot as it OC-
curs.
Alieni should never have been
made. Yet it was.
Why?
To make money. So the public
needs to stay away in droves to-
send a message to filmmakers ev- .
erywhere that trash is still trash �
and that even sequels need to be
original in their own way. j
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Sports
(Bile lEaet Carolinian
June 10, 1992
COMMENTARY
French Open changed tennis
Americans halt European reign
By Daniel Willis
SUff Writer
"
" Ptxrto courtaay of Racratonal S�rvlc��
Windsurfing is ust one of the many activities Recreational Servtces has inked into rts summer lineup, r-or more
informatton on planned summer activ.ties, stop by the RS offices in Chnstenbury Gymnasium.
summer
By Jamie Goins
SUff Writer
ECU: Recreational Semcescixn-
tinues to offer students, faculty and
staff a vaned menu of fitness and
fun throughout the summer ses-
sions. As summer heats up, so do
the opportunities for stress relief
and socialization with intramural
sports, fitness, outdoor recreation
and drop-in play.
Adventure trips are scheduled
by theOutdoor Recreation Program
throughout the summer and geared
toward nov ice adventurers. Offered
first summer session is a Beach
' lorseback Riding Day Trip. Up to
iree hours will be spent walking
nd running horses at the White
Sands Trails at the Barrier Islands
near Cedar Island, N.C The pre-
trip meeting will be held Wednes-
day, une 10 at 5 p.m. in Brewster
D101. The trip, which will take
place on June 12, is limited to 10
participants, and the cost for the
trip is $45 for students and $50 for
faculty, staff and guest. A $25 de-
posit is required. This is perhaps
the most popular of all outdoor
adventure trips. For more informa-
tion call the ROC at 757-6911 or 757-
6387.
A wide variety of outdoor rec-
reation equipment is available for
rent on a daily, weekly or extended
use basis. Equipment rental is the
biggest sen. ice offered by the Out-
door Recreation Program accord-
ing to Brian Miller, Coordinator of
Outdoor Programs.
"We have good quality gear at
a verv low cost to the student
Miller said. "We try to keep the
student's budget in mind. All we
ask is that the gear be returned in
the same cond ition as i t was i n when
it was checked out Everything
from canoes, to tents, to steeping
bags, to windsurfers can be rented
for a nominal fee. Students, faculty
and staff are encouraged to drop by
the ROC (117 CO and let the staff
satisfy your summer adventure
equipment needs. The ROC is open
imi Mondav and Friday from 1130
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6
p.m Tuesday through Thursday
for 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and closed on
Saturday and Sunday. Come by to
get a copy of the Outdoor Recre-
ation Equipment Rental Rates or to
register for a trip.
On the lntramuralSports front,
first session activity is coming to a
close with one final event slated for
basketball enthusiasts. A Round ball
Rama information meeting will be
held June 16 at 4pm in Biology NI-
KE. The Rama combines a Hot Shots
compeb tion, free throw contest and
Three-Point Shoot -Out into one
competition. Divisions for men and
women are available for sign-up.
For details, contact David Gaskins
at 757-6387.
Second summer session
intramurals begins soon, so get your
teams together for sofrball, co-ed
water basketball, and beach volley-
ball. These team activities are sur-
rounded by a variety of individual
programs which include putt-putt
golf, one-on-one basketball and the
first ever UigSplash' Bonanza spon-
sored by Greenville's Big Splash
Aqua Golf Complex Softball regis-
tration and Co-Ed H20 Basketball
starts the second su mmer session of
fun June 30 with registration meet-
ings at 4 p.m. and 430 p.m. respec-
tively.
Fitness classes take place dur-
ing both first and second session
with specialized programs in
aerobics,aquambicsand toning. All
second session classes will be held
in Christenbury Gymnasium. Reg-
istration for second session begins
June 24 in 204 Christenbury Gym-
nasium. A special section of drop-
in classes for individuals interested
in sampling class offerings is also
available on June 22,23 & 25. Each
session of classes costs only $7.50
for students and $15 for faculty and
staff with special reduced rates for
aquarobics. Classes take place be-
tween 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday-
Thursday For a complete class
schedule including costs and in-
structors call 757-6387 or stop Rec-
reational Services main office.
Not interested in structured
fun? The Equipment Check-out
Center can supply you and your
friends with special summer sup-
plies for that upcoming beach trip,
picnic or aftemoonat the park. Your
valid ID allows you to check out
frisbees, golf clubs, (roquet, beach
volleyball equipment, softball sup-
plies, horse shoes and much, much
more free of charge. The check-out
center is kxa ted in 115 Chnstenbury
Gymnasium and is open Monday-
Friday at 10 a.m. Make those rac-
quetball reservations white you're
there for the Minges Coliseum
courts.
Stop by the swimming pools at
Christenbury Gymnasium and
Minges Coliseum this summer for
free play and lap swimming Mon-
day through Friday- Minges Coli-
seum is open for water basketball
and free swim each Sunday from 2-
5 p.m. Shoot the hoops in
Christenbury Gymnasium with the
'gym rats' Monday-Thursday from
3-6 p.m. or take a noon time break
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
from ll:30-lpm. Christenbury
Weight Room and Minges Weight
Room are also open all summer for
fixed and free weight training with
the presentation of a valid ECU ID.
For summer hours of operation, call
the After Hours Hotline after 5 p.m.
at 757-6443.
With the fast paced studying of
summer session classes a necessity,
enjoy a leisurely break from it all
with Recreational Services stress
release summer line-up.
Jim Courier defended his French Open title
Sunday at the hands of Peter Korda � but the
finals really took place two days earlier against
fellow American Andre Agassi. The two
actually did meet in the finals last year.
During the mid to late 80s, tennis was
dominated by European players such as Ivan
Uendl, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, and Mats
Willander. Fans wondered if the United States
would ever return to a competitive level in the
tennis world.
It wasn't until the emergence of Agassi in
1988 that a real American hopeful appeared.
Since that time many other Americans have
flourished.
Michael Chang pulled off a dramatic
French Open victory in 1�H, becoming the first
American to win the French since Tony Trabert.
In winning this title, Chang was forced to
defend himself against such Europeans as
Uendl and Edberg.
The same year, Pete Sampras pulled off an
equally impressive feet at the U.S. Open.
Sampras featuring a blazing 125 mph serve
calmly disposed of two respected Americans:
John McEnroe and Agassi in the semis and
finals respectively (he also beat Uendl in the
quarterfinals).
These victories are very impressive, but not
in companson to what Courier has accom-
plished. Courier has won three out of the last
five Grand Slam tournaments. He's number one
in the world and has a 23-match winning streak.
It's general knowledge among the players
that Courier works as hard as anybody on tour.
Obviously his work has paid off � if he wins
the next two Grand Slam tournaments, he'll
become the first American from the open era to
complete a Grand Slam.
The U.S. has fared well at recent Grand
Slam tournaments, but Agassi, the most well
known voung Amencaa has yet to win a maior
tournament. He seems more concerned about
making Cannon and Nike commercials than
winning tournaments.
It's sad to see, because Agassi is one of the
most talented plavers in the game. If he had the
discipline and work ethic of Chang or Courier,
he could possiblv be the best player in the game
Unfortunately Agassi believes "Image Is
Everything
Irvin gains honor at NCAA meet
By Chas Mitch'l
Senior Sport� Writer
Ovet the weekend a t the NC AA
Men's Outdoor Track Champion-
ship in Austin, Texas, senior spnnter
Bnan Irvin added yd another All-
Amencan honor to his credit. Irvin
competed in the MX) meter event
and ran to an impressive time of
4545 seconds for a fifth place finish
overall.
According to Head coach Bill
Carson, lrvin's performance was
anything but short of outstanding.
"Bnan had to run in lane two, where
the track is extremely tight" Carson
said. "Had he (Irvin) ran in an out-
side lane, Bnan could have beaten
Hanna (lane three) for the fourth
place finish
Irvin, who now has six All-
Amencan honors and numerous
other ECU, IC4A and NCAA
records and awards, has his sights
set on Olympic glory. For his out-
standing performance and ability,
Irving has been selected to compete
in the Mizuno 12 Outdoor Track
and Field Championships. Also,
Irvin received an invitation to the
Olympic Trials in New Orleans, La
for June 19 thru 28. As if that's not
enough, Irvin will be joined by not
only coach Carson but Mr. Tom
Calez. Caiez is the personal coach
of Olympic great Carl Uewis and
will definitely add insight and di-
mension to Irvin who is now well
on his wav in the track world.
So if you re stil I wondering who
is Brian Irvin, maybe this will help:
A three time AH-American in
the 1,600 meter relay, Anchor teg of
the ECU teamthattook All- America
honors in the 1990 NCAA outdoor
championships and the 1991 indoor
and outdoor championships,
Ranked third nationally in 1991 in
the 400 meters with a 47.02 time,
invited to run at TAC meet in Madi-
son Stuare Gardens in 1991, a two
time All- Amencan in the4 0 meters,
the ECU record holder in the 4(10
meters (45.72), ran the fastest pre-
liminary tie at the 1991 NCAAOut-
doat Championships (45.94) and
finished fifth in the finah (4636
competed in the 1991 U.S. Tra.
and Field Championships were he
placed 12th of 30 runners in the 40i)
meters (45.86), also competed in the
1W1 World University Games, also
a member of the 1,600 meter relav
team that set IC4A championship
record (3:1136) in 190, selected first
team All-East in the 1C4A m m�.
ATTIC h
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 10, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 10, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.880
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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