The East Carolinian, June 3, 1992






Condoms finally convienent
With AIDS spreading, awareness is top priority
4
Platters entertain
Special Olympicshosted the infamous singing group
IS
Oftft lEaat (Earnltnian
Vol.66 No.31
Wednesday, June 3,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
8 Pages
Condoms in dorms coming soon
i
Sorority against skits
Hit' sorority of I Vita DeHi Delta,
which "Saturday Night I ,ivc" has repre-
semed in several skits, might join seven!
Other national sorority houses in bring-
ing legal action against the show, accord-
ing to The Stttte Press at Arizona State
University. The possible lawsuit would
,itt.u k the unauthorised useof the sotor-
it logo.
College builds "green"
rhe College of William and Mary in
Virginia is building its now University
I enter under environmentally friendly
regulations lr feed of gutters the sys-
tem will iiM drains to allow rainwater to
flow into a pond where it will provide
nutrients and surfat e water in soil.
Party house busted
Police shut down The lungle, an off-
campus party bouse at the University of
South Dakota, alter arresting 137 people
for underage consumption. Passers-by
gathered on the lawn across the street to
cheer m even eat pizza as each person
was released from the house. Even the
IRS is investigating the use of parts prof-
its to pay utility hills. The Jungle legend
lives on with 1 -shirts listing the top 10
reasons the bouse was busted.
UC system angry over money
Students in the University of Cali-
fornia system are upset over the retire-
ment benefits going to the UC system
President David Gardener. Phe retire-
ment package totals more than $2 mil-
lion at the sirru1 time the students are
facing a 22 percent tuition fee hike
Compiled by Elliabath Shlmmal T akan from U ,
I ha National Coltaga Nawapapar.
International
House to
become
office space
Repurcussions surrounding
housing reductions examined
By Jeff Becker
Assistant New tditor
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
Let's see, do I want a Milky
Way, Fritos, a toothbrush, a con-
dom, or all four? This fall in the
ECU dorms, these could be your
choices. The idea about making
condoms available in the dorms
is part of the AIDS awareness
campaign.
"We are exploring the idea
of having condoms included as
one of the items in the vending
machines rather than condom
machines in the bathroom said
David Fmmerling, oi-m of stu-
dent development "If it is fea-
sible we would like to put them
in the vending mat tunes like any
other health care product"
The idea of condoms in the
dorm has been turned down
twice in SO, A until spring of 1992
when a resolution encouraging
AJDs awareness by having con-
doms easily assessible in the resi-
dence halls
"This is the biggest step
we've made said SGA Presi-
dent Courtney Jones. "SGA has
been active in the past in trying to
get condoms in the dorm, this
time the administration listened
and has done something about
it
One of the ideas in having the
condoms in thedorm is to include
accompanying literature about
AIDS and other STD's. The idea
of the literature is to educate stu-
dents on the pressing idea of safer
sex.
"This generation of college
students needs to realize that
AIDS is real and serious
Fmmerling said. "The issue needs
to be addressed, people need to
understand how divisions about
sex can be irresponsible, and now
Al l)S is a matter of lifeand death
Currently Fmmerling and
others are exploring the idea and
hoping to have thecondomsavail-
able in the dorms this fall. "We're
just n iw laving down the ground-
work Fmmerling said. Fhereare
plenty of vending machinesavail-
able, now the packaging and the
adual trial run through the ma-
chines must be tested.
The word around the cam-
pusspreads rapidly about the new
item in the vending machines. "I
think ha vingcondoms in thedorm
is a really gtxxi idea because it's
more convenient said senior
Tasha TriceTeople will use them
more when they're easy to get
"Having condoms in the
dorm is a gcxxl iiiea, but you can
get them cheaper at student
health said senior William
Gessaman. "It helps in an emer-
gency situation, it's better than
saying forget it
The opposing side of the idea
of having condoms in the resi-
dence halls has moral implica-
tions.
"The moral issue becomes
the spotlight, many people do
believe that sex today is taken for
granted, many don't engage in
sex ami shouldn't be exposed to
sex said a male sophomore . "1
do not agree with having con-
doms in thedonn, it creates chaos
or distracts from one's morals or
beliefs
CONDCDMS
Preventing STDs: A
Checklist
� You can eliminate your risk entirely by not having sex
with anyone (abstinence) or by having sex only with a
non-infected partner who has sex only with you (mutual
monogamy).
� 'Ihe more sexual partners vou have, the greater the risk
you have, the greater your risk of contracting a sexually
transmitted disease (STD).
� Many STDs have no symptoms, so people often do not
know they are infected. If you are not sure that your
partner is free of infection, use protection dunng sex.
Condoms, used properly from start to finish each time you
have sexual intercourse,are the best protection. Sperm iadal
foams and jellies offer additional protection. Thev are best
used along with condoms, not in place of them.
Library included in
$600 million bond
By Tony Rogers
Staff Writer
Thedepartmentof international Programs
will centralize its offices in the International
House m hopes of strengthening ECU's multi-
national environment, but closing the house to
residents may create problems in keeping in-
ternational stu-
dents at ECU
once thev ar-
nve
The uni-
versity estab-
lished the Inter
nationalHouse
in 174 as a
dorm that
would special-
ize in addressing the needs of students from
other countries. David Watkins, associate vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs, said the
chancellor's Space Allocation committee de-
termined tha t con v erring the house to the head -
quarters of International Programs would help
internationalize the campus.
"If you want to attract quality interna-
tional students, in numbers, you must have a
solid international program with real iden-
tity Watkins said. "We needed to find a place
where we can give International Programs an
identity of their own. We found that the
international House may be the ticket
Umesh Gulati, chairman of the university's
committee on international students, said the
university made a mistake in closing the Inter-
national House.
"Itisa very inappropriate and short-sighted
policy to abolish a common residential house
for international students Gulati said. "1 be-
See International, page 3
.
FC'U's student and faculty complains
about poor library facilities may come to
an end if the North Carolina Legislature
passes the Capital Improvements Bond
that will allow the public to vote on a $25
million addition to Joyner Library.
If approved by the state Hous, the bill
would authorize the issuing of $600 mil-
lion in bonds bv the state. The bill will be
voted on by the general public Nov. 3,
1991
The money raised would then be used
to make construction additions and lm-
provementson thecampusesof all lfSstate
universities as well as at community col-
leges and public schools across the state,
including the money for joyner Library.
According to state Senator Ed War-
ren, chairman of the Education Oversight
Committee and Pitt County representa-
tive, Joyner Library is the fop pnority of
the bill'
"It is essential that we find funds for
joyner Library Warren said.
"Right now, joyner can accommo-
date about 10,000 students comfortably,
but there are almost 17,000 students cur-
rently enrolled at ECU.
Warren said he sees this bond refer-
endum as a key to the progress of ECU
and its ability to grow into a top univer-
sity in the state.
"Wecan't let tough budgetary times
tear down what we have struggled to
build over the past decade he said.
Bill Dansey, chairman of the Finance
and Facilities Committee of the Board of
Trustees, said the bond referendum is the
only chance ECU will have for expansion
funding in the near future.
"The money from these bonds wili
meet facility needs that haven't been met
by the state he said.
Dansey also said the $1.4 million in-
vested in designing the addition is a gixxi
start to the project.
"Unfortunately, we have come to a
standstill until the state comes up with
the monev he said.
Dansey also explained that state law
requires the entire $25 million be raised
before contraction can begin Therefore,
construction will not begin until after the
November vote.
Kenneth Marks, thedirector of joyner
Library, said the addition will not only
expand all existing services and functions
but will also add a few new services.
See Library, page 3
SGA book swap to
continue fall semester
By Kimberly Williams
SUff Writer
In an attempt to fight the high prices
of textbooks, the SGA implemented the
new book exchange program at the end of
the spring semester.
The program, which is off to a slow
but hopeful start, allows students who
wish to sell books to enter information
into the computer system, and it allows
students who wish to buy books the op-
portunity to obtain a list of people selling
books. a
The book exchange program is not
currently available to students during the
summer sessions but will be in use again
at the beginning of the fall semester.
"We had about 200 students enter
their books into the computers said Joey
Johnston, who is in charge of the book
exchange program. "Probably about half
of those people are still in the computer
One of the problems that the SGA
book exchange committee is dealing with
is that many students want their money
instantly and do not want to wait to enter
their books in the computers and try to sell
them that way.
Johnston said most of thestudents who
were leaving school for the summer and
who had not sold their books by the time
they were ready to leave, took their infor-
mation out of the computers and went and
sold their books at the Student Store or
University Book Exchange.
One of the biggest challenges of the
new book exchange program is proving to
students that the money they will save
using the system is worth waiting a little
extra time.
Johnston said that if students just wait
a month, it will save them money. "The
average was $6 more saved and $6 more
made per book he said.
The SGA book exchange committee is
also looking for more financial backing.
Johnston, who is also the SGA legislator,
said oeca use the program was implemented
so late, the committee was only given $200
to work with.
Students can restassu red that the book
exchange committee has done their best to
get accurate listings of what books are
needed foreach academic department, with
the exception of a few small departments.
See Books, page 3
Putting away
Photo by Dail Raad � Th Eamt Carolinian
The Special Olympics was held even during the rainy weekend, and the
winning spint held throughout the games. Story on page 2
Employee files $350,000 lawsuit
By Matthew Jones
Managing Editor
An ECU employee filed a lawsuit last
week demanding over $350 AX) in damages
related tothewiretappingof her Public Safety
phone linedetailed in last month's grand jury
indictment
Public Safety secretary Patricia Hair Bu I-
lockfiled thesuitagainstTeddy LeeRoberson,
former teteaxTimunk3tiiT�sdirectar,and kirm
Willis Bunus, former captain of investiga-
tions for the campus police department
Bullock's complaint is the second such
lawsuit relating to wiretapping on the cam-
pusof ECU. Although the firstoomplaintwas
filed against two individuals, the university
settled the suit out of court for over $10,000,
Since that time, the university has paid over
$200,000 to other wiretapping claimants.
The university settled most of the claims
for approximately $10,000, the amount
granted by federal law to victims of illegal
wiretapping.
However, Brooks Mills, the individual
whose phone line was tapped in the original
case, received a settlement of over $50,000.
Bullock's demand of $350AX)stems from the
same reason.
"She has a greater privacy interest than
someone who just called up a wiretapped
phone saki Herman Gaskins, Bullock's at-
torney.
The Stale Attorney General's office rep-
resented the defendants to the first wiretap-
ping lawsuit however, whether counsel has
been determined in Bullock's case remains
unclear.
Deputy State Attorney Tom Ziko said his
officee "atfrmtryrotrepresantir
and Burrus. Greenville attorney Myron Hill,
who is representing Burrus in the federal
indictment case, said he has not yet been
contacted onceming Bullock's lawsuit but
the complaint has not yet been served upon
the defendants.
f





June 3, 1992
2 JUNE J �
Second Special Olympic games prevail through rain
By Tracy Ford
Staff Wnlfr
More than 1,500 athletes re-
turned to ECl Saturday as
Greenville hosted the North Caro-
lina State Special Olympic games
for the second consecutive vear.
Alice keene,0 coordinator of
more than 3,500 volunteers, said
the rain dampened but did not stop
the event
"We have had an incredibly
km rate of no -shows Keene said
"For us, it's another affirmation that
ourvolunteersareroallv dedicated
Some oi the events had to be
moved underneath the bleachers to
keep the athletes drv and safe.
To participate in Special Olym-
pics, the athlete must be at least 8
years old and have a mental handi-
cap. There is no ma vimum age limit
10 participate, and some of the ath-
letes are in their ftK
John Richards, chairman of the
Special education department at
ECU,slid theSpevial Olympics pro-
vides year round activity for the
athletes.
"One of the biggest benefits of
the Special Olympics is (the ath-
letes)havingtheirown self-concept,
and the second would be going out
there and interacting with other in-
"One of the biggest benefits of the Special
Olympics is (the atheletes) having their own
self-concept"
-gohn Richards, Special Education Pept. Chair
dividuals Richards said. "To them
it's a chance to do smething new
and different, the participation in
itself is rewarding
The experience is also reward-
ing for the volunteers involved.
Tammv Treschuk, a criminal jus-
tice major at ECU, volunteered to
omY gymnastics, a sport she has
been involved with all her life.
"Gymnastics is the hardest
sport for a Special Olympian to
master she said. "It's really an
accomplishment. It's very reward-
ing 10 see the kids do so well after
working with them all year
Besides gymnastics, athletes
can chtxise from track and field,
aquatics, bocce, power lifting, soft-
ball, tennis, volleyball and basket-
ball. Each athlete choose one of the
sports and trains with a volunteer
coach foraminimumof eight weeks.
Greenville, ECU and Titt
County were major contributors to
theSpt ial Olympics. ECU contrib-
uted itsathleticfieldsand will house
and feed the athletes from other
counties.
"Because school is out right
now, we don't have the great num-
ber of students, but this is as much
a Greenville ,Pitt County and East-
em North Carolina pull as it is any
one organization said Keith
Fishburne, public relations director
for North Carolina Special Olym-
pics.
The North Carolina Special
Olympics will bring more than
$500,0110 in revenue to Htt County.
The Hatters performed a free
concert on Friday, May 29,at Ficklen
stadium as a prelude to the opening
ceremonies
Just like the "real" Olympics, a
select number of athletes from the
state games wi II be chosen to attend
the international Special Olympics
held in M96.
In two years, the winter-inter-
national games will be held in Aus-
tria.
The Special Olympics hosted a variety of games
their spirit and talent dispite the weather
he 3,500 volunteers helped thel .500 atheletes to show
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International
liee international students are a
catalyst for internationalizing the
campus. Justhavingan international
center or a few more courses in
international studies will not be
enough to internationalize thecam-
pus.
"The international student is
very important, and the Interna-
tional House provides a great at-
traction for choosing ECU or, once
thev have chosen, then staying at
East Carolina University "
According to Gulati, some in-
ternational students expenence a
culture shock w hen they arrive. He
said ECU needs to make their tran-
sition as easy as possible or stu-
dents will either go homeor trans-
fer to another school.
"We are not saying we need a
big International House for every
international student b istayGulati
said. "We are saying we need to
k n k after th He students who would
not live comfortably in a big dormi-
tory for the first couple of years
Watkins said the lack of build-
mgspaceatECU created a dilemma
- either concentrate oil recruiting
international students to ECL by
strengthening International Pro-
grams or accommodating them
once thev are here through the In-
ternational House.
"Do voucreatean environment
where vou don't have the bodies
like the International HoJ
set aside i r international!
but not have any coordid
tralization for the dexeiif
an international program
said. "Then, what you (a
ably hav e, is this nice sin
here f r students wh I at
pus, but in fait thev al
campus because vou haf
able to attract them "
The International
mained open ear nrun
mod ate intemati n-
could not travel hot
break. Ehe House
kitchen that enar
- k ethnic meals i
university cannot � I
alities without
the Internationa Hous
I
national students a1
VNatkins said the
comrr
i
departn �
the I ' � 1
rrvv. '�en
dry men be
dents to stay in til
said arrangema

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J.





June 3, 1992
2 i JUNE J,
Second Special Olympic games prevail through rain
Bv Tracy Ford
s�jt1 Witter
More than l 500 athletes re-
turned to E( l Saturday as
C ,nvn ilte hosted the NortoCaro
lira State Special Olympic games
tor th�' second consecutive year
Mice Keene, co-coordinator ot
more than i500 volunteers, said
the rain dampened but did not stop
the e ent
We have had an incredibly
low rate oi no shows Keene said
Ruust'sariomeraffurmationthat
ourvohinteersarereally dedicated
Some of me events had to be
moved underneath the bleachers to
keep tho athletes dry .mo! safe.
To partk ipate in Special OKnv
pics, tho athlete must be at least s
years old and ha e a mental handi-
cap rhere is no maximum age limit
to participate " some oi the ath-
letes arc in their 60s
lohn Richards chairman of the
special education department at
ECl saidtheSperialOrympkspro-
vides year-round activity for the
athletes
()ne oi me biggest benefits of
tho Special Olympics is (the ath-
(etes)ha ingtheirownseli core opt
and the second would bo going out
there and intera tiny; v ith other m-
'One of the biggest benefits of the Special
Olympics is (the atheletes) having their own
self-concept"
-John Richards, Special Education Dept. Chair
dividual "Richards said. Tothem
it s a chance to do something now
,nd different, tho participation in
iwlt is rewarding
I ho experience is also reward-
ing tor tho volunteers involved.
lammv Iroschuk, a criminal jus-
tao major at ECU, volunteered to
coach gymnastics, a sport she has
been involved with all hor life.
i .vmnastk is tho hardest
spirt for a Special Olympian to
master she said, "it's really �"
accomplishment It's very reward-
ing to soo the kids olo so well after
working with thorn all year
Besides gymnastics, athletes
can choose from track and held,
aquatu s, bocce, power lifting soft-
ball, tennis, volleyball and basket-
ball. Eachathtetechoosesoneoi the
sports AuA trains Mth a volunteer
coach foraminimumof eight weeks.
Greenville, ECU and Pitt
c ountv woro major contributors to
theSpec ialOh mpios, ECUcontrib-
uted its athletic fiekdsand will house
and feed tho athletes from other
counties.
"Because school is out right
now, we don't have the great num-
ber of students, hut this is as muih
a Greenville ,ritt County and East-
om North Carolina pull as it is any
one organization said Keith
Fishbume, puhho relations director
tor North Carolina Special Olym-
pus.
The North Carolina Special
Olympics will bring more than
$5X),UXt in revenue to Pitt County.
Ihe Platters performed a free
concert on Friday, May 29,atF4dden
stadium as a prelude to theopening
ceremonies.
lust like the "real" Otympk s, a
select number of athletes from tho
state games will be i h een to attend
the international Special Olympics
hold in 19.
In two years, the winter-inter-
national games will be hold in Aus-
tria.
Photo by Dall H��d - Th� ��f Crolmn�
The Special Olympics hosted a variety of games The 3.500 volunteers helped thel .500 atheletes
their spirit and talent dispite the weather
to she A
"Greenville's ONLY Exotic
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WEDNESDAYS
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International
international students
catalyst tor internationalizing the
. . isthavinganinti i
� or a m �re irses in
itional studies will n
enough to internati malize the
I
"Ihe international student
riant, and the Inti
nal House provides a great at-
tra t; hi tor i noosing 1.( L or, on
the have chosen, then stayu g at
. � i arolina University
According to (iulati, w in-
ternational students experience a
ture shock when they arrive. He
saidE U needs to make their 1
� on as eas) as possible i
� � wiil either o home
fert ���� � �� school
We are not saying ���� eed �
� International Hous
intematM rvil studentti i sta)
. e are saying ��� � i �� :
- . ��� � � - -tudent- ud
not live comfortably in a big di m
tory for the first ample I
Watkins said the la k � �f build-
g � eatE L - 'dilemma
�� . � trate on re
international 5tu '� I L by
strengthen
gram or accomnv
e they are here through the In-
ternational Hoi. �
"Doyou environment
where
emadonalrt
� � ationa

pus, but
. . .
unr.
The Best in Country and Southern Rock
ADMISSION $1.00
DRINK SPECIALS
$2.50 Pitchers
75 Kamikazies
504 Jello Shots
$1.25 Highballs
$1.00 Domestic Beer
K
I LADIES ADMISSION $100
GUYS $1.00 Members�$3.00 Guest I
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June 3, 1992
3
igh rain
4h
3lo by DaM R��d ���f Carolinian
00 atheletes to show
ATTIC
752-7303 I 809 I. 3th St
The
CoMedY
ZONE
l cr Wednesday Night
Thursday. June 4
NITRO
Ing Jim Gillette & Michael Angelo
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Friday. June 5
S E X
POLICE
Saturday. June 6
s32 os
Draft
( KEN WIRE GANG
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J
International
Continued from page 1
Library
Continued from page 1
lieve international students are a
catalyst for internationalizing the
campus. J ust having an intematuMial
center or a few more courses in
international studies will not be
enough to internationalize the cam-
pus.
"The international student is
very important, and the Interna-
tional House provides a great at-
traction for choosing ECU or, once
they have chosen, then staying at
East Carolina University
According to Gulati, some in-
ternational students experience a
culture shock when they arrive. He
said ECU needs to make their tran-
sition as easy as possible or stu-
dents will either go home or trans-
fer to another school.
"We are not saying we need a
big International House for every
international studenttostay'Gulati
said. "We are saying we need to
look after those students who would
not live comfortably in a big dormi-
tory for the first couple of years
Watkins said the lack of build-
ingspaceatECUcreatedadilemma
� either concentrate on recruiting
international students to ECU by
strengthening International Pro-
grams or accommodating them
once they are here through the In-
ternational House.
"Do you create an environment
where vou don't have the bodies,
like the International House strictly
set aside for international students,
but not have any coordinated cen-
tralization for the development of
an international program Watkins
said. "Then, what you can conceiv-
ably have, is this nice situation over
here for students who are on cam-
pus, but in fact they are not on
campus because you haven't been
able to attract them
The International House re-
mained open year round to accom-
modate international students who
could not travel home during
breaks. The House also provided a
kitchen that enabled students to
cook ethnic meals. Gulati said the
university cannot provide these fa-
cilities without a dorm similar to
die International House, and these
conveniences are what keep inter-
national students at ECU.
Watkins said the issue of ac-
commodating international stu-
dents needs to be addressed by the
departmentof Student Life. During
the breaks, he said a wing of a dorm
mav remain open year-round or
faculty members could invite stu-
dents to stav in their homes. He also
said arrangements could possibly
be made to house the students in
local motels.
Slav and Umstead dorms will
close for renovations in the fall and
reopen as a single residence hall in
two years. Inez Fridley, assistant
director of housing, said a wing of
the dorm may be set aside for inter-
national students.
Watkins said the Slay-Umstead
complex may address some of the
special needs of international stu-
dents. However, Gulati said he was
concerned beca u se no defini te plans
have been made to reserve a wing in
the Slay-Umstead complex.
The International House holds
a maximum of ten students. Watkins
said the small size of the dorm also
contributed to closing the house.
"There have not been many stu-
dents dispelled from the house he
said. "We felt we were not taking on
an issue that was of such magnitude
that it was going to cause major
problems. In the end the university
would benefit
Gulati said the university needs
more residential housing for inter-
national students, not less.
"If we are thinking of doubling
thenumberof international students
in the next two or three years, we
should double the capacity of resi-
dential housing for intema tiona 1 stu-
dents rather than abolishing it
"Our seating for library users
will go from 1,200 to 2,000 Marks
said.
"We have no group study fa-
cilities at this time, but, with this
addition, we will have 24 group
study rooms
Marks said the addition, which
will stretch into the parking
lottoward 10th Street, will also hold
faculty study rooms that currently
do not exist at Joyner Library.
Warren said the second prior-
ity of the bill would be the $2.5
million necessary to complete the
cancer center at ECU's School of
Medicine. Dropped from the bill
was the authorized funding for the
purchase of the Rose High School
property.
One bond referendum already
approved by the State Legislature
proposes the selling of $300 million
in bonds. The money from this pro-
posal would go to construction im-
provements at the 16state universi-
ties only. Community colleges and
other public instruction facilities
would be left out. Warren said all
higher education facilities across the
state should be incl uded in one pro-
posal.
Warren explained that a bond ,
referendum seemed to be the logi-
cal financing choice for three rea-
sons.
"For one thing, interest rates on
bonds are low right now he said.
"Because of die recession, construc-
tion bids should be low, and North
Carolina can afford this because of
its low debt
North Carolina's state debt is
about one-fourth the national aver-
age. Warrenalso said thenewbuild-
ing project would create new jobs
and stimulate the state's economy.
A study done by the Bureau of Eco-
nomic Analysis of the U.S. Com-
merce Department estimates that
the previously proposed $300 mil-
lkm project would create 11,500 new
jobs across thestate.Nostudies have
been done concerning the new $600
million bond proposal.
The bond proposal's future
looks bright if it is brought to a
public vote in November.
A recent study conducted by
Louis Harris Research Inc. shows a
69 percent approval of the $3(X) mil-
lion referendum with 22 percent
opposed and 11 percent unsure.
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She Saat (Haroltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. Hem Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bui Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
,7, � � �, (' MM has served the Has. Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasising information that affects ECU
Jhe hastanHimannas �� . i Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
11UM1 , CI!ers srK,uId he aliased to T Ed fe fit e�i PuM.cat.ons Bldg HI Oreenville. N.C
27858 4353 lor more information, call (919) 757-666.�
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, June 3, 1992
Residence hall condoms safe idea
In the age of AIDS and other sexually
transmitted diseases, our nation and our
world have become acutely aware of the
dangers surrounding unprotected sexual re-
lations. Now. the PXT" campus will share in
that growing awareness; vending machines
containing condoms will most likely make
their premiere in residence halls this fall.
Since 198c, the idea of condom ma-
chines in the dorms has been disputed
throughout the university community. The
issue of safetv versus moralitv has been
bandied about with no real results. Now,
three vears later, it seems that the idea of
condom vending machines on campus will
become realitv, and not a moment too soon.
New statistics from the Center for Disease
Control AIDS Hotline report there were
46,611 new cases of AIDS diagnosed in the
last year, bringing the national total for the
past year to 218301.
Staggering numbers with staggering
consequences.
With no known cure in sight, the war
against AIDS will have many more casual-
ties before the white flag is waved. But those
who choose a sexually active lifestyle have
an effective weapon with which to defend
their health. The use of condoms as an effec-
tive prevention in the spread of AIDS has
been common knowledge in the medical
community for several years.
The good news for ECU students is the
university has seen fit to make condoms
more readilv available to student; living in
the residence halls. Though proximity does
not automatically lead to increased use,
availability will certainly encourage safer
sexual practices.
Opponents of the idea of condom ma-
chines in the residence halls sight morality
as one of the key issues. Some say that
making condoms more available will lead
to increased sexual activitv. The news for
these opponents is college-aged individuals
are adults. Some of these adults are choos-
ing to have sex. Right or wrong, it is their
choice. But with AIDS and other STD's rear-
ing their ugly heads, the smartest idea is not
to pretend to make choices for the students,
but rather to make their choices as safe as
possible.
Besides abstinence, condoms are the
only practical way to prevent the spread of
AIDS and STD's. We live in a world where
these diseases are reality.
ECU students will now live in a world
where condoms will be available to them 24
hours a day and safety from disease can be
a reality.
Campus Spectrum
International House more than place to live
By Neresh B. Tolani
Campus Spectrum
Editor's note � The following ar
tide is an open letter from a foreign stu-
dent describing the advantages of the In-
ternational House The residence hall mil
dose its doors at the end of the first sum-
mer session to provide office space for
international programs.
I arrived at ECU, January 198E
as a foreign student, to pursue an
undergraduate degree 1 had been as-
signed a room in the Slay dorm on
campus Having been away from
home for about a week, I was incred-
ibly homesick and extremely hungry,
craving for a "real home-cooked
meal Although 1 spoke English well
enough, I still felt alienated in this
new place I was supposed to call home
The gloomy, cold and wet
weather of January did not comfort
my growing depression I decided I
WM going back home to the comfort
of warmth, friends and family On the
third day of my stay at ECU, I packed
my bags and decided to inform the
International student advisor, Dr
Lucy Wright, about my decision, hop-
ing that she would grant me a pardon
and let me out of my misery I ex-
plained to her how 1 felt and requested
her to allow me a phone call to my
parents
She listened with sympathy,
reasoned with me and granted my
wish for a phone call, except that it
was to be made at this placecalled the
� International House We arrived at
the International House, only to find
outthattheperson whosephonel was
to use was out and iwould be back in
an hour
At this stage, Dr Wright sug-
gested mat I wait there for the phone
guy, and that she would be back in an
hour to pick me up I don't know if Dr
Wright had had experience with
"troublesome foreigners" like myself
or that she was an experienced miracle
worker, but that entire hour turned
outtobetheturningpointofmylifein
America
During this hour I explored the
International House, I found that it
was a dorm that had a capacity for ten
students Here was a dorm that repre-
sented a home away from home I also
met the residents, who were interna-
tional students like myself, and who
have had experiences and emotions
that I was going through
In this one hour I made friends
that I would later grow to love as a
family. Duringthishourlbecame con-
vinced that there might be some hope
after all, that perhaps if these students
could make it, then so could I Finally
the phone guy arrived
The resident manager intro-
duced us He was a graduate student
in Sociology and talked to me about
his experiences and urged me to give
ECU a chance. I finally got to call my
parents I explained to them howl felt,
but I did not tell them I was ready to
come home yet Dr Wright arrived
an hour later as she had promised and
noticed how relieved and relaxed I
koked
She was kind enough to sug-
gest that I stay at the International
House for a night, and if 1 still wanted
to go home she would personally take
me to the airport That night I actually
enjoyed myself for the first time at
ECU
Education Regained
Summer school: a comedy of terrors
By
Matthew Jones
Bill Walker
Michael Martin
FNeudo Fditorial Columnist
The following morning I went
to Dr Wright and requested her to
transfer me to the International House
where I had learned a vacancy ex-
isted My request was granted and I
stayed at the International house for
two years before moving info an apart-
ment with a friend
I have recently finished my
Masters degree also at ECU, and I can
confidently say that the International
House has hosted memories of hun-
dreds of students, bo domestic and
international, as it has for rhe. To the
1-r
international student, the lnterna
nonalHousehas been a refuge of sorts,
it has been a place to visit or stay at
when all the other dorms are closed
for the holidays, it has been a place to
visit on the off chance that one will
'ind someone from one's homeland,
or one who speaks the same language
To American students this has
been a place to visit, where they can
go to practice a foreign language, or to
share experiences about a visit to some
foreign country, or to make new
friends or to discuss international poli-
tics or to discuss the marketing strat-
egies and policies of the third world It
always amaes me when I think about
the kindness the International House
receives from trie local community
and organizations These oganiza-
tions take it upon themselves to visit
the International House and organize
events for all students to celebrate in.
be it the season of goodwill or the
Fourth of July
The International House also
maintains an open door policy, and
everyone is welcome, it remains open
even when the entire campus is closed
It tries to house ten students, each of a
different country including one stu-
dent from the United States Where
else can one go on campus to experi-
ence ten different cultures under the
same roof, ten different languages,
lifestyles, and culture, or where can
one go on campus to have live �epre-
sentation of culture which would oth-
erwise be confined to textbooks and
imagination.
1 am appealing to the adminis-
trators, to piease experience the Inter-
national House, before making a deci-
sion as to its status as a dorm. On
behalf of all th students who have
shared an experience at the Interna-
tional House,t appeal to you to let the
International house continue as it has,
so that it continues to represent what
it stands for and as an important and
integral part of the International spirit
of ECU.
One of the greatest mvths sur-
rounding this campus concerns sum-
mer school
Most people dread it
We think it's okay
With eight such sessions al-
ready under our belt, we've come to
learn that summer school is not
dreadful, but delightful Not even a
three- 1 nth stint at the beach, gain-
ful en ployment in a large INaVo-
politan area,or even93 days oi'faith-
ful devotion to reruns of Cilhgan's
Island can compare to the
oxymoronic notion of summer learn-
ing
Summer school provides an
experience different from the nor-
mal slower-paced semesters The first
thing one comes to realize from the
start of a summer term k the lack of
interest bv both teacher and stu-
dents Students don't want to be
sweating in Greenville, strapped to
the grindstone, and teachers don t
want to be slaving, stuck in the .e -
rure pit
The outcome proves to be ben-
eficial for both parties A sort of re-
id atmosphere and mutual respect
builds between teacher and student
Students show up for classes
and teachersare more willing togive
you that extra point you need Stu-
dents become more organized be-
cause of the intense course load and
teachers do their work faster because
ot less students
Summer School is actually not
the boring dread it's perceived to be
It can he a learning experience un-
matched bv regular semesters Cov-
ering an entire s-mester, well, in four
weeks, makes getting an education
fun Weekly tests and daily quizzes
neep even the laziest student on
guard
But the classroom isn't the only
area of change during the humid,
ungle-iike summer months of Gre-
enville Socialites will notice a change
in the pace of downtown The select
rew devoted Greenvilhans dominate
the dirty district. Bars are sparsely
populated and a certain "circle" of
cronies evolves out of a devotion to a
particular bar
Bartenders know you by name
and preferred dnnk, and the Stop
Shop clerks always say "Hi " Ev�
the bartender at a local iaundrymat
is prone to give you two free wasr-
on a Tuesday night � contingent
upon vour smile and his day
Back on the university grounds
(ah-hem Dr Rives) parking is infi-
nitely easier in summer school than
it is during regular semesters One-
third the number of students pro-
vides two-thirds more parki
spaces and the decrease in traffic is
visible The university also embarks
on massive construction projects to
confuse students when they return
in the fall (just so that the freshmen
don't feel like they've been picked
on).
The whole town seems to
breathe out a sigh of relief when
summer rolls arou nd No noise ordi-
nance violations No massive frat
parties Noobnoxiouscollegedrunks
harassing the locals in public areas
Even we editors like summer
school Weget paid the same amount
of money for half the work.
After all, isn't that the Ameri-
can wav?
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Health care not just a national issue
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
Well, I may as well make it offi-
cial I have cancer
Specifically, I have Hodgkin's
lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph
glands At the moment, half of the
lymph glands in my neck and chest
are swollen to the size of basketballs
(I'm exaggeranng) And as I've just
gotten out of the hospital, which I was
forced to make my home for five and
a half days, it's difficult to write about
anything except health care
In most ways, I'm lucky First of
all, I picked a really good cancer, as
these things go; the cure rate for
Hodgkin's is better than 90 percent
What's more, the pathologist teils me
that the cancer hasn't spread to my
spleen or anywhere else (that's what
the godawful surgery was all about)
So I'm getting of f light: probably six to
eight weeks of radiation treatments,
and thaf s it. No chemotherapy, thank
Whoever' In Charge
I'm also lucky in that I'm cov-
ered by my father's health insurance
The company is trying to weasel out
of paying for this, but they're really
stuck. In a future column, I'll tell you
all about the insurance company and
their dishonorable attempts to screw
rr out of the money I deserve, all
while giving ma a cheery "good luck"
on the phone.
But the bills are coming in any-
way, because I see most of what I'd
have to pay if I were less firm with the
insurance folks, and well, you
wouldn't believe it Sixteen hundred
and fifty-five dollars for one set of
tests, threehundred more for a couple
of CT scans 1 haven't gotten the bill
from the hospital yet, and frankly, I
don't want to Abdominal surgery
complete with organ removal plus five
days' stay I don't even want to
think about it
This is why health care is such a
contentious issue in America today
I've got a cancer that can be cured
(probably), but under slightly differ-
ent circumstances, it could kill me
anyway, simply because I couldn't
afford the bills Hell, I couldn't hope to
afford this I'd have trouble affording
it if I had a full-time job, what with
losing all that time from work.
Everyone should have access to
health care But granting that every-
one should have access to health care
ts rather easier than providing it
There are three basic desired
qualities of health care: rapid access,
affordability, and high-tech equip-
ment Trouble is, you can only have
two of the three
Right now, we have rapid ac-
cess and high-tech equipment. We
want affordability The question is,
what are we willing to trad for it?
Since speed of access is an im-
portant consideration � most diseases
worsen with time � well have to
trade in the high-tech toys. (Depend-
ing on how high tech radiotherapy is,
that kind of trade might kill me. Cast
Entertainment
la vie)
The most sensible solution that
comes to mind is to limit those parts of
health care that are made universal.
Vaccinations, routine checkups �
preventive maintenance, in short �
should be made covered That may
even save money in the long run,
thanks to the well-known relation-
ship between prevention and cure
But I'm skeptical that anything
more will come of universal health
care than that. The costs mount up
ft�t, as soon as America actually has to
start paying for universal health care,
America will start looking for ways to
gut it.
At any rate, until we have uni-
versal health care, you're responsible
for your own I don't ordinarily give
advice like this, but I urge you to
prepare for the worst. Now. While-
you're healthy
Find out whether you're cov-
ered by your parents' insurance (if
they claim you as a dependent, you
probably are covered, but check).
If not, sup smoking, stopdriruv
ing, and get your own heal insure
ance Find a way to pay for it If s
worm it
If worse come to worst, there
are organizations that pay part of the
heal care costs for young persons.
Wa college students are still young
enough to apply for some of these
funds. Check.
Believe me, the last thing you
want when you're sick is to have to
worry about paying to gat better I've
seen the bills, and they ain't pretty.
Unlike other sequels that have come out recently. Lethal Mft
has all the action and humor to make it one of the summers'
' Weapon 3' pac
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
All over the country, in manv
newspape rs, television shows, and
radio bnwdcasts Lethal Weapon 3
has become the brunt ot uniushfied
criticism. Ibo many reviewers suf-
fer from the delusion that sequel is
synonymous with shoddiness.
Thesecnrics that malign sequels
should remember the Thin Man
senes, the Andy Hardy series and
the manv lames Bond films. Se-
queLs have been around Holly-wood
for a long time and not without
some fine artistic films being cre-
ated as a result.
Lethal Weapon 3 happens to be a
first-rate sequel that is sure to please
audiences well into the hot days of
July. The series has finally reached
an agreeable tone. The viciousness
has been toned down and the hu-
mor has been keyed up
"The magic is back proclaim
the ads and how nght they are. Mei
Gibson and Danny Glover make
the perfect team. The two have de-
veloped a closer friendship in each
one of the Let hal Weapon fi lms. Their
comic timing gets better with each
outing.
This time Martin Riggs (Gibson)
has finally freed himself of the sui-
cidal instincts that plagued him in
the first two installments. He still
has a fearlessness about rum but his
energy has been channeled into wit
and compassion instead of self pity
Roger Murtaugh (Glover) still
maintains that he "is too old for this
shit but deep down he thnves on
the excitement. He has learned to
respect and appreciate Riggs-
Murtaugh remains the stable fam-
ily man who still loves the thrill of
being a cop
As Lethal Weapon 3 opens
Murtaugh and Riggs arrive at the
scene of a bomb scare. Their repar-
tee while hud erU
a parked car nas bee;
vanous preview dips
to cut the blue wire but
wants to wait tor the h
Riggs azures him that
what he is doing
'Tmcuttingthered
says Riggs.
"Whooooooa a i
vou said blue returns
Riggs assures
"You tell thai
she loudly purrs,
isthejaminmyjel
he meant the red the
then snips the red triad
on the bomb speeds uj
tells Murtaugh to grab '
had landed on the COO
The two then race out i
ing as the bomb expk
The next scene pr
some visual firewa rl
building blow- jp befd
A building it. vland
scheduled fbcdemolirja
makers demolished it
era. The results kxk u;
ibry enough, the rrvnie
increases from there
A ruthless ex-
son) becomes the viil
Weapon 3. His e
gerated w hen he pu?
worker into fresh cor
concrete pours down.
'Wait he tells a
worker who wants tcj
"we can put our lruo
evil man raids the p
illegal weapons that!
confiscated.
The plot is purpo
ter all its oniy purposel
a means tor Murtaugh
relate. The action ar
Curdled musi
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Soul Rotation is either the smart-
est album the Dead Milkmen have
produced, or the weakest, or maybe
ifs both. As the Milkmen them-
seheshavemadeabundanth. clear,
nothing in this world is easily un-
derstood.
Kr�wnforrjerversehumorand
goocl-narured yet vicious lampoon-
ing of American culture, the Dead
Milkmen have spent seven years
making the wrong enemies and
enjoying it
On Soul Rotation, they try to
find a meaning to it all. Initially a
bland and confusing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories,
the album congeals after a few lis-
tens into an intriguing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories.
The pungent wit of earlier al-
bums, however, is bareh in evi-
dence. This time, the Milkmen are
serious.
Many songs on the album ex-
press a paranoid concern about the
way of things, a sort of crackpot
ideology, but the ideology is best
expressed in The Conspiracy
" Aragged piece withabreak-
neckpace, "Conspiral
ofa "They" who owrj
control people's livi
basis without our lcn
In the song, e i
ter. Delivered with a
the song whips Sou. j
paranoid frenzy
into the final song
The conspiracy
to include UFO
They" don't want ci
the obvious irraoor
we live our lives
himself.
In "God's Kid 1
H.P. Hovercraft I
Anonymous) spj
"maybe there are
who created all
and another, God
who created even
perfect people, its
to let arryone else
Scil Rotation
utesofdankpai
on a decidedly
-Shaft in Gr
Richardl
heroof the 1970s
listeners not to
lent example. In
Hovercraft
v
��!�.� m�i.mL�i���





CONDON
CARD
i-
Regained
imedy of terrors

: �� Mop
w Hi Even
rr at a local .iutvirvm.it
. : re w ashes
, i i ontingent
� md hi 'l.iv
v. rstt) K'(1"d�
U ins is mfl-
hoolthan
i ��� v c ne-
i r number ol students pre
� . i� �-ing
. � e in traffic at
1 r university also embarks
�� iction prokecta to
I r student vt � -i-ti they return
.st �o thai the freshmen
? � they've been picked
(town seems to
� a sigh o( rellei when
�. iround No noise ordi-
itiona No massive frat
; . � . obnoxiouncollege drunks
ing the local in public areas
. . � Even we editors Ilk summer
hrVe get paid the sama amount
money tor hall the work
VVt ii; Isn't th.it the Amen-
m wa v
er Hammer
national issue
IS Ml
.1 fo.l.n i

oou

� .
tiMi desired
rapid .u oaas
t! tai h eijuip
i an only h,n �
i�" rapul .ii
buipmant We
ie question is,
tr.liie tor it'
ess is .in im-
HOStdsMS�S
A'f'll h.ive 10
t vi (Oapand-
.liother.ipv is.
it kill me C'est
rh moat sansibla solution that
stomtndistoUntittrtOMpaftsei
, - ira th.it .ire m.ule universal.
thorn routine checkups �
. entiva maintananoa, m short �
ild be mad mvarad That may
lava money m the long run,
� ID the well-known relahon-
etwean prevention and cure.
But 1 m skeptical that anvthmg
�. ill come or univers.il health
. �� m th.it lhe iosts mount up
is toon as A meru a M tu.illvh.isto
st.irt paying tor universal health care,
Aniru a will start looking tor ways to
Rut It
At inv rate, until we have uni-
eml health i are. you re tvsponstbla
for your own 1 don t ordinarily giv
idvica like tins, but 1 urge you to
� pare tor the worst Now While
� re healthy
knd out whether you're cov-
erd by your parents insurance (if
i laim vou as a dependent, you
probably are covered, but check)
It not stop smoking, stopdrink'
mn, and Ret vtuir own health insur-
ance Find � way to pay for it. It's
worth it
It ors� iomes to worst, there
are organizations that pay part of the
health care costs for young persons.
We college students are still young
enough to apply tor some of mesa
funds Check
Believe me, the last thing you
want when you're sick is to have to
worry about paying to get better I've
seen the bills, and they ain't pretty.
v
Entertainment
�he Saat (Harnlftiiati
June 3, 1992
Platters entertain Olympians
Photo courtoy ot W�m�r Brotrtar Picture
Unlike other sequels that have come out recently, Lethal Weapon 3, starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover,
has all the action and humor to make it one of the summers hottest hits.
' Weapon 3' packs big bang
By IkeShibley
Matt Writer
All over the country, in many
newspapers, television shows, and
radio broadcastj Lctto! Weapon 3
has become tin brunt ot u trustified
cntHism loo many revkfwensuf-
ter from the delusion tlat sequel is
synonymous with shoddkWM
Trw xe crl tics th.it malign sequels
should remember the ITun Man
series, the Andy I lardy series and
the many amfl Bond films Se-
quebhavebeenaround! toUywood
for a long time anil not without
some fine artistic films being cre-
ated as a result.
Uihtl rVagpon 3happena to bea
first-rates�iuel that is sun1 to please
audiences well into the hot days of
filly, The seni�s has finally reached
�in agrOMble tone I'he viciousness
has been toned down and the hu-
mor has been keyed up
"The magic is back! proclaim
the .uts and how nght thev are. Mel
t ibson and Danny (llover make
the perfect team. The two have de-
veloped a closer fnetidship in each
one of the Lethal Weapon films. 1 "heir
comic ttnimg gets better with each
outing.
Ihistinv Martin Riggs(Gibson)
has finally frml himself of the sui-
cidal instincts that plagued him in
the first two installments. He still
lias a fearlessness aNut him but his
energy has chefwteled into wit
and comp.ission instead of self pity.
Roger Murtaugh (Glover) still
maintains that he "is too old for this
sfnt but deep down he thrives on
the excitement. He has learned to
respect and appreciate Riggs.
Murtaugh remains the stable fam-
ily man who still loves the thrill of
lxing a cop
As Lethal Weapon 9 opens,
Murtaugh and Riggs arrive at the
scene of a bomb scare. Their repar-
tiv while huddled over the bomb in
a parked car has been on display in
various preview clips. Riggs wants
to cut the blue wire but Murtaugh
wants to vvait for the bomb squad.
Riggs assures him that he knows
what he is doing.
Tmcutting the red wire, Rog
says Riggs.
"Whixxxxxxa a minute ago
vou said blue returns Murtaugh.
Riggs assures Murtaugh that
"You tell that man'
she loudly purrs, "hat he
isthejaminmyjeHyroll
he meant the red the whole time
then snips the red wire, lhe timer
on the bomb speeds up so Riggs
tells Murtaugh to grab the cat that
had landed on the roof o( the car.
lhe two then race out of the build-
ing as the bomb explixles.
The next scene provides awe-
some visual fireworks. An entire
building blows up before our eyes.
A building in Orlando had been
scheduled for demolition so the film-
makers demolished it for tne cam-
era. The results hxik superb. Incred-
ibly enough, the movie'sexcitement
increases fmm there.
A ruthless ex-cop (Stuart Wil-
son) becomes the villain in Lethal
Weajfon 3. His evil is nastily exag-
gerated when he puslies a disloyal
worker into fresh concrete as more
concrete pours down.
"Wait he tells a potenbal co
worker who wants to turn away
"we can put our initials in it This
evil man raids the police Station for
illegal weapons that have been
confiscated.
The plot is purposely thn. Af-
ter all its only purpose is to provide
a means for Murtaugh and Riggs to
relate. The action and the humor
provide the foundation for success.
Rene Russo plays , lieutenant
in Internal Affairs who knows mar-
tial arts She takes part in some of
the wilder fight scenes. As Riggs
tells Murtaugh when she takes on
five hoodlums at once: "1 want you
to watch this, Roger. She has a gift
More excitement comes in the
bang-up finale as Riggs sets fire to
several acres oi construction.
The humor floats in fmm all
areas. Riggs consistently spats one-
liners The woman from the ar-
mored car returns later in the film
with flowers and candy for
Murtaugh. "You tell that man she
loudly purrs, "that he is the jam in
my jelly roll
Much added humor comes
from 14 Geti0oeFesd of GoofyBm
and Mv Cousin Vinny). Leo likes to
tell people that he is a gixxl real
estate agent. "Whatever you want;
Leo gets c iet it? l,eo GetZ . This
sophomoric humor takes the film
into tiie c ome� 1 ic stra h s phere. Leo's
every other word is "okay He
rattles off dialogue like an auto-
matic weapon.
The scripthasbeen streamlined
so that the serious intrusions are
kept to a min i mu m. The scene w here
Murtaugh shixits a teenager comes
off as heavy-handed. Yet another
potential uncomfortable interrup-
tion where Riggs confronts
Murtaugh on his boat plays true.
The swageness of the first two
films has been downplayed in Le-
thal Weapon 3. Thus the film suc-
ceeds more than either of the other
two. Siime viewers mav crave more
serious killing but most will relish
the fun to be had watching these
characters interact.
This film rocks and mils for its
en tire two hours. Many viewers will
revisit this rVSaBJNM several times.
There is just so much to enjoy.
On a scale of one to ten, Lethal
Wmpou 3 rates an 8.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Saturday night, The Platters
played to a soaked but enthusiastic
crowd at the opening ceremonies
for the Special Olympics.
Though the performance was
in question nght up to the start, The
Hatters decided not to disappoint
their fans and gave a rousing, fun-
loving show. Even the" rough
weather � a constant drizzle from
start to finish, sometimes escalating
to a downpour � didn't deter lhe
crowd fromen joying the l�50sstyle
group and dancing to their heart's
content.
The Platters performed around
fifteen songs, smcxithly changing
lead singers and keeping the
audience's attention with nary a
hitch. Singing some of their hit
songs, like "Only You" and "With
This Ring The Tlatters left a smile
on the audience's faces and obvi-
ously enjoyed playing to such a
receptive enwd.
First managed in 1�S3 by Buck
Ram, The Platters started out as an
all male quartet, eventually grow-
ing into the four male, one female
group that it is today. Monrie
Powell, the lead tenor ot the gnup
for the past tw enty years, joins with
Donne Radford, LeonQlliam, Vkki
Mixire and Mike Davis tn create the
special sound of meaningful lyrics
coupled with an impressive array
of vocal harmonies.
Buck Ram, The Platters' man-
ager fmm RS4 till hisdeath in 1991,
led their success with his one-of-a-
kind combination of nostalgia and
amtemrx irarv sty leof performance.
Ram led The Platters to un-
equaled fame and popularity, com-
piling sixteen gold records and ap-
pearances in the movie "Rock
Around the dock" and five other
films.
Through The Platters, Ram
Pholo by Jo� Hor�t
The Platters performed for an enthusiastic Special Olympics' crowd
Friday evening despite the bad weather.
brought back performance values
and the importance of material to a
group's record.
The Platters lyrics and songs
may have started in the 1950s, but
their music is still fresh nearly forty
years later. As Ram said regarding
his hit song "Only You "It starts
out, 'Only you can make this world
seem right and in the last ten years
we've been worried a lot about the
world With ten or more gold
records from different artists per-
forming "Only You Ramattributes
its success to its simplicity and
honesty.
"It's one of our better songs
Ram said. "Just a song that caught
on, and I think it's because of the
simple lyric
Though the weather may have
deterred most of the crowd from
staving, the wait was worth it when
The Platters finally tixik the stage.
Their upbeat style and obvi-
ous love of their music had people
dancing right in front of them and
enjoying themselves immensely.
Endingtheirhour-longperfor-
mance, The Platters gave hugs and
handshakes to their fans and left to
a rousing ovation.
King provides 'Needful Things'
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
"You've been here before
With these four words, Stephen
King begins his latest � and last �
Castle Rixk story, Needful Things.
Readers may think they have been
here before and know all there is to
know about Castle Rock, but King
still has a few tricks up his sleeve.
Kinghasdeligh ted readers with
the small town life of Castle Rock,
Maine for vears now. With the first
appearance of Castle Rock in his
novel, The Dmi Zone, King has gone
to feature this make-believe town
and its characters in books like Dif-
feren t Seasons, Cujo, The Dark Half and
the most recent. Four Past Mulnight,
in the novella, "The Sun Dog
In his prologue to "The Sun
Dog King describes his belief that
"small towns are scale models of
what we laughingly call 'society
With 77k" Dead Zone, King starts to
make this belief a reality that has
persisted throughout the years.
Needful Things centers on the
appearance of a new store in Castle
Rock, Needful Things. Even before
its opening, the whole town is buzz-
ing about the store and its possible
wares. "If II be just another antique
shop quotes Cora Rusk, mother of
Brian Rusk, who rums out to be the
shop's first customer. But she doesn't
discover until later just how wrong
she is.
Leland Gaunt runs Needful
Things. Fans of King will recognize
the similarities between Gaunt and
The Man in Black who predomi-
nates books like The Stand and The
Eyes of the Dragon. With the latest
starting thread and tie-in to King's
continuing series, The Dark Tower,
Gaunt is the epitome ot evil and tne
ultimate antagonist ever known to
modem-dav fiction.
Squaring against Gaunt is the
aii-too-human tragic hero, Sheriff
Alan Pangborn. First introduced in
The Dark Half, Pangborn was regu-
lated to a secondary role without
much character development. But
now King brings him to the fore-
front, endowing him with such real-
ity that readers can't help but iden-
tify with hirn
With thisCasde Rock story, King
focuses more on charactenzation
than the surrounding landscape.
With the notonety Castle Rock al-
ready has, a topographical descrip-
tknofitwouldonlyservetodampen
the speed of the book. So King for-
goes this and proceeds to illustrate
the lives of Castle Rock residents.
King has come up with a volca-
nic ending for his loved town and
readers will find themselves hard-
pressed to put this one down before
turning the final page.
Curdled music sours Dead Milkmen's latest album
By Mark Brett
Staff Writ�r
SoulRotatum iseither the smart-
est album the Dead Milkmen have
produced,or the weakest,or maybe
it's both. As the Milkmen them-
selves have made abundantly clear,
nothing in this world is easily un-
derstood.
Known for perversehumor and
gixxl-natured yet vicious lampoon-
ing of American culture, the Dead
Milkmen have spent seven years
making the wrong enemies and
enjoying it.
On Soul Rotation, they try to
find a meaning to it all. Initially a
bland and confusing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories,
the album congeals after a few lis-
tens into an intriguing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories.
The pungent wit of earlier al-
bums, however, is barely in evi-
dence. This time, the Milkmen are
serious.
Many songs on the album ex-
press a paranoid concern about the
way of things, a sort of crackpot
ideology, but the ideology is best
expressed in The Conspiracy
Song A ragged piece with a break-
vi
neck pace, "Conspiracy Song" talks
of a "They" who own the world and
control people's lives on a daily
basis without our knowledge.
In the song, everything is sinis-
ter. Delivered with a fanatic's zeal,
the song whips Soul Rotation into a
paranoid frenzy that echoes right
into the final song.
The conspi racy theory ex pand s
to include UFO sightings that
"They" don't want communicated,
the obvkms irrationality of die way
we live our lives and finally, God
himself.
In "God's Kid Brother singer
H.P. Hovercraft (a.k.a. Rodney
Anonymous) speculates that
"maybe there are two Gods One
who created all the perfect people,
and another, God's Kid Brother,
who created everyone else. And the
perfect people, it seems, don't want
to let anyone else in on the joke.
Soul Rotation ends,after 40 min-
utes of dank paranoia and mistrust,
on a decidedly peaceful note with
"Shaft in Greenland Referencing
Richard Roundtree'sblaxploitation
hereof the 1970s, the Milkmen urge
listeners not to follow Shaft's vio-
lent example. In a strange place,
Hovercraft croons, Travel around
i
I
and meet all the people Work up
me nerve to touch them lightly .
See ho h it feels to be Shaft in Green-
land
Musically, the album seems to
flatten the band's quirky style. A
mixture' flames Brownriffs,avant-
garde stytings and pure punk
grunge, the Dead Milkmen sound
was somethirig unique. Many songs
on this effort b lkw that basic tem-
plate but lack the perverse innova-
tion that really biought earlier al-
bums to life. Soul Rotation, as a re-
sult, sounds hollow.
Perhaps this was deliberate on
the part of the band. By doing away
with the more outrageous aspects
of the humor and the musical tricks,
the Milkmen are left with a basic
skeleton to hang their words on.
Withoutany of thatdistracting rich-
ness, the listener is forced to pay
attention to the message for once.
Maybe die Dead Milkmen were just
tired of being the goofballs.
Or maybe they just got lazy
and turned outa moderately funny
album that examines ideas they've
dealt withelsewhere.Only the Milk-
men can know for sure, but opti-
mism and a strong fondness for
Soul Rotation says if s the former.
TTteDeeJ Milkmen have released their newatoum. Soul Rotation. Unlike their previous albums, SoulRotation
takes a much more serious approach to music and life in general. But if you donl understand the latest afoum
from the group with the cowish name, donl worry. They will be the first to say that there isnl much m the world
that is easily understood.
i'
I
wnw





CONDOR
CARP
������
ned
nedv of terrors
i unaa
king is mfi-
x �ne-
barks
�eots to
return
shmen
picked

, � seems to
� relief when
e ordi-
nassive frat
� ge li anks
��CIS
tors ke summer
11 esame amount
� � . rk
� �� it the Amen-
mmer
national issue
ess is an im-
most diseases
�ve have to
It ys ! I Vpend-
kdiotherapy is
kill me C'est
ble solution that
� �mittho'parts of
. � � ri � a ie universal
' MIPS �
ntei ince, in short �
made v ereii That may
P; the long run,
, , known relation-
. � and cure
keptii al that anything
� iniversal health
�ta mount up
� � as America actually has to
ngi rui iversal healthcare,
tart looking for ways to
� til we have uni-
ir� � . re responsible
� ��- : � � � rdtnarily give
ke this, but 1 urge you to
. � - the w si Now While
il r ,��� ,r vou're cov-
� � ts insurance (if
?�pendent, you
� ?red, but check)
� i ; moking,stopdrinkr
iir own health rnsur-
vay to pay tor it It's
It worse comes to worst, there
rganizahons that pay part of the
re usts tnr voung persons
liege students are still young
gh to apply for some of these
hands Check
Believe me, the last thing you
want when you're sick is to have to
worry about paving to get better I've
seen the bills, and they ain't pretty
Entertainment
aUje fEaet (Ear0liman
June 3, 1992
Platters entertain Olympians
Photo courts�; ot W�ir BiOth�r� MC!ur��
Unlike other sequels that have come out recently, Lethal Weapon 3, starnng Mel Gibson and Danny Glover.
is all the action and humor to make it one of the summer's hottest hits
' Weapon 3' packs bi
Bv IkeShiblev
Matt Writer
Ml over the country. in many
tewspapers television shows, and
k1io broadcasts lethal Weapon 3
has become the brunt ot unjustified
vriticism. 1 oo mam ro lowers suf-
fer from UV delusion that sequel is
synonymous with shoddiness.
These, ritksthat malign sequels
should remember the Ihin Man
series, the Andy Hardy series and
the mam lames bond films. Se-
quelshavebeenaround 1 folfywood
for a long time and not without
some fine artistic films being cre-
ated as a result.
Lethal Weapon 3 happens to be a
first-ratesequel that is sure to please
audiences well into the hot days ot
lulv Ihe series ha finally reached
an agreeable tone. I 'he k iousness
has been toned down and the hu-
mor has been keyed up
rhe magic is Kk ki proclaim
the ads and how nght they are Mel
Gibson and Danny Glover make
the perfect team. The two have de-
veloped a closer friendship in each
one of the Lethal Weapon films. Their
comk timing gets better with each
outing.
Phis time Martin Riggs(C.ibson)
has finally freed himself of the sui-
cidal instincts that plagued him in
the first two installments He still
has a fearlessness about him but his
energy has been channeled into wit
ind compassion instead of self pity.
Roger Murtaugh (Glover) still
maintains that he "is too old for this
hit but deep down he thnveson
the excitement. He has learned to
respect and appreciate Riggs.
Murtaugh remains the stable fam-
ily man who still loves the thrill of
leing a cop.
As Lethal Weapon 3 opens,
Murtaugh and Riggs arrive at the
i one of a bomb scare. Their repar-
tee while huddled over the bomb in
a parked tar has been on display in
various preview clips. Riggs wants
to cut the blue wire but Murtaugh
wants to wait for the bomb squad.
Riggs assures him th.it he knows
what he is doing.
"I'm c utting the red wi re, Rog
says Riggs.
"Whooooooa a minute ago
you said blue returns Murtaugh
Riggs assures Murtaugh that
"You tell that man
she loudly purrs, "that he
is the jam in my jelly roll
he meant the red the whole time
then snips the red wire. Ihe timer
on the bomb speeds up so Riggs
tells Murtaugh to grab the cat that
had landed on the roof oi the car.
Ihe two then race out ot the build-
ing as the bomb explodes.
The next scene provides awe-
some visual fireworks. An entire
building blows up before our eyes.
A building in Orlando had been
scheduled tor demolition some film-
makers demolished it for the cam-
era The results look superb, lncred-
iblv enough, the movie sexcitement
increases tnm there
A ruthless ex-cop (Stuart Wil-
son) becomes the villain in Lethal
Weapon 3. His evil is nastily exag-
gerated when he pushes a disloyal
workei into fresh concrete as more
concrete pours down.
"Wait he tells a potential co-
worker who wants, to turn away,
"we can put our initials in it This
evil man raids the police station for
illegal weapons that have been
confiscated.
The plot is purposely thin. Af-
ter all its oniy purpose is to provide
a means for Murtaugh and Riggs to
relate. The action and the humor
provide the foundation toi i l e.s.
Rene Russo play? ,i lieutenant
in Internal Affair- who knows mai
tial arts She takes part in some ot
the wilder fight scenes. A- Riggs
tells Murtaugh when she takes on
five hoodlums at onceI wan; sou
towatchthis,Roger She hasa gift
Mire excitement comes in the
bang-up finale as Riggs sets fire to
several acres of construction.
The humor floats in from all
areas. Riggs consistently spats one-
liners ITie woman from the ar-
mored iar returns later in the film
with flowers and candy for
Murtaugh "You tell that man she
loudly purrs, "that he is the am in
mv jellv roll
Much added humor comes
from LeoGetz(JoePesciofGoorfWllas
and My Cousin Vmny). Leo likes to
tell people that he is a gixxi real
estate agent 'Whatever vou want;
Leo gets. Get it1Leo Getz " This
SOphomork humor takes the film
intothei omedk stratosphere. Leo's
every other word is "okay He
rattles off dialogue like an auto-
matic weapon.
The script has been streamlined
so that the serious intrusions are
kepttoaminimum. Thescenewhere
Murtaugh shoots a teenager comes
off as heavy-handed. Yet another
potential uncomfortable interrup-
tion where Riggs confronts
Murtaugh on his boat plays true.
"Ihe savageness i t the first two
films has been downplayed in Le-
thal Weapon 3. Thus the film suc-
ceeds more than either of the other
two. Some viewers may crave more
serious killing but most will relish
the fun to be had watching these
characters interact
This film rocks and rolls for its
entire two hours. Many viewers will
revisit this Weavon several times.
There is just so much to enjoy.
On a scale of one to ten, Lethal
Weapon 3 rates an 8.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Saturday night, The Platters
played to a soaked but enthusiastic
crowd at the opening ceremonies
for the Special Olympics.
Ihough the performance was
in question nght up to the start, The
Platters decided not to disappoint
their tans and gave a rousing, fun-
loving show. F.ven the rough
weather - a constant drizzle from
start to finish, sometimes escalating
to a downpour didn't deter khe
en iwd t r m enk ving the 1 95( K sty Ie
group and dancing to their heart's
content.
Ihe Platters pet formed around
fifteen songs, smoothly changing
lead smgers and keeping the
audience's attention with narv a
hitih. Singing some of their hit
songs, like "Only "Vou" and "With
Ibis Ring Ihe Platters left a smile
on the audience's faces and obvi-
ously enjoyed playing to such a
receptive crowd.
First managed in lur bv Buck
Ram, The Platters started out as an
ail male quartet, eventually grow-
ing into the four male, one female
group that it is today Monroe
Powell the lead tenor ot the gnup
for the past twenty years, pins with
Donne Radftrd, 1 .eonalliam. Vicki
Mixire and Mike Da vis to create the
special sound of meaningful lyrics
coupled with an impressive array
of ial harmonies
Buck Ram, The Platters' man-
agertrom 1954 till his death in 1991,
led their success with his one-ot-a-
kind combination of nostalgia and
contemporary styleof performance.
Ram led The Platters to un-
equaled tame and popularity,com-
piling sixteen gold records and ap-
pearanees in the movie "Rock
Around the Ckxk" and five other
films.
Through Ihe Platters, Ram
Photo by Jo� Horst
The Platters performed for an enthusiastic Special Olympics crowd
Friday evening despite the bad weather
bmught back performance values
and the importance oi material to a
group's record.
The Platters lynis and songs
mav have started in the 1950s, but
their music is still fresh nearlv torn
years later. .As Ram said regarding
his hit song "Onlv You "It starts
out, Onlv vou can make this world
seem nght and in the last ten years
we ve been worried a lot about the
world With ten or more gold
records from different artists per-
forming "Onlv You Ramattnbutes
its success to its simplicity and
hones tv
"It's one of our better songv '
Ram said, "lust a sng that caught
on and 1 think it's because of the
simple 1tk
Ihough the weather ma have
deterred most of the crowd from
staving, the wait was worth it when
The Platter- finally took the tage.
Their upbeat stvle and obvi-
ous lo e of their music had people
dancing nght in front of them and
enoving themselves immensely.
Endtngtheirhour-longperfor-
mance, The Platters gave hugs and
handshakes to their fans and left to
a rousing ovation.
King provides 'Needful Things'
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
"You've been here before
With the-e four words, Stephen
King begins his Litest � ami last �
Castle R(xk stop eeilhd Things.
Readers may think they have been
here before and know all there is to
know about Castle Rivk, but King
still has a few tricks up his sleeve.
King hasdeligh ted readers with
the small town lite of Castle Rock,
Maine for years now. With the first
appearance of Castle Rock in his
novel, The Dead Zone, King has gone
to feature this make-believe town
,ind its characters in books like Dif-
ferentSeasons ,Cujo,TneDarkHalfand
the most recent. Four Past MUnight,
in the novella. The Sun Doy?
In his prologue to "The Sun
Dog King describes his belief that
"small towns ,ire scale models of
what we laughingly call 'society"
With Vie Dead Zone, King starts to
make this belief a reality that has
persisted throughout the years.
Needful Things centers on the
appearance of a new store in Castle
Rock, Needful Things. Even before
its opening the whole town is buzz-
ing about the shire and its possible
wares. "It'll be ust another antique
shop quotes Cora Rusk, mother of
Bnan Rusk, who rums out to be the
hop's first customer. But shedi�esn't
discover until later ut how wnxig
she is.
Leland Gaunt runs Needful
Things. Fans oi King will reccgnize
the similarities between Gaunt and
The Man in Black who predomi-
nates books like The Stand and The
Eves of the Dragon. With the latest
starting thread and be-in to King's
continuing senes, The Dtirk Tomer
Gaunt is the epitome ot evil and the
ultimate antagonist ever known to
modem-dav fiction.
Squanng against Cunt is the
all-too-human tragic hem, Shenff
Akin Pangbom. First intnxluced in
The Dark Half, rangbom was regu-
lated to a secondary mle without
much character development. But
now King brings him to the fore-
front, endowing him with such real-
ity that readers can't help but iden-
tify with him.
With thisCasfJeRixkstorv, King
ftvuses more on characterization
than the surrounding landscape.
With the notonetv Castle Rock al-
readv has a topographical desenp-
tionof itwcwW only servetodarnpen
the speed ot the book. So King tor-
goes this and proceeds to illustrate
the lives oi Castle Rivk residents
King ha aw up with a volca-
nic ending for his loved town and
readers will find themselves hard-
pressed to put this ime down before
turning the final page.
Curdled music sours Dead Milkmen's latest album
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
SoulRotation is either the smart-
est album the Dead Milkmen have
pn d uced, or the weakest, or maybe
t both. As the Milkmen them-
selves have made abundantly clear,
nothing in this world is easily un-
derstood.
Known for perverse humor and
good-natoredyetvicious landown-
ing of American culture, the Dead
Milkmen have spent seven years
making the wrong enemies and
enjoying it.
On Soul Rotation, they try to
find a meaning to it all. Initially a
bland and confusing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories,
the album congeals after a few lis-
tens into an intriguing mix of con-
spiracy theories and UFO stories.
The pungent wit of earlier al-
bums, however, is barely in evi-
dence. This time, the Milkmen are
serious.
Many songs on the album ex-
press a paranoid concern about the
way of things, a sort of crackpot
ideology, but the ideology is best
expressed in "The Conspiracy
Song A ragged piece witha break-
neck pace, "Conspi racy Song" talks
of a "They" who own the world and
control people's lives on a daily
basis without our knowledge.
In the song, everything is sinis-
ter. Delivered with a fanatic's zeal,
the song whips Soul Rotation into a
paranoid frenzy that echoes nght
into the final song.
The conspi racy theory expands
to include UFO sightings that
"Thev" don't want communicated,
J
the obvious irrationality of the way
we live our lives and finally, God
himself.
In "God's Kid Brother singer
HP. Hovercraft (a.k.a. Rodney
Anonymous) speculates that
"maybe there are two Gods One
who created all the perfect people,
and another, God's Kid Brother,
who created everyone else. And the
perfect people, it seems, don't want
to let anyone else in on the joke.
Soul Rota tion ends, after 40 min-
utes of dank paranoia and mistrust,
on a decidedly peaceful note with
"Shaft in Greenland Referencing
Richard Roundtree'sblaxploitation
hero of the 1970s, the Milkmen urge
listeners not to follow Shaft's vio-
lent example. In a strange place,
Hovercraft croons, Travel around
ami meet all the people Work up
the nerve to touch them lightly .
See how it feels to be Shaft in Green-
land
Musically, the album seems to
flatten the band's quirky style. A
mi xtu re of James Bmwn riffs, avant-
garde stvlings and pure punk
grunge, the Dead Milkmen sound
was something unique. Many songs
ixi this effort follow that basic tem-
plate but lack the perverse innova-
tion that reallv brought earlier al-
bums to life. Soul Rotation, as a re-
sult, sounds hollow.
Perhaps this was deliberate on
the part of the band. By doing away
with the more outrageous aspects
of the humor and the musical tricks,
the Milkmen are left with a basic
skeleton to hang their words on.
Wi thout any of tha t distracting rich-
ness, the listener is forced to pay
attention to the message for once.
Maybe the Dead Milkmen werejust
tired of being the goofballs.
Or maybe they just got lazy
and turned out a moderately funny
album that examines ideas they've
dealt withelsewhere. Only the Milk-
men can know for sure, but opti-
mism and a strong fondness for
Soul Rotation says it's the former.
Photo by v�org� Moor
The Dead Milkmen have released their new album, Soul Rotation Unlike their previous albums, Soul Rotation
takes a much more senous approach to music and life in general. But if you don't understand the latest album
from the group with the cowish name, don't worry. They will be the first to say that there isn't much in the world
that is easily understood.
i i
I





xw
1
L fitfi I
jffi
rrors
. fral
i Hammer
national issue

.
i

is to
Iff,
������
� uni-
i � s 11 v e
iriii � u n
Whik
i rc cov-
� ii ce (if
� � �
top drink-
� � �� msur-
ly tor it It's
.��. , i worst, there
� f th�
� for young per i
�nl . � . iung
� � -���.� oi these
- � � � �� � � (thing vou
� s ti have to
r to get better I ve
�en the I i . ain't pretty
-ntertainment
She iEaat (Unroltntan
June 3, 1992
Platters entertain Olympians
Photo court��y of W�rn�r Hrothara eiciuro
tequete that have come out recently. Lethal Weapon 3 starring Mel Gibson and Danny Giover.
e action and humor to make rt one of the summer's hottest hits
' Weapon 3' packs big bang
B Ike Shiblev
Staff VNnt.M
in manv
a 1 and
idio bn,hi � von 3
ebruntol unjustified
pts suf-
delusioi thai equd i-
jvnonvmi us with sh tidiness
Hi � '���. sequels
embet Man
ries, the nd Hardv series and
e ma � � -
quelshavebeenai � ��� �xl
tor a i. e and nol a ithoul
some fine .irti-tu t: re-
ilt.
� �
first-rati � � � � ise
audien
� . ti hed
, � � . � . usness
��i �- � hu-
� keved ui
n �. i.nni
re Mel
' I annv ikrvet make
- ��- � team. The two have de
veloped ,t � i -r � i I hip in each
� iheir
mi � th each
Ihi iibson)
� -ui
idal instini ts that plagued him in
he first tallmenl He -till
ess about him but his
�. . ha been channeled intowit
ind 11 impassion instead f self pitv
Roger MurtaughHover -till
, � thatfv I - ld for this
� � eet ' wn he thru es on
� itement I ie has learned to
I , � and appreciate Riggs
�.nigh remains the stable fam
�in who -till loves the thnll of
.� �
A- I ethal Weapon open
Murtaugh and Riggs arrive at the
. � ,i bomb scare. Iheir repai
lee while huddled over the bomb in
a parked car has beei lispkn in
various preview clips Riggs wants
to i ut the blue wire but Murtaugh
want- to waif fof tin- bomb squad
Riggs assures him thai he knows
what he is doing
Inn uttingthered w ire f-
says Riggs
W1 ��x�- .i a minute ag i
VOU sakl blue return- Murtaugh
i , Murtauj
"Yoti tell that man
she loudly purrs, "that he
is the jam in my jelly roll
meant the red " i vl le time
then snips the red wire i he timer
the bomb speeds up so Riggs
tell- Murtaugh to grab the . at tii.it
had landed on the roof of the . ar
I he two then ra. e out of the build-
ing a- the bt mh explodes
Ihe next - ene provides awe
some � ial fireworks An entire
building blows up before our eyes
A building in I Orlando had been
si hed ult d tor demolition so the tilm-
makers demolished it f r the am
era fheresultstooksuperb Incred
ibh �� ���in a ie sex iternenf
im rea �� fn m there
� ruthle� ex-cop (Stuart Wil-
son) beo mes the villain in Lethal
Weapon 1lb evil is nastih exag
aerated when he puslies a diskiyal
workei into fresh ion. rete as more
concrete pours down
Wait " he tell- a potential 11
worker who wants to turn away,
"we i an put our initial- in it I his
evil man raids the poli( estation tor
illegal weapon- th.it have been
i onfist ated
fhe plof i- purposel) thin At
ter all it- only purpose 1- to pro kle
a mean- tor Murtaugh and Kigg- to
relate ! he a tion and tlie humor
etoundal

in In
tiai art She tal I me of
the wilder tight scenes - Riggs
tell- Murtaugh when -he takes i
frvehixxflun I want) u
to wad h this Rogei
M ree tei i i
bang up finale as Riggs etsfirel
several a. re- of onstru'
- rm all
area- F
liners fhe '��. �� e u
mored ar return- lati i the n
w ith ' � i � and i and v tor
Murl that ma;
loudh purrs, that he i-the iam in
mv ell '
idded humor ��� ��
and eo likes 1
tell people that
estal � �-�'� i � ��� anl
I ev gi ts.Get ii e � � � !hi-
sp' - take- the film
inti �" � med �� � phere I e
every other word is 'okay He
rattles off dialogue like an auto-
mata weapon
rhes ripthasbeenstreai
so that the seritius intrusions
kept toa minimum - - � ei
Murtaugh -hoot- ,i teei .ur �mes
off a- heavy-handed Yet anotJ � i
potential uncomfortable interrup
tion where Rigg nfronts
Murtaugh on hisboat j �� true
Ihe
films has been ' ��� i laved in L
thai Weapon ' he film su
. eil- more thaii either of the Other
rw � � iewers " i ravei
serious killing but mosf vmII reli-h
the fun to be I .i I wal ' ng ti
i hara. ter- inter,n t
fhis film nn ks and roll- fi r its
entire two hours Man viewerswill
re isif this '�'� n se'eral time
Inere i- jusf SO mu. h to enio
t n a 'nale of one to ten
Weapon rate- ,m
Bv oe Horsl
A-sist.int I ntertainmi-nt Iditor
Saturday night, Ihe Platter-
played toa - wked but enthusiastic
crowd at the opening ceremonies
t r the Spei ial'hmpi. -
I"ho. performarw e was
inque-tn m right up to the-tart, The
Platters de kied not to disappoint
their fans and ga e a rou-ing, fun-
loving -how. Even the rough
weather a constant drizzle from
start to finish, sometimes es alating
h a di -v.npour didn't del.
t rowdfromenjoy ingthe 1950s style
group and dan. mg to their heart s
I oiitent
� rmed around
n. H'thK changing
lead sinj � � , ping the
th nary ,i
hitih. Singing some of their hii
song � nly 'you and With
ihi � . he! atters lefta -milt
on �� � ' � �- .ind obvi
iuh i
ni ei
I n 1953 bv Hi. �
Ran i ttei 11 as an
entualh gn ���
:ne int. � ' lie, i me female
gi thai it is 1 i �- � ����
I . rof the grt �up
for the past twenty vears,Hinswith
- . v illiam, Vkki
M(xreand ' ' � ' reatethe
spe � - if meaningful lyrics
- � �� � r.y.
"ie-
Hiu k '�� ttter- man-
n ' -itilihi-deathm 1991,
ed then with his on �; a
kind combinal I ostalgia and
,r: - � fperformai
�� � �
ialei.1 fame and ptpularit com-
piling sixteen gold records and ap-
� Kink
� � md h e other
he Platters, Ram
� i. -�
" - Platters performed for an enthusiastic Special Olympic-
: - I ry evening desprte the bad weather
bmught ba. k performance values
I �� important eof material to a
group record
Ihe Platter- lyrics and -nng-
may hue started in the lVs but
irmusk is still fresh nearly forty
years later As Ram said regarding
hi- hit song " nh You "It start
out ' Yilv vou van make this world
and in the last ten years
we ve been w. irried a lot about the
w ?rid With ten or more gold
records fromd fferenl artists p'r
forming - - .martnbute-
it- success to it- simplicity and
estv
t's oneof - -
Ram said lust a song thai
�� . - �� ,
-
�� rmayha
mosl ' �� � from
������
� � � � i
. � ��
H-m and
ving themseh es imrm
Endingtheirhi-ur . - rl -
- arxi
�� -
i rousini
King provides 'Needful Things'
By )oe Horsl
�ssist.iiit tntfrt.iinment Fditor
"You've been here before "
With Ihesekmrwords Stephen
� egins hi- latest an�1 last
.i-tle K.nk -top. Needful Things
Readers may think they have been
d know all there is to
know about a-tle Rock, but King
-till hi- a few tru k- up hi- sleeve
King hasddighted readers with
the small town lifi I istte Rock,
Maim I i irsnow With me fir-t
appearaiKe of (a-tle Rock in hi-
. King has gone
to feature this make-believe town
and its hara. ter in books like
� � � � . � �� Haland
then t recent. ' Midnight,
in the novella
In his pr ilogue to Ihe sun
!g Kingdes nbe- hi- belief that
"small towns ire scale models of
what we laughingly call 'society
With The Dead Zone, King starts to
make tills belief a reality that ha-
per-i-ted throughout the years.
Needful Things center- on the
appearance i a new stnre ina-tle
R.nk tsit'ul Things. Even before
pening, the whole town is buzz
ing about th�' store arxi its possible
ware- It'll be jusf another antique
-hopquotesCoraRu-k moherot
an Ru-k, who turns out to be the
ip'sfirstcustomer But-h-do�
discover until later just how wren
she is
1 eland aunt run- Needful
Ihing- f King will recognize
the similarities between (�uint and
Ihe Man in FM.uk who predomi-
nates books like ' �-� rflrui and The
Eyes th ��. n With the latest
Stirling thread and tie-in to King's
continuing series The ' ��� " nixr
( aunt is Ihe epitome of evil and trie
ultimate antagonist ever known to
nHlem-dav fution
Sjuanng again-t Gaunt i- the
all-hx-hurruin tragic hero Sheriff
Alan Panghorn. Fir-t introduced in
�� �� Pangbom was regu-
lated ti a secondary nle without
much character development. I il
now King brings him to the fore-
m nt, endowing him with such real-
ity that readers can't help but iden-
tify with him.
WiththbCasueRockston -
� - uses more on chara m
than the surrounding landscape
With the notoriety Castle Rock al-
readvhas a topographical d -
tioi ' ' ervel
the � � � � - � "
goes thi- an cee �'
ves ol istle Rock n lents
King hinn ivoka-
nic ending tor his kwed town and
rvHders will find themselves hard-
pressed to put this one down bet ore
turning the final page
Curdled music sours Dead Milkmen's latest album
Bv Mark Brett
Staff Writer
ttJRotaftonbeither the smart
-1 album the I X'ad Milkmen have
rodl "I rthe weake-t,or mav be
� th A- th Milkmen them
�elve-have made abundant Iv . lear,
i thing in this world is easilv un
Il tood
Kn wn for perver-e humor and
pod naturedyetvk kmslampoon-
ng of Amerk an i ulture, the I .Md
Milkmen hue spent wen years
making the wrong enemies and
enjoying it
( m Soul Rotation, thev try to
find a meaning to it all. Initially a
bland and confusing mix of corv
piracv theories and UFO stories,
'tie album congeals after a few lis-
tens into an intriguing mix of con-
pir.Kv theories and UFO Stories
The pungent wit of earlier al-
bums, however, is barely in evi-
dence This time, fhe Milkmen are
serious.
Many songs on the album ex-
press a paranoid 0 nt em ah Kit the
way of things, a sort of tr.nkpot
ideology, but the ideology is host
expressed in "Theonspiracv
Song " A ragged pieie witha break-
nei kpace( onspirai Song"talks
of a " Pnev " wh 11 rwn the world and
control people's live- on a daily
basis without our knowledge.
In the song, ev ervthing is -ini
ter I telivered with a fanatw - zeal,
the song whips Soul Rotation into a
paranoid frenzy that echoes right
into the final Ming
Iheionspira. y theory expands
to include UFO sightings that
"They" don't want i ommunu ated,
the obvious irrationality of the way
we live our lives ami finallv, hhI
himself
In ' l .od's Kid Brother singer
HP Hovercraft (a.k.a Rodney
Anonymous) spe. ulate- that
"mavbe there are two C ahU" (ne
whoreated all the periec t people,
and another, Cod's Kid Brother,
who created everyone else. And the
perfwt pe� iple, it s�vm, don't want
to let anvone else in on the )oke.
SouKofufien ends,after 40min-
utesof dank paranoia and mistrust,
on a decidedly peaceful note with
"Shaft in Greenland Referencing
Richard Roundtree'sblaxploitiition
hero of fhe 1970s, the Milkmen urge
listeners not to follow Shaft's vio-
lent example In a strange place,
HovercraftClOOns, 'Iravelamund
i
and meet all the people Work up
the nerve to tou h them lightly
See how it feels to be Shafi in Ireen-
land
Musically, the album seems to
flatten the band- ijuirkv -tvie A
mixture of James Brown riffs,avant-
garde -tvhngs and pure Mink
grunge, the )v,u Milkmen sound
was something unique Many songs
on this effort follow that basic tem-
plate but lai k the perverse innova-
tion that really brought earlier al-
bums to life Soul Rotation, a- a re-
sult, sounds hollow.
Perhaps tins was deliberate on
the part of the band. By doing a way
with the more outrageous aspects
of the humor and the musical tricks,
the Milkmen are left with a basic
skeleton to hang their words on.
Withoutanvofthatdistr.il ting rich-
ness, the listener is forced to pay
attention to the message for once.
Mavbe the I Xui Milkmen were just
tired off being the goofballs.
Or maybe thev just got lazy
and turned out a moderately funny
album that examines ideas thev v e
dealt withelsewhere (Vilv the Milk-
men can know for sure, but opti-
mism an1 a strong fondness for
S�i Rotation -ays it's the former.
Photo by uorg� Moor
The Dead Milkmen have released their new album. SoulRotation Unliketheir previous albums, SoulRotation
takes a much more serious approach to music and life in general Bui if you don't understand the latest album
from the group with the cowish name, don't worry They will be the first to say that there isn't much in the world
that is easily understood
I





Classifieds
SH?e lEaat (Unrnltnuiu
June 3, 1992
I OK KIM
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Now tak-
ing applications for Fall.
Call 752-8915.
WANTED 2 male room-
mates. Furnished bed-
room with bathroom. ECU
bus access. Available Au-
gust for Fall semester,
$175mon, incls utilities.
Call 321-1848.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2 bed-
room apartment; close to
campus; new apartments;
energy efficient. $170mo.
plus 12 utilities. Avail-
able August. Call 757-
0933.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Two bedroom house. Call
Ginie 756-5552.
ROOMMATE WANTED
:for apartment 12 block
from campus, 2 blocks
from downtown and su-
permarket. Rent includes
utilities, phone, and cable
bills. Call 758-6418. Act
I OR KIM
Now!
LOOKING FOR TWO FE-
MALE nonsmokers (pref-
erably) to share bedroom
apt. beginning in August.
$121.67 rent plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Julie ASAP 830-
0984.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Male or Female, 2 story
2bedroom apt. Walking
distance of Campus, Dish-
washer, Cable, Rent $165
mo plus 12 utilities. Call
Clark or leave message
758-0645.
ONE BEDROOM APT.
available now. Close to
campus and downtown.
Dishwasher, frig stove.
Nice size bath and bed-
room. Call 758-4701.
APARTMENT FOR
RENT: 2bdr. 1 12 bath,
fully carpeted, free cable
and water. $445month,
no deposit required. Take
over lease. Please respond
immediatley. 752-2571 or
752-9409.
HIGHER EDUCATION
COSTS SOURING
Locate private sector aid for
college students. Contact
AAA Student Scholarship
Service at 758-9501
Alfredo's N.Y. Pizza Open from 5pm til
718 E. 5th St. � Downtown � 752-0022
with 1 topping
every outi, iviuii, i uts
3 Large Pizzas I ALL PITCHERS
I OR S A LI
FREE to a good home. En-
ergetic female black Lab
pup eight weeks old. Call
757-0903. Leave message
if needed.
TWO AIR CONDITION-
ERS for sale. Good condi-
tion. Call 752-9058.
SEIZED CARS trucks,
boats,4wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available in your
area now. Call (800) 338-
3388 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: 23" Schwinn
Highplains, great condi-
tion, $150. Call Craig at
752-4627.
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KBA, Box 13001, RTP, NC
27709.
MOVING! Everything al-
most new. 3-pc sofa, $200;
Sleepworthy full bed,
$100; Queen bed, $120; 7-
pc dining set, $150; stu-
dent desk, $25; TVVCR
cart, $15; coffee table, $10;
crib with mattress, $25;
high chair, $10; Kolcraft
playard, $28; iron board,
$55'7"x8'3" rug, $30; 4-
pc stacking lawn chair,
$15. 758-3489.
!OKSLI
42 HEXAGON OCEANIC
fish tank for sell. Includes
underwater gravel, filter,
light, and stand. Only 3
months old and has never
been filled. Best offer gets
this. Call 757-1814 or 757-
5128.
MILI' WILD
WANTED: Baseball play-
ers for the 1992 Carolina
Bush League. For more in-
formation contact Mark
Honeycutt 752-4630 or
Chas Mitch'l 756-0763. Se-
rious inquiries only
please!
EASY WORK! Excellent
pay! Assemble products at
home. Call toll free 1-800-
467-5566 ext. 5920.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW
HIRING: Earn $2,000
month and world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, etc.) Holiday,
summer and career em-
ployment available. No
experience necessary. For
employment program call
1-206-545-4155 ext. C586.
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT: Fisheries.
Earn $5,000month. Free
transportation! Room &
board! Over 8,000 open-
ings. No experience nec-
essary Male or Female.
For employment program
call Student Employment
III Ll� WAN! I I)
Services at 1-206-545-4155
ext. 1649.
POSTAL JOBS AVAIL-
ABLE! Many positions.
Great benefits. Call (800)
338-3388 ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air cou-
riers and cruiseships. Stu-
dents also needed Christ-
mas, Spring, and Summer
for amusement park em-
ployment. Call (800) 338-
3388 ext. F-3464.
BRODY'S for Men is ac-
cepting applications for
additional part-time Sales
Associates. Must be cus-
tomer service and sales
oriented. Prior retail ex-
perience helpful. Flexible
schedulesalaryclothing
discount. Apply Brody's,
The Plaza Mon-Wed 1pm
to 4pm.
WAITRESS WANTED:
part-time, good pay and
tips. Call Shirley after 6pm
at 355-0143.
BRODY'S is accepting ap-
plications for a Visual Dis-
play Assistant. Help make
store signage and create
storewindow displays.
Approximately 15 to 20
hours per week. Ideal for
Fashion Merchandising
Art Majors. Apply
Brody's, The Plaza Mon-
Wed 1pm to 4pm.
I $7.99 l
I 3 toppings i
carry out only
not good after
9pm
I
I
I
$11.99
good til 9pm
I
I
I
I
$1.50
(with this coupon)
I
I
I
I
I
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error-free, quick
and dependable at reason-
able cost. Excellent typing
and proofreading skills
(grammar, punctuation, sen-
tence structure, etc.) Call
Pauline at 757-3693.
WORDPROCESSING: Re-
sume term papers, thesis,
psychological assessments.
Fast service, reasonable
rates. Call 321-2522.
PERSONA I S
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks friendship and
correspondence from like-
minded lady. Photos and
letters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
CONGRATULATIONS to
Lisa Sykes The East Carolin-
ian-Advertising Queen for
the month of Mav" Thanks
to all AD Reps for an adjust-
ment free month! Your
leader Notorius Sutorius.
NICOLE: Summertime is
here and we are still friends-
I was worried for a while but
now I know it's you and me,
Friends Forever. Love, A.S.
LISA: One more day,then
watch out, buddy- the crazy
chics will hit downtown on a
drinkin spree. Drinkin' and
designing The East Qirolm-
um. FUN! FUN! FUN! Just
don't break out in hives with
all the excitement! Love, 5.
m �r ynit.ii 1,111.3 i,uupwii g
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSDISHESSILVERWARE
DISHWASHERPOTS & PANS
MAILSERVICE�CLUBHOUSE�LAUNDROMAT
SWIMMING POOL & LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
Putt-Putt:
Golf Courses
Anniversary
Coif SALE!
Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday, June 5th, 6th and
7th only!
Buy 20 Games of
Putt-Putt Golf
for only
$25.00
10th Street Extension
758-1820
KOUKTKADKR
HIV AM) 1 kadi:
PAPKRHACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
75S-6909
COMICS OLD NEW
NOW! USED CD'S
J
.v
A Beauuful Plice to Ljvc
�All New�
�And Ready To Reni-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway i'atrol Station
limited Offer � $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Wuliams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Qhb tad qaiat ana bedraona Auniafcao' apartments,
anargr�nKiaa.ft�a�tttratHiat�ar, waahen.aVyata,
cablaTV. Oaajfai of afcataa only. JHOtnaat 6
maablmm MOB1LB HOME RENTALS-coastal s
anaJM Aparmn md rrvxsJe horm. ic Kuim Oaraant
near Brook Vatky Counro das.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
1
��
m
8fe
Kg
i

i
k WELLNESS 4
w ASSISTANTS
(Aerobic Instructors)
litt County Memorial Hospi-
tal ha-s positions availahit tor
Weltness Assistants to teach
atrroha" dasscs tor hospital
employees Hijih school
diploma and CPU certification
required; aerobic certification
pretenvd. Hours ma van be
tween 330pm and S:HOpm.
Competitive salary. For con
sideration call 551-4556 or
send resume to: Employment
Office. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. P.O. Box 6028.
C-reenville. NC 27835-6028.
K IK AA
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Students$2.00
Nonstudents$3.00
Display A4s;
Open Rate per column inch$5.50
DEADLINE
Monday, 4 pm for Wednesday's Edition
CRITERIA FOR ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANY ORGANIZATION MAY USE THE ANNOUNCEMENTS
SECTION OF THE EAST CAROLINIAN TO LIST ACTIVITIES
AND EVENTS OrEN TO THE PUBLIC TWO TIMES FREE OF
CHARGE ALL ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE TO BE TYPED OR
NEATLY PRLNTED DUE TO THE LIMITED AMOUNT OF SPACJ
AVAILABLE, THE EAST CAROLINIAN CANNOT GUARANTEE
THE PUBLICATION OF ANNOUNCEMENTS. IT IS NOT ADVIS-
ABLE TO RELY ON THESE ANTSOJNCEMENTS AS A SOLE
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION. DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT
5PM FOR WEDNESDAYS EDITION.
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
a constituent of
UnivereilY
Medical Center
Ifte XgiL Company
of QrunvsQt LvL
GHeetMLWs msr full uce ham. cam salom-
2408 S. Charles St. Suite 5 355-4596
Faculty & Studesiu -
$10 offfidl set of mils
(ask for Robin)
oft r good for lumltd ttmt
Tanning: $4-single visit-SIS -5 visits �$25-10 visits
Announcements
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate stu-
dents completing their de-
gree this summer who need
help in developing or refin-
� ing their interview skills are
invited to a workshop on
June 3 at 3pm. Sponsored by
Career Services, the work-
shop will be held in the
�Bloxton House.
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center invites you to
worship with them. Sunday
Masses: 1130am & 830pm at
the Newman Center, 953 E.
10thSt,Greenville. Weekdays:
8am at the Newman Center.
BISaPCUAL-CAV-LESBIAN
ALLIANCE
Social support, activism and
activities. All interested and
caring people welcome. Call
757-6766 from 11:15-12:30
Mon-Thurs. for information
-i-
on time and place.
RESUME WRITING
WORKSHOP
The Career Services office an-
nounces a workshop on re-
sum? writing to be held on
June 10 at 3:00pm in the
Bloxton House. Participants
will learn about format, con-
tent and production of a pro-
fessional resume. Handouts
will be available. This work-
shop is especially designed for
prospective graduates, but is
open to anyone.
3rd ANNUAL "OLDIE-
GOLPIES" DANCE
ECU District97, State Employ-
ees Association of NC, will be
sponsoring their 3rd annual
"Oldie-Goldies" Dance, on
Saturday, June 13,1992 from
8-30pm-1230am, at the Gre-
enville Country Club, with a
new DJ featuring music from
the '50s, '60s, and 70. There
will be door prizes, light hors
d'oeuvres, and cash bar, as
I V
well as prizes for winners of
costume and dance contests.
We are expecting a surprise
visit from "Elvis Ad-
vanced tickets ata costof $6
person, may be obtained by
calling Nancy Corbett, (757-
4199) or Peggy Nobles, (757-
6012). A limited number of
tickets will be available at
the door.
PEACE CORPS
Challenging and rewarding
BtBerpenBrtE�tBrkJKJaAxp
T
to $400 after completion of
serviceCollege Loan Defer-
ment and partial forgiveness
of some school loans. Those
are just some of the benefits
offered by Peace Corps. In-
terested? Stop by and see
your on-campus Peace Corps
Recniiter-Belinda Blinkoif-at
H2SpeightMonday through
Wednesday between the
hours of 9am-3pm. Call
Belinda at (919) 757-6061 and
find out what the toughest
job has in store for you!
Sports
and th
Greenville Fun Park of f
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
While Davey Allison and Dale
Eamhart are burning up NASCAR
tracks an xind theS njth,Greenvillians
may soon be burning up tracks of
their own � go-cart tracks that is.
Greenville Fun Park, the newest
form of family entertainment in Pitt
County, offers racing and an arcade
to kids of all ages The go-carts mav
not be exactly like the NASCAR ve-
hicles Allison and Eamhart use that
abuse the Charlotte Motor Speed-
way Of North Wiaksboro tracks, but
the quality of competition and fun
certainly run neck-in-neck
"It's a different nde evervtime
Jerry Haynie, co-owner and creator
of Greenville Fun Park, said. "(The
gp-carts) have been ckxrked from 17
to 20 mph, but it feels like you're
going 60
Since i tsopemng two weeks agi i
theGreenville Fun Park hascaprured
a steady crowd, and some visitors
have become regulars.
'It's really fun racer Charles
Carraway said. "I've always loved
racing, and I guess this i? the closest
111 ever come to getting in there with
the big boys. You know, it's a whole
lot different than driving a car
The formula "K" gas-powered
go-carts have a 5-12 horsepower
H nda engine that i
up to 40 mph Butoj
similar in effect to
school buses, allow
Fun Park staff to co
the $3; III machine
The 80-foot tna
with seven turns
hair-pins It sits on al
land (me mi le N orm
fairgrounds on lYo
"(The track i
the optimum ri
Howard Feree
tracks for over a veil
was built We've
out North Can lina.
land, New 'jersey an
at different tracks
come up with this i
Havniecameul
make a go-cart tra
some 15 wars a go
Lee Setters and H
Emerald Cirv lac;
tainment, and go
great investment.
"We wan ted to.
for the families H
we have created a ta
� sme place thai
hangout
The Greenvilk
onlv one of its kindl
and Atlantic Beach
kxated on a mam
-�a lr
f. tt
Big Splash offers Greenvillians a chance to bring down 1
The range is located on U.S. 264 North, just past the
Bulls, Blazers set
CHICAGO (AP) � The Chi-
cago Bulls, who felt the burden of
expectations to reach the NBA
Finals, believe they can be more
relaxed against the Portland Trail
Blazers.
"It's a great relief, there was
a great amount of pressure on us
to do a good job and get back
here said Scottie Pippen, who
was thecatalyst for Friday night's
99-94 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers that wrapped up the
Eastern Conference finals.
Pippen, who snapped out of
a slump with 29 points, 12 re-
bounds, four blocked shots and
four steals in the final game, said,
"There's definitely been a lot of
pressure on me for not being able
to produce
Pippen was referring to his
in-and-out performances in East-
em Conference series against the
New York Knicks and the Cava-
liers after suffering an ankle in-
jury in the opening game against
the Knicks.
"Now we just have to go out
and play he said. "It's a great
feeling
What the Bulls feared the
most was going flat and the em-
barrassment of not being able to
reach the final round and defend
their title.
"There is a feeling of relief in
a lot of ways to get back to the
finals coach Phil Jackson said.
It hasn't been easy since so
much was expected from the
Bulls, who went 15-2 last year in
winning the championship and
then came back with a 67-15
record for the best mark in the
NBA this seasonj
Before the
there were some i
Bulls might go l
offs this season
increased afterl
sweep over Miai
"Ridiculous,
response, and tht
losing three gar
and two more ta
There is no
over the Trail Bl
Michael Jordan c
in the sixth gamt
"a great contidt
all of us
Jordan had
formance in the
ters of Game 6,
shots before scoi
the final period
honors with Pipj
There is no �
Trail Blazers foi
had the best recc
ern Conference:
knocked off Ut
winning at U tah ll
day night.
"Portland is-)
athletic teams in j
dan said. "It's a 1
Jordan said
defend ing the cl
winning it for thJ
Games 1 and!
at Chicago Stadij
and Friday night
shifts to Portland
following Sundaj
day. If needed,
be at Portland lu
The sixth i
would be played!





V V 11
SERVICES OFFERED
l PING: Error-free, quick
tdabie at reason-
Excell rvt typing
�freading skills
actuation sen-
etc I Call
WORDPRCK 1 SS1NG: Re-
thesis,
' ssments.
enable
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
Ml sK i NDPOETlC
and
like-
�nd
MKAS to
� arolin-
Mr
adiust-
e but
I me,
D RAVES
S2 00
NQLNCFMENTS
IF SPACI
KV.
v � i 1 A'lS-
- JE
� -XI
ail Company
SALON
m uln ft Studan�
� . , nails
� Hi hin i
xum$ � IkHtUmf � f gtiXOAU
isit$15 -5 visits$25-10 visits
r winners of
ks

Ad-
it a cost of $4
� obtained b
orbett, 737-
:o Nobles, 757-
inted number of
l be available at
F CORPS
and rewarding
ie�nfcLieJradx
Sports
�h;e �aBt (Earolfntan
Ju.4e3, 1992
7
and they're off
Greenville Fun Park offers family entertainment
By Michael Martin
Sperti I dttei
While Dave) Alison and Dale
Eamhart are burning up NASCAR
trac ksaround iheSoutKGreenviffiani
ma soon be burning up trades of
their own gixart tracks that is.
v deenvflle Fun Park, the newest
form of family entertainment in PHI
County, offers racing and m arcade
to kids erf all ages. I he go-carts may
not be exai try like the NASCAR ve-
hu les Allison and Eamhart use that
abuse tire Charlotte Motor Speed-
way or North Wilksboro tracks, but
the quality oi competition and fun
certainly run net k-in-neck.
It's �' different ndeeveryume
lem I iaynte, co-owner and creator
of (Ireenvilte Fiat Park, siid. "(The
gn-iartsi hue been docked from 17
to 20 mph, but it feels like you're
going 60
SirKeitsoperangtwoweeksago,
foeGreenvilteFunParichascaptured
a steady crowd, and some visitors
have become regulars
It's realh fun racer Charles
Carraway said. I've always loved
racing, aivl 1 guess Ihis is Ihedosest
I'll ever come to getting in then with
the big boys. i ou know, it's a whole
kit different than driving a car"
rhe formula "K" gas-powered
go-carts have a 5-1 2 horsepower
tfter completion of
service College Loan Defer-
ment and partial forgiveness
oi some school loans. Those
are just some of the benefits
offered bv Peace Corps. In-
terested7 Stop bv and see
our on-campus Peace Corps
Recruiter-Belinda Blinkoff-at
112 Speight Monday through
Wednesday between the
hours of 9am-3pm. Call
Belinda at (919)757-6061 and
find out what the toughest
job has in store for you!
Honda engine that iscapableof speeds
up to 40 mph. But a safety governor,
similar in effect to those found on
sctxxl buses, allows the Greenville
Fun Park staff to control the speed oi
the S3J0QO machines.
The 8Vfixit crack is 22 feet wide
with seven turns�three of which are
hair-pins. It sits on a three acre pkt of
land onemileNorthof thePirtCounty
fairgnHinds on IYigress Riwd.
"(The track) was designed for
the optimum ride co-owner
Howard Feree said. "We studied
tracks for over a year before this one
was built. We've traveled through-
iHitNorthCan�lina,Tennessee,Mary-
land,New Jersey aixl Florida looking
at differenftracks so that we could
come up with this one
Haynie came up with the idea to
make a gixart track in Greenville
some 15 years ago and presented it to
Ijee Setters and Feree. He felt the
Emeraki Citv lacked familv enter-
tainment, and gD-cart9 would be a
great investment.
"We wanted to make something
for the families Havnie said. "Flere,
we havecreated a family atmosphere
� some place that just won't be a
hangout
Ihe Greenville Fun Park is the
onlv one of its kind between Raleigh
and Atlantic Beach. Since the park is
located on a maor industrial mute,
employees of Burroughs Wellcome
and Pmctor and Gamble have fre-
quented the facility dunng lunch
breaks and after work.
'It's the only place you can really
act like a kid but still be safe said
Hollis Gunn, a "pit chief" of the park.
"Everybody has fun. You get to go
around for about five minutes as fast
as you can.
"But safety is really important
he added. "Everyone who drives the
ca its has h wear a sa fety bel t, and we
stop people that dnve crazy"
Empkyees of the track use hand
signs tosignal drivers to "stop bump-
ing" or to forewarn them of their last
lap. A checkered flag ends the race
and the drivers pull into pit row.
"We're not going to put up with
rough-housing Haynie said. 'The
niles are explicit and everyone is ex-
pected to follow them
The go-carts and track are in-
spected yearly by state officials, and
the park falls under guidelines set up
forstateorlocal fairs. Inspectors check
the speed and safety of the gixarts, as
well as the track condition.
"We tike more precautions than
the state regulates Feree said. "Our
number one goal is to be safe. We
have three to five employees on the
track at all times, and the riders have
to be a certain height to operate the
vehicles bv themselves
Thevehiclesand trackhavebeen
designed so that the gixarts cannot
flipover. The iron rails that surround
the track can be hit at full impact
without damage to the cart or the
driver.
But the gixart track and arcade
are just phase one of a three-phase
pmject for the park. Haynie said he,
Setters and Feree have plans to buiki
a pond for bumper boats and a slick
track for gixarts, and finish with a
miniature golf course.
The cost of a ride is $350, or a
package of four rides can be pur-
chased for $13. The Greenville Fun
Park is open Monday through Thurs-
day from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m Friday
and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m
and they are closed on Sundays.
So if you are tired of paving
speed ingticketsandtteRkTwudPetty
inside of you is just crying to get out,
maybe the Greenville Fun Park is the
place to be. Be careful though. It can
and is addicting.
Greenville Fun Park can bring out the racing enthusiast in anyone
Above, co-owners Lee Setters and Howard Feree take a practice
round, while Setters (below) proves that hairpin turns can be made
BigSplash provides golf alternative
Prioto by D�il R�d � Th� E��t Cimllnlsn
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sport Writer
Bring down strokes for little money
Photo by D�ll R��l � Tht Eft Csrollnian
Big Splash offers G reenvill.ans a chance to bring down their golf average wrthout empty.ng their pocketbooks.
The range is located on U.S. 264 North, ust past the Tar River bridge.
Bulls, Blazers set to battle in finals
Having big fun would nor-
mally cost big money. But not any
more. With the increasing number
of recreation parks being erected
in Eastern North Carolina,
Greenville has now added another
recreation spot to its list.
"Big Splash driving range is
more than just a pond to knock golf
balls in according to General
Manager Tim Norris. "It's a great
place for family activity, or just
somewhere to escape for a few
hours
On hand are a staff of five pro-
fessional attendants and a recog-
nized Professional Golf Associa-
tion (PGA) golf pro. Big Splash
offers not only a driving range, but
assistance and guidance to your
golf game as well.
"We have a good mix of people
who come out to the Big Splash
Norris, who has been in business
for two years, said "Many venture
out during their lunch hours to
relieve some tension or even just
relax and enjoy their lunches. Quite
often in the evening, we have
couples and lovers who come out
just to view the sunset Norris
said.
Aside from the standard put-
ting greens, bunkers and sand
traps, thereare 20 stationary marts,
200 feet of grass ("to work on your
approach shots Norris said) and
150feetofhirtingarea.Byfaroneof
the largest yet simplest golf ranges
around. The pond serves as an ac-
curate distancefor measuring one's
stroke. There are three cups (float-
ing gTeens) at various distances -
75 vards, 125 yards and 150 yards.
With many accessories avail-
able at the range, BigSplash's main
focus is the golf enthusiast. There
are clubs available for rental needs
as well as tonics, snacks, golf ap-
parel and many other items to
choose from.
Prices start as low as $1.75 for
a small bucket of balls (20 to 25)
and up to $7.50 for a large bucket
(145 to 155) balls. Big Splash is
open from 11a.m. until 10 p.m. and
when weather permits. For addi-
tional information on hosting par-
ties, reservations or other events
call 758-1341.
CHK AGO (AP) - The Chi-
cago Bulls who felt the burden of
expectations to reach the NBA
Finals, believe they can be more
relaxed against the Portland Trail
Blazers
"It's a great relief, there was
a rreat amount of pressure on us
to do a good job and get back
here said Scottie Tippen, who
was theiatalvst for Friday night's
-44 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers that wrapped up the
Eastern Conference finals.
Tippen who snapped out of
a slump with 2 points, 12 re-
bounds, four blinked shots and
four steals in the final game, said,
"There's definitely been a lot of
pressure on me for not being able
to produce
Tippen was referring to his
in-and-out performances in East-
ern Conference series against the
New York Knicks and the Cava-
liers after suffering an ankle in-
jury in the opening game against
the Knicks.
"Now we just have to go out
and play he said. "It's a great
feeling
What the Bulls feared the
most was going flat and the em-
barrassment of not being able to
reach the final round and defend
their title.
"There is a feeling of relief in
a lot of ways to get back to the
finals coach Thil Jackson said.
It hasn't been easy since so
much was expected from the
Bulls, who went 15-2 last year in
winning the championship and
then came back with a 67-15
record for the best mark in the
NBA this season.
Before the playoffs started,
there were some who thought the
Bulls might go 15-0 in the play-
offs this season. The expectations
increased after a three-game
sweep over Miami.
"Ridiculous was Jackson's
response, and the Bulls proved it,
losing three games to the Knicks
and two more to the Cavaliers.
There is no talk of a sweep
over the Trail Blazers, although
Michael Jordan called the victory
in the sixth game over Cleveland
"a great confidence builder for
all of us
Jordan had a miserable per-
formance in the first three quar-
ters of Game 6, missing 15 of 20
shots before scoring 16 points in
the final period to share scoring
honors with Pippen at 29.
There is no fear of taking the
Trail Blazers for granted. They
had the best record in the West-
ern Conference at 57-25 and they
knocked off Utah in six games by
winn ing a t U tah 105-97 last Thurs-
day night.
"Portland is one of the most
athletic teams in the league Jor-
dan said. "It's a big challenge
Jordan said it was tougher
defendingthechampionship than
winning it for the first time.
Games 1 and 2 will be played
at Chicago Stadium Wednesday
and Friday nights, then the series
shifts to Portland for games the
following Sunday and Wednes-
day. If needed, Game 5 also will
be at Portland June 12.
The sixth and seventh games
would be played in Chicago.
NBA
CONFERENCE
FINALS
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Chicago 4, Cleveland 2
Chicago 103, Cleveland 89
Cleveland 107, Chicago 81
Chicago 105, Cleveland
Cleveland 99, Chicago 85
Chicago 112, Cleveland 89
Chicago 99, Cleveland 94,
Chicago wins series 4-2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Portland 4, Utah 2
Portland 113, Utah 88
Portland 119, Utah 102
Utah 97, Portland 89
Utah 121, Portland 112
Portland 127, Utah 121, OT
Portland 105, Utah 97,
Portland wins series 4-2
FINALS
Chicago at Portland
Wednesday, June 3
Portland at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Friday, June 5
Portland at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Sunday, June 7
Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 10
Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m.
Friday, June 12
Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m
if necessary
Sunday, June 14
Portland at Chicago, 7 p.m
if necessary
Photo by D�ll R��d � Th Eumt Croilonian
Scraaatch!
Chris Chapman looks surprised as he misses his shot while playing a game ot billerds at the Greenv.lle Fun
Park. Chapman and friend Eric Moore were waiting for the ram to subside so they could take a few laps.
Seles almost ousted from French Open
PARIS (AP) � Monica Seles
knew beforehand she wouldn't be
kicked out of the French Open be-
cause of the U.N. sanctions against
her native Yugoslavia. But she
nearly got knocked out anyway.
Seles, the top seed and two-
time defending champion, trailed
4-1 in the final set before coming
back to beat Japan's Akiko Kijimuta
6-1, 3-6, 6-4, and reach the
quarterfinals.
While Seles struggled to avoid
a stunning upset, her counterpart in
the men's field advanced with little
trouble. Top-seeded defending
champion Jim Courier over-
whelmed 17-year-old Ukrainian
Andrei Medvedev 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, to
make the final eight.
"I feel this is probably my best
tennis so far said Courier, who
has not dropped a set in his four
matches.
Rain hit Roland Garros for the
fourth day, wiping out five of me 12
scheduled matches. In one sus-
pended fourth-round match, No.
11 Andre Agassi led Spain's Emilio
Sanchez, 6-1,6-3,1-1 Pete Sampras,
the No. 3 seed, never got on court
against Carl Uwe Steeb.
But if the rain and Courier's
victory were predictable, Seles'
troubles against an opponent
ranked No. 150 in the world were
i
shocking. Seles had won her three
previous matches 6-1, 6-0; 6-2, 6-2;
and 6-0,6-1.
Seles' shaky performance came
in the wake of uncertainty over the
status of Yugoslav athletes.
The UN. Security Council on
Saturday imposed sweeping sanc-
tions against Yugoslavia, now con-
sisting only of Serbia and
Montenegro, because of its involve-
ment in the fighting in Bosnia-
Herzegovina.
Only hours before Seles took
the court Sunday, tournament offi-
cials annouced that they would not
stop her from playing.





t;
Sports
uJhr iEast (Earulinian
June 3, 1992
7
SERVICES OFFERED
pim;
and they're off
family
u
Michael Martin
Sport 1 i itoi
IN(
s
K p
fJca
�Ml K
n' llison aixl Dale
ng up N S( K
� - uthIreenvillians
n tv burning up tracks of
t tracks that is
irk ttv newest
� tinment in Pitt
� � i! i,1. an an ade
. . �. arts mn
- �� . W K ve
amharl use that
' v � VJ Speed
horn tracks but
� etition and fun
Hk
� li ciA time
lei and creatoi
irk said
k ked from 17
t tei � � vou're
ES

.ftanv
J
isits
i tion of
1 )rfer-
veness
Ih se
�; i I enefits
Peace orps In-
h and see
IV
I)
rps
W lnesd
hours (if I i
iLQRES. ndaal 1
; tnd rewarding find out what the toughest
h atanfcje�AeUqp job has in store for you!
iBlinkoff-at
"inuigh
tween the
3pm Call
57-6061 and

iweeksago
� � ) . aptured
� � � H- isitors
racerharles
. loved
�� . . sest
rhng in there with
- � w it sa whole

. powered
rsepower
HoixLunigiivthati-capableot-pot'd-
up to 40 mph. hut a safety governor
similar in effect to those found on
school bust's, allows the C.nvnville
bun Park staff tocontrol the speed ot
the $3,000 matbines.
he 80-foot track is 22 teet wide
withseventums three otwhu. hare
hair puts. 11 sits on a thnv acre plot ot
Lux! onemileNorthot the PrttCounty
fairgroundscm Progress Road.
��( lhe track) was designed tor
the optimum ride " co-owner
Howard Feree said. "We studied
tr.H ks tor o er a year before this one
was built We've traveled through-
outNorth( arolina. lennessee Mary-
land Newlerse and Florida looking
at differennracks so that we could
come up with this one.
1 lavniecame up with the idea to
make a go-cart track in Greenville
some 15yearsagoand presented it to
Lee Setters and Feree. He feh the
Emerald Gty lacked family enter-
tainment, and go-carts would be a
great in estment
Wewanted to make something
for the families I laynie said. "Here
wertavecreatedafamih atmosphere
some place that just won't be a
hangout
lhe (ireenvilte bun bark is tiie
onlvoneof its kind between Raleigh
and Atiantk Bea� h. Nine the park is
located on a miM industrial route,
employees of burroughs Wellcome
and Proctor aixl Gamble have fre-
quented the facility during lunch
breaks ,m alter work.
"It s the onlv place vou can really
act like a kid but still be safe said
I lollisC Uinn.a pitchiefotthe park.
"Everybody has tun. You get to go
around tor about five minutes as fast
as vou can.
"but saM is realty important
he added. "Everyone who drives the
carts has tt i w oar a s.)tetv Mt. and we
stop people uiat drive crazy.
Empk jyeesof the tr.u k use kind
signs tosignal drivers to "stopbump-
mg" or to forewarn them of their last
lap. A checkered flag ends the race
atxi the drivers pull into pit row.
"We're not going to put up with
rough-housing" Haynie said. "The
mles ,re explk it and o eryone is ex-
pected to tollow them
he go-carts aixl track an in-
spected yearfv by state officials, and
the park tails under guidelines set up
forstateor local fairs. Inspectorscheck
ihespeedarxi safety of thego-carts as
well as the track conditkin.
We takemore precautions than
the state regulates Fereesakl "Our
number one givil is u be safe. We
have three to five employees on the
track at all times, aixl the rulers have
to be a certain height to operate the
vehicles bv themselves
Fhevehk lesand trackhavebeen
designed so tint the go-carts cannot
flip over, rhe iron rails that surround
the track can he hit at full impact
without damage to the cart or the
driver.
but the go-cart tr.nk and arcade
are just phase ine of a three-phase
project tor the park. 1 lavnie said he,
Setters m Feree have plans to build
a pond for bumper boats and a slkk
track for go-carts, and finish with a
miniature golt course.
lhe cost of a nde is $350, or a
package ot tour rides can be pur-
chased tor $13. lhe.reenville Fun
ParkbopenMondaythrough Ihurs-
day from 11 am. to 10 p.m Friday
aixi Saturday from 11 am. to 11 p.m
aixi they are dosed on Sundays.
So it you are tired ot paying
sptlingrxkvtsantltheKKtvmirett
inside of vou ls ust dying to get out,
mavhe theCreenville Fun Park is the
place to be. IV careful though. It can
and is addicting.
Greenville Fun Park can bring out era Ihusiast in anyone
Above, co-owners Lee Setters and H - eetake a practice
round, while Setters (below) proves th �� � n turns can be made
Photo by
Big Splash provides golf alternative
Bv Charles Mitchell
Senior Spirts Writer
Bring down strokes for little money
Photo by Dill R��d � Th� Eft CsrolmiMn
, .ihans a chance to bring down their golf average without emptying their pocketbooks
264 North, just past the Tar River bridge.
ing big fun would nor-
mallv cost big money. But not any
more With the in reasing number
of recreation parks Kjing erected
in Eastern North Carolina,
(ireen ilte has now added anomer
rev reation spot to its list
"Big Splash driving range is
more than just a pond tokrw K k goli
balls m according to General
Manager Tim Norris. "It's a great
place for family activity, or just
somewhere to escape tor a tew
hours
(.Vi hand area staff ot fi e pro
fessional attendants and a recog-
nized Professional r�lt Associa-
tion (PGA) golf pro. Big Splash
offers not only a driving range, but
assistance and guidance to your
golf game a- well
"We have a good n I eople
who come out to the Big Spla
Norris, who ha- been in business
fortwoyears said "Mai hire
out during their lunch hours I
relieve some tenskm i i even just
relaxandenjoytheirlui � - � te
otten in the evening we have
couples and lovers who come out
just to view the sunset Norris
said.
Aside from the standard put-
ting green- bunker- and
trap there a re 20stationar mart �
200 feet ot grass to work on your
approach -hots Norn- said) and
ISOfeetofhittingarea B faroneol
the largest yet simplest g �lf ranges
around lhe pond sen es as an ac-
c uratedistam eformeasuringone's
� . . re three cups (float-
ing greens iistances -
ards, 125 yards and I50yards
. ,ries avail-
able at the range Big Splash's main
� - us i- the goll � last Ihere
� � clubs available f �r rental needs
i- toni � golf ap-
parel and many other items to
i hoo-e from
Prices start as low as $1 " tor
,i -mall bucket of balls (20 to 25'
d up to $7 50 fi " i irge bucket
15 to 155) balls Big Splash i
open from 11 a m. until lop m.and
when weather permits. For addi-
tional information on hosting par-
tie- reservations or other events
� - vn
Bulls, Blazers set to battle in finals
( I'�MM lhe C ho
ig B� fell the burdenof
ex in 'to reach the NBA
1 inalsbelie e the v an be more
relaxei-t the Portland T rail
V
��� .it relief, there was
. it in iunt of pressure on us
ib anil get bai k
� � - ittie Pippen, who
�a,i- the atah stfor 1 rid.i night -
�; . � � , vei thele eland
ers that w rapped up the
I astern Conferem e finals
Pippen who snapped out of
i imp with ?g points, 12 re-
bounds four blocked -hot- and
� teals in the final game, said,
" ! here - definitely been a lot of
pressure i m me tor mt being able
to pn f.in e
Pippen was referring to his
in-and-out performarw es in East-
ern t onferen e series against the
New i ork Kni k- and the C ,ia-
liers after -uttering an ankle in-
jury in the opening game against
the Knicks
"Now we just have to go out
ami pla) he said "It's a great
feel
What the Bull- teared the
mo-t was going flat and the em-
barrassment of not being able to
ren h the final round and defend
their title
" I here i- a feeling of relief in
a lot of ways to get back to the
final Coa h Phil a k-on said.
It hasn't been easv since so
much was expected from the
Bulls who went 15-2 last year in
winning the championship and
then ame back with a 67-15
record tor the best mark in the
NBA this season.
Before the playoffs started,
there were some who thought the
Bulls might go 15-0 in the play-
offs this reason, rhe expectations
increased after a three-game
-weep over Miami.
"Ridiculous wa- Jackson's
response, and the Bulls proved it,
losing three games to the Knicks
and two more to the Cavaliers.
There is no talk of a sweep
over the I rail Blazers, although
Michael Jordan called the victory
in the sixth game over Cleveland
"a great confidence builder for
all of us
Jordan had a miserable per-
formance in the first three quar-
ters of Came 6, missing 15 of 20
shots before scoring lh points m
the final peritxl to share scoring
honors with Pippen at 24.
There is no fear of taking the
Trail Blazers for granted. They
had the best record in the West-
ern Conference at 57-25 and they
knocked off Utah in six games by
winningat Utah 105-97 last Thurs-
day night.
"Portland is one of the most
athletic teams in the league Jor-
dan said. "It's a big challenge
Jordan said it was tougher
defending the championship than
winning it for the first time.
Games 1 and 2 will be played
at Chicago Stadium Wednesday
and Friday nights, then the series
shifts to Portland for games the
following Sunday and Wednes-
day. If needed, Came 5 also will
beat Portland June 12.
The sixth and seventh games
would be played in Chicago
NBA
CONFERENCE
FINALS
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Chicago 4, Cleveland 2
Chicago 103, Cleveland S
Cleveland 107, Chicago SI
Chicago 105, Cleveland sb
Cleveland y, Chicago 85
Chicago 112, Cleveland S9
Chicago 99, Cleveland 44,
Chicago wins series 4-2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Portland 4, Utah 2
Portland 113, Utah 88
! Portland 119, Utah 102
Utah 97, Portland S9
Utah 121, Portland 112
Portland 127, Utah 121, OT
Portland 105, Utah 97,
Portland wins series 4-2
FINALS
Chicago at Portland
Wednesday, June 3
Portland at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Friday, June 5
Portland ai Chicago, 9 p.m.
Sunday, June 7
Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m.
Wee" lesday, June 10
Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m.
Friday, June 12
Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m.
; necessary
Sunday, June 14
Portland at Chicago, 7 p.m.
if necessary
Scraaatch!
Photo by D�il R��d � Thm Eft Csrolionmn
Chns Chapman looks surprised as he misses his shot while playing a game of billiards at the Greenville Fun
Park Chapman and fnend Enc Moore were waiting for the rain to subside so they could take a few laps
Seles almost ousted from French Open
PARIS (AD � Monica Seles
knew beforehand she wouldn't be
kicked out of the French Open be-
cause of the U.N. sanctions against
her native Yugoslavia. But she
nearly got kntvked out anyway.
Seles, the top seed and two-
time defending champion, trailed
4-1 in the final set before coming
back to beat Japan's AkikoKijimuta
6-1, 3-6, 6-4, and reach the
quarterfinals.
While Seles struggled to avoid
a stunning upset, her counterpart in
the men's field advanced with little
trouble. Top-seeded defending
champion Jim Courier over-
whelmed 17-vear-old Ukrainian
V
Andrei Medvedev 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, to
make the final eight.
"I feel this is pmhablv my best
tennis so far said Courier, who
has not dropped a set in his tour
matches.
Rain hit Roland Garros tor the
fourth da v, wiping out five ot the 12
scheduled matches In one sus
ponded fourth-round match, No
11 Andre Agassi led Spain's Emilio
Sanchez, h-1,6-3,1-1. Pete Sampras,
the No. 3 seed, never got on court
against Carl Uwe Steeb
But if the rain and Courier's
victory were predictable, Seles'
troubles against an opponent
ranked No. 150 in the world were
i
shocking. Seles had won her three
previous matches 6-1,6-0 6-2,6-2;
and 6-0,6-1.
Svles shaky pertornuncecame
in the wake of uncertainty over the
status of i ugoslav athletes
The U.N Security Council on
Saturday imposed sweeping sanc-
tions against Yugoslavia now con-
sisting only of Serbia and
rVtontenegro,becauseof its involve-
ment in the fighting in Bosnia-
Herzegovina
CYilv hours before Seles took
the court Sunday, tournament offi-
cials annouced that thev would not
stop her fnim playing.





SUMMER ENCORE
Uie 14
ot HOT
BIE ADAM ROE LION OF NARFQRM
BY STANTON

MPI ' '�
� � �
1M . . �. II '� IMDI RAI
INS I u rRIBAI '�' 'II f I HI 'l M I o
l.i MA I IVI �Mi Bl( ANS
IUBN llll MAlivl PI l IPI I
I Ml �.
in onoi ii n i i'i 'i ii i Nl
PRISH INS IH1 MATIVI I'I nl'l I
III I II VI l I HI I Alt 1
Mil 11 ami Wl APOMSfc VI HM I I

Advertise in
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CALL:
(919)757-6366
biting. & lHinkinjrvJV'fl Saloon
THE ONLY PLACE TO BE for
TRAILBLAZERS VS. BULLS ACTION!
Daily Drink and
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including
25$ eoch Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
The Only Place To Be - All Summer Long!
Greenville Aquarium's
WEEKLY SPECIALS
WILD NEON COLORS!
SUPER NATURALS .
m
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m
a
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12" - $2.29
15" $2.99
18- $359
CHECK OUT THE STORE FOR
MORE SPECIALS I 'j
i
Second rurtuM
Whisper
Power Filters
JUNIOR-SI 5.99
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1-51999
2-$2599
3-S3399
"�� J 4-S39 99
5-$49 99
MAQIMI-IM
CANASTER FILTERS
MODEL 220
$79 99
MODEL 350
$99 99
UNIVERSITY CENTER
14TH & CHARLES STREET
HOURS
M-F 11-9
SAT 10-9
SUN 1-6
757-0056
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
1-3pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





SUMMER ENCORE
the l�"�
$TArfcS
otHOT
suhm
SOHtTHWt
BIE ADAM ROE LION OF NARFQRM
BY STANTON
. � POUCI


'
advertising got your attention
Advertise in
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CALL:
(919)757-6366
THE ONLY PLACE TO BE for
TRAILBLAZERS VS. BULLS ACTION!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25$ each Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
I
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
The Only Ploce To Be - All Summer Long!
Greenville Aquarium's
WEEKLY SPECIALS
WILD NEON COLORSI
SUPER HATURALS .
fcJ 6 $.99
' " " 9" $149
12 -$2.29
15" - $2 99
18" - 53-59
� &
Second natuM
CHECK OUT THE STORE FOR j
MORE SPECIALS I
HOURS
UNIVERSITY CENTER M-F 11-9
14TH& CHARLES STREET SAT 10-9
SUN 1-6
JUNIOR-SI 5 99
COMPACTS 18 99
1-51999
2-525 99
3-53399
4-539 99
5-549 99
MAGNUM
CANASTER FILTERS
MODEL 220
579 99
MODEL 350
599 99
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18, 22, 29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
1-3pm
LOCATION
MEN DEN HALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9 - Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-0056
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





SUMMER ENCORF
BIE ADAM ROE LION OF NARFORM
BY STANTON
ike I
of NOT
it
VOUtTHWt
vi. NiGH I
LAW AND ORDER
Professor
advertising gof your attention
Advertise in
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CALL
(919)757-6366
Eating N ininkinV, fl Saiot,n
THE ONLY PLACE TO BE for
TRAILBLAZERS VS. BULLS ACTION!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25$ each Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
The Only Place To Be - All Summer Long!
Greenville Aquarium's
WEEKLY SPECIALS
WILD NEON COLORSI
SUPER NATURALS .����.�
C 5
$299
$359
Second natuM
Whisper
Power Filters
JUNIOR-S15W
COMPACT18 99
-$1999
2-$25 99
3 $33 99
4-$39 99
5 $49 99
CHECK OUT THE STORE FOR kJ
MORE SPECIALS I
HOURS
UNIVERSITY CENTER M-F 11-9
14TH & CHARLES STREET SAT 10-9
SUN 1-6
MAGNUM
CANASTER FILTERS
MODEL 220
$79 99
MODEL 350
$99 99
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
JUNE 15, 18,22,29
JULY 6, 9
TIME
1-3pm
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception JULY 9- Room 244)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-0056
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





Title
The East Carolinian, June 3, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 03, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.879
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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