The East Carolinian, April 23, 1992






Thank you � the two most powerful words
Scott Maxwell finds peace, says good-bye
4
Barefoot on the Mall lives again 7
Fourteenth annual celebration sure to attract bin numbers
�1?� �aat ftar0limatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66 No.28
Thursday. Aphu 23, 1992
Grefnvillf, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
12 Pages
wound Other
Woman to run police
rhe campus police department at the
I nn ersitv of North Carolina at C hapel till
has hired the state s first woman police chief
at the university e el
AJanaEnnis currenth a Durham Police
I Ypartment captain will take o er the posi-
tion May 4
"1 believe she will add a degree of
prefessionalism l.t. Cl.u Williams of Uni-
ersity Police said (ver time, I think it will
show that she will be a positive force in this
department"
Officials said Ennis' community-oriented
policing will he an asset to I NC and are
excited that she will be taking over the posi-
tion
Student sues NCAA
A Washington State I niversity student
is suing the N( A dec taring he was denied
a fwtball scholarship because of unfair eligi-
bility requirements
KenMd - a place-kicker, was ruled
ineligible foi irship in March because
henev er ttok theS holastic Aptitude lest or
American I rest both ol which are
required nd . A rules.
�� �� on of McConkey's test scores
I haves ured a 900 on I
SA1 wi il � the 7tX1 mark needed for
scholarship eligibility, hisattome) saki
In ordei t. apply for a waiver from the
SA I requirement Mc onkey would need to
ha e.i 1 i umulam egrade-pointa erage in
high schiHil.he had ,i 2 9
I he suit was tiled in I s I 'itrit tCourl in
S inct M - was issued a tempo-
restraining order that allows hhm to at
tend spring pr.k tk e until the issue � settled
Students donate books
Students .it Missouri University's medi-
dhool recenth collected 400 used text-
ks to send to underprivileged people in
Africa
rhe book dm e was held by ML schap-
tei f the American Medical Student Assoc ia
� �
"Many ol students' books end up sitting
around going to waste said Candise Cope,
the group's president. "They could he sold
ba k to bookstores, but manv students don't
even lIo th.it. Whv not send them to a place
where they're actually going to be read7"
New president chosen
The chancellor of the University of Cali-
fornia .it In ine was recently selected as the
next president of the University of California
s stem.
I.uk V Pelt.is.in, 68, is .i constitutional
scholar and has been chancellor of Irvine for
eight ve.irs
Pel tason will replace Dav id C a ril ner who
decided to step down after the death of his

As chancellor, Peltason said he w.is de-
termined to improve the Ir ine campus by
recruiting ti p scholars and l mhling pri ate
donations.
Student sentenced
I he last f six St. John's University stu-
dentscharged in thesexual assault of a tem.ile
student has been sentenced to three year's
probation, community service anil ,i drug
counseling program.
The guilty plea entered bv Michael
Calandnllo 2 '�. was a surpnse to those fol-
lowing the uise because three of the suspects
were acquitted last summer
C a land nlloadmitted he gave the woman
three drinks with vodka in them ami then
forced her to perform oral sex.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmet. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene 2
Editorial4
Classifieds6
EntertainmentII
Comics9
Sports 10

New book swap starts Wednesday
Bv Jennifer Ward rep
i'l s Ed itor
I he new book bu b.u k
s stem that enables students to
sell their textbooks tor more
mone and bu textbooks tor
less has finally become a real-
ity Students will have access
to the Student BookSy stem be-
ginning April 29.
'When I tirst heard about
the system, I was sure it would
work said loev lohnston,chair
of the SC A book bu -backcom-
mittee. " I he more I learned
about it, the more I was sure
lohnston and Stephen
S haubach,designerofthes s
tern, donated computers to start
the proje t
students van use each com-
puter to input a list ot books
the) w ish to sell or to obtain
information about books the
want to buy.
A list of people w ho are
selling (host books ami their
phone numbers w ill be printed
so that students may contact
ow nersand set prices.Students
will be harged $1 for each book
entry, but the charge maj be
eliminated once computers are
bought. Schaubach said
Both lohnsfon and
Schaubach are confident that
students will use the system.
"I'm loo percent posith �
people will use it lohnston
said "It's extra monev iist to
make a few phone calls
lohnston and Schaubach
agree that the system may take
a while to get oii the ground,
since people must enter books
into thestem befi re there
are anv a ailable for buyers
" I he tirst semester will be
mostly ust entering in
s haub.n h said. "But who
knows, ue may get enough on
the first day. It's in the ham! sot
the students
lohnston said the buy-back
i ommittee i now trying to ac-
quire lists of books that will be
used from departments on
campus. The StudentStores re-
ceives lists direcHv from the
departments and UBI pa I
m he said
1 erything is el n
. �� re iisf trying to get th
lists lohnston said "U .
know what book you need, that
wimid help "
immittee members will
work the stem booth, which
will be located in Mendenhall
studententer, lohnston said
workers will not be paid unless
the project starts making
See Books page 3
Organization promotes
disability awareness
Chancellor Eakin serves as guinea pig
Bv Amy Humphries
St.itt Wntvr
Walk'n in the rain
Photo by Jill Cierry� ECU Photo Lab
The week of rain should not dampen the spirits of ECU students for
Barefoot on the Mall today The 14th annual event usually brings
thousands out to enjoy spring weather, music and much more
v han ellor Ri hard Eakin se eral ra
dio and tele is ion personalities and I
businessmen w ill assume" ph sical dis-
abilities fora da
' I hi'M'w ill in ludewheek hair simu-
lations an.i hearing and isual impair-
ment simulations saktSissv Lee-Elmore,
a student in I v. el.pmental Disabilities
Intervention and Research Program
(Dl IRP)
I i Mki' reated .n awareness ��� � �
that ill tal Ma) 4through '�' .
DDIRP serves as an outlet for stu-
dents And t.Kulry to discuss problems,
solutions anil topics related to the .level
opmentallv disabled
Ihe( ban. el lor w ill never know the
difficulties of a disabilities after iist tynf
day of simulation but he m,u run into
obstacles and learn what changes can be
made to help the disabled I ee-Elmore
said.
The awareness week also includes a
seminar on the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act The Act was passed in u!v of
10 and serves to mainstream the dis-
abled into society. Because ot the Act,
.improvements tor the disabled will be
made in such areas as public sen. ices,
employment transportation and telecom-
munication
Dr. Eakin will also addn d prob-
��ii. ountered from being in a w heel-
i hair

ult invited
� ' emmar but anyone interested n
-aid Richard ' lirecl
l ipment l � � �
rion and Resean h Progi i mar
will be held on May ' K n it d �
Ramada Inn on Crew
�. � . �
i -� � ni� dbal
. . . -k.i: imj
is usiialh apparent before age 22. I he
disabilities are lifelong and usually limit
one or more of the person's normal rune -
lions siuh as self- are or mobilit
The DDIRP seeks to improve ondi-
tions tor the developmental disabled
and their families There are programs to
tram residential service providers to gi e
care to the disabled
he Interagencv Deaf-Blind Service
Team, one program DDIRP offers, im-
proves service for indi ktuals w ith visual
and hearing impairments. Also,a study of
thedisabled elderlv is in progress todeter-
mine their need anil provide better care to
them
The DDIRP became an official organi-
zation at ECU in the fall ol 1990
Evaluations show how advisers rate with students
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
During early registration,
some advisers participated m
optional adviser evaluations
Those advisees who partici-
pated rev ei ed one coupon for
Hank's Ice (ream and got a
dian. e to w in a dinner tor two
at I i.irrvl's.
I he winner of the 530 gift
certificate to Darrvl's was
April Mitchell a junior and an
elementarv education major.
" rhtjcoupon to Hank's Ice
Cream and the chance to win a
dinner for two was a good idea.
It gave students the incentive
to fill out the advisor form
Mitchell said. "It's a good idea
that we can evaluate out ad i-
sors We can My what we
would like, good or bait A lot
of advisors need to be in-
formed on how thev'redoing
The results of the forms
will help determine who will
be the top four advisers of the
1991-1492 school year. There
will be four outstanding ad-
viser awards. Tvvoawardswill
be received by advisers from
General College and two will
be given to two advisers in
declared majors.
The winning advisers will
be recognized at the fall con-
Pholo by ECU Pholo Lab
Chancellor Eakin awards April Mitchell with a gift certificate to Darryl's restaurant for participating
in an advisor evaluation survey
vocation in August.
Each winning adviser will
receive $250 for professional
advancement and receive an
engraved silver bowl by Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin at the Fall
Convocation.
The rating system used on
the evaluation asked the fol-
lowing questions:
� My adviser's know ledge
of degree requirements and
academic regulations
� My adviser's knowledge
of where to seek information
that heshe does not hav,
�My adviser's availabil-
ity through regular office
hours or appointment
� My adviser's attitude to-
ward helping me.
Questions 1 through 4 av-
erage:
�My own preparation
preparedness for meeting with
my adviser
� My overall rating of my
ad iser.
"The advisor evaluation
surveys give us feedback on
advising said loAnn ones,
assistantdean of General Col-
lege. "We want to make advis-
ing the best we can
Last vear at the National
Academic Advising Associa-
tion com ention.ECl was pre-
sented a certificate of merit for
innovative and exemplar)
practices in the academic ad-
ising of students
Ms. Talmvra l.eahv ol the
geography department won a
national award tor outstand-
ing advising last vear ,i w ell.
In addition to finding the
best m isors on campus Ms
lones has been working on a
mini-advising enter
"We are now in our third
vear of a mini-adv ising cen-
ter Jones said.
"Our center was formu-
lated in order toaccommodate
students who have declared
pre-business or undeclared
majors Jones said
There are five retired ad-
visers and five graduate stu-
dents who work in the mini-
advising center, Jones said.
"When 1 was an under-
graduate there was nothing
See Advisor, page 3





2 �be East ffiarolintan
April 23, 1992
CRI
S)ENE
Anti-abortion activists seize Buffalo
Worried RA calls Public Safety;
constipation found
April 14
2248�Vehicle Stopped for headlight violation, speeding and
possessing a weapon on campus Verbal warning issued.
April IS
0241V Ik-lk Hall: Report of three male subjects climbing up the
side ot the building. Subjects were identified as students, verbal
warnings given.
0859 Willis Building: Items were taken from a construction
crew working.
1302 Reade St. Parking Lot Window broken out of a Ford
Escort.
1 14 ames St Decal stolen from vehicle.
April tf
0138 Ihe Pantry Vehicle stopped. Subject was arrested for
P W 1 mm transported to the Magistrates office.
1042� Police Department Vehicle stopped. Student given ver-
bal warning for expired inspection sticker.
1509- Slav Hall: Vehicle Stopped. Student given verbal warning
tor expired inspection sticker.
1739 College Hill Dr Vehicle Stopped. Non-student charged
with speeding, carrying a concealed weapon on campus, possessing
stolen property, unregistered vehicle and no insurance.
211 -Fletcher Hall: Vehicle stopped. Student issued state for
expired drivers license.
2142-Oreene Hall: Vehicle stopped for stop sign violation.
Student issued state citation.
April 17
1210�Messick: Unknown person stole electronic equipment
from nxm.
141rv� Jarvis hall: Fire alarm activated by mechanical problem.
April 18
2Q3(� Scales Fieldhouse: Damage to property and vending
machine found broken, into and property missing.
2240� -lovner Library: Vehicle stopped for erratic driving. Non-
student given verbal warning.
April 1
0022 Minges: Suspicious male reported looking at vehicle.
Identified as a student no advised to leave the area
0105�Brewster: Vehicle stopped. Student given a campus cita-
tion for speeding and passing dn a double yellow line.
0227�Damage to personal property report One subject ar-
rested for being intoxicated and disruptive.
134 Cotten I fall: RA concerned about a student having pains.
Subject was constipated.
Apnl 20
0011 Evans St Vehicle stopped for running a stop sign. Staff
member given a campus citation.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safety logs
BUFFALO, NY. (AP)� Hun-
dreds of demonstrators massed in a
steady rain yesterday to begin what
they say will be a two-to-four-week
siege aimed at shutting the city's
abortion clinics. Theclinics said they
were still open this morning.
"We're going to rescue chil-
dren with our bodies Operation
Rescue leader Keith Tucci said as
about 2(Xabortion opponents gath-
ered on Main Street in front of one
of four clinics he said his group
besieged.
rolice kept a similar number of
abortion-rights demonstrators on
theoppositesideofthestreet, which
was closed for three blocks by the
protest. The two sides traded in-
sults, but chanted their slogans
peacefully.
At all four clinics, officials said
at mid morning that thev were see-
ing patients.
Outside a clinic on High Street,
where more than 2lK demonstra-
Saffire, said he was demonstrating
because "I've just had a baby. It's
the best thing that ever happened to
me. She's beautiful These (abortion
rights) people have earrings in their
noses
Atanother,clmic,about40anti-
abortionactivistscamed signs read-
ing, "abortion has two victims, one
dead, one wounded About 60
abortion-rights activists chanted,
"Pro-life, your name's a lie, you
don't care if women die
Tucci said Operation Rescue
required its participants to sign a
pledge of non-violence. But he said
some protesters might defy a court
order prohibiting them from block-
ing access to the clinics.
Militant abortion-rights dem-
onstrators said thev would useforce
to clear the way if necessary.
"We plan on humiliating them
and driving them back said Dave
Blairof Detroit, a member of a mili-
tant group called the National
forChoice,anabortion-rights group.
The Rev. Daren Drzymala, a
Baptist minister from Buffalo, said
the abortion-rights activists would
help Operation Rescue's cause by
fnghtening away women seeking
abortions.
"These people have shown
their true colors with their vulgar-
ity and their cussing Drzymala
said.
There were frequent verbalcon-
frontations on Monday, the day
Operation Rest ue initially planned
to begin an action patterned atter
last summer's siege outside clinics
in Wichita. Kan , that resulted in
2,600 arrests.
"People say, Is Buffalo going
to be the next Wichita1'I say Wichita
was just the beginning Joe
Slovenec, an Operation Rescue
leader, told about 5(H) people at a
rallv Mondav night at a Roman
Catholic chinch. About 600 others
watched the rally on . bsed-cm uit
television in a parish hall
Outside, about 100 abortion-
rights activists shouted obscenities,
waved signs s-uch as "No return to
the Kh kstreet bub hers, "and n
inglysang"( �h e Me IhatOld
Religion "
"I admire their vocabulary
Thev went to college and le
four wordsind you can't sa) �
in frontof children said the
pastor, Msgr. Joseph.
An abortion opponent ei '
ingthechurchheldupa postervn
�i picture of an aborted fetus and
shouted, " rhat's a ot'M baby
abortion-rights protester sh
back, "Women die of illegal
tions. What -�re you going I
about that?"
tors pro and con gathered, an abor- Women's Rights Organizing Com-
tion foe pushed an abortion rights mittee.
demonstrator and she kicked him
in the groin, rolice separated the
pair and made no arrests.
The abortion opponent, John
"Women get assaulted every
day by these Operation Rescue
gixms said Dianne Mathiowetz,
spokeswoman for Buffalo United
ECU Recreational Services Presents
NVcu of War
April 23,1992
"Pull together" for a good cause!
Join in the fun at ECU'S Annual Barefoot
on the Mall and show our support to the
Ronald McDonald House
Teams shall consist of ten members (male, female, co-rec) or
individuals may sign up on The Mall
A minimum $1.00 donation per participant requested
To register YOUR team
contact Kendra Curtis
at 757-638 or stop by
204 Chnstenbury Gym
SAVE TIME!
Save
Stamps
Too
Pay You
utility
bill at
the
NEW
EAST
BANK at
Mendenh
Monday - Friday
lOam-zpm
Call Greenville Utilities" at
551-1539 for further information.
The
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
HONORS PROGRAM
takes pleasure in congratulating the
following graduating seniors of spring 1992
for completing the requirements to become
GRADUATES OF THE
HONORS PROGRAM
REBECCA CHESTER
ERIKA CHURCHILL
JONATHAN GRAUEL
ANNE H0RT0N
DERRICK HYMAN
TERRI JARVIS
MICKIE KENNEDY
SCOTTY VAN LAW
SCOTT MAXWELL
MICHELE Mc DEVITT
STEVE RANDOLPH
SCOTT SMITH
PATRICK STANFORTH
AMBER S6UTHERLAND
ALEXANDRA TRIPP
AND IN RECOGNIZING THE COMMENCEMENT
SPEAKER FOR SPRING 1992
MR. RICK ATKINSON
ECU HONORS PROGRAM GRADUATE 1974
Make Overtoil's Your Last Stop
at the End of the Semester
$3.00 off
j OVERTONS
price on any one pair of
i UMBROSHORTS
Must present coupon for discount.
One coupon per customer per visit.
Cannot be used with other sales or oilers.
expires 5-8-92
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
$10.00 off
OVERTONS
price on any one pair of
TENNIS SHOES
Must present coupon for discount.
One coupon per customer per visit.
Cannot he used with other sales or offers.
expires 5-8-92
i20
20
off OVERTONS
price on any one men's or ladies
swimsuit
Must present coupon for discount. One coupon per customer per visit.
Cannot be used with other sales or offers.
20
expires 5-8-92
20
Supreme Court a
ib- hej
ert � d in the ga : a m , and �
chan Han
.iht �� first - : retailing
lay and three
throu - �

"



� � ��
. partint
. .
� � . � �

. �
We Wa
The East Carolinian is now acl
the following positions for su
� Staff Illustrator
� Systems Manager
� Circulation Manager
� Classified Ad Technician
� News Editor �
Please apply at our office
Student Publica
You ha
long en
o
� Starts Wedn
1992-throw
� Monday - Fi
�Saturday 12
� Cost is one
� Bring in thu
book free �
Overtoil's
1
111 Red Banks Rd.
Greenville, NC
919-355-7600
fyofc
Ppfoft
355-5783
8am-7pm M-F
8am-6prr. Sat
Wh
Mendenha
Ce
el
f S!
buying-an
created'b
profits sup
iby with the
fC JC11 1 5 f74T6YO





ize Buffalo
Bghtsgroup rail) Monda) night at a Roman
�vmala, a Cathoht church About600others
ii.ttalo -aid u,i! e rally on ctosed-ciicuil
its would television in a parish hall
mse b
April 23, 1992 (gfre jEaat (Earnltnian 3
i
( Hi- - j about hi' abortion
thouted obscenities,
k h as Mo return to
� hers andmock-
Me ikuOld-Ttme
theii ocabulary.
ind learned
� , u can t s,n them
i I the church
a enter-
iheld upa poster with
rted fetus and
bab) " An
shouted
egal abor-
. nu going ti' go
E TIME!
reenville Utilities at
Ifor further information.
our Last Stop
he Semester
$10.00 off
)VERTON'S
price on any one pair of
TENNIS SHOES
i upon for discount.
n per customer per visit.
ed with other sales or offers.
expires 5 8 92
20
TONS
men's or ladies
jsuit
me coupon per customer per isit.
lei sales ta offers.
8-92
20

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0
355-5783
8am-7pm M-F
8arn-6pir. Sat
Supreme Court overturns execution stay
Books
Advisor
(AD � Double murderer Rob-
ert Alton Harris died in the gas
chamber at dawn yesterday to
( alitorma s first execution in 25
years, after a dramatU last-minute
-ta was overturned
rheSupremeC ourto ertumed
that sta And three others filed
through the night In the v'th U.S.
Circuit Court of ppeaK Inanex-
braordinar) mwe, frustrated high
i ourt justices ended thejudk ialduel
In orderingtheappealscourtnotto
isut' an) more stays without per-
mission.
Ihe fourth st,n was issued ,u-
ter I larris was strapped tothedeath
seal After the Supremeburt'srul-
ing Harris 39,washasul) returned
to the gaschamber, loo king far more
somber than earlier. Rut he winked
and nodded at one guard And
mouthed, "all richt
Triegas was introduced at about
&S6 a.m and shortly afterward
Harris' head jerked from left to right
before falling slow I v to his iluM. He
appeared to be unconscious about
rv 12a.m and was pronounced dead
at (v21 a.m.
Warden Daniel Vasquez read
his final statement. You can be a
king or a street sw eeper but every-
bod dances with thK .rim Reaper
it said.
Harris died 14 years after he
shot to death two San Diego teen-
agers so he could use their car tor a
bank robbery. He admitted taking
part in the slayings; his supporters
cited his past as an abused child,
among other things, as a reason to
spare him.
With Harris' execution, Cali-
fornia becomes the 20th state to
make use of the death penalty since
tlie U.S. Supreme Court in 1476 al-
lowed states to resume capital pun-
ishment. He was the lhs�th person
put to death since the ruling.
Sixteen other states have the
death penalty but haven't used it.
A total of 330 men and women
remain on death row in California,
and more than 2,5lX)nationallyasof
lanuarv.
Harris had been scheduled to
die just after midnight, but theth
US-Circuit Court of Appeals in San
Francisco put the execution on hold
six hours beforehand, based on a
claim that his brother shot one of
the teen-agers.
It issued three more stays
based on a claim thatdeath by gas is
cruel And unusual punishment.
Ihen the US. Supreme Court or-
dered no more stays.
There is no good reason for
this abusive delay, which has been
compounded by last-minute at-
tempts to manipulate the judicial
process the court said in the 7-2
ruling. As with two previous votes
on the gas issue, lustices ohn Paul
Stevens and I iarrv A. Blackmun
dissented.
In the dissent, Stevens wrote,
"the barbaric use of cyanide gas in
the Holocaust, the development of
cyanide agents as chemical weap-
cis,our contemporary understand-
ing of execution bv lethal gas, and
toedevelopmentof less cruel meth-
ods of execution all demonstrate
that execution by cyanide gas is
unnecessarily cruel
US District judge Marilyn Hall
Tatel ordered that Harris' execu-
tion be videotaped as evidence for
the gas issue. A video camera was
seen in the death chamber today.
We Want You!
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for
the following positions for summer and fall of 1992:
� Staff Illustrator
Systems Manager
Circulation Manager
� Asst. News Ed.
� Copy Editor
� Asst. Entertainment Ed.
Classified Ad Technician � Typesetters
� News Editor
Staff Writers
Please apply at our office on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building.
You have w
long e n o u g
PEN
Starts Wednesday April 29,
1992- through May 6fo
Monday - Friday
Saturday 12-4
Cost is one dollar per book
Bring in this ad to enter one
bOOk free (one ad per customer)
Where
Mendenhall Studen
Center
e live in a world of change. The
Student Book Excrffinqe v!l
change the way we look at
.
buying and selling ttxtho iKs It was
created by students Mr students All
profits support the ; yan ,?so!f St :
3M
m
the ninu:
s v ' � want!
Continued from page 1
money.
Once students understand
how the system operates, workers
will not be needed, Schaubach
said.
"I'd like to see it get to the
point where we wouldn't have to
man the booth' he s.iid. "I'd like
to see the campus become that
computer literate"
Johnston said he became in-
terested in the system when he
read an article about it in The Ensf
Ginaffftion.Then hedecided to pro-
mote the project to SGA.
"I thought it was a great idea
he said. "So I figured I could help
out in getting it through SGA
Hie SGA recently appropri-
ated S2lH to advertise the system.
The booth will be open from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. from April 24
through May 6. On Saturday, May
2 and tm May b the booth will be
open from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Continued from page 1
like a mini-advising center said
Chuck Lee, one of the graduate
assistants in the center.
"I like helping others and my
job is to help students choose
classes that they need Lee said.
Thead isingcentercalled up
Jason Quick, a pre-business ma-
jor, to let hi m know that he needed
to make an appointment with
them for registration, he said.
"Everyone in the center has
always been able to help me im-
mediately even if my adviser
wasn't in said Stacie Mabus, a
freshman who is undecided on
her maor
"Mv adviser helped me
choose a wide variety of courses
to take so l could decide what I
liked
Come Join Us And Be A Part Of
THE 4th RANKED DANCE
TEAM IN THE NATION
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmm
' ECU DANCE TEAM
TRY-OUT DATES
APRIL 24, 25, 26
1st Meeting Will Be Held On
April 24 at 4:30 inside
MINGES COLISEUM
(4IN THE NATION)
HEY,HEYE.C.
at Brown and Wood
M BEUEVE
this is a great graduation gift!
$233.83 per month
1992 Pontiac Sunbird
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Payment based on list price of $12,323 with $738 00 dealer
discount, $1,000.00 down payment and 2.9 A.P.R. tor 48 months.





ize Buffalo
April 23, 1992 She East (Carolinian 3
� it ,i Roman
ut 600 others
sed- ircuit
p.uishl all
� ibortiorv
. houted obscenities,
No return to
andmock-
d i line
� ibular)
imed
� i them
Ithechurch
enter-
� i with
� and
� � . An
ited
ibor-
E TIME!
eenville I tilities at
r fun rmation.
four Last Stop
he Semester
$10.00 off
)ERTON'S
price on any one pair of
TENNIS SHOES
� i discount.
i per isit.
talcs or ol fers.
20
ION'S
men's or ladies
suit
mer per isit.
icr v
20
Supreme Court overturns execution stay
Books
Advisor
(AP) Double murdert?i Rob- rhegMwasintroducedatAboul
it Alton Harris died in the gas 6:05 a.m , and shortly afterward
ihambei at dawn vesterdav in Harris' head jerked from left tnrighl
California's first execution in i beforefallingsknvlytohischest.He
vears after a dramati la a minute appeared to be unconsc iou � about
-ta was overturned 6:12a.m,ctnd was pronounced dead
rhe Supreme Court rtumed at 6:21 a.m
that sta and three others filed Warden Dani' Vasquez read
� ugh the night b the Vth I s his final statement Youcanbea
i iu uit v ouit . . tnex king or a street sweepei but ever)
traordinan move frustrated high bodydanceswithheGrim Reaper,
rtjustit ps ended the judicial duel it said
h otdei ii
lssu an mo
misioo awrs so he could use their cai for a
rhe fourth sta was issued al bank robber) He admittetl taking
I larris was strapped tothedeath part in the sla ings; his supporters
seal f ipreme iurl srul cited his past as mi abused Juki,
i ig. Harris hastily returned among other things as a reason to
mbei liH�kingfarmore sparehim
-on � � winked With Harris' executiim ili
m.i i it one cuai t and totnia becomes tlie 2(Kh -tate to
mo ihed
pealscourtnotto Harris died II years after he
tavs without per- shot to death two San Diego teen
make use of the death penalh since
the U.S. Supreme Court in I976al-
bwed states to resumecapital pun-
ishment. 1 le was the 169th person
put to death since the ruling.
sixteen other states have the
death penalty but haven't used it
A total of 1 U men and women
remain on death row me alifornia,
and moifthani Hi nation.) IK asol
lanuai
I larris had been s heduled to
die tt after midnight, but the9th
U.S.( ircuit( ourtof Appeals inSan
I i.HH iscopul theexe( utjononhokd
six hours beforehand, based on a
claim that his brother shot onv ot
the teen agei -
It issued three more stays
ha-ed on a claim that death by ga is
cruel and unusual punishment.
Ihen the I S Supremeourt or-
dered no more sta) s
I here is no w reasHi for
this abusive delay, which has been
compounded by last minute at-
tempts to manipulate the judicial
process the court said in the 7-2
ruling. As with two piv ions votes
on the gas issue, u �ti es ohn Paul
Stevens and I larr) Blackmun
dissented
In the dissent, Stevens wrote,
"the barbark use of c) anide gas in
the Holik aust, the development ot
cyanide agents as hemk al weap-
ons, our contemporary understand-
ing ot e ution b) lethal gas, and
tin-development ot less ruel meth-
ods of execution all demonstrate
that execution b cyanide ;as is
unnecessaril) cruel "
USDistrictJudgeMarilynHall
Patel ordered that Hams' execu-
tion be videotaped as evidence tor
the gas issue. A ideo camera was
sen in the death chamber toda)
We Want You!
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for
the following positions for summer and fall of 1992:
� Staff Illustrator
� Systems Manager
Circulation Manager
� Asst. News Ed.
� Copy Editor
� Asst. Entertainment Ed.
� Classified Ad Technician � Typesetters
� News Editor
� Staff Writers
Please anolv iit our office on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building.
- ��.? - . � w. - �� ' '
You have waited
long enough. . .
Starts Wednesday April 29,
1992- through May 6
Monday- Friday 11-5
Saturday 12-4
Cost is one dollar per book
Bring in this ad to enter one
bOOk free (on� ad per customer)
Where?
Mendenhatl Student
Center
PC 355-5783
Kam-Tpm M-F
Ham-ftpn: St
1
cc
CD
cc
k,
CQ
0Q
CC
CD
e live in a world ol change. The
A A I Student Book Exchange wl
V change the way we look at
buying and selling textbooks. It was
created by students for students. All
profits support the program itself: Stop
bv with the names of the books you want
.���,U �� ��
CALL 737-4736 FOR MOEB i$Tmm&i0M
�i Ii
Continued from page 1
money
Once students understand
how Ihesy stem operates, workers
will nol be needed, Schaubach
said
"I'd liki' to see it get to the
point where we v i Mikln't have to
man the booth he �ml. "I'd like
to see the i ampus be ome that
computer literate
lohnston said he became in-
terested in the system when he
read an article about it in Thel
i nroliniiin. I hen hede ided to pro-
mote the proje t toS ! A
"I thought it was a great idea
he said. "So I figured 1 could help
out in getting it through S A "
I he S .A ret ently appropri-
ated $200 to advertise the system
The booth will he open from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m from April 2
through May 6 (hrvSaturday, May
2 and on Mav 6 the booth v ill be
open from 12 p.m to 4 p.m.
Continued from page 1
liked mini-ad ising center aul
Chiu k Lee, one of the graduate
assistants in the enter
"I like helping others and my
job is to help student choose
classes that they need Lee said.
Ihe.nh ising center called up
I,(son Qui k, a pre-business ma
or, to let him know that heneed- 1
to make an appointment with
them for registration, he said
! . eryone in the center has
alwav � been able to help me im-
mediatek even it my adviser
wasn't in " said Stacie Mabus, a
freshman who is undecided on
her major.
Ah adviser helped me
choose .i v ide variety of courses
to take so 1 could decide what 1
liked "
IN
Come Join Us And Be A Part Of
THE 4th RANKED DANCE
TEAM IN THE NATION
ECU DANCE TEAM
TRY-OUT DATES
APRIL 24, 25, 26
1st Meeting Will Be Held On
April 24 at 4:30 inside
MINGES COLISEUM
(4 IN THE NATION)
HEY,HEYE.C.
at Brown and Wood
HE BELIEVE
this is a great graduation gilt!
$233.83 per month
1992 Pontiac Sunbird
92299
Equipped with automatic transmission,
air conditioning, tinted glass, sport
mirrors, AM-FM cassette and more!
Payment based on list price of $12,323 with $7300 dealer
discount, $1,000.00 down payment and 2.9 A.P.R. for 48 months.
i
. �





SITE i�ust (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, Hews Editor Richard Haselric, Staff illustrator
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Lewis Cobi e. Entertainment Editor Larry Huccins, Gradation Manager
Dana Damu SON. Asst. Entertainment Editor Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Michael Martin, Sports Editor Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor Jean Caraway, Advertising Production Manager
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Keeping up with the Jones boy
Memories of a forgotten newspaper
ROTC initiates
By
Greg
Jones
Editorial
Columnist
min
The Easl Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since ll)25. emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The I asi Carolinian publishes 12.0(H) copies ever) Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion ol the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of v iew letters should be
limited to 250 words or less For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication I etters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg . ECU, Greenville, N.C .
2785S 4! Foi more information, call CM1)) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, April 21, 1992
Fond farewell, advice offered
roday, our newspaper will break format.
The space where this print now resides is
usually reserved for our opinion on various is-
sues. But this is our last paper of the semester, and
quite frankly we are tired of voicing our opinion.
In lieu of splashing our opinion on this hal-
lowed page, we will instead offer Advice. So here
goes.
� Retrain from stressing too hard about your
finals. In the end, you'll be done with them all and
wonder what it was you were worried about.
�Barefoot on the Mall is a festival for feet.
Anyone wearing shoes of any kind will be asked
10 leave.
� Thrve things come no! back: the air that is
flown, the spoken word, and lost opportunities.
�Commencement is right around the corner.
Seniors, this means your 10th year High School
reunion is fast approaching.
� The next time Brother Jim graces our cam-
pus, let's get out there and show him what
rnasturbator's and fornicator's we really are.
�College life is great. Study a lot, drink a little,
become involved and use a condom.
� Finally, don't forget that these are the best
years of your life. Twenty years from now, when
you're sitting in board meeting, you'll look back
and realize the fondest memories are those ol col-
lege.
and what a long strange trip it's been.
Beginning my tenure as Direc-
tor of Advertising one year ago, little
did I know all that lay ahead, watting
to test my patience and, at times, my
sanity
A casual reactor of The East Caro-
linian may think of the paper as some-
thing that magically appears on Tues-
days and Thursdays, providing the
Students with reading material to flip
through between classes
There is, however, a minority of
students on campus who know this is
not the case Thesesmokmg, dipping,
swearing, ZMB-Ustening, Wendy's-
e.ittng folks are the staff of The East
Carolinian
At times the paper has been ac-
cused of being too-liberal, too-conser-
vative, unethica, and (most recently)
unprofessional Theseattributesarea
matter ot perspective, however, it is a
fact that these are some of the most
dedicated people with which 1'veever
had the pleasure to work
One clear example comes clear
to mind The welcome-back edition in
the fall of 1991 Perhaps you remem-
ber it7 It was a 56-page, tour-pound,
bundle of joy that arrived at your
newsstand only one day late This
love-child might have been a week
late or aborted all together had it not
been tor a handful of sleepy-eyed
newspaper junkies
The paper was supposed to
come out on Wednesday, thefirstday
of classes On Tuesday, production
day, the air was full with optimism.
we had sold the most inches of adver-
tising tor a single newspaper in the
history of The East Carolinian It soon
became apparent that with this ret ord-
breaking accomplishment came an
unwanted realization � hundreds i �1
ads had tobecreated and what seemed
like miles of copy had to be placed
within the 56-page mammoth
Thepaper's deadline was 2 a m
Wednesday morning
Along about 11 pm Fuesday
night, the first hint of a pessimistic-
attitude surfaced Questions were
raised concerning the probability of
the paper maintaining its schedule
Unfortunately, our General
Manager. Tim Hampton, was the first
to speak up. He paid dearly for his
pessimism At the time, I was work-
ing alongside my brother. Matt (ones,
who played the role of news editor
Neither of us cared to listen to Tim's
reasoning
The Brothers Jones then began
to launch into a tirade directed to-
ward Tim How could he dare think
we wouldn't get this paper finished
b) deadline? We would simply step
up our efforts and work harder, damn
it
At this time, the three of us
walked into the ad production office
and asked Doug Morris how many
ads he had left to complete "Eight
he said Eight short, little, easy ads
No sweat "
One o'clock Wednesday morn-
ing, a mere hour until deadline
"How many more ads do you
have lett, Doug
"Eight Eight short, little, easy
ads No sweat "
Bv this time, Doug ha'd been in
front oi the ad computer for 18 hours
Grey hairs sprouted before our eyes
He resembled some sick, key-punch-
in g statue, with the faint iKior of Dim's
breadsticks surrounding him
It was now official, the paper
would come out on Thursday And
the new printing deadline moved to 3
p m Wednesday
fter ip I gizing t'1 Tim for
beii Rright we all settled down for a
beverage-filled all-nighter "The
IVist was among us all
At thecrackofdawn, Doug said
"Eight Eight short, little, easy ads
No sweat "
He also mentioned vimething
about going to bathroom, but he as
afraid his legs didn't work anymore
Around noon on Wedne I
Doug really did have only eight ads
left Meanwhile, we all came � the
realization that we needed, t g �
class
We all used the opporrui
a chance to sleep, shower, u
lungs a break from the 23-1
tine binge
We arrived back at the
2 -V p m to put the finishing touches
on our masterpiece and h dehvei ��
the printer .it 3 p m on the m se
Things went considerat
terforusatterthefirsteditun 'v �
encountered numerous ;
throughout the year, but at le
had set a benchmark for h . . j.
ip things could go
� � � �
It is often said tl at
courses represent only halt of
lege education Learning how to in-
teract with people, at ��.��. � ri-
sibility, prioritizing and time-n
ment are all equally im �� t pur-
suits of a college education
The EastCarolinian pn . �
colleagues and myself wid
dose oi Life 1001, which 1 d
prove invaluable when search g irtd
obtaining a career after sv
I urge everyone who has �
the time to read these ramblings to
become involved with the newspa-
per A variety ot positions � �
entertainment reporter, adv
representative, copy editi - ��
As for the staff men � rj
present and past, who ha
reigns fThe East Carolinian spt i
tion � Tim, Deborah, all the Mate
Margie. Mbie, Larry S ti eai dl
the a : rep � and ever � � � I
leredttaplea iret get) � ���
and w -i. ��� ith J
I all the risii gli lersruj rid
future emj �� - g I
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Acquainted with the night
Letters to the Editor
Scott
Maxwell
I ditorial
Columnist
From about eighth grade until
: ted fi m high school 1
e I n my wallet a razor blade
This was so 1 could kill myself, it 1
decided to
1 thought a lot about killing
myself back then, for one main
reason I"he woman who gave birth
to me, who still lives in that damned
rathole of a house in Florida � a
woman 1 refuse to call my mother �
abused me Not physically, mind
you, and not in any sense I'm sure
the courts would agree with But she
took a special, vicious pleasure in
what I would consider emotional
abuse. The details aren't important.
So I carried around a razor
blade most of the time. And as I
usually failed in my fumbling
attempts to gain from friends and
lovers the emotional support I
desperately needed, I often thought
about using it
That was how it came to be
that reading saved my life For some
people, I guess, it's religion, for
others it's drugs, for me it was
Harlan Ellison's stories.
Again, the details aren't
important What matters � and
what mattered then � is that
Harlan Ellison writes stones about
pain Not physical pain, not usually,
but emotional anguish, of any stripe
the pain of being reacted by a lover,
the pain ot being a crazy bag lady in
New York, of being miserably shy,
of being simply lonely, it's in there.
I managed to find in Harlan
Ellison's tones an indication that
someone else in the universe had
been through what 1 was going
through, and had made it Simply
knowing that, simply knowing it
was possible, kept me alive through
those miserable days and nights.
I got the hell out of Florida
after high school, and have since
severed all ties with the woman
who abused me there My girlfriend,
whom 1 met in Florida and who is
also attending college here, is a
wonderfully kind and patient
person who has done a lot to repair
the huge furrows that that Floridian
harpy raked into my psyche. And I
threw away the razor blade.
Even so, I carried a deep sense
of gratitude to Harlan Ellison, as I
would for a favor 1 could never
repay I know he didn't do it for me,
but he wrote the stories that enabled
me to find strength in myself to
keep going. I owed him, at least, a
thanks.
Well, 1 got a chance to thank
him, a year or so ago A friend who
knew of my respect tor Ellison as a
writer called from Raleigh to tell me
about a fundraiser tor Harvey Cantt
It was at the H.irdb.u kafe in
Chapel Hill, Ellison would be
signing books and pretending to
wait tables and generally making an
amusing ass of himself while die
assembled guests ate dinner
But this was a fundraiser and
they had to raise funds A hundred
dollars a plate And I couldn't afford
it
A week before the dinner, for
no apparent reason, the Visa gods
raised my credit limit by $200
Fifteen minutes after I found that
out, my girlfriend and 1 were signed
up for the last two tickets to the
event
We went. Ellison was witty,
intelligent, amusing, charming,
acerbic � everything people say he
is. You could feel him in a room like
a force of nature, everywhere he
went, the swirling clouds of people
behind him were affected by his
presence If you weren't talking to
him, you were talking about him,
that was for sure You tended to
forget that he was only five feet five
inches tall, because he feels like a
giant.
He gave his opinions He
waited tables He yelled at my
girlfriend for not eating her soup
(but he was only kidding) He read a
not-yet-published story to the
crowd, and he reads his stories even
better than he writes them
Slowly it grew later, and
darker. People were starting to drift
away, talking and laughing softly,
into the night. I don't drink, but I
downed a couple of glasses of wine
anyway because I was going to need
them 1 walked away front my
girlfriend and stood in a ragged line
of people who were waiting to get a
book signed or to say goodbye.
Waiting to say my thank you to
Harlan Ellison.
When the people in front of
me had cleared out, I stood a little
sheepishly for a moment in front of
him � he was half-sithng on a table,
and I felt awkward talking so far
down to him I was holding onto a
copy of Deathbini Stories he had
signed for me earlier in the evening
"Mr. Ellison I said, "I just
wanted you to know that your
stories saved my life about a million
times, and even though I know you
didn't do it for me, I just wanted to
say thank you " And I stuck out my
hand for him to shake
Which is a lie It didn't go that
way at all. As poor as it is, that's
infinitely better than what did
happen. No, that was only what I
tried to say, what I had been
promising myself I would say
1 actually did manage to say
some of it, but after the tirst three or
four words my throat simply closed
up I stopped iist short of tears It
wasn't enough. Itwasn t enough
Ten years ol abuse m ith only his
words between me and that stupid,
stupid razor blade cod damn it,
Gee, thanks, Mr Ellison wasn't
enough
1 finally managed to finish
what Id Started, more or less, but
toward the end 1 simply gestured
vaguely with the book It was all 1
could do
Somewhere in there he took
off his glasses, and 1 could see that
his eyes were grey He looked down
at the floor for a moment, then back
up at me, and said, "You know, you
never know, when you wnte a book
like that, what it's going to come to
mean to someone else, twenty,
thirty years later
I knew what he was trying to
do for me. I struggled to get out
another "Thank you" without
breaking down and crying and
embarrassing myself, and barely
made it
"Thank you he said gently.
There's a moment in one of
my favorite Ellison stories, "Paladin
of the Lost Hour when a man
named Billy Kinetta gets a chance to
meet another man who died saving
Kmetta's life in Vietnam Kinetta
hadn't even known the other man,
whose momentary distraction of a
couple of Viet Cong saved him, but
he frequently goes to the grave,
trying to say thank you. And one
day � well, the details aren't
important. He gets his chance.
Billy Kinetta says thank you to
the dead man And then, as Billy
tells a friend:
he let me go He let me go
so 1 didn't even have to say I was
sorry He told me he didn't even sa-
me in that foxhole. He never knew
he'd saved my life. I said thank you
and hp said no, thank you, that he
hadn't died for nothing
That's what Harlan Ellison
did for me, that night in the Hard-
back Cafe He was telling me that he
understood, but that the thanks
weren't really necessary, that I
didn't owe him anything, that he
was simply glad to know he'd done
some good in the world while he
was here
1 left, then, with my dear and
wonderful girlfriend, and walked
away into the night. And for the
first time that 1 could remember, I
felt free.
Here's hoping we can all do
some good in the world while we're
here. Goodbye, ECU, goodbye.
Is Walker reallv
an ECU student?
To the Editor
The written .iss.nilt that was di-
rected onSCA PresidantCoarrne) ones
and Vice President Sherrj Smith in
Walker's Ride on the Wild Side" in tho
April 14edition ol The East Carolinian is
unjust What has Mr William Walker
done in his cars .it EC U' In thii article,
he bashes outgoing students for rr ing
to help the student body as a whole
become more im oh ed in campusorga-
nizations such as si and prevent stu-
dent apathy He sa s S has lost Hal-
loween for ��: acci pted stupid noise
ordinances for biw talked numerous
times about some underground book
exchange that has never materialized
for him, made payments of almost a
quarter of a million dollars for him m the
wiretapping issue, appropriated an ob-
scene amount of money for the "ques-
tionable" recreation confer foriim,done
nothing about the parking situation for
him, decreased library hours for him,
and lost the school yearbook for him. I
can not believe ho has the brass to say
Ms Jones and Ms Smith have been on
the SGA long enough to be held respon-
sible for all these matters.
Obviously, the Great J. William
Walker knows nothing about SGA, Ms.
Jones nor Ms Smith 1 have been in-
volved in numerous activities as well as
SGA for three years and now serve as a
student assistant for Chancellor Eakin
through the Ambassador's program. In
my three years of hard work, 1 have
learned to recognize attitudes such as
theelesterousj. William Walker's bring
this university down What has King
Walker done here in his time at ECU1
First, the SGA did not lose Hal-
loween. Halloween was lost by non-
students and outsiders that created
problems while visiting Greenville Sec-
ond,SGA is currently working towards
solutions to the noise ordinance situa-
tion with committees headed b Vs
nesandl iss heduted meetings with
PoliceChief Hinman for debate Third,
underground book ex-
change program, as Mr Walker referred
to it. has n.w materialized and received
funding ��' 520G to start advertising
Fourth, referring to the wiretapping is-
sue, the SGA has officially supported
� ns of Startle) Kitreli in report-
ing! phesaw wrong Fifth, the
: scene amount of money for the
stionab atton center will
make ECU the tops on the East Coast as
tar as recreational centers This recre-
ational center will bringnotoriet) and a
lling point in recruiting students to
ECU Is this obscene? Sixth, the parking
situation is tough on other campuses
such as UNC and NCSU as well as ECU
At least ECU allows it freshmen to h.n e
a car at school, which is unlike many
other universities Seventh, the SGA has
decreased libran, hours us for him. 1
suppose he is the onlv one that is not
allowed into the library at times when
he feels like he might want to study 1
guess everyone else is allowed in except
him It's also Ms. Jones and Ms Smith
that caused the loss of the yearbook for
only him. I suppose everyone else re-
ceived a yearbook except him. So King
Walker, Ms Jones and Ms. Smith have
caused all these losses? It is apathetic
students such as yourself that have
caused the losses. Not one, but many.
In reference to the ad "There isn't
a woman alive who doesn't love Dick
Heads" and portray ing the photographs
of Mr Tommv Spauldingand Chancel-
lor Eakin in the "Clearly Labeled Satire
Page humor is funny, but this is de-
grading and disgusting.
I have worked closely with Mr
Spaulding for three vearsnow.and now
am a Student Assistant tor Chancellor
Eakin through the Ambassador's pro-
gram. In working with Mr Spaulding
in SGA and on other committees
through the university, 1 have come to
realize that Mr Spaulding will go out of
his wa to help a friei I whet
. . . -
school workin the :�
science department rpersoi , Mr
Spaul ling sets a good i
dents. Mid the) can .� I
abotttprobtcrnssucha Mi Watimr,
but to work towards s
AsfarasChancf
cemed, in growing to � rt per-
sonal!) as well as profess.
past three years, a student
for more in a chancellor H
Is sporting events in
our student athletes, maintains
believable social schedule ��
his spare time to good will org
fions and manages somehow �
time to spend with his family Hema re-
tains an open door policy to stud- nts
who want to display feelingsover some-
thing whether it be good or bad, and
even takes time to talk with students
about personal problems if they wish to
discuss them.
To downgrade students such as
Courtney Jones, Sherry Smith, Tommy
Spaulding, and ECU Chancellor Eakin
is senseless What good comes out ot
this7 None Grow up, Mr J. William
Walker. 1 realize the ad displaying the
photos of Mr Spaulding and Chancel-
lor Eakin are on the "Clearly Labeled
Satire Page but this is not funny It is
sad joumalishc attributes
In wnhng this, I am reminded of
the editorial that npped one East Caro-
linian staff wnter who totally missed
the facts of the Lollapalooza concert
even as to the order of the performers in
the show
The question was raised, "Was
the writer even in attendance at
Lollapalooza?" Now, in relation to the
downgrading of Ms Jones. Smith. Mr
Spaulding, Chancellor Eakin 1 sav Is
Mr Walker even a student at ECU1
Damon P Johnson
Junior
Political Science
University covered with injustice
To the Editor
My first reason for writing is
about Brother Jim's recent visit to our
campus. Brother Jim tried to shine his
narrow-minded viewsdown everyone's
throats, and 1 persortelly think he stunk
at brain-washing techniques. When I
was leaving after hearing some of the
garbage he was preaching the first day
he was here, I overheard an ECU ad-
ministrator make the comment to one
Of his suit friends that he found it hard
to believe that people at the college
level could not listen to someone's views
without criticism during their speech.
He was not letting his views be known
in an educated way; he was trying to
shove his thoughts on people and criti-
cize everyone. I did not appreciate the
statement made by the administrator,
and I guess he would not like me to
make the statement that I find it hard to
conceive that anyone at the college offi-
cial level could not read a phone book to
find out that tapping someone's phone
is illegal But, 1 do
My next reason for wnhng is the
homophobia around here. It's every-
where, but 1 must know something
Why is someone else's sexual prefer-
ences so intriguing to some people For
instance, while walking on a recent Sat-
urday afternoon, I noticed a guy walk-
ing his dog and looking back As he
passed, he said, "Dude, check out the
two chicks holding hands back there "
So what! At least they were not finger-
ing each other on the sidewalk, but if
they had been, it would have been their
business. I don't see gays walking
around saying, "Hey, check out that
girl licking that guy's mouth oufThere-
fore, why should straights worry so
much about gays? Oh, and if you con-
demn such practices, why don't you
put yourself into a gay's position? But,
of course, the easy way out would be to
act like a narrow-minded, ethnocentric
Neanderthal and put down everything
you never care to face. The term gay
does not stand for trash or sinner M
rule of thumb is to find out about some-
thing before shooting my mouth off
about it, but anyone can make a mis-
take
M final reason for wnhng is the
base men t doors to Scott Hall The lobby
is locked up around 12am, and 1 can
understand the reasoning behind this,
but 1 cannot understand the reasoning
for locking the outside basement doors
at night without the residents having a
key to get in them The inside door at the
base of the inside stairwell is left open
so people can enter the basement and
leave through the outside doors People
are trying to study or watch television
in the base ment are constantly badgered
by people trying togetinatnight Hous-
ing, give us curfew door keys like ev-
eryone else around campus.
Till next time, give 'em hell.
Ronald Mercer
Junior
Chemistry
By Kenneth Chesson
SUfl Writer
.rmv ROTC lias madi
sirj history in I ewfraternit) tiled
Pershing Rifles heidea forthefrati n
whit h is the first 'its kind
stemmed fi im a isil to Clemson
Uni � � �
many jobs of the Pershing
� �
: � � I basketba
� koi feed ifvolunta rsfron
in drill
United 5l iti

erekV
beenalol fi
the grou ' � �
and basii know i
i r two semi
"Allot us
. � f we
1
i
rolio. ed a
temity the i J

.
� rl tndi
FRIDAY Meal
EARTH MERCHU
and
SPAWN
S VI L HI) AY NKiHI
FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH a�
THE KILL KIDS
onlv $�:
v
v�a
U JlT'AAt Sl��
Appearing April 26. 1
Sunday 8:00 PM
Jenkins Uiditoritim
S hool of tt
sponsored b The Memorial Baptist Chi
BSl
l or ini'rt mi ' -
School's Almost
It's Time To

. �
�m
�7
757-
Accomodal
60 peol
Mexican Restaurant





with the Jones boy
gotten newspaper
No sweat
He also mentioned something
g to bathroom buthewaf
didn t work anymore.
,1 pn Wednesday!
ive only oiht ads
�� Meant hih tv in e to thei
� � needed to go tol
pportunity s
- v erand giveourl
eak i m the 23-hour nico-
i� k .it the office at
� ' ngtouches
� md to deln er it to
3 on the nose
� considerably bet-
fterthVVe.till
- problems
' at least we
M ' w Si rvt ed-
� � �� thai . ollege
� half of a o
rtg how to m-
I pting respon-
ne managt-
� n pi rtant pur-
�tion
n provided my
� � with a heavy
I which 1 think will
. a hen searching and
reel after hool
� who has Uken
� " ese ramblings to
� 1 with the netvspa-
� �. r positions exist �
� porter advertising
I j editor etc
' - Staff members,
� a ho have held the
ntan s produc-
ill the Marts,
ott fean, all
� else � 1
� �'�� know
lership and
to the Editor
�� � nd whether it be
� - �� olunteer v rk
a political
� � : � rsonall) Mr
lex imple tor sh;
IJT1 not to bitch
�sou.Mr Waiter,
solul
ellorEakints( v
. � know him pcr-
�� tstonally in the
� � � could no task
r He constantly
.�ents in support of
iii tains an un-
lule, -volunteers
I will organiza-
s mehow to find
� family He mam-
door j itudents
�� Jisplat reelings over some-
good or bad. and
� � � rime to talk with students
� ei Hal problems if rhe wishtO
discuss them
grade students such as
tnej (ones,Sheny Smith. Tommy
Spaulding, and ECU Chancellor Eakin
is senseless What good i mes out of
this' None Grow up Mr i William
Walker 1 realize the ad display ing the
phot 'Mr Spaulding and ChanceJ-
learly Labeled
Page but this is not funny It is
malistic attributi
In writing minded of
� I'jr,)-
totally missed
m concert
erl rmersin
' -i- raised. "Was
attendance at
tion to the
nes Smith, Mr
' "akin I sal Is
� lent it ECU1
�nee
ed with injustice
� ��.
i
�he sidewalk, but if
� uld have been their
Kays walking
heck out that
s mouth out There-
straights worry so
Oh. and if you con-
I whv don't you
jay's position' But,
way out would be to
� i inded, ethnocentric
�utdown everything
face The term gav
� stand for trash or sinner My
' " � is to find out about some-
shooting my mouth off
in make a mis-
� for writing is the
ttHatl The lobby
: iround 12am, and 1 can
zoning behind this,
'�' 'and the reasoning
c �� utsiJe basement doors
at night without the residents having a
nthem Theinsidedooratthe
inside stairwell is left open
Hi enter the basement and
leave through theoutsidedoors People
are trying to study or watch television
in thebasementareconstantly badgered
bv people trvingtoget in at night. Hous-
ing, give us curfew door keys like ev-
eryone else around campus
Till next time, give em hell
Ronald Mercer
Junior
Chemistry k
iROTC initiates service fraternity
April 23, 1991 �lje SaBt (Carolinian5
By Kenneth Chesson
M.itf Writer
ECU's Army ROTC has made univer-
sttyhistor) in starting a new fratemitv called
Pershing Rifles Ihe idee for the fraternity,
which is the first of its kind on campus,
stemmed from a recent visit to Clemson
I ni erstt)
One of the main jobs of the Pershing
Rifles is to put together a color guard for
football and basketball games Until now
thocolor guard consisted of volunteers from
the Amu KOK hey will also represent
EC I in drill competitions throughout the
I nited States competing against other uni-
versities.
CadetC apt Derek Watts said there has
been a lot of time and effort put in to starting
Ihe group. Members studied the history
and basic knowledge of the Fershing Rifles
for two semesters, Watts said.
"All of us were nervous while waiting
to see if we would be accepted he said.
"When they came with their decision tell-
ing us we were accepted we were greatly
relieved and surprised. They gave our fra-
ternity the name Z-4
ECU's Tershing Rifles consists of eight
cadets, Watts said.
Phe nation-wide fraternity is run bv
cadets. Ihe cadets take care of all the finan-
cial work and other tasks that need to taken
(are of in the fratemitv. Thev have advisers
to assist them if any help is needed, but the
cadets have the final authority.
Ihe cadets raise money by having fund -
raisers. The fratemitv is solely supported
b) the fratemitv members and the money
the) raise through fund-raisers
"Starting from the ground up is very
costly Watts said. "Right now we wear
our Army uniforms while performing cer-
emonies. We hope to expand and invite the
Air Force cadets to pledge the fratemitv
once we get on our feet and get everything
running smoothlv. Therefore we will need
to purchase uniforms for the fraternity so
everyone will be wearing the same uni-
form. That in itself will be costly
TherershingRifleisisa National Honor
Fraternity not a social fraternity, Watts said.
"It is a.great honor to become a member
of the fraternity Watts said. "We don't
have a rivalry with any other university.
ust to be the best is the main goal
Perilling Rifles was started in 1K44 at
the University of Nebraska, the National
Headquarters of today's Pershing Rifles.
Pershing.
Rv 1
H �
ij


Photo cckift�y -iOTC
The members of ROTC's new fraternity, Pershing Rifles, prepare for the up-coming
year The service fraternity exists nationwide
' '
FRIDAY NIGHT
EARTH MERCHANTS
and
SPAWN
SATl'RDAY NIGHT
FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH and
THE KILL KIDS
onlv$:
Appearing April 26, 1992
Sunday 8:00 PM
Jenkins Auditorium
School of Ail
sponsored b The Memorial Baptist Church and
BSU of ECU
I or mart information call 75S-5 14
the FIZZ BISTRO
110 E. 4th St. -752-5855
FRIDAY
Lenny & the Legends
SATURDAY
David Mann - Sax player
featured on the Tonight Show
Paul Tardif
Carol Dshield
lewis Pragasm
(call for advance reservation)
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1-AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
� �,
p.
Every Thursday Night
Student DUCKl Night
J�S1
v
r!
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
��
The
CoMedY
ZONE
Ever) Wed
nizhi
ATiTIC
752-7303 1 209 E. 5th St. CoMedY
ZONE
The
Every Wed.
nichl
Thursday, April 23
DARKSTAR
SfH 32 oz Draft � .99c HighlaJLs � .99c Membership
Friday, April 24
Up Rising
Baltimore's No. 1 Reggae Hand
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday, April 25
Purple School Bus
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Monday, April 27
DILLON FENCE AND
SUGAR SMAK
Reading Day Eve Concert
Thursday, April 30
Egypt and
Sex, Love and Money
.99c 32 oz Draft � .99c HightolLs � .99c Memberships
Friday, May 1
STEGMONDS
ECU'S No. 1 Band
$2.00 32 oz Draft
INCERT SERIES
THIS SATURDAY
WRDU W6.fMm
The Home Of Rock N Roll rAjTJ
PRESENTS EARTH O
THE 2nd ANNUAL BUDDIES
CELEBRATION
CeieOrjie
� arin
Da, 9?1
Tile
CJonnells
flREHOSE
OILLON FENCE � BUFFALO TOM � FUT DUO JETS
portion o' tie pfOceH3� ne"t i'm "vfor'Tientai youos
Tickets Start at Just $8.50
IPlus Service Charge
v ngfrn eo�MAww 62'(i
THREE EASY WAYS TO GET TICKETS!
Visit any Tctttmastet Center teaturmn, TRACKS Recom Bar Sarstno Muse ano
Sound Shop stores tflroogtiou! Horrn ttwjw a saies m at outlets
Charge pi rickets bv shone' IjmSm ewm cm
0' surcftase tickets on te eventng ot the sno at the MM Creed Bo Othde 'ocateo wst
outside C the -nam iates 0�n 5 30ofn through showtime icash MC Visa accepted!
' Serm charge added to as outw shone and box office sales
I I II Ml II III II III Jill I .I I WWIP�.�
WM
�� � i �a





April 23, 1991 �he tEast (Carolinian 5
with the Jones boy
�gotten newspaper
i
� ore
' � � w
- . . �
� a;e
- � .
� . -
gand
� � taken
i

� - - exist �
id ef!
� � -
I the
� iuc-
"
� � - I
to the Editor

� ine-
rt d
' 'TV
� �
ll 0i
ham
. ymg the
I
ll 1 oi

n issed
-�
)4

� �� �
ed with injustice
My

i into

-�inn
� tocfo
� inn
� ittht
� menl and
� Paeple
ikh ft krvtekrti
tngl igtiindtntghl Hou
; ul � ' ' � Ri ��� low Ittyfl hkeev-
' �Wb( I, �ft lin��.ivpmWI
� ReMld Mm�
it l-uti ��, .r Hung I
"
ROTC initiates service fraternity
B Kenneth ('hosson
SUfl Wnti-r
ECU's mn ROTC has made univer-
sity history in startinga new fraternity called
Pershing Rifles rheideafoi the fraternity,
which is the I t of its kind on campus,
stemmed from ,i recent visit to Clemson
I ni ersitv
ne ol the rrwn jobs t the Pershing
Rifles i- tii put together a color guard for
: ' � kefball games Until now
thecolorguai I I � lunteei .1
� . ill also represent
i drillomperitions throughout the
I nited States compel runi
( adef( apt I erek Watts said there has
rt put in to starting
kroup ' ' the hi
and bask knowledge of the Pershing Rifles
tor two semesters, Watts said.
"All of us were nervous while waiting
to see it we would he accepted he said.
When the) came with their det ision tell
ing us we were accepted we were great!)
ivlie ed and surprised, fhey gave our fra-
ternity the n,ime 4
! C U's Pershing Rifles consists of eight
iadets Wattss.tui
fhe nation-wide frafernif) is run bv
cadets I hecadeis take cafe of all the finan-
cial work,nut other tasks tli,it need to taken
ire of in the fraternity. fhey have advisers
to is -i -t them it,im help is needed, but the
(adet - ha e Ehe final authonu
1 hecadets raise money by ha ingfund-
raisers Ihe fraternity is sotel) Mipportw.1
b the fraternity members and (he mone)
tin rai e through fund-raisers
"Skirting from the ground up is very
costly Watts said "Right now we wear
our Armv uniforms while performingcer
emonies. We hope tr expand and invitethe
Air Force cadets to pledge the fraternity
once we get on our feet and get every thing
running smoothly therefore we will need
to purchase uniforms tor the fraternit) so
everyone will he wearing the same uni
form. That in itself will he costly
fhePershingRiflesisa National Honor
r,iternirvnotasocial traternitv, Wattss.iKt
" 11 is a grea t hi n r U be I me a memhi -r
ot the fraternity Watts said "We don't
have a rivaln, with anv other university
lust to he the best is the main goal "
Pershing Rifles was sorted in lsi4 at
the University cA Nebraska, the National
Headquarters ot today's Pershing Rifles
Pershing.
l �?via: .
V.
14
k
.
The membor of ROTC's new fr :��'��. . '� prepare for the up-coming
� ;�� -ri!tv' exrt . i � ��
n
FRIDAY NI(;i�T
, �v EARTH MERCHANTS
X& and
SPAWN
BA l KDAY NKiHI
FOIMAIN OF YOUTH and
THK KILL KIDS
onlv &
appearing April 26, 1992
Sunday 8:00 PM
hiikms iif i it r iinn
St hool of
sponsored b) The Memorial Baptist Church and
BSI of ECL
at mm � �� � .� �
the FIZZ BISTRO
110 E. 4th St752-5855
FRIDAY
J
SATURDAY
:��- � ��: jyet
�� ; - "e Tonight Show
Pd.
: i Dsnield
� �
$2.25 Pitchers
weekdays
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 � AUG 31
L
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373

����-v:
:v4- I
�� VV
j'l
t.
"m
&$
ti�
: V
Every Thursday Night
Student tBIJIJKl Night
m
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
V
-v
Th Al 1111 The
CGMedY 7M"73�3 12�' E' 5th "� CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
Hihl
. Wed
Thursday, April 23
DARKSTAR
.Wc 32 o Dr.jft � .Wc HighbaJk � .Wc Membershipe
Friday, April 24
I j) Rising
Baltimore's No. 1 Reggae Hand
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday, April 25
Purple School Bus
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Monday, April 27
DILLON FENCE AND
SUGAR SMAK
Reading Day Eve Concert
Thursday, April
Egypt and
Sex, Love and Money
.99 32 (� Draft � 99 Ifighhafc � 99 MembersNjps
Friday, May 1
STEGMONDS
ECU'S No. 1 Band
$2.00 32 oz Draft
� HaideEr �
CONCERT SERIES
S3TJEZE
WRDU W6.FMm
Ih. Mom. OtRmk N KrSXSJ
PRESENTS EARTHO
THE 2nd ANNUAL BUDDIES
CELEBRATION
The
Connells
flREHOSE
OILUIH FBMX � BUFFALO TO. � FUT DUO JEIS
A oolic o' fie Doac. . �. j-oups
Tickets Start at Just $8.50
P � JMaffle
f Grnutnr
Di.tll
VV DBEffl au�m 6�Ci
THREE EASY WAYS TO GET TICKETS!
� -a lis' sar ��
s 919-834-4000 mmSESl
Of oufctase ticnets or itie evening of !t? sno� a- �" A �. xatec
DutsOe o The oates Ope 5 30c- 'oug' snoxtime icav MC � accepM
� �� - � - �-
-iIM 1 Kl IK
(xtlN
o





,
Classifieds
She East Carolinian
April 23,1992
Kl l
II MM I NONSMOKING koom-
ma n Nil pi Dfof MimswrorlongM
tor 2 bedroom townhoma ovv. vvD
12 ram i utilities (cabk .nut water
M-vvt-r in rt'tit) (all 321-0977
ROOMMATE WAN 11 n 2 bedroom
ap.irtnu-nt tor rent in hOUM I 2 blockl
Irnni.HtbuiMiny; hn lmIrs lull kiHlwn.
lull b.illi UM "I u.ishr Mid ilrver I'rt-
vateentranct S250plu�partofutUiMw
n�mfill7111 9601 Available unmedi
�Ml)
IIMMI KHOMMAIIMinilVlur
FUI TO through Spring "i 150.00ptf
monft pin1 J utilities r� Rival 11
tatei Seat) himish�i Call Mindy931
775� Stact) 931 7858
KINGS AIMS APARTMENTS Om
.mil two ImhImxm apartmantt l ntrgy
affkient Mveral locations tn town I �
petad, kid hen appliancea, awna water
anil spwet paid waaherdryei hook
iips Now taking application tor I,ill
1 .ill � 8915
ETMAIE ROOMMATE- natdtd to
nuelargi badroofndupltii tor nun
net Khool Waahti Dryei 1 2 mlk
rrom campui and voBaybail net' siSi
month � 1 2 utilititi and deposit Call
�s 2099
POR Kl n i rwo bedroom dupin .it
OOO par month Ne.ir lei Rivet Bum-v
avallabla 1 Ion to amputl Idaal t�r
peti Avatlabla Ma) 10th 1 .ill ulia it
Bryan 52 M60
ROOM Ol 1H PI I IOK KENT-
Available Ma) August Walking dis-
mm tot ampus and downtown 8170
month plui 1 : unUtMsall 58 sS4s
SUBLEASE AVAII ABLE FOB SUM-
MER' Fully Fumiahad rwobedroom
apartmani .it Wilson Aciw Walk to
campus! lean raaponstola non-smok
ers pleat I umished! 752 l
BOOMMATI m 1 DBT Undergrad
tmokei tot ial drinkei needed to ihan
; bdrm hOUM SI rent plus 1 3 utili
bm 1 .ill 757 1814
ATTENTION Ml I'IMs iV11iw.ui
t� tii laat minute w�- hava 1 and 3
badfooma available 100 confirmad
u aru leal ill us now and tell us your
txv.is o 1375 Homa Locator Faa
IIMMI ROOMMATE WANTED
lot apartmani In prune location, 12
blot kfromcampui IbkxktfTomdown
town Monthl) rent Includat utilities
phone and 1 ible A. t Now' 758 6418
hoi si id si m 1 si for si m
MBB2badroom,lbath petsk H50
month plus utilities I .ill 757 1814
FBMA1� ROOMMATE- needed tor .1
Kitty fumiahad apartment SIOOplus 1
futilities CaU752 4399
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Nou 1 iking 1 eases m 1
bedfoom, 2 bedroom A
1 tin.uikn Apartments
CALL 752-2865
APARTMENT FOR SUMMER- sub-
le.ts- , 2 bednxun, wiough for two
people, 5 mm walktocampus, monthly
rate mimed to S� 11F per person, call
758-42DI
LARCJF FURNISHED ROOM A VAIL-
ABIE- MkI May-Mid August Dek,
touch, Chafe, bookM'H. double bed .md
draaaar .ill fadeded Room la in lovely
hoCM ilos- to eajnpw with cathedral
inlmKV private deck, loft, AC,and cabk
including all movie itunnels at no ad-
ditional expense I Ins sublease is ideal
tor dorm residents that can't handle
summer h hod in tht� slums C all today
758-73
ROOMMAH Nl I Dlf�ASArSum-
mer tem.ile, non smoker, hOUaa W3
Ulrisms, 8180 a month plus 1 4 utili-
ties c all 752-2560
FEMALE ROOMMATE- needed to
share 2 bedroom bouse t' r summer.
Walking distance 5130'muithphia 1
2 utilities Non smoke- .anire, respon-
sible Upparck�!ima! elerrtsi Call
180 U24
HRANP-NIW: Tbdr, batb duplex
10mm walk trom camput AC
Ihslmshr ting tan part turn S120
nvmthutilities.leposit (rtm) Any
orallot suintner 4openinns-nonsmok-
ers cillll-l)4lXI(m.uhine-anytime)
ROOMMAH Ml PI P- lenule non-
smoker to sh.ue 2bdrm, 1 l2bath
townhouse at Oakmont Suare Apart-
ments A great environment to reside
in' Tool and tennis vourt (all Karen
TJvTOh I ease message
F1MAII ROOMMAH- needed tor
summet Move m May TMli.don't pay
until lune Own room and bath 12
utilitiesandrent Non smoker Call355-
2831
VVN II O- two male roommates, fur
niahad bedroom with bathroom E 1
bus .mess available August tor Fall
S'lnestrr 5175 moil, liu Is utilities C all
121 I MM
glas�. kitchen table with 4 chairs, 6
drawerdresser.Allnegotiable Call757-
3710.
NEED TO SELL- 1983 Midnight Blue
Honda Nighthawk 65D. Good condi-
tion. $1700 or best offer. Price includes
FSG helmet Call Bill at 757-1367.
FOR S ALE! One way airline ticket from
Greenville to San Francisco Available
5292. Leaves51192 SI75 Call758-
8904
FURNITURE- Chest, dresser with mir-
ror, Double bed frame and headboard
$175 Call 321 -1334
ECU GRAD STUDENT FINISHING
SCHOOL- selling vacuum sweeping
business (truck and equipment) Work
nights, weekends Income will cover
payments, PLUS, Cash investment
$10,(XX) (owner financing of balance).
Excellent opportunity to pay your way
thru school Serious inquiries only Bob
H3IM882
FOR SALE: Microwave, clean, ginxl
condition $70 or best offer Tirm size
carpet, cream, covers whole nxm, great
condition, $50 or best offer Call 931-
8785
HEAPING FOREUROPETHISSUM-
MFR? let tfiere anytime for only 8189
with AIRtflTCHI (Reported in Lef sCo
&NYTimesAlso, super low roundtnp
lares to West Coast AIRH1TCH 212-
8M-20M
wanti:p
FOR SALE
A Heiuuful i'livc to ljr
�MINrv
�And Kra.tv ToRanf
IMVKRSriV APARTMENTS
-I l, St.rrl
� oeatod Nmi i CU
� Not M�i.t StHpmj Cenlctl
� i.tow lTun Highway Pttfe) Station
Limittd Offoi $330 � month
Conttd J l m ToBMny Wiiii�mi
�7815 or 830-1937
OHloi or" M, s. i-s Waat
�AZALEA GARDENS'
��ilifr� mt. tm ��� �nJ ��� ��than. itn
nhi� IV OaHjm � �irl�� jl SMOimonh, 6
nnkw VK'WIH IH'StflU -V: M ,��!�
u�1m Apnm�uolmXHl�b�TiMiiAulaUrn
�� ftm-k V�lky C'�n�r CT�b
Conua J.T. or Tommv Wtflumt
v, 815
SfTFDCARS: trucks,noaN.4-wheel-
ers. motor homes by IHI. IKS, OF.A
� itlabla s our area noM Call B01V338-
3388 i xt i s�w
FOR SAl F! IBM 5 Menviry Writer
hpewnter t. lists2lH10new Excellent
condition-1800 call 78-m
BIKE FOR SALE- Mnvtnn Sprint llV
spvd unisex, blue rareK usef and b
tantastu shafv Must aaalll � 12 Call
Danaat931-841S Graatbikatl
FOR SALE: Queetvsie Iwf DR table
s 2 i hairs, cottee table. COUCh and
maM hitig chair- all in great shape Call
C'olWn72-170fl
BUY 1HIS: Round table with leaf and
sixihairs Good condition ITS Call758-
0315, leave messa !t no answer
FOR SALE: Red. Cyclepro bicycle In
good condition Great for summer
school Must Sell" Asking $80, make an
otter Call 931-9516 Asxforjim
BIKE FOR SALE: Trek 820 ATB. blue,
21 speed excellent condition, new
smoke tires, rack it bag Call 355-1N15
$3(X)
FOR SALE: Desk, nightstnnd. 3 drawer
dresser with l shelves, nvin frame, rix
spring and nuttress, brown couch and
easy chair,Toshiba stereospeakers,
beat h i ruis�'r bike and Knptonite Uxk,
OIII DCARE NEEDED now and
through summer for two children,
ages 2 1 2 and 7, two or thn-
weekdays mornings and afternoons
l v asional Saturday evenings and
weekend overnights Must have
experience and own transportation
all tor interview with kids 72-
6372
CRITSF SHIPS NOW HIRING: Eam
SjOOOt r'mORth and world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, iheCaribbean,etc) Holi-
il.n summer a:xi career employment
available Noexpatiencaneceeiary. For
employment program call l-2lv545-
41ext CS86
FREETRAVEL Aircounersand cruise
ships Students also needed Christmas,
spnngand summer foramusertvnt park
employment Call 800-338-3388 Ext F-
34M
NOW ACCEPTING APPUCATIONS
for night auditorfront desk position
Pleeae appiy in person at The Hampton
Inn, 3439 S Memonal Drive Previous
hotel expenence preferrecf but not nec-
essary
PROFtSSIONAL COUPLE SEEKS
HOUSESITTING anv timedunng mid-
May thru August Will cre forpets.etc
Call 918-6r4-7869 evenings after b p.m.
References available
$10-$36OUP WEEKLY: Mailing bro-
chures' Spare Full time Set own hours!
Free Details! Send self-addressed
stamped envelope Publishers (S) P.O.
Box 51037 Durham, N.C. 27717.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions. Great benefits Call 800-338-
3388 Ext. P-3712
READ BOOKS FOR PAY! $100T ITLE!
Fill out likedislike forms FREE 24hr
recording 505-764-0699
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay1 Assemble
products at home Call toll free, 1-800-
467-5566 ext. 5920.
HELP WANTED- Student needed to
work part-time for a busy law firm in
Greenville If interested, please call 355-
0300.
ECU VOLLEYBALL TEAM: needsstu-
dent helper for Fall season - paid posi-
tion Contact Coach McCaskill at 757-
4612.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-
Fisheries. Earn $5,000month Free
transportation' Room k Board' Over
8,(XX) openings No expenence neces-
sary Male or fgrjlflk For employment
program call Student Employment Ser-
vices at 1-206- 545-4155 ext 1644
HELP WANTED: Carpet Bargain Cen-
ter Morning hours Apply in person at
shire on 1009 Dickinson Ave from 8 am
hi h pm
STOP We need your help mailing our
circulars Work full part-time trom
S500wk. Guaranty Work at home'
For free info send long selt-addressed
stamped envelope. Family
Homemailers, Box 351, Damascus, MD
20872
When you're ready to move ahead call
Mark at 830-0772 anytime.
EZ BICYCLE REPAIRS- Any Brand-
Any Problem. Expert workmanship at
affordable rates. Call Steve 355-0420.
Leave message
PERSONALS
SERVICES OFEERED
LOOKING FOR A GREATSUMMER
JOB? FLORIDA JOB OPPORTUNITY
REPORT A Directory of Hospitality
Industry employers, job descriptions,
wages, and housing Lists Attractions,
Resort Hotels, Cruise Ship, Summer
Camps, and more! For vour copy send
$8 95toCAREERRESEARCHCROUP.
7226W CobnialDr Suite249,Orlando,
Fl 32818
WHY PAY AND STARVE TO LOSE
WEIGHT? Save and eat to satisfy hun-
ger (even for sweets) and get rast, per-
manent weight loss to the sie thaf s
right for you and feel better than ever
while you drop 1 3-1 pound daily (dia-
betics and hvpoglycemic s. uh) Maybe
even make a little money without over-
ruling your lifestyle to lose weight or
keep it off Free information by mail
355-3789
WORDPROCESSING: Resumes term
papers, letters, psychological assess-
ments Reasonable rates, fast service
Call 321-2522
TYPING- Error-free.quickand depend-
able-at reasonable cost. Excellent typ-
ing and proofreading skills (grammar,
punctuation, sentence struchire, etc )
Call Pauline at 757-3693 1
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE?
SFAMS locates private sector financial
aid for college students Call Marshall
Yount 1-800-238-8771
BETTER RESUMES GETJOBS. Don't
take chances when first impressions
count A better resume will open ihe
nght doors 1 can help you apply for
work with a personalized job applica-
tion letter and resume designed to show-
case your talents If you're senousabout
the future call me I'm a professional
writer with over fifteen years' expen-
ence in marketing and resume writing
FORUM COMMITTEE- Nicole, Katy,
John, Stuart, and J. Thanks for making
this year's experience a learning one
Hope it was "good for you" too. I'm
going to miss chairing the "Laidback
Bunch" Have a fun summer and good
luck next year Love, Tracy. PS Katy
make sure to send Nicole pictures of all
the "potential" speakers
GAMMA SIGS: We had a fun time
with the service project Hope to do
something again sewn Love Alpha
Sigma llu
Nut: I've fallen and I can't get up' Please
break your promise soon Confusion is
great Your mess, Squirt.
DELTA CHI- thanks for all of the fun
during Creek Week' CongTats to Lisa
Bertmg our new SCA Secretary' You're
1 Bettv' Beta Pi's Not much longer
now! How about that AOPi softball
team Could it be another champion-
ship' Love Sisters and Pledges of AOPi.
CONGRATS to all AOPi seniors and
alum! Go�xi luck after graduahon'
CONGRATS to the newley elected of-
ficers of AOPi: Chnshne "Roll Pi" John-
son Kate "Clueless" Bott, Stacey "the
brain" Carroll, and Li "Bob's queen"
MuBkanl All other officers keep up the
great work' You guys are the shit'
SEBERT- Are your pantson tight7 They
better be' See vou at Bahama Mama'
TO MARGE, JODI, CRUISER, FOX,
LISA,AND SHFRRI- You are the best'
Mo one at ECU compares to you' "tours
Forever. DOO-DAD
SIGMAS want to wish everyone gtxxi
luck on finals' Have a great summer'
SIGMA SENIORS: Get ready to be
burned" Senior send-on Friday night"
PUD- Cruiser, Shern, Jodi, Fox, Lisa
and Liod It's almost over' You guys
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS ADPi SOFT-
BALL SOCCER: You did a great ,ob
in the playoffs! .
ALPHA SIGMA PHI-Congratulations
on most improved Fraternity and high-
est G PA. Also to the new Creek Hall of
Fame inductees John Can trell.JohnCist
andChuck Heard
DONT MISS The Sigma topless car
wash, Fnday from 12-4
ANDY STEPHENSON! Thank you n
much for coaching our softball team'
Love the Alpha Phi's
GOODLUCKtoallgraduatingser, �
Love, the Alpha Phi's
Pi KAPPS: We can't wait til the Shag
social tonight (Get out those dancing
shoes') Love the Alpha i'lu's
DZ PLEDGES: Thanks so much for the
great Big Sis party' You guys are A�
SOME Lve the Sisters
DELTA ZETA wishes e pod
luck on exams and A FABL Ll �
MER"
DELTA SIG'S: We hid a gn
with vou guys on Wednesd.n Hope to
"toga' with you aajainaoon '� nks
Delts
Pi DELTA: Congrats to all - .
officers' Pm-Cathy Maas Pres-Su-
sanFalk,Sec-Jen Putnam . .
Tavlor. Hedge Ed -Christ �
Meredith Hewitt, Soria
Member-at-Large-Mis-v Wade S?r-
geant-at-ArmvLisa Fox, r .
JenCrawford,Gloria Ling,
Cynthia Stancil, Aitr
Handlev, Sch. M 5S)
Oaistenbury, Pubfacity-Frances weD
Histonan-Lyn Lincoln, Kit
Howard, Sister Act Dire I
Rives, AlumniCorTe-porv � ����
Earp
Are you interested in working for Expressions
magazine? There will be stipended positions to be
filled Fall '92. Only those willing to make a
committment should inquire. Stop by the
Expressions office in the Student Publications
1-3. See Kathy Horns, Expressions General
Manager.
EAST CAROLINA'S MINORITY PUBLICATION:
Minority being any group of students that feel
outside the "mainstream For example: ethnic
groups, international students, non-traditional
students, differently-abled students, veterans or
women.
ATTENTION-TIB 11TH NMM.
BAHAMA MAM
Kappa Mgma house I �
12 30 Featuring the Ar . -�
Police and Hawaii.)! ' - .
tt�st First Place is e�;v - - : �
Daytona tor Bikini Final - Kt
is$100,Thirdta$50 I. �� reS
mfo call 752-5543 757- xpi
Sigma
ODDS and ENDS
HELP WANTED
Experienced cook
specializing in Mexican
food. Apply in person at
Alfredo's
i s now B UYING
8 n d SELLING all
h o m e t in nishing
8 n �J appliances a 1
very reasonable
prices. For m ore
i n t" 0 r ni a t i o n , call
RANDY at
3 55-22 14 (leave
message if no
answer).
SUMMER WORK
SI0.95 guaranteed starting rate -
full or part-lime openings.
Call: Charlotte. NC - 704-55&-6565
Raleigh. NC - 91�-851-7422
Greensboro. NC - �19-335-1519
Hickory. NC - 704O2.V4665
$$$
Sell your textbooks back
at ECU Student Stores.
Selling used books here
means Recycling Them!
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
Alfredo's N.Y. Pizza
718 E. 5th St. � Downtown � 752-0022
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 topping
$7.99
carry out only
not good after
9pm
I Lgnch $peci9l �
� Personal Size �
� 1 topping pizza
� with large soda �
I $3.99 j
good 10pm
JL J.
Every Sun. Mon. Tues
ALL PITCHER
$1.50
(with this coupon)
Announcements
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
PEMT ItNTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Catholic Center invites you to wor-
ship with them. Sunday Masses
11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. At the
Newman Center, s53 E. 10th St
Two houses trom the Fletcher Mu-
sic Building. For more information
contact Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
Alpha Phi Sigma will hold its next
meeting on April 27th at 5pm in
room 218 Ragsdale. At this time
officers will be elected for next year,
so please plan to attend. For more
information, please contact Melissa
Smith at 931-7569.
THE BISEXUAL-GAY -LESBIAN
nJililAlivA
Social support, advocacy, activi-
ties. Everyone welcome - gays,
lesbians, bisexuals, concerned
family and friends. CaII757-6766
?or information regarding meeting
time and place.
AUDITIONS FOR
IQLQRGUARD
If you have ever wanted to become
a member of the Marching Pirates
Colorguard, then here's your
chance! We are looking for indi-
viduals who love to perform in
front of large, enthusiastic crowds
and work hard for excellence. We
will join the Marching Pitates at
home football games, selcted away
games, exhibitions, pep rallies and
BOWL games. No experience
necessary. Come out and join the
fun and excitement

FAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Volunteers of East CarolinaFriends
should plan to attend the annual
closing banquet, held this year on
Sunday, April 26th, 2-5pm, in
Mendenhall Student Center. Lunch
will be provided and elections for
the '9293 year will be held. Persons
interested in running for an office
should call 757-6137 for further in-
formation. Bring $3 by Thursday,
April23rd, to Brewster A-409 to con-
firm your reservation at the ban-
quet. This is a mandatory event and
does not include the little friends.
Contact your Director of Services
for further information.
ENGLAND
It's not too late to plan to study in
England for the 1992-93 academic
year! Experience another culture
while earning college credit! Please
contact the International Studies
office in Brewster A-117orcall 757-
6769 for more information on this
exciting opportunity! For the cost of
attending ECU, you can attend
school in England - call - it can
change your life!
B1IS1NFSS WORKSHOP
"Reducing Conflict in the Work-
place" focuses on managing diver-
sity and handling difficult and
sensetive employee problems.
Workshop skills applicable to all
employees-not just manager. Work-
shop will be held on Saturday, May
2nd, 9am to 4pm at the Meredith
Suites Hotel in Research Triangle
Park. Sponsered by the Center for
Peace Education. $75 registration fee
(S65 if registered by April 20th). For
more information call 919-929-9821
or 919-489-8079.
GAMMA BFTA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi: Our last meeting
this semester is April 22nd at 5pm,
in Mendenhall. See you there!
ECU BIOLOGY dim
We will be having an Advisor Ap-
preciation Dinner at Chico's on
Wednesday, April 22nd at 5pm.
Also, there will be an Adopt- A-Street
on Saturday, April 25th. We will
meet at Hardee's on Cotanche at
10am.
"BREAKING UP IS HARD TO
DO-UMSTEADSLAY1991-92
End of the year Hail Blow-out for
Umstead's and Slay's " Last Genera-
tion Food, folks, and fun tor all on
Saturday April 25. SUPERBLA
(Noon-until).
ECU MODEL U. N.
Congradulations to the ECU MUN
delegates in their win at New York
It was a great end to a great semester
and die beginning of the ECU MUN
dynasty M. DHILSS
PSI CHI
Attention all Psychology depart-
ment staff members and members
of Psi Chi: Psi Chi will be holding a
"Spring Ring" at Elm Street Park on
Friday, April 24th at 4 pm. There
will be a cookout and refreshments
will be served. Directions to Elra
Street Park will be posted in Rawrl
on the Psi Chi Bulletin board. Please
come out and enjoy a pleasant after-
noon with us!
Entertainment
Barefooters t
By Dana Danielson
Assistant EntortairanenI Iditor
Springtime is ii rJ
time to kick off I
litdebitofsteai
today's 14th annual Bai
Mall
A � ide �tn. � f different a
tn itie Barefoot
program
The musical I ituresthe
hand F asl .ir tiinaGi
Cold Sweat at 1 p.m
"GatemoutiV : i � ��
and rhe� ean Blue at 4 ;
Asidefrommusic,several
pusorganizati
open
Camm
a pie throw ain � ublic
Safer)
In addirJ n to t te torn
of reveng reedunl
b.ike sates and homemade candv
sales will be offered
Also a grilled homemade
chicken w ing, hamburger, hot
and onu n ring stand and a try b I
stand, put n by the Native Amen-
cansof ECU, will be included in the
festivities.
Residence Hall Association will
sponsor a twister Tie-Oft, and for
those who bnn their own T-shirts
the Craftsman East will tie ly
them.
rhe Recreational Services � I
host a Mc-1 ug-t f-V ar benniniiat
2 p.m. and continuing through the
afternoon
I �� dollar donations are sug-
ii.Jtliemonevr,i
pport the Ronald
� .� ar was the!
tug and we ra
1 I R Roth.m
Recreational Se
� tweat least rha
rity I
haJtenge I
one. Lt. Keith Km- I
Stuar - tor, marl
of Mendenhall; Carla '
n and p
iach
elebriries bo part
. Trap
: . �� lent Unii i
high



be drawn and
� � i fitting ii

up to providt
� Ichair Parti
I
chair � I exj
tlte course
!n addition I
course, winn rs
shot �
will receive an L
Hie ' -
sponsor a demonstra
Club
� � '
Dance Theatre de
Bv oe Horst
Staff VSriter
fhe beaut) of human motion.
Hie grace of human form
I ast Carolina Playhouse com-
bined grace and beautv Tuesday
night with iteopetung performance
of Dance Theatre.
Starting out cn an upbeat note,
the dance piev'es flowed tigether ti
term an entertaining, and often
breath-taking, look at the human
form. In most pieces, the dancers'
enthusiasm and love were dearly
e ident;theoverall energy was high
and consistent throughout the per-
formance.
rhe nightopened with "Square
Roots (A Non-Mathematical Bal-
let choreographed by loseph
Carow.
Wearing colorful and varied
costumes, the dancers entertained
the crowd accompanied bv music
like "Duelling Banjos" and "Tur-
key in the Straw Heather Lvleand
Jennifer McCord danced wonder-
fulK in their individual sections,
setting the tone of the night with an
upbeat, tun-tilled number.
Following "Square Roots" was
Dawn Clark's piece, "Interface
" Interface" contrasted u ith the first
piecebvdelvtngmore into the theme
and message of a piece rather than
its entertainment value. With songs
bv Aretha FranWin serving as back-
ground, Interface" becamea piece
with a message. It forced the audi-
ence I think about the meaning
instead of looking at the pure
tainment value.
1 lie next piece was The
coiden rubeschoreographed K
PatnuaWeeks Couptedwith
nal music by School of Musk senkw
Michael B. Dixon, this piece beauti-
The dancer's si I
throughout all pertorma
fully exj
and their rea I
ing and the musi I
beauty of this pie I
tent thuit vith or- j
change theaudienct
swing with it. One
focus on the golden
themglovs intens .
Ihe highlight ot the "j
"Steep St � ' -
resident Linda '
Pertalion acting a re
� - was the pi N
mission. An inh
arious
Stud)" amused
left them laugh I
Rebel '92 pro
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
This year's edition of theKr.v.
magazine will be available during
exam week and will include a van-
etv of ECU student's artistic and
literary work.
Much work of the art school
will be showcased in RsM 92. The
gallerv section will feature the
ludges choices for this year's Rebel
art show, held in the fall.
As always, Rebel 92 will feature
the winner's work of the fiction and
poetry contests. The first placestory
was written by Scott Maxwell, and
DougSmithsubmitted the firstplace
p�vm.
This year's feau.
anetv of writer's wt
"500 Winters j
Behrens deals wittj
the return of native
rure in this countr
features a painted
Behrens, who has rtj
interviewed extensl
indigenous to North
QtnsKemple'b
Art of Cartixning
on the pathetic state!
comics and offers
ways in which
cartoonist's work.
Clyde Edgertor





6J
PERSONALS
v PPi SOFT-
v
Entertainment
3Ik iEast (Carolinian
April 23, 1992
7
Barefooters to celebrate spring

l Dana Danielson
mt l ntertatnmenl I ditoi
me is hi the air ,mJ it -
� � �� the shoes .u-ul lot ,i
amsat
il Barefoot on the
� ' � fferentat
� � �
neup features the
trolina Grass at noon
y m i, larence
' w n at 2 0 y m
it 4 p in
" mn eralcam
;mawillha e
� �
'� ; � dunking ho.ths
i I homemade cai
ffered
homemade
' " � .� .yi hot d
' ind and a fr bread
it on bv the Nati e meri-
, will be included in the
I iall ssociahonwill
r a 1 w ister I ie Off and for
� ng their own 1 -shirts
�" " I .1st W ill tit
il Ser
- f-VVarbeg
gestedandthemone raised v ill ey
tii support tlu Ronald McDinakt
louse
l astvear was the first veai w e
had tin' tin; and ' raised about
� I - said ! R Roth marketing di
re� i forRet reationa - � e
e to raise at lea -t thai mu h tl
veai
v elebril
ide .1 . hallenge foi those seeki
iMio I t KeithKnoxol Publii Safeh
rt Secctoi mat kol lirectoi
oJ M hall Carla 'i Resi
lu ation aivl possibh .1 f � ��
tun hesandathlete 1 few l
tlu elebi iti I partit ipate
t'L to Fl 1 rap sponsored
b tin' Student I nion will be a
� � �be missed I hetrap
� itable w .�U ant
pa n I
nt 1 f vekro and
throw - him in hei - I igaii �' I
surf a e An outl f a a ill
bedraw �� I �
clos HV,
i bsta II be set
up to pm ide insight to being in a
wheelchair Participants will be
seated and blindfolded in a wheel
hair and expected to go through
the course
In addition to the wheelchair
(. ur-o w innie 1 orkgun
sho � Ii .� m �

sponsoi � ' 1 tl
M
: Miniri : level iu, David Sche
.� I entertain Barefooters this
� !t tamountoi 1 hangeina tub
It noonecan guess theexa t amount,
tlu' person with the ck�sest guess
will w in a SHU) sa ings bond.
Ihe Student I nion will rattle
�� dozen r-shirts throughout
I IN
I nfortunateh IheRock) I lor-
rorFktun a ill not be shown
this vear due to malfunctioning
iHitside proje tors
We re realh som about the
� shown
1 nn jobes said assistant program
� � it Mend �'� e hope
to hi � � �
� n the Ma � u in
i- the Rose
St ruxil en lura 1 auffer
n with I ntem-
Photo courtesy Reprise Records
Itzel and Bobbv Milton of The Ocean
year on Central Campus Mall
Lauffer s original proposition
was fora relaxedda of festiv itiesto
run from 10 am tolOp.m includ-
ingbands crafts and food. Baref �:
on the Mall runs from noon to 6
p m tod.w
Lauffer was unable to attend
her first festh albecausehercarwas
-tru. k bj a drunk driver shortly
after thopropiw.il lo.n ing her para-
lyzed. She did. however, attend
Barefoot the following year.
In case of rain, mit acth itie
excluding the toxi booths, will he
held inside The Vefcro FI I rap
will be set up in the covered area
outside Mendenhall C afeteria it it
will tit
Ihe rainsites tor the bands are
asfollows K Grass in MSC Multi-
purposeRoom Cold I MS(
Last ear tt isand f students tui
coorc r kt � ire I �- same
Hendrix "heatre Clarence
"Gatemouth i MS Mul-
ti purpose Rtnm �
MSC Hendn �
11 let o .v ill be i

Dance Theatre demonstrates human motion Thunderheart' illustrates
to be
INfce a
N
hn�c
� ,2-0022
Mon, Tues
PITCHERS
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1 MODE! 1
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� will be posted in Raw!
on tin � Please
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l oo Horsl
Staft w


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.
t the I
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rful m .
- the dancers entertained
lied by musk
anvi Tur-
Hi atfierh leand
-rd danced wonder-
their indi ldual sections,
� -noot the night with an
� nlUxl number
Suuare RiHts w as
terface
� contrasted with the first
. � Ivingmore into the theme
� a piece an
it value ithsoi
klinsei � " �ck-
Interf u e bei amea � -
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think ibout th mea
kmgati � � nter-
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B Ike Shibley
M.itt V ri! T
m :(earty evident in the Danci � 1 :� was high and consistant
pieces flowed 1 tfx breathtaking k rt the human form.
. . 1 red tl ims
� u i the mu ed the
il. if tiii- piece to such an ex-
h one light (or musk 1
theaudii net - I ��� uki
� w ith it. Om x.en the ligl '
Iden tubes mak
. . .
� ' I by guest
resklent Lin Kent
Pertalkm actin !
hir, was the 1
;skm An interesl - I '
�� .
imusei.1 tl-
ii laughii �
Folkiw epStud
bits' viewed the mysterKius sym-
:vk �: . f the 1 nets and cell I
bodieshoreographed b
Pertalkm, "Orbits' flowed with a
concentric balance to give
thematic dance piece
v rbitsirnpressi eba kdnip,
�: . ed of c r stals and
�4 � ed to further enha: '
� rder in the uni-
erie also hon � iphed
imw.gaveanin!
ok at the wandenngs t the
1 of a voung 1 nie White
ave an outstanding peri
exemplifving the beaut) and .��
of ballot wonderfully. L sing ultra-
violet light to create a dazzling ef-
fect on White- dress and the male
partner- gloves, Reverie de-
lighted the senses to see
After a second intermission,
Alan Arnett- Mood Sw ings" con-
cluded the night on the same up-
beat, entertaining note thatitstarted
on.
L singsongs trom NatalieCole
and 1 larr C onnk k. Ir tci name a
tow Mood Swings" hearkened
back to the '40s .n-A the "50s with a
rousing number Combining tap
and jazz dance, Mtxxl Swings" left
the audierK e w ith a spring in their
step and .1 -mile on their face
1 new turn
� . � . � resei

. � es � imp rtant fH'int-
1 he yi. ture ertitie- . �
kilmor asai � I 1 I preat stat-
ure Hiscleancut -quare iawel
face thmK veils a raging sea of
emotion- In 1 hecooB)
plaved Ice Mar andseemeddes-
tinedforprett) bo n4es How-
oxer C 'Ii or tone changed that
desrim b casbng Kilmer as Jim
Morrison in � - KUmer
bnught believability and even
ompatlv. to the role.
In rheart kilmor
pla - a clean-sha en FBI agent
whii finds himself drawn into
the mvsteriou- world oi the na-
tive American Indian His rrui-
dhismo becomes repressed as he
struggles with the seriousness
oi the script He turns in a stellar
performance that anchors the
picture
Ihe other point thi- picture
makes 1- that the mistreatment
oi Indian- did not end when the
West was settled. Even today
the native American- get pushed
around the countn K a greedy
heartless political machine. Ehe
film's director, Michael pted,
poignanth depicts the India
plight of toda
The stor) open- with agent
Rav Lex 011 Kilmer being sent t
The Badlands of South Dakota
to investigate the murderof I eo
Fa-tnk,apolitka activemem-
ber of -UM trie boriginal
substance
.
� � - ; � diansin
a ttghth
the caneasih kei . " � - I �ni
5amShepard
an ag� nt alreadv inplac
re - �: : . ' '
- � � ed wil
days. He avers that rJ -
been identified sothi
I tppi end him.
Whi � estij
der � oi is
Walter Grahai
Green 1 1 -� 1 �' fficer
row es that mon
1- involved in the 1:
than 1 e oi ki ��- - I le helps
Levoi meel other �� 1 j of
ARM �. also befriends him
when the situation on the reser-
vation worsens
�- the 1 ' " iveb doubts
surface in Levoi's mind Heqi�s-
tions the credibilit oi the law
enforcement on the reservation,
especialh lack Milton Trod
Ward 1 who -o I blocks
to snare members I VRN4 he
FBI wants tocapturejami -1 - - -
Iwue the alleged murder hut
does not seem interested in 1
leering evkJence Amysten be-
gins tosurmundFatElk -d-
A tangled wel f d
emerges is I
tion hi- alliances
� Thunder ; 1 :
B) Dana Danielson
it.int 1 nU'rt.nnm.nt I ditor
I his veal �dition of theJ
tine will be available during
. k and w ill include a an
r � 11 L student's artistk oo
literarv work.
!tuh work of the art school
.Mil be Oxwvcased in RrW 92 lh�
Caller section will feature the
pudges hone- tor thi- oar s Rdrl
art-how. held in the fall
A-alwaRrM�: willteature
Ihe w inner - work of tlie fiction anil
poetry contests. Thefirstplacestorv
was w ntten h Scot! Maxwell, arul
Unigsmvsubmittevlthefirstplaoe
�11
his yeai - features m lude a
varieh oi writer
A inters b I a id
Behrens deals with the hope for
the return of natJN e AmeiK.in cul-
ture in tin- country 1 he story al-o
features a painted illustration h
Behrens, who has researched and
interviewed extensively Indians
indigenous to North C arolirw
C hn-Kemplepievo ihol o-t
Art of Cartooning is a comment
im the pathetic State of new-paper
OOfltics od offer- suggestions of
wavs in whn.h to improve
cartoonist's work
C Ivde tdgerton, the author of
Rane 1- featured in m inter-
iew w nten hv Mary ngel Bkwint
that otter- insight to the creative
mini and advice to pmspectjve
writers.
Hemingway House in Key
West, R. is the focus oi a pieve h
1 im I lampton, w horov oal- the pa-t
i t the writer in the residence w here
sin h n( n els ,is The Sun Also Rises
and For Whom Ihe hell rolls were
penned
Rebel 2 also features two fac-
tual narratives; lane Ashfotd's Te-
ruu itv" deals w ith the unusual do-
mestic problem of hats in the home,
and Denise Machala's "Whit's in a
beach" takes a detailed look at a
childhood tnernorj
A final editorial written bv
Christine Russell, talk- about free
speec h and how Americans are let-
ting basic rights slip aw.u
The Rebel's fnanaging editor,
left Paricer, writes the prologueedi-
ti'nal
What I talk about in the edito-
rial goes along our reasoning of
bnnging in more illustrators and
creating greater opportunity for
writing and art to be connected
Parker said.
"Illustrationasweonceknewit
has waned. 1 believe if books and
magazines make a greater effort to
gv-e readership something they
can't get from 1 then they can
start drawing people back to read-
ing '
The brunt of the production
work was handled K art director
Steve Reid Reid created la out de-
signs and graphic- for the maga-
zine
The cover was designed b
Michael Dabbsand features the first
place sculp ture from the RfW92 art
show
Anyone interested in contrib-
uting to the 1993 Rebel should in-
quire at publications office or watch
for a table by the Student Stores
where applications for editorial
positions can be obtained
REBEL






PERSONALS
Entertainment
el lie taiU Carolinian
April 23, 1992
7
Barefooters to celebrate spring
v I ana Danielson
i nterUitvmenl 1 ditor
ne i.ii.(
t Mi I
ind u

an ; i '
ll
.
.



v , i �

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-
'



IScheltzi ind Bobby Miltoi fTh eai
lers this year oi entra impus Ma
itub Lauffei � � il
��'��� � � i itiesto
ingbai ������� �
: in on the Mall runs fron
I .uittcr was unable '
her first festh al because her car was
struck b i drunk driver shortly
tioning after the proposal, leaving her p
K zed She did howe er, atti
� the Barefoot the tollowing year.
In v.i-11 tain most ,u ti ittes,
im excluding the fcxxl btxths will be
� eld inside Tlu-
be set up in the .en I an i
� I. Mendenh.1
.m!1 tit
��.� � ���� band ii
� �
��� �
tip
V � Mei li
P is HAKI) H)
�0022
I UCS
3S
50
-
t J
I

� i si
, rs
ting a
rkon
ere
merits
s to Elm
n Rawl
: Please
.ant after-
Dance Theatre demonstrates human motion
l lot' Horst
st.i I! VN
Thunderheart7 illustrates
Native American struggle
.ii -ecti
I �
� '
�.� It
raphed I
.


i �
I r '
� irther enhai I " �

� � also h�:� r.
�' . '
� � � �
Photo courtesy Doug Ray
� ri -�-� ��� is I )l an I : nsistant
reathl ok at the human form.
of ballet wonderfully. I sing ultra-
violet light to create a dazzling ef-
� � n White's dress and the male
� er's gloves, Reverie de-
igl ted the senses to see
Alter � second intermission,
�Man Amett's Mood Swings" con-
cluded the night on the same up-
beat, entertainingnote that it started
on
I sing songs from atalie( ole
and 1 larr C onniv k, It to name a
few Mood Swings" hearkened
back I the'40s and the l with a
rousing number Combining tap
and jazz dance Moixi Swings" left
the audienv e w ith a spring in their
step and a smile on their face.

l Ike Shible
Si iti v nt.T

M
���� ,
ictorol � :�� �� ��
'� � l i. � ��
think eils a I iging �� � '
tions. Ii he coolh
� . �� : eemed

� � i that
am
� � Kill
� . .
:� �
rsthal
been 1 � � � �
. . .

In
- a
who finds hit
the m �� rid oi thi
rive American Indian t lis n
chismobe 01 ' � ��:�:�
struggles with the seriousn
of the script 1 le turn- in a stellar
performance that anchors the
pk ture
rheother point this picture
makes is that the mistreatment
of Indians did not end v hen the
West was settled Even toda
the native Amerii ans get pushed
around thecountn b a greedy
hearties- political machine, rhe
film's director, Mu hael �Xpted,
poignanth depicts the Indian's
plight of too i
rhe ' i � ipens wit!
Ra i e ii I Kilmer) beingsent to
rhe Badlands ol South Dakota
to in estigate the murder ol I
Fasti lk,apoliticalI ahvemem-
her of RM " � M riginal
I
ti � '
� �
.
Ward
membi
FBlwantsl
1 w ice, tht �
doesn
A t,


Thunder
Rebel '92 promises quality; substance
I- te.ltut.
I ana Danielson
i int 1 ntertainmenl 1 a1 itor
litii m of thei
� . will be available during
- md v. il! in ludea
i ,tuden! - arti .tie and
� II
� � work of the art - hool
ised in '� � I b�
. � � ill feature the
es tor this war's Rebel
� �� hiv held in the fall.
A- ilv lys Ribd92 will feature
inner's work of the fiction and
etryci mtests. fhefirstplai eslor)
rten b ott Maxwell, and
bueSmith submitted thefirstplace
:
A'intei
� . �� leal
the retui f nal rican i ul
ture in this (ounti I i � �
featui i painted illustrati i b
Behrens, who ha n � 11 hi I and
inti i iewed extensh el) Indians
ii lieei � ' " � rtl u ana
n in inter- diihlho.Kl memory
' . . n : Lint A final editorial, written by
t to the creative Christine Russell, talk- about tree
to pi pective speech and how Americans are let-
ting basic rights slip away.
' � t
,
Art of C artooning is ,i comment
on the patheti( -tat of ne -paper
comics and otter- suggestions of
v, a) in u hu h to impro e
cartocnisl s work.
C kde I dgerton the author oi
can't get from 1 then the can
start drawing people bat k to read-
ing
fhe brunt of the production
work was handled b art director
Hemingvva House in Ke fhe Rebel's managing editor, SieveReid.Reidcreated layoutde-
ii bthefixus l left Parker, writes the prologueedi- sigrts and graphics for the maga-
flm Hampton, wrx reveals the past tonal zine
of the writer in the residence where "Whatl talk about in the edito- rhe cover was designed b
suchnovelsas rheSun lsoRises rial goes akmg our reasoning oi Michael Dabbsand features the first
and For Whom I ho i � I I illswere bringing in more illustrators and placesculpture from the Rebel 92 art
penned creating greatei opportunity for show.
Rebel 92 also features two t.u writing .od art to he connected Anyone interested in contrib-
tualnarratives;JaneAshford's le Parker -aid utmg to the 1993 Rebel should in-
nacity" deals with the unusual do- ustrationasweoncelaewil quireatpublkationsoffkeorwatch
mestic problem of bats in the home, has uan.nl 1 believe it books and tor a table by the Student Stores
andDeniseMachala's"What'stna magazines make a greater effort to where applications for editorial
Beach" takes a detailed took at a gtye readership something thev positions can be obtained.





PERSONALS
Entertainment
�lje iEast CEarulixiiau
April 23, 1992

arefooters to celebrate spring
' m.i i i
II' I )I1U'Kdu
ink di

� v-
. . .
Dance Theatre demonstrates human motion Thunderheart' illustrates
j
Native American struggle
I ' . ! k I S I
'

11
hearth

: ' -
. rs
, a

Rebel '92 promises quality; substance
ana I .
m
' �
inlit
hel
. ������ .��II. and
rtedthefii tpla e
� UlthOI oi
child I � ' �
. . � � � tten b -t.nt dra . back to read
� � - it tree
I . . in-are let ' � �� �
I . rk wa- hand
edit : Steve Retd Reid i reared la
lett Parker, writes the pi ueedi sign- and i I " ��' �
in
,1 � ill ib lit ii theedito- rhe co ei was '� �� � I b
rial .� , i � ui reasoning ot MichaelDabb � ll thefirst
tnnj re illustrators and placesculpture from the
:� atmg greater opportunity tor show
writing ind art to be cinn�cted nyone interested in contrib
t(1l, rr1 � hi ii ! � re rarker said uting to the 1993 Rebel should in
� �. th the unusual do lllustrationasweonceknewit quire at publications office or watch
f bats in the home, has waned. I believe if books and for a table by the Student Stores
and I ��' it'sina magazines make a greater effort to uhfreapplkation-torediton.il
Beach" takes a detailed kxk at .1 gi e readership something the) positions can be obtained
� 1 ,
he Sun lso Ri-
!� 11 � � features two fa





8
(SH)C East (flarolmian April 23,�992
Thunder
Continued from page 7
Tension fills the theater from
the opening shots of South Dakota
Indians chanting. Much of this ten-
sion arises heca use the story is based
on actual events.
Although Thunderheart creates
a serious mood, the tension could
have been more emphasized; the
rope encircling the viewer's heart
could have been more taut. Apted
defuses some of the power inherent
in the film.
Apted and his editor cut too
quickly from drums banging out a
solemn rhvthm. The shots of sun-
shine over the Badlands are like-
wise hx� short.
Apted spends loo much time
on other shots that need only a pass-
ing look. A sequence in which Levoi
stakes out an elder of the tribe,
played masterfully by Chief Ted
Ihin Elk, drags on for too many
minutes.
The story could havebeen more
nhtlv written. The plot wanders
too much with excessive dead space
where no information reaches the
viewer and the urgency of the situ-
ation lessens. This should not have
happened because Levoi remains
on edge during the entire experi-
ence in South Dakota. The viewer
needs to vicariously feel mis un-
easiness.
Many shots, though, do reach
cinematic perfection. They
seamlessly mesh with the mood.
Extended shots of Levoi's sweat
rl I led face ha unt the screen. An over-
head shot near the end is equally
haunting.
The truth of the picture is dis-
tressing. Many films, from Arthur
Perm's Little Big Man to Kevin
Gainer's Dances with Wolves, have
made people aware of just how
badly the Native Americans have
been treated in the past. As Ameri-
cans, w e collectively wince to know
that our ancestors could hold such
little regard for human life.
Thunderhearl shocks the senses
bv boldly showing tfwtnothmghas
changed m 200 wars.
with detached distress. missed opportunities to create a re-
Thimderhetut beats with so- markablecinemaucexperience,this
ciallv-conscious blood. Despite the picture still needs to be seen.
EasLTatplma 19914992
Playhouseoeason
EAST
CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
APRIL 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 at 8:15 p.m.
APRIL 26 at 2:15 p.m.
Live Theatre For Less Than A Movie So Bring A Date
ECU STUDENTS: $4.50
Call: 757-6829
CALIFORNIA
STRAWBERRIES
IBUU-EV
. "Greenville's Qnly Exotic
VALUABLE COUPOT
-d PINT OF
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� When You Purchase One Pack Of
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FLAT (12 PINTS)$8.99
Earl's Store
tzn
Straight out of Greenville 10 miles to Earl s Store
TUESDAYS
cm
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers)
Cash Prize
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female 'Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night.
HELP WANTED: Female Exotic Dancers Needed. Call 756-6278
Open Tues.Sat. Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 3:30pm
PET-RITZ
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m PrkesinJhisEjfcctive Through Tu, Ail 1992. Ir. � . . p SlorwC
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Bf-ea nt urn �� th�
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SQOKBU
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Wl
�.





8
vUhe taut (Earulinian
April 23, 1992
Thunder
Continued from page 7
Femion tills the theater from
the opening shots o( South I takota
Indians chanting Much of this ten
stonarisesbecausetheston abased
n a tual events
Uthough ntnmfetfittirt creates
i serious mood Ihe tension could
have been more emphasized the
rone enc ik ling the viewer s heart
could have been more taut pted
fu sstmeofthepowei inherent
in the 'ilm
pted and his editor i ui too
nuickh from drums banging out a
�lemn rhythm rhe shots ol sun
. ,n er the Badlands are like-
too �hort
tared spends too much time
nthet shots that need onl a pass
� look sequence in which Levoi
ikes oul an elder oi th'1 tribe
ived masterfully b) Chiel red
(Tun Elk drags on for too mam
minutes
Phestors couldhavebeenmore
� htl) written rhe plot wanders
� , i mu ln ithex essivedead spa e
where no information reaches the
v iewei and me urgency ol the situ
ation lessens fhis should not ha e
happened because 1 evoi remains
on edge during the entire experi-
ence in South Dakota rhe viewer
eds to vicariously fed this un-
easiness
Main shots though, do reach
cinematic perfection. rhe
seamlessly mesh with the mood.
I trended shots ol Levoi's sweat
filledfacehauntthescreen over-
head shot near the end is equally
haunting
rhe truth ol the picture is dis-
tressing Mam films from Arthur
� � Bv; Mrtri to Ke in
��: . ' � �� � vith w livs.have
.�� .van i l iu-t how
the atn e meri� ans have
�� it � in thepasl V- meri
, ti eh w in etoknou
�. incestors could hold su h
� ii � � human life
ksthesenses
Ainc that nothing has
with detached distress missed opportunities to create a re
Vhunderhearl beats with so markablecinemaHcexpenencethi
ciallx conscious blood Despitethe picture still needs to be seen.
199L1992
EasLCaipuna �. � -
Plavhousc �s �eason
EAST
CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
CALIFORNIA
STRAWBERRIES
APRII 21. 22. 23. 24 and 25 at S:15 p.m.
PKIl 26 at 2:15 p.m.
live Ihtatrt For Less lhan Movie So Bring A Date
1(1 SI I DIMS: 14.50
Call: 757-6829
Jr.
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THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS:
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$2.00 off admission Saturday Niht.
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10
Wie SaHt (Uarolininu
April 23, 1992
Sports
Lady Pirates stump UNC
'Girls of Summer' win doubleheader 3-0,4-3
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
After coming off a dismal weekend
in South Carolina, the Lady Pirates took
aim and fired upon the Lady Tar Heels
who recently finished third in the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference tournament.
North Carolina, who ranks fourth in
the Southeast Region, desperately
needed to win at least one of the two
games to maintain their two spot lead
over ECU in the south rankings. How-
ever, the "Girls of Summer" had other
plans as they soundly defeated UNC in
their scheduled double header.
Jenny Parsons pitched a three-hit
shutout as the Lady Pirates won the first
of a twin bill 3-0.
"Aside from the moist field condi-
tions, the ladies played exceptionally
well an assistant coach said. Laura
Crowder lead the aggressive Pirate "D"
who eliminated all possible threats from
Carolina.
Crowder started the first inning off
with a baseon balls and eventually made
it to third courtesy of a passed ball and a
wild pitch. Mechelle Jones then drove a
deep sacrifice fly to center field to score
Crowder from third.
Cheryl Hobson continued the inning
with a hot smash off the glove of a Caro-
lina infielder to reach first. With one out
and a two-two count, Lisa Coreprew
capped an explosive first inning with
her two run blast (her fourth homerun of
the year).
After a brief 10-minute break the
second scheduled game was underway.
With the assistance of the ever present
Pirate defense, Parsons pitched yet an-
other complete game and recorded the
second win of the evening 4-3.
ECU got on the board first when C.
Hobson reached first on a error aided
single and later scored on a Georgeann
Wilke triple. The Heels, determined to
take at least one game, scored three runs
in the second inning to put the heat back
on the Pirates bat.
The Lady Bucs answered that chal-
lenge with three runs of their own in
their half of the third. Crowder stroked a
single down the third base line and later
stole second. With one out, C. Hobson
received a base on balls to reach first
base to put runners on the corners for
Wilke.
On a 1-2 count, Wilke drove a shot to
second for the fielders choice RBI that
scored Crowder from third. With C.
Hobson on third and Wilke on second,
senior first baseman Christy Kee blasted
a seeing eye single to left field to account
for her two runs batted in and end the
scoring for the Pirates.
With the score now 4-3, the Pirate
"D" turned up their game a notch and
literally shutout the regions number four
team. Parsons went on to record three
strikeout and her 36th win of the season.
The40-16 Lady Pirates will play their
final regular season home game today
against UNC-Wilmington at the Lady
Pirate field (across from Allied Heath).
The scheduled start time is 3 p.m. for the
doubleheader.
ECU flounders f our games at USC
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
Photo by Dall Reed � ECU Photo Lab
Exceptional defense, pitching and base running are pnmary reasons tor the ECU Lady Pirate
softbaH team' s success this season The team took a pair of wins from UNrC-ChapelHil Tuesday.
The Lady Pirates played six games
this r. ast Easter weekend at the Annual
Lady Gamecocks Easter Tournament
and managed to salvage two victories.
In game one, ECU lost 4-3 to Geor-
gia Southern in seven innings.
Jenny Parsons pitched the 10-hit
contest and recorded two strikeouts for
the Lady Pirates. Lisa Coreprew led ECU
offensively with her 2-for-3 and one RBI
outing.
Parsons pitched a four-hitter as the
Lady Gamecocks of South Carolina
scored three unearned runs with the
assistance of three Pirate errors. Laura
Crowder stroked out two hits in her
four at bats and added two stolen bases
to her credit.
Georgeann Wilke pitched a four hit-
ter as the Lady Pirates won for the first
time this weekend.
Even though the defense commit-
ted three errors, the hot bat of Chanel
Hooker who went 2-for-3 kept ECU in
the contest.
Three errors proved costly as USC
cashed in to win yet another one against
ECU by the score of 3-1. Wilke took the
loss while giving up just six hits and
striking out two. The lone Pirate run
came in the form of a Cheryl Hobson
out-of-the park homerun. Hooker again
had the hot bat with her 2-for-2 after-
noon.
In their third meeting of the tourna-
ment, ECU whitewashed Georgia South-
ern 11-1. Parsons recorded the win in
pitching a two hitter as the Pirate "D"
committed no errors. Laura Crowder,
Stephanie Hobson and Cheryl Hobson
lead the Pirate hitters in the 15 hit game.
Crowder went 3-for-3 with two stolen
bases. Stephanie Hobson also went 3-
for-3 while sister Cheryl batted 3-for-4
during the contest. Sherri Allen got into
the action with her three RBI triple to
light things up.
In the Pirates' final game of the tour-
nament, Parsons pitched ECU to extra
innings before succumbing to her 10th
lost of the season. The Lady Pirates
took the No. 13 nationally ranked Game-
cocks 11 innings before losing the con-
test 1-0. Crowder went 3-for-5 and Lisa
Coreprew went 2-for 5 in a losing ef-
fort.
The 38-16 Lady Pirates play today
at 3 p.m. against North Carolina at the
Ladv Pirate field (across from Allied
Health.)
N.C State, Ga. Tech win in ACC action
N.C. State 2, Virginia 1
RALEIGH (AP) - Vinny
Hughes hit a one-out triple in
the bottom of the ninth inning
to drive in the tying run and set
up Kevin Ross' game-winning
hit as North Carolina State de-
feated Virginia 2-1 Sunday.
N.C. State improved to 36-
12 overall and 12-9 in the ACC.
Virginia fell to 19-25,3-17.
Virginia took the early lead
in the second inning when Han
Martinsen singled and later
scored on a two-out single by
Casey Shore.
It stayed that way until the
bottom of the ninth as Virginia's
Kent Kruse (0-4) and N.C.
State's Terry Harvey locked up
in a pitcher's duel. Harvey did
;not allow another run nd
yielded just six hits before be-
ing relieved by Stacy Betts in
the eighth inning. Reliever
Jamie Wolkosky (3-1) came on
to pitch a perfect ninth inning
and notch the win.
Meanwhile, Kruse carried
a no hitter through 6 2-3 in-
nings before yielding back-to-
back singles to Paul Borawski
and Rob Bark. He maintained
his shutout until the ninth when
he walked Sean Drinkwater
with one out and then gave up
a triple to Hughes. Kevin Stock
came on in relief and intention-
ally walked the next two bat-
ters to load the bases. Kevin
Ross then singled to bring home
Kip Bryan.
Ga. Tech 6, UNC 3
ATLANTA (AP) � Michael
Smith homered and drove in
three runs to lead 14th-ranked
Georgia Tech past North Caro-
lina 6-3 Sunday and complete a
sweep of a three-game Atlantic
Coast Conference series.
Tech (33-9,10-7 ACC) built
a 6-0 lead for Brent Colson (8-
2), before the Tar Heels got
three runs in the eighth.
Smith got his two-run
homer in the second, following
Brian Alyea's RBI single.
North Carolina starter
Brian Willman (3-2) lasted into
the sixth. He gave up nine hits
and all six runs.
Chris Cox and Manny
DaSilva doubled in the Tar
Heels' three-run eighth.
FSU 11, Wake Forest 1
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
(AP) � Florida State scored five
runs in the first innings and
cruised to an 11-1 victory over
Wake Forest Sunday, sweeping
a three-game series.
Chris Roberts went 3-for-4,
with two RBI, while Tony
Leibsack went 2-for-3, with an
RBI and a solo home run for
Florida State (33-14, 13-7 ACC)
in the second inning.
Seminole starter Roger Bai-
ley (10-3) pitched 6 1-3 innings,
allowing only a solo home run
to Brad Pryce in the sixth. Bai-
ley allowed only six hits and
three walks while striking out
eight.
Wake Forest (25-16,9-9) had
runners in every inning but the
ninth. The Demon Deacons left
12 men on base, including the
bases loaded in both the first
and seventh innings.
Clemson 5, ASU 3
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Keith Williams hit his eighth
home run of the year in the
eighth inning to clinch
See ACC, page 11
Crowder, Parsons
lead NCAA ranks
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sport Writer
Two ECU Lady Pirates
worked their way to the top of
the NCAA charts for women's
fastpitch softball.
Senior co-captain Laura
"Lou" Crowder has the nation's
record for most stolen bases in a
season with her astounding 51-
of-52 base stealing for a percent-
ageof .993. In addition, Crowder
also holdsthe new NCAA record
for most consecutive stolen bases
without being thrown out.
Crowders' amazing string
of 69 stolen bases (over a three-
season period) tops the old
record of 54 set by Donna Newell
of UCLA With her well blended
mix of speed and talent, Crowder
is also ranked No. 18 in the na-
tion in batting. She sports a .483
batting percentage in, 56 games
played.
Jenny "Scrappy" Parsons is
the nations leader with most vic-
tories in a single season.
Parsons' 36 wins leads all
other pitchers in the nation rank-
ing her 11th with a 79.8 win per-
centage. Parsons throws a vari-
ety of pitches ranging from her
wicked curve ball to her floating
riser to her blistering fastball �
not to exclude her drop, fork and
other pitches, Parsons continues
to mix up her bag of tricks to
keep her opponents guessing.
As a junior, Parsons is ex-
pected to return next year and
lead the Lady Pirates to yet an-
other winning season.
NBA playoffs end topsy-turvey season
(AP) � Going into the last of
1,107 regular-season games, the 16
NBA playoff teams still were not
deterrnined Sunday night after Mi-
ami, Houston and Atlanta lost games
that would have guaranteed a spot
in the postseason party.
Miami could have clinched the
final Eastern Conference spot, but
lost 109-93 to Boston, which sealed
the No. 2 seed in the conference with
a 109-93 victory over the Heat
That left the door open for At-
: lanta, but the Hawks lost 112-108 at
Cleveland, giving the berth back to
�$� Heat Both Miami and Atlanta
�finished with 38-44 records, with
3Hiami getting the first playoff berth
3mong the four most recent expan-
sion teams on the basis of having a
Setter conference record than the
3-iawks.
'Z, Houston could have clinched
3he final Western Conference berth.
but fell at home, 100-97 to Phoenix.
With those outcomes, the first-
round pairings in the Eastern Con-
ference have Miami playing Chi-
cago, Indiana facing Boston, New
Jersey meeting Cleveland and De-
troit meeting New York.
In the West it's Utah and the
Los Angeles Clippers, Seattle and
Golden State, San Antonio and Phoe-
nix, and Portland against either
Houston or the Los Angeles Lakers.
The Rockets'loss gave the lak-
ers, in the last game of the regular
season, a chance to make the play-
offs for the 16th consecutive year
with a victory over the Los Angeles
Clippers. The Clippers on Thursday
night clinched their firs tplayoff berth
since 1976.
The Lakers stayed alive with an
upset victory on Saturday at Port-
land.
Jeff Hornacek scored 18 points
for the Suns, already assured of the
No. 4 playoff spot in the Western
Conference.
"Nobody can say we didn't try
to win this game Phoenix coach
Cotton Fitzsimmons said. "I told the
team that if Houston gets in, they'll
have to earn it by beating us
"It was a day when the lid was
on the casket" Rockets coach Rudy
Tomjanovich said. "Balls would be
on the rim and come out We missed
little things and had lapses. It wasn't
a day to have a game like that"
The Celtics capped a late sea
son surge to their 14th Atlantic Drvi-
sion title in 20 years with their eighth
consecutive victory without sitting
Larry Bird.
"AllIcansayis,XoaevelancL
Miami coach Kevin Loughery said
before the Cavaliers won. "We got
11
y
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ACC
Clemson's 5-3 victory Sunday
over Appalachian State.
Williams' hit came after the
game had been delayed twice
by rain, the first time briefly
but for nearly an hour the sec-
ond time.
Clemson (38-7) scored in
the first inning
Northrop led withi
made it home on
single.
The Tigers sec
the third with a sir;
len base by Ted
single by North
Love wins
Heritage
Classic for
second time
HILTON HEAD 1SLAND,S.C.
(AP) � Davis Love III, who won
his third Heritage Classic over the
weekend, says it was a different
player who won in 1987.
"There's so much room be-
tween my win in '87 and my win
last year Love said.
Or this year.
"1 feel like a completely differ-
ent plaver he said. "I've ma-
tured
Love no longer just tries to blast
for cash. He's improved all of his
game, including putting, which
may have been his weakest area
when he hit the PGA Tour in 1985.
"I lot of people consider him a
long hitter fellow golfer Russ
Cochran said. "1 think that's just
oneof his weapons now. He'ssolid
from the word go.
"Davis is a good combination.
You get a guy who can drive it with
length and straight, and a guy
who's a good putter and got a head
on his shoulder, that's a winning
combination
The 28-year-old Love has won
two of his last three tournaments
and has been in the top eight in
four of his last five. He is second on
the money list to red-hot Fred
Couples.
Were it not for Couples, Love
would be the story of the pro tour.
And there are some who feel the
former North Carolina All-Ameri-
can is in Couples' class.
"He's become a world-class
player MarkO'Meara said. "He's
got all the talent and potential to be
oneof the best players in the world.
He's in the same category as Fred
Love shies away from such
comparisons.
"I just think Freddie's learned
how to play the game. He's a very
athletic golfer. He's a feel and touch
golfer, nota scientific and mechani-
cal golfer. 1 think that's the way the
game should beplayed Lovesaid.
"I need to move my game in that
direction.
"Freddie's arrived 1 see my-
self as being a year or two behind
Freddie in experience
As good as Love is playing, the
comparisons with Couples are in-
evitable. They both will play in the
Greater Greensboro Open this
week. Couples skipped the Heri-
tage after winning the Masters.
Love lost to Couples in a play-
off at the Los Angeles Open earlier
this year.
Love is the first player to win
the Heritage Classic three times
and only the second to win back-
to-back titles. He says he now has
more confidence and "tournament
toughness
"I've learned to control my
swing pace under pressure he
said. "Guys that hit the ball a long
way have to have even more con-
trol over their swing
He said his best swings come
when he hits the ball with about 80
percent of his power.
Love found the control after
the death in late 1988 of his father
and lifelonggolf teacher. But first it
took some time to get over his loss.
"My swing wasn't there for a
while and my game wasn't there
for a while because I was trying to
do too much on my own Love
said.
But he began working with
golf teachers )ack Lumpkin and
Bruce Harmon along with sports
psychologist Bob Rotella.
Love also added his brother,
Mark, a one-time golf teacher, to
his golfing cadre as caddy and on-
the-course counselor.
"I've got some people I can
trust with my swing now Love
said. "I just have some direction
now. I mink in that streteh in 89 it
wasn'ttratlwasn'tworkmghard.
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10
(Btfe lEaot (Earolintan
April 23, 1992
Sports
Lady Pirates stump UNC
'Girls of Summer' win doubleheader 3-0,4-3
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
After coming off a dismal weekend
in South Carolina, the Lady Pirates took
aim and fired upon the Lady Tar Heels
who recently finished third in the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference tournament.
North Carolina, who ranks fourth in
the Southeast Region, desperately
needed to win at least one of the two
games to maintain their two spot lead
over ECU in the south rankings. How-
ever, the "Girls of Summer" had other
plans as they soundly defeated UNC in
their scheduled double header.
Jenny Parsons pitched a three-hit
shutout as the Lady Pirates won the first
of a twin bill 3-0.
"Aside from the moist field condi-
tions, the ladies played exceptionally
well an assistant coach said. Laura
Crowder lead the aggressive Pirate "D"
who eliminated all possible threats from
Carolina.
Crowder started the first inning off
with a baseon balls and eventually made
it to third courtesvof a passed ball and a
wild pitch. Mechelle Jones then drove a
deep sacrifice fly to center field to score
Crowder from third.
Cheryl Hobson continued the inning
with a hot smash off the glove of a Caro-
lina infielder to reach first. With one out
and a two-two count, Lisa Coreprew
capped an explosive first inning with
her two run blast (her fourth homerun of
the year).
After a brief 10-minute break the
second scheduled game was underway.
With the assistance of the ever present
Pirate defense, Parsons pitched yet an-
other complete game and recorded the
second win of the evening 4-3.
ECU got on the board first when C.
Hobson reached first on a error aided
single and later scored on a Georgeann
Wilke triple. The Heels, determined to
take at least one game, scored three runs
in the second inning to put the heat back
on the Pirates bat.
The Ladv Bucs answered that chal-
lenge with three runs of their own in
their half of the third. Crowder stroked a
single down the third base line and later
stole second. With one out, G Hobson
received a base on balls to reach first
base to put runners on the corners for
Wilke.
On a 1-2 count, Wilke drove a shot to
second for the fielders choice RBI that
scored Crowder from third. With C.
Hobson on third and Wilke on second,
senior first baseman Christy Kee blasted
a seeing eve single to left field to account
for her two runs batted in and end the
scoring for the Pirates.
With the score now 4-3, the Pirate
"D" turned up their game a notch and
literallv shutout the regions number tour
team. Parsons went on to record three
strikeout and her th win of the season
The4(Hr Ladv Pirates will plav their
final regular season home game today
against UNC-Wilmington at the Lady
Pirate field (across from Allied Heath).
The scheduled start time is 3 p.m. for the
doubleheader
ECU flounders four games at USC
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
Photo by DaII H��d � ECU Photo Lab
Exceptional defense, pctehng and base running are primary reasons for the ECU Lady Pirate
softhallteam ssuccess thtsseason TheteamtookaparofwinsfrtxnUNC-CriapeiHilTuesday
The Lady Pirates played six games
this f. ist Easter weekend at the Annual
Ladv Gamecocks Easter Tournament
and managed to salvage two victories
In game one, ECU lost 4-3 to Geor-
gia Southern in seven innings.
lenny Parsons pitched the UVhit
contest and recorded two strikeouts for
the Ladv Pirates. Lisa Coreprew led ECU
offensively with her 2-for-3 and one RBI
outing.
Parsons pitched a four-hitter as the
Lady Gamecocks of South Carolina
scored three unearned runs with the
assistance of three Pirate errors. Laura
Crowder stroked out two hits in her
four at bats and added two stolen bases
to her credit.
Georgeann Wilke pitched a four hit-
ter as the Lady Pirates won for the first
time this weekend.
Even though the defense commit-
ted three errors, the hot bat of Chanel
Hooker who went 2-for-3 kept ECU in
the contest.
Three errors proved costly as USC
cashed in to win vet another one against
ECU bv the score of 3-1. Wilke took the
loss while giving up just six hits and
striking out two. The lone Pirate run
came in the form of a Chervl Hobson
out-of-the park homerun. Hookeragain
had the hot bat with her 2-for-2 after-
noon.
In their third meeting of the tourna-
ment, ECU whitewashed Georgia South-
ern 11-1. Parsons recorded the win in
pitching a two hitter as the Pirate "D"
committed no errors. Laura Crowder,
Stephanie Hohr�n and Cheryl Hobson
lead the Pirate hitters in the 15 hit game
Crowder went 3-for-3 with two stolen
bases. Stephanie Hobson a Is vsent 3-
for-3 while sister Cheryl batted 3-for-4
during the con test Shern Allen got into
the action with her three RBI triple to
light things up.
In the Pirates' final game of the tour-
nament, Parsons pitched ECU to extra
innings before succumbing to her Hth
lost of the season. The Lady Pirates
tmik the No. 13 nationallv ranked Game-
cocks 11 innings before losing the con-
test 1-0. Crowder went 3-for? and Lisa
Coreprew went 2-for-5 in a losing ef-
fort.
The 38-16 Lady Pirates play today
at 3 p.m. against North Carolina at the
Ladv Pirate field (across from Albed
Health.)
N.C State, Ga. Tech win in ACC action
N.C . State 2, Virginia 1
RALEIGH (AP) Vinnv
Hughes hit a one-out triple in
the bottom of the ninth inning
to drive in the tying run and set
up Kevin Ross' game-winning
hit as North Carolina State de-
feated Virginia 2-1 Sunday.
N.C. State improved to 36-
12 overall and 12-9 in the ACC.
Virginia fell to 14-25, 3-17.
Virginia took the early lead
in the second inning when Hans
Martinsen singled and later
scored on a two-out single by
C asev Shore.
It staved that way until the
bottom of the ninth as Virginia's
Kent Kruse (0-4) and N.C.
State's Terrv Harvey locked up
in a pitcher's duel. Harvey did
not allow another run nd
yielded ust six hits before be-
ing relieved by Stacy Betts in
the eighth inning. Reliever
lamie Wolkosky (3-1) came on
to pitch a perfect ninth inning
and notch the win.
Meanwhile, Kruse carried
a no hitter through b 2-3 in-
nings before yielding back-to-
back singles to Paul Borawski
and Rob Bark He maintained
his shutout until the ninth when
he walked Sean Drinkwater
with one out and then gave up
a triple to Hughes. Kevin Stock
came on in relief and intention-
ally walked the next two bat-
ters to load the bases. Kevin
Ross then singled to bring home
Kip Bryan.
Ga. Tech 6, UNC 3
ATLANTA (AP) � Michael
Smith homered and drove in
three runs to lead 14th-ranked
Georgia Tech past North Caro-
lina 6-3 Sunday and complete a
sweep of a three-game Atlantic
Coast Conference series.
Tech (33-9, 10-7 ACC) built
a ri-0 lead for Brent Colson (8-
2), before the Tar Heels got
three runs in the eighth.
Smith got his two-run
homer in the second, following
Brian Alyea's RBI single.
North Carolina starter
Brian Willman (3-2) lasted into
the sixth. He gave up nine hits
and all six runs.
Chris Cox and Manny
DaSilva doubled in the Tar
Heels' three-run eighth.
FSU 11, Wake Forest 1
WTNSTON-SALEM, N.C.
(AP) � Florida State scored five
runs in the first innings and
cruised to an 11-1 victory over
Wake Forest Sunday, sweeping
a three-game series.
Chris Roberts went 3-for-4,
with two RBI, while Tony
Leibsack went 2-for-3, with an
RBI and a solo home run for
Florida State (33-14, 13-7 ACC)
in the second inning.
Seminole starter Roger Bai-
ley (10-3) pitched 6 1-3 innings,
allowing only a solo home run
to Brad Pryce in the sixth. Bai-
ley allowed only six hits and
three walks while striking out
eight.
Wake Forest (25-16,9-9) had
runners in every inning but the
ninth. The Demon Deacons left
12 men on base, including the
bases loaded in both the first
and seventh innings.
Clemson 5, ASU 3
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Keith Williams hit his eighth
home run of the year in the
eighth inning to clinch
See ACC, page 11
Crowder, Parsons
lead NCAA ranks
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sporta Writer
Two ECU Lady Pirates
worked their way to the top of
the NCAA charts for women's
fastpitch Softball.
Senior co-captain Laura
"Lou" Crowder has the nation's
record for most stolen bases in a
season with her astounding 51-
of-52 base stealing tor a percent-
ageof .993. In addition, Crowder
also holds the new NC AA record
for most consecutive stolen bases
without being thrown out.
Crowders' amazing string
of 69 stolen bases (over a three-
season period) tops the old
record of 54 set bv Donna Newell
of UCLA. With her well blended
mix of speed and talent Crowder
is also ranked No. 18 in the na-
tion in batting. She sports a .483
batting percentage in V games
played.
lenny "Scrappv" Parsons is
the natit ns leader with most vic-
tories in a single season.
Parsons' 36 wins leads all
other pitchers in the nation rank-
ing her 11 th with a 79.8 win per-
centage. Parsons throws a vari-
ety of pitches ranging from her
wicked curve ball to her floating
riser to her blistering fastball �
not to exclude herdrop, fork and
other pitches, Parsons continues
to mix up her bag of tricks to
keep her opponents guessing.
As a junior, rarsons is ex-
pected to return next vear and
lead the Lady Pirates to vet an-
other winning season.
NBA playoffs end topsy-turvey season
(AP) � Going into the last of
1,1117 regular-season games, the 16
NBA plaoff teams still were not
determined Sunday night after Mi-
ami,Houstonand Atlanta lost games
that would have guaranteed a spot
in the postseason party.
Miami could have clinched the
final Eastern Conference spot, but
kst 109-93 to Boston, which sealed
the No. 2 seed in the conference with
a 109-93 victory over the Heat
That left the door open for At-
. lanta, but the Hawks lost 112-108 at
-Cleveland, giving the berth back to
� Heat. Both Miami and Atlanta
nished with 38-44 records, with
;jMiami getting the first playoff berth
-jmong the four most recent expan-
sion teams on the basis of having a
"fetter conference record than the
Hawks.
m Houston could have clinched
�ijhe Final Western Conference berth.
but fell at home, 100-97 to Phoenix.
With those outcomes, the first-
round pairings in the Eastern Gin-
ference have Miami playing Chi-
cago, Indiana facing Boston, New
Jersey meeting Cleveland and De-
troit meeting New York.
In the West, it's Utah and the
Los Angeles Clippers, Seattle and
Golden State,San Antonio and Phoe-
nix, and Portland against either
Houston or the Los Angeles Lakers.
The Rockets' loss gave the Lak-
ers, in the last game of the regular
season, a chance to make the play-
offs for the 16th consecutive year
with a victory over the Los Angeles
Clippers. The Clippers on Thursday
night clinched their first playoff berth
since 1976.
The Lakers stayed alive with an
upset victory on Saturday at Port-
land.
Jeff Hornacek scored 18 posits
for the Suns, already assured of the
No. 4 playoff spot in the Western
Conference.
"Nobody can say we didn't try
to win this game Piwenix coach
Cotton Fitzsirnmons said. "1 told the
team that if Houston gets in, they'll
have to earn it by beating us
"It was a day when the lid was
on the casket Rockets coach Rudy
Tomjanovich said. "Balls would be
on the rim and come out We missed
little things and had lapses. It wasn't
a day to have a game like that"
The Celtics capped a late-sea-
sm surge to their 14th Atlantic Divi-
sion title in 20 years with their eighth
consecutive victory without ailing
Larry Bird.
"AD I can say is, 'GoOevelancL
Miami coach Kevin Loughery said
before the Cavaliers wort "We got
See NBA, page 11
ECU Photo Lab
Just kickin' around
Weather always seems to ptey an important role in whal ECU students do for fun Here, these guys piav
a little hackey sac to pass the time between studying Remember, Barefoot on the Mail is this afternoon
ACC
Clemson's 5-3 victory Sunday
over Appalachian State
Williams' hit came after the
game had been delayed twice
by rain, the first time briefly
but for nearly an hour the sec-
ond time
Clemson (38-7) scored in
the first inning
Northrop led withi
made it home on
single.
The Tigers sc
the third with a su
len base by Ted
single by North!
Love wins
Heritage
Classic for
second time
HILTON HEAD lSLAND.S.C.
(AP) � Davis Love III, vho won
his third Heritage Gassk n et the
weekend, says it was a different
player who won ir
"There's so much room be-
tween mv win :r 57 and my . m
last year Love said
Or this year
"I feel like a completely diffi i
ent player, he said, "I've ma-
tured
Love no longer just tries t
for cash. He - improved all of his
game, including putting, which
mav have been his weakest area
when he hit the PGA Tour n i
"I lot of people consider him a
long hitter fellow golfer Russ
Cochran said. "I think that -
oneofhi weapons now. He's
from the word go.
"Davis is a good combination.
You get a guv who can drive it with
length and straight, and a guv
who's a good putter and got a head
on his shoulder, that's a winning
combination
The 28-year-old Love has w m
two of his last three tournaments
and has been in the top eight in
four of his last five. He is second on
the money list to red-hot Fred
Couples.
Were it not for Couples, Love
would be the stone oi the pro tour.
And there are some who feel the
former North Carolina All-Amen-
can is in Couples' class.
"He's become a woridt-dass
plaverMarkO'Mearasaid. "He
got all the talent and potential to be
oneof the bes t players in the world.
He'sin the same category as Fred
Love shies away from such
comparisons.
"I just think Freddie's learned
how to play the game. He's a very
athletic golfer. He's a feel and touch
golfer, nota scientific and mechani-
cal golfer. I think that s the way the
game should be played Lovesaid.
"1 need to move mv game in that
direction.
"Freddie's arrived. I see my-
self as being a year or two behind
Freddie in expenence"
As good as Love is p laving, the
comparisons with Couples are in-
evitable. They both will plav in the
Greater Greensboro Open this
week. Couples skipped the Hen-
tage after winning the Masters
Love lost to Couples in a plav-
off at the Los .Angeles Open earlier
this year.
Love is the first plaver to win
the Heritage Classic three times
and only the second to win back-
to-back titles He savs he now has
more confidence and tournament
toughness
"I've learned to control my
swing pace under pressure he
said. "Guys that hit the ball a long
wav have to have even more con-
trol over their swing
He said his best swings come
when he hits the ball with about SO
percent of his power.
Love found the control after
the death in late 1988 of his father
and lifekmggolf teacher. Butfirstit
took some time to get over his loss.
"Mv swing wasn't there for a
while and my game wasn't there
for a while because I was trying to
do too much on my own Love
said.
But he began working with
golf teachers lack Lumpkin and
Bruce Harmon along with sports
psychologist Bob Rotella.
Love also added his brother,
Mark, a one-time golf teacher, to
his golfing cadre as caddy and on-
the-course counselor.
"I've got some people I can
trust with my swing now Love
said. "I just have some direction
now. I think in that stretch in W it
wasn't that I wasn't working hard.
I just kind of tost my direction
BE kl
You
Sundrc
Shorts
Tanks
A
We Br
OutY
Best.
Treat
to lots
lookfor
with:
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� highlight! j
� tanning
� waxing
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S
THE LI
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Team merr,
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APPLICi
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P.O.





mht gam (Barolintan April 23, 1991 11
Sports
mpUNC
header 3-0,4-3
da
i
v
it run
again
fter
rurna-
uth-
dk'T,
lengf with three rum of thoir own in
their half of the third e rowder stroked I
single dow n the third baseline and later
stole second With one out Hohson
received ' base on Kill- to re.uh first
to put runners on the lorners for
Wilke
Onal 2 count Wilke drove shot to
nd tor the fielders choke RBI that
scoredrowdet from third With C.
ion on thud and Wilke on second,
senior fl rsl baseman c hn-tv Kee blasted
,i seeing eve single to left field toaccourrt
, - rwo runs batted in and end the
for the Pirates
h the score now 4-3, the Pirate
turned up their game a notch and
illv shutout the regions number four
wenl on to record three
strikeout and her Jeth win of the season.
rhe40 16 Lad) Pirate will play their
ason home game tixlav
rvst L NC Wilmington at the Lady
ross from Allied Heath).
eduledstarttimeis3p.m for the
doubleheader
es at USC
lobson and Cheryl Hobson
irate hitter-in the 15 hit game.
for-3 with two stolen
I ink Hobson also went 3-
while sister Cheryl hatted 3-for-4
during the contest Sherri Allen pot into
� � Ktion with her three RBI triple to
' things up
In the Pirates' final game of the tour
nament, Parsons pitched ECU to extra
inning- before succumbing to her HKh
lost of the season ihe Lady Pirates
took the No. 13 nationally ranked Game
� - 11 innings before losing the con-
test l1 C row dor went Mor-5 and Lisa
( oreorew went 2-for-5 in a losing ef-
fort
rhe 38-16 Lady Pirates play today
at " p m against orth Carolina at the
Lady Pirate field (across from Allied
Health .
der, Parsons
NCAA ranks
Mitchell
Writer
I Pirates
ly to the top of
tor women's
iptam Laura
ias the nation's
Itolen bases in a
bounding 51
Igtorapenent-
lition.c rowder
NCAA record
. e stolen bases
Irown out
imaing string
I, (over a three-
tops the old
mna Newell
?r well blended
Ulent,( rowder
is also ranked No IS in the na-
tion in batting She sports a.483
batting percentage in games
played
lennv "Scrappy" Pan-on, is
the ruitu ns leader with most vic-
tories in a single season.
Parsons' 36 wins leads all
other pitchers in the nation rank-
ing her 11 th with a 74.S win per-
centage Parsons throws a vari-
ety of pitches ranging from her
wicked curve ball to her floating
nser to her hhstenng fastball �
not to exclude her drop, fork and
other pih hes Parsons continues
to mix up her bag of tricks to
keep her opponents guessing.
As a unior, Parsons is ex-
pected to return next vear and
lead the Lady Pirates to vet an-
other winning season
� -at �?�9
KL4S?
rc
.�l- to 0 �
PteMo by Kevin
ECU Photo Uk
ECU students do for fun Here, these guys play
Remember, Barefoot on the Mall i this afternoon.
.
ACC
Continued from page 10
NBA
Continued from page 10
Clemson's 5-3 victory Sunday
over Appalachian State.
Williams' hit came after the
ame had been delayed twice
bv rain, the first time briefly
but for nearly an hour the sec-
ond time.
Clemson (38-7) scored in
Love wins
Heritage
Gassic for
second time
HILTON HEAD1SLANDS.C.
tAP) � Davis Love HI, who won
his third Heritage Classic over the
weekend, says it was a different
player who won in 1987.
"There's so much room be-
tween my win in '87 and my win
last year Love said.
Or this year.
"I feel like a completely differ-
ent player he said. "I've ma-
tured
Love no longer just tries to blast
tor cash. He's improved all of his
game, including putting, which
may have been his weakest area
when he hit the PGA Tour in 1985.
"1 lot of people consider him a
long hitter fellow golfer Russ
( ochran said. "I think that's just
oneof his weapons now. He's solid
from the word go.
"Davis is a good combination.
You get a guy who can drive it with
length and straight, and a guy
who's a good putter and got a head
on his shoulder, that's a winning
combination
The 28-year-old Love has won
two of his last three tournaments
and has been in the top eight in
four of his last five. He is second on
the money list to red-hot Fred
Couples.
Were it not for Couples, Love
would be the story of the pro tour.
And there are some who feel the
former North Carolina All-Ameri-
can is in Couples' class.
"He's become a world-class
player Mark O'Meara said. "He's
got all the talent and potential to be
one of the best players in the world.
He's in the same category as Fred
Love shies away from such
comparisons.
"1 just think Freddie's learned
how to play the game. He's a very
athleticgolfer. He'sa feel and touch
golfer, not a scientific and mechani-
cal golfer. 1 think that's the way the
game should be played Lovesaid.
"1 need to move my game in that
direction.
"Freddie's arrived. I seemy-
self as being a year or two behind
Freddie in experience
As good as Love is playing, the
comparisons with Couples are in-
evitable. They bom will play in the
Greater Greensboro Open this
week. Couples skipped the Heri-
tage after winning the Masters.
Love lost to Couples in a play-
off at the Los Angeles Open earlier
this year.
Love is the first player to win
the Heritage Classic three times
and only the second to win back-
to-back titles. He says he now has
more confidence and "tournament
toughness
"I've learned to control my
swing pace under pressure he
said. "Guys that hit the ball a long
way have to have even more con-
trol over their swing
He said his best swings come
when he hits the ball with about 80
percent of his power.
Love found the control after
the death in late 1988 of his father
and lifelonggolf teacher. Butfirstlt
took some time to get over his loss.
"My swing wasn't there for a
while and my game wasn't there
for a while because I was trying to
do too much on my own Love
said.
But he began working with
golf teachers Jack Lumpkin and
Bruce Harmon along with sports
psychologist Bob Rotella.
Love also added his brother,
Mark, a one-time golf teacher, to
his golfing cadre as caddy and on-
the-course counselor.
"I've got some people I can
trust with my swing now Love
said. "I just have some direction
now. I think in that stretch in W It
wasn't that I wasn't working hard.
I just kind of tost my direction
the first inning when Kevin
Northrop led with a double and
made it home on Jeff Morris'
single.
The Tigers scored again in
the third with a single and sto-
len base by Ted Corbin and a
single by Northrop. Morris
walked and Keith Williams was
safe on a double error, and both
made it home on a Shawn
Satterfield triple.
The Mountaineers (16-31)
scored first in the fourth on a
Joe Bernard walk, a sacrifice
and a single by Jody Broyles.
Appalachian State scored
again after the second rain de-
lay when Brent Cardwell
walked and Randy DeBruhl
singled.
Paul O'Neil's single
brought them home following
a Broyles sacrifice.
beat, butwe played hard. You'vegot
to give Boston anawful lot of credit"
Boston completed a comeback
from five games behind New York
witheightgamestoplayand tied the
Knicks with a 51-31 record.
Boston gets the No. 2 seed be-
hind Chicago in the conference be-
cause the Celtics beat New York 3-2
in the season series.
Atianta,tryingtornakethe play-
offs for theseventhconsecutiveyear,
led 108-107 in the final minutes be-
fore Mark Price scored five points in
the final 9,6 seconds for Cleveland.
BE KIND TO YOUR BODY . . .
You've worked your mind all year, so give your
body a break. Dress it in all natural fabrics-
QWU FOOTBALL VIDEC
RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
Sundresses
Shorts
Tanks
Batike T-shirts
Leggings
and mini skirts.
Arlington Village '919 Redbanks Rd. � 756-1058
OF THE 1991 SEASON!
Order Your Highlight Video Today
And Believe For A Lifetime
CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to.
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We Bring
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Treat yourself
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look for spring
with:
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A
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
DAY-STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
for the 1992-1993 term
Responsibilities: � Selecting the Student Union President
� Approving Committee Chairpersons
� Approving the Student Union Budget
� Setting Policy for the Student Union
Qualifications: � Full-time Student
� Resides Off Campus
� Independent
Deadline to apply: Monday, April 27,1992 by 12:00 noon
Applications can be picked up at the Student Union
Office - Room 236 Mendenhall
� cuts
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Saturdiiv 9am-6pm
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May 1 & 2 (Fri, Sat)
Starting time 6pm
Registration begins at 4:30pm at the ECU track.
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or walk in shifts for 24 hours
For more information, call 752-2574.
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Mitrrrpd,i irdf �"
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SPONSORED BY:
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To all ECU Graduating Se
Anv individual purchasing a vehicle six months prior to or one year
afterJNofjaraduaSon can qualify for instant financing through
GMAC and a $500 rebate from GMAC.
With the staff at GEO imports hassle free no pressure, no purchasing
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12 Stic �aat (Earultnian April 23, 1992
(AP) The Edmonton Oilers
are part oi Wayne Gretzky's past
Ihe I os Angeles Kings hope his
future includes another Stanley
( up
Gretzk) who led Edmonton
to tour NHL championships be-
fore being dealt to Los Angeles m
August 1988, was part Of a parade
of ev Oilers who came back to tor-
ment their tormor team Monday
night
Gretzky had tour assists and
tour other members o the Oilers'
Kenyan runner
wins Boston
Marathon for
third time
BOSTON (AP) Plenty of
runners had speed and stamina
Ibrahim Hussein and Olga
Markova also had the smarts to
sur ive a brisk early pace
fhey lurked hundredsor" yards
behind the early loaders, saving
their energj and waiting tor the
pa esetters to poop out. Then they
spurted ahead and galloped the
final six miles unchallenged in ihe
Boston Marathon
And both crossed the finish
line Monda) with fantastic times.
Hussein a Kenyan who won
his third Boston Marathon and sec-
ond in a row, had the HM'mi best
men's time of the races in the
o ent s history, 2 hours. S minutes
14 seconds.
Markova a Russian making
her first !ston appearance won
in 2 2; 4 � these ond best women's
time m Boston since 1972 when
women became official competi-
tors in the race, and the best
women's time in the world in five
years.
lheir rewards were impres-
sive �60,000 e.nh tor winning.
So were their victory margins a
2-minute 25-secondadvantagefot
Hussein o ei oaquim Pinheiroof
Portugal and a 2-minute, 43-sec-
md gap between Markova and
i oshiko amamoto of Japan.
fhe weather i loudy skies
and i temperature ol 58 degrees at
the starl was conducive to a fast
pace
Uta Pippig of Germany, oneol
thew omen sta oritesanda victim
he early pace, realized her mis-
take when she tried to keep up
with leader Wanda Panfi! in the
early staj
Ihe pace, she said, "was razy.
I was s(i tired
Panni, the favorite and defend-
ing champion, later suc umbed to
the speed as Markova went by her
just after the ln-mile mark of the
2f-mile, 385-yard endurance test.
I'ippig recover to finish third,
while Panfil en� � vi jp sixth.
"She's reallv happv she didn't
run with Wanda on the first part
because the second part is very-
hard, " a translator said for
Markova moments after she
crossed the finish line.
Ihe pace was even faster
am ng the men as Simon Karon of
Kenya covered the first 10 kilome-
ters, just over h miles, in 28:43, one
set i nd faster than the former Bos-
ton record for that checkpoint.
He had charged in front at the
start and held a lead of up to 200
yards over a pack that ranged from
four to eight other runners, all Af-
ricans But at 13 miles, Hussein,
threeother Kenyans and three-time
runner-up Juma Ikangaa of Tanza-
nia caught him and Karon was
never a factor after that
Hussein, who beat Ikangaa by
one second in 19HH in the closest
finish ever in Boston, ran with
Ikangaa and Boniface Merende of
Kenya to the 20-mile mark.
Then Ikangaa faded. One mile
later, Merendedropped back, leav-
ing Hussein striding strongly ac-
companied only by the throng that
cheered from the sides of the road.
Ikangaa finished fourth and
Merende sixth.
Hussein was confident Karori
couldn't last at his fast pace.
"1 wasn't worried about him
Hussein said. "I would have been
worried if he were still in the lead
at 16 miles
Pinheiro, the runner-up in
2:1039, said, "I tried to stay back.
The first part of the race was too
fast. I couldn't go out fast like the
other runners did
dynasty combined for five goals as
the Kings outscored Edmonton 8-5
to even their Smythe Division semi-
final series at one victory apiece.
"I reallv felt that after the first
game, the way they came out to-
night was instrumental in getting
us going Kings coach Tom
Webster said.
Paul Coffey had two goals and
Martv McSorley, Charlie Huddv
and lari Kurri each hid one In all,
the fiveex-Oilerscombined for five
goalsand nineassists. LAhad three
it former I
power-plav goals after going 0
for 9 in tlie opener
" I don't think vou can expect
tohoUK .retkv,l offevand Kurn
down tor too long said
lAlmonUui'slV'rnieNicholls,who
sco red twice I hev've got a great
power plav. We )ust have to be
disciplined and not take a lot of
penalties
in the other Smythe Division
semifinal, Vancouver evened the
series with a 3-2 victory over
WinnipeginCame2 IntheNorns
King!
rL i tivinn it'sNewlersevattheew
1 Vision, Minnesota took a two- with a 5-3 victory at Chicago. Ui "�� P&sbun at
gam lead with a 4-2 victory ,n Ihe four Wales Conference YoARaBS and
Detroit and St. Louis pulled even nes resume tonight. In the Patrick Washington
9 p m2 a.m
2 completely separate Cubs
Under One Roof
MOTHERS PLAYHOUSE
PUTT-PUTT
K
Mon-Thur 6-11
, Friday 6-1
orlwlde. W '�.
10th St. past DunWn Donut8Suy j-io
hJ3" '�"
axplrt May 30, 1992
axplr� May 30. 1992





12 dlic t:a�t (Earollnian April 23, 1992
former Oilers combine for Kings win
. s Imun .U tr,�- ' .1

lure
he 1 dmontonHlers
ay ne (iretzk s past
;eles Kings hope hi-
les another Stanle
tO fOUl l
dvnasty i ombined tor ti egoalsas
the Kings outscored Edmonton 8 5
toe en their Smythel i isionsemi
tinal series at one victory apiei e
I really felt that after the first
who led I dmonton game the a they came out to
championships be night was instrumental in getting
ilti Us Angeles in us going kings coach rom
was part ot a parade Webstei said.
ame ba� k to tor PauK offey had two goals and
team Monday Marty McSorley,harlie Huddy
and Ian Kurn each had one In all,
id � ii assists and thefiveex-Oilerscombined for five
; the Oilers goalsand nine assists. LA had three
powei play goals aftei going !
tot 9 in the opener
I don t mink you can expet I
toholdGretzkyoffey and Kurri
dou n tor too long, '�ant
I dmonton s BemieNicholls who
scored twice fhev vegotagreat
power pla We just have to be
dis liplined and not take a lot of
penalties
Inthfothtt Smythe I h ision
semifinal, Vancouver evened the
series with a '� " ictory over
Winnipegin iame2 IntheNorris
Division, Minnesota took a two with a 5-3 victory at rucago Division N
Kame load with a 4 2 victory in fhe four Wales onferencese fork Rangers and
I fctroitandSt Louis pulled even ries resume tonight In the Patrick Washington
PUTT-PUTT
With over 1,000
courses world wide.
Kenyan runner
wins Boston
Marathon for
third time
Mon-Thur 5-11
Friday 5-1
Saturday 10-11
10th St. past Dunkln DonutsSy J-10
expire May 30, 1992 I explreaMity 30, 1992
lt ot
ader;
hen the
ill
� nish
times
�Maratl i indse
'hi second l
'e in the

� taking
� 'earanct won
�� � men's

'inheii
� ' i ta-t
nd-

ldura � '
on the first
rid part is '�
ator said for
ed the finish line
is even fastei
� . - : iriof
Ken � the first kik me-
istover6miles in28:43,one
: fa � � ! than the former Bos-
� � re rd I ' that heckpoint.
�. hadcl irgedin tront at the
h I a lead of up to 200
� � it ranged trom
. � � �' ei runners, all At
But at I miles I lussein,
threeother Kem an-ami three-time
runner upjumalkangaaof l.in.i
ma caught him and Karon was
�ii�: ei a fat tor after that
lussein, who beat lkangaa h
one second in 1988 in the ck)sest
finish ever in Boston, ran sith
lkangaa and Bonifa e Merende of
Kenya to the 20-mile mark.
Ihen lkangaa faded ?nemike
later, Merendedroppedba k,lea -
ing Hussein striding strongly ac-
companied only by the throng that
cheered from the sides of the road
lkangaa finished fourth and
Merende sixth.
Hussein was confident Karon
couldn't last at his fast pace
"I wasn't worried about hint
Hussein sod. "I would have been
worried it he were -till in the lead
at lf miles.
Tinheiro, the runner-up in
2:1039, said, I tried to stav back.
Hie first part of the race was too
fast I couldn't go out fast like the
other runners did "





12 vlhc East (Earulintan April23, 1992
Gretzky, host of other former Oilers combine for Kings
win

hiers dynasty combined for five goalsas power-pla goals attei
i � rJw Kings outscored Edmonton H i forMintrx
v In- toeventheirSmytrwDivisionsemi Idon'tthink oucanexj
i i� final series at one victory apiece toholdC.rel � ffev�wdr
I reall fell thataftei the firsl dov n !
� - game the was they came out to Ldrnonton'slVnwNicholls.whi
ht was instrumental in getting scored twici lhe
, going Kings coach rom power pla We just have to fo
, , �. . J dis liplinet
luiU offe had two goals and penal! i
v irt McSorle harlie Hudd In tl i
,�nd lari Kurri each had one In.ill semifinal
thefiveev-Oilerscombined for five series w
inwlsandnineassists.l had three Winnipeg
Minnesota took a two with a 5 I victory at Chicago
game I�hJ with a 4 2 victory in rhefourWales onfi n i � �
it and St Louis pulled even ries resume tonight In the Patrick
.
nt take �
Dubs
�'
TlV.VIy,
Mon-Tnur Ml
Friday 5-1
Saturday 10-11
PUTT-PUTT
yxj w,th over 1'000
NC. . courses world wide
j' 10th St. past DunWn Donutssy
BUY ON'tTx BUY ONE
Kenyan runner
wins Boston
Marathon for
third time
expire May 30, 1992
expire May 30, 1992
� �

� � �

trie ton
- � -nit
� . � � � reel i
idol
I Karoi was
s i tl
tnieu
ran with
i � . mai k
� . mile
�� � ea
striding strongl) a
� 'Iit
, i the n iad
. t fourth and
Ikangaa I
Merendi
I ius ��'M n.is 11 mfident Karori
, hi.in I la i .it his tat pa e
" v. lit worried about him
Hussein mi would have been
worried it he were -till in the le.nl
M h mil-
Pinheiro, the runner up in
2 10-39, said, "1 tried to stay back
The first part of the race was too
fast I couldn't goout fast likethe
other runners di.i





Title
The East Carolinian, April 23, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 23, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.876
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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