The East Carolinian, March 31, 1992






Basically, it's hot 3
Basic Instinct thrills audience with steamy love scenes.
Get a job!
Columnist describes how to capture dream jobs.
14
�he lEaHt (Earoltttiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus ccnmunity since 1925
Voi.66No.21
Tuesday. March 31. 1992
Grfenviue. North Carolina
ClRCUlATION 12.000
8 Pages
SGA Election '92
Brooks, Jones compete for presidential position
Jonathan Brooks wants to be
it t? man who get- things done .it
I i and one vn a he wants to
make a change is b) improving
relations with the 11 oft ireenv ille
it he i- del ted . A president
vs ith all oi these posith e
c ents there is still mw hthatneeda
to be done Bnxks said
I le slid Kl i annol get anj
thing done working against cit)
hall.
1 he politti S ol protest ,inii
division will not work, have not
worked and won't worli in 1992
Brooke s.iui 11 ul,a afternoon at
the SGA andidate -1 orum As
S(I A president I will be an at rh e
voice in city council debate which
h,is not been done in the past
Brooks said he v iews the job
ot president as being a representa-
tive of EC I tor the city and the
state.
Brooks admitted that he and
his opponent, Courtney oneshave
se eral similar goals tor the ottu e
ot president, such as a new text
hook buy h.n k program and re
turning the Buccaneer yearbook,
but Brooks means (t getting to
those ends are ciuite different than
ones
"My opponent and I do not
differ on that man points our
main difference as candidates rests
on my belief that an SGA presi-
dent has to workaway from cam-
pus' Brooks said
Brooks said he ants to see a
better representation ot minori-
ties m SC.A and said the
multicultural center is an eyesore
which he will work to replace.
"Anyonewho attends an S! A
meeting will see that it anything
minorities hae been shut out of
the Sc.A and are not represented
at ail I intend to do something
about that, " Brooks said.
Brooks said he feels apathy in
SiA is a problem at ECU. "Incen-
tives are going to have to be made
to get people involved so every-
one will see what S( A can do for
you
Brooks has been active in state-
wide politics since 1982. He has
been a part of the youth advisor
program for Gov Martin He is a
member of Inter-Fraternity C oun-
Cil, and was the chair ot external
relations He is ,o a member ot
Kappa Alpha social fraternity
Candidates for Vice President
Crystal Cross
c rystalt ross is concerned with
the lack of m oh ement in St .A and
wants the apath) to end. she said
Friday in a spttxh to the student
body
"If elected I will initiate a new
system to recruit E( I students to
become involved in SGA t ross
slid
C ross has been a member of
many organizations on campus in-
cluding Alpha Delta Pi social soror-
ity, where she is the membership
ihairperson She held the position
of unior executive at-large and has
been a member of the C reek C oun-
cil for two years.
It has always been mv con-
cern to pay close attention to the
ideas and opinions ot students, and
to consider them each very impor-
tant Cross said
As vice-president she said she
will be the president's right hand
unman and would expect to be a
representative for the students in
any situation that the president
could not fulfil.
"SGA is for you Cross said
"SGA members should be solely
concerned wit the affairs of the
student body. If elected SGA vice-
president, I can make a positive
c hange and difference on this cam-
pus
Sherry Smith
Sherry A. Smith has been
involved in SGA since her
sophomore year when she was
a day representative and she is
now running for SG A vice-presi-
dent.
Other offices she has held
include her current position as
junior class president, sopho-
more class vice-president and
vice-chair for the screenings and
appointments committee.
This year she is junior class
president and now she is serv-
ing as chair for the screenings
and appointments committee.
Jonathan Brooks and Courtney Jones
( ourtney ones, the current
S( , A speaker of the legislature, is
running for SC.A president and is
hoping her experience will be an
attribute to her ability to represent
the E( I students well.
Jones has been involved with
S( .A tor three years. She served as
chair of die rules and judiciary com-
mittee tor one year and was her
freshman class president.
Some ot her a� tomplishments
havemduded oh oordtoatorofthe
biannual S .A leadership retreats,
coordinator and moderator of the
Double Funding SGA hearing the
first of its kind to be held at ECU and
coordin itorof the Si -A procedures
committee anil the programming
committee.
Ideas and goals an? nothing if
you have no experience to get them
done, Jones said m a speech at
Friday's & !Aandidate's Forum.
And 1 belie e I ha e the experience
to di something with mine
ones' ideas include a new text-
book bu b.u ks stem, a vote on the
city council tor the Sc.A president
and bringing b.u k the ECU year-
book
Issues with the city, I agree
with Mr Brooks 100 percent they
need to be better Jones said. "And
I've already been working on that.
I've already met with the mayor,
members of citv council, and Chief
Hinman of the police department
Some issues of change Jones
said she has discussed with
Greenville representatives is Hal-
loween, the noise ordinance and
SGA representative present at city
council workshops.
Jones said she is concerned that
minority representation on SGA is
low because few students know
how to get involved in SGA. She
said SGA has taken steps to solve
this problem by forming a pnxre-
dures committee to spread the word
about involvement in SGA.
lones sits on a committee to
help plan the location and funding
of the new multicultural center.
She is a voting member of the
Fine Arts Funding and the Transit
Bauds. Among other positions she
has held, Jones was a section leader
of the jazz and the symphonic band,
Some honors she has received
are Most Outstanding Committee
Member for the SGA rules and Ju-
diciary committee for two years and
a Pitt Countv scholarship recipient
in iwi.
Candidates for Secretary
�n
r
"This student government
experience has taught me ex-
actly what 1 need to know to be
vice-president Smith said.
See it Big Keep it Simple
(SIB-KIS) is the approach Smith
and Courtney Jones are follow-
ing to accomplish future goals
such as a new parking lot.
Smith said the concept is to
fulfill the projects they attempt
by doing the little obs such as
creatingcommitteesand calling
the right people in order to reach
the large goal.
"Remember Miss Jones and
I have the commitment, dedica-
tion and the patience to get these
small things done that will get
you as a student body big re-
sults Smith said
Smith received a best com-
mittee member award in 1991
and is a member of the Council
of Student Organization Lead-
ers, Golden Key National Honor
Society and Sigma Sigma Sigma
social sorority.
She attended the Interna-
tional Student Governments As-
sociation leadership conference
in Texas last month.
1
Lisa Berling
Lisa Berting is a communica-
tion major with a concentration in
public relations. She has been in-
volved in SC .A for two years and is
on the screening and appointments
committee.
"I ha e timemanagemontskills
and I'm also verv open minded to
people's different opinions and be-
liefs lierting said.
Berting said she wants to in-
crease student involvement by cre-
ating a program sponsored by SGA
but involving all other organiza-
tions to have a dav where bcxths
are set up representing all groups
explaining their purposes and re-
cruiting students.
Berting has attended several
leadership retreats in help her
achieve her goals
She said she wants to work with
each of the tour SGA committees
individually to end conflict and con
fusion that sometimes occurs be-
cause oi l.n k of communication.
Berting has plans to intormthe
sc ,A legislatureof city events sothe
representative can inform the stu-
dents
"Ali these goals are realistic
and I know SC.A can achieve these
goals Berting said
lnaddition to SC.A, Berting has
been a member of lnter'arsit
Chnstian Fellowship, the Student
Pirate Club, Eas Carol.na Friends
and works for The East Carolmuin as
an advertising representative.
She is an active member of Al-
pha Omicron Ti social sorority, and
has been her pledge class chaplain
and is the current Panhellenic del-
egate
"Ever since I've been serving
on SGA I've appreciated ECU even
more Berting said. "I'm not run-
ning for any glory- or a popularity
contest. I'm running for this posi-
tion because I have the dedication,
experience and determination that
I believe enables me to be the best
candidate for SC.A secretary
Tristin Jones
Tristin one has held the posi-
tion of secretary for all fouryearsin
high school and said she feels this
experience will enable her to be the
best SGA secretary ECL students
could chose.
"If elected 1 will be a hard
worker as well as very dedicated
Jones said.
Jones is a member of several
organizations on campus and has
volunteered for four charities in-
cluding the American Red Cross
and handicapped children.
In the scxial sorority she be-
longs to, Alpha Delta Pi, Jones has
been chair of two committees and is
the new member, education chair
for next fall.
Jones said her inexperience with
SGA will not hinder her perfor-
mance because she has expenence
with time management and organi-
zation she has gained from her other
obligations and positions of man-
agement.
"1 feel as though I am a quali-
fied candidate for SGA secretary
Jones said. "I know I could fulfil my
requirements if elected as well as
accomplish a lot of new goals
Candidates for Treasurer
Heidi Hicks
Heidi Hicks is a sophomore
marketing major and a member of
the SGA legislature and the only
student on the ECU Credits Com-
mittee, she is a candidate for SGA
secretary.
"1 feel that the SGA secretary is
the main line of communication
between the members and officers
of SGA Hicks said.
Her goal she said is to expand
the communication to the entirestu-
dent bcxly.
"I will make it my job to make
sure you know what is going on
with the SGA Hicks said.
Student participation and
avvarenessisanothergcwl Hicks said
she will strive to achieve as secre-
tary
She is a member of Alpha Xi
Delta social sorority and iscurrentlv
the scKial chair. Hicks said her abil-
ity to belong to these organizations
and hold a part-time job is an ex-
ample of her time management
skills.
"I'm a person who doesn't take
things lightly Hicks said. "Those
of you who know me know I'm a
hard worker
Brad Osborne
Brad Osborne has been on
the SG A appropriations commit-
tee for two years and is running
for SGA Treasurer.
He is assisting the present
treasurer, Eric Hilliard, which he
said he feels will create a smooth
transition if elected treasurer.
Some of his plans are to de-
Scott Gottlieb is the second can-
didate running for SGA treasurer.
At press time, no further informa-
tion was available.
I
velop an equal distribution of
money to the organizations
funded bv SGA, make available
consultation appointments with
groups to plan their budgets fora
realistic estimate ot the finances
SGA will give and improve the
student loan situation.
"Student loans were not be-
ing paid back, thanks to Eric
Hilliard we've gotten that down
to almost zero people not paying
back , I want to continue that
Osborne said.
He said he also wants to
"make students aware that loans
are available to everyone
Osborne was the Student Pi-
rate Club president for two years,
was president of RHA one year,
served on the Student Union
Board of Directors for two years
and has been in the Dining Ser-
vice committee from his fresh-
man year to the present time.
All SGA profiles written by
Julie Roscoe, assistant
news editor.





2 �lit East (Earolintan March 31, 1992
Greenville seeks to preserve
historic college view area
Yearbook folds
Missouri University will stop publishing its 97-yef old year-
book after this schtxil year has ended because of financial problems.
Suzanne Holland, interim vice chancellor for student affairs
made thedecisiontostop publishing the yearbook, Barbara Burlison,
Savitar advisor, said the yearbook is approximately 145,000 in debt.
"Until the letter comes down, it's not official Burlison said.
"But the book was running a debt and though we were making
headway, it wasn't a lot
Vice chancellor position added
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will stxin
reiastate the position of vice chancellor for graduate studies and
research. The position was abolished in 1989 due to a lack of money.
"The faculty has urged me to reinstate the position said
Chancellor Taul Hardin.
Mary SueColeman, ass�iate provost and dean of research, was
chosen by Hardin to be promoted to vice chancellor Die Board of
Governors and the Board of Trustees must approve Coleman's
appointment before she is officially elected.
Textile center opens
N.C. State recently announced the establishment of a new
Textile Center. The center is not a place, but an $8 million endow-
ment from the federal government. The $8 million will be split
between four schixMs with the purpose of "enhancing the competi-
tiveness of the U.S. apparel industry
David Buchanan, theCollegeof Textiles associate dean, said the
funding will bring publicity and prestige to date as well as keeping
classroom knowledge up to date
Dorm residents more balanced
A survey conducted bv the student development office at
Appalachian State University revealed that students living on-
campus may be more well rounded than those living off-campus.
The survey found onampus students to be more involved
with student activities, happier with their social lives and perform-
ing slightly better academically.
"Students that live on-campus are more exposed to other stu-
dents and faculty, thus allowing them to grow socially' said ASU
Vice Chancellor for Student Development, Dr Greg Blimling.
The study also showed that students living in the dorms have a
betterappreciation for university-sponsored art, musk and theater.
Compiled b) Kliiatttth Shimmrl. Takrn from It's and othrr campus newspapers.
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
In the first week of March,
ECU students were asked to get
the word out about the nomina-
tion of College View to the Na-
tional Register of Historic Places
and to assist in improving the
quality of life in the neighbor-
hood.
In December, the Greenville
Historic Preservation Commis-
sion officially recommended the
College View area to the N.C.
Historic Preservation Office for
nomination to the National Reg-
ister of Historic Tlaces.
The National Register, main-
tained by the National Park Ser-
vice, is the nation's official list of
districts, sites, and buildings sig-
nificant in American history, ar-
chitecture, and culture.
The proposed College View
Historic District will encompass
approximately 350 houses, lo-
cated in 31 blocks bounded by
Holly Street, East First Street,
Eastern Street and Fifth Street.
The state approved the pro-
posal at a January meeting and
has forwarded the nomination
to the federal government for fi-
nal approval.
Upon favorable review, Col-
lege View should be placed on
the National Register of Historic
Tlaces in March or April 1992,
becoming Greenville's first Na-
tional Register Historic District.
In a letter written by Mayor
Nancy M. Jenkins and ECU
Chancellor Richard E.Eakin, they
thank the owners and tenants in
the College View area, many of
whom are staff and students of
ECU, for their support of the
nominationand ask fortheirhelp
in neighborhood improvement
efforts.
In the letter, they say that
"the city and the university share
a common commitment to pre-
serve, protect, and enhance the
special community setting of the
College View District
Thecityand university want
to encourage "responsible own-
ership and tenant living
"We are really pleased that
the city asked us to help spread
the word said Brooke Driskall,
president of Alpha Delta Pi, a
social sorority. "1 think it's im-
portant that other students get
this information from us so that
we can let them know that we
support this action
Others helping to distribute
the information are members of
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Chi Omega,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Sigma Sigma
Sigma, and Delta Zeta.
Designation of College View
as a National Register Historic
would officially recognize the
neighborhood as having archi-
tectural, historical, and cultural
value worthy of preservation.
Designation can also bestow
eligibility for certain benefits,
such as income tax incentives for
rental or commercial properties
within the district and protec-
tion from state or federal projects
which might adversely affect the
neighborhood.
"The city will offer strict en-
forcement of laws and ordi-
nances related to the area said
Marvin Davis, assistant city man-
ager.
"The city recognizes that
College View, as with any neigh-
borhood, is an integral part of
the city as a whole Davis said.
"Having livable neighborhoods
is a cornerstone for a strong vi-
able city. Improvements in Col-
lege View will also positively
impact the entire city
"As a whole the project went
really well, and all the residents
in the area were cooperative and
glad to be a part of the efforts to
help clean up Greenville said
Driskall.
215 E.Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
(919) 756-3301 (800) 682-7050
1. Mendenhall Student Center
2. Student Supply Store
3. Croatan
4. Bottom of College Hill Drive
5. Belk Building (Allied Health)
STUDENT CX)VERNMENT ASSOCIATION
EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1992
Bring you student I.D. and vote and possibly
win this Schwinn Frontier Bike
L
Fight
Apathy!
Vote SGA
Wednesday!
The East
Carolinian, like
it, or recycle it!
LISA
eBERTINGe
SGA
SECRETARY
NORTH TOPSAIL
Ys4?C
Presents
6. General Classroom Building
7. Jones Cafeteria
8. Front Entrance of Joyner
9. Between Jarvis Hall and Jenkins
10. Health Science Library
Must vote to enter, may enter only once
at the poll in which you vote.
Must have student I.D.
Polls open 9am-6pm.
CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER, your MC
EASTER WEEKEND�APRIL 18, 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11:00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC WRQR 94.3
1109 Charles Blvd
Phone 758-4251
RADIO
Phone: 830-0944
$22.50 DAY OF SHOW S17 50 IN ADVANCE
FOR TICKET & ACCOMMODATION INFO 919 328-4745 1-800-359-4745
EasLCacplifia 199U992
Playhouse ea
son
APRIL 2, 3, 4, 6. and 7 at 8:15 pjn.
APRIL 5 at 2:15 pjn.
I it Theatre Kor I ass Than V Moii So Bring A Date
ECU STUDENTS: $4.50
Call: 7"7-r829
Coffeehouse:
TONIGHT!
NeiyPorter
Musician
The Underground
8:00 P.M.
Movies:
'LaFemmeNktev'
Wed. April 1
�THELMA&LOUISE"
ThursFri&Sat April2-4
�TheHitcher"
Sun April 5
FORUM:
HarveyWasseiman
from Greenpeace
How to Save
thePlanet
Tue&Aprl7
Henckix Theatre
800 PM
Barefoot
is coming
APRIL 23!
Entertainment
'Crucible't
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
On Apnl 2, the East Carolina
Playhouse will present ijs fourth
and last drama of the 1991-92 sea-
son, Arthur Miller's "TheCrucible"
"The Crucible" is Miller's per-
sonal insight and passion into the
Salem Witch Tnalsof 1692, thought
10 parallel the McCarthy hearing
of the 2()th Century
Qccurnng on the trials' 300th
anniversary the Playhouse's per-
formances will chronicle Millar's
story of theevents and characters of
a generation that was consumed bv
hystena, intolerance and greed. John
Shearin, the director, -avs "This t-
one of Miller's most powerful
works. The play nngs out with the
truth of the human condition
The play illustrate- in detail the
course of events of the witch trials,
starting with vague suspicions and
growing into the overwhelming
insanity that end with 19 people
being sent to the gallows to be
hanged as witches. The theme be-
ing, as Miller himself states, the
"handing over of conscience to an-
other, be it woman, the state, or
terror propels the mam character-
into internal conflict.
Each of the 2J
Crucible" wa- a I
the events thai
portrays the 00
question of ha J
and correct mo
face of temptatul
Sheann m
Dionysian( ,n
physical pleasui
out no matter
code will force it
and even into q
This moral
ma)or participar
extreme wa
Abigail Vi
Kelly VHaa-
figure � a J
and the voung
love with a mai
These perform
additional - (
and Abigail that,
"fleshes out Abt
human
lohn Proctol
rft is -evn b
typical trag i
Proctor as "pem
tempered, and
having Lommitt
mortal -in- in his
tor maintain
'Basic Instinct7
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Paul Verhoeven's la-t two film-
were Robocop and Total Recall. With
them, he transformed violence into
an art form.
With his latest effort, Basic In-
stinct, Verhoeven must work with
thecontemporary world rather than
an imagined one of some distant
future.
In the process the violence is
scaled down so as to appear realis-
tic Unfortunately, despite this real-
ism, Bask Instinct came across as
less believable than either of the
other pictures.
The director tries diligently to
elevate his characters above the
much hyped but essentially barren
script.
Michael Douglas plays Nick
Curran, a San Francisco cop with
bad memories of shooting innocent
tourists. His troubles with alcohol,
drugs and smoking are well-docu-
mented in the film, but the viewer
never understands how Curran s
past drove him to his many vices.
Nor does thestor'exammeCurran's
p-whe. Nick-
ing, after thro
wagon, i- p!ai
mental examplel
fascination witnl
a murder easel
needed informal
tal -tate.
The suspei tl
for is Catherine
Stonei, a novelii
murder.
Whenaretir
dered exactly!
Trammel's novi
for questioning
begins as Nick
psychological gj
other while freqj
erotic sex
Earlv in the
relate- the plot
est work. The
falling for the wi
eventuallv ged
premise is satind
being senou-
Cathenne 5
about the rock
ides the most i
film.
.�
.43
����,v:
n
UJednescI
B
A
Progressive
Donee Nigl
10 Drofl
$1.15 Tall Boys
�2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Komik
�Ladies Free til 1
&?





2 vTfoe Caatifarolitlian March 31. 1992
Greenville seeks to preserve
historic college view area
Yearbook folds
Missouri University will slop publishing its r yeai old yeai
book after tWsschotl year iSas ended because of finarM ial pn�blems
Suzanne Holland, interim vice chancelloi foi student affairs
madethedecbiontostoppublishingtheyeartKxik. Barbara Burlison,
Savitar advisor, said the yearbook is approximately $45,tHl in debt
L ntil the letter comes down it s not official Burlison -iui
"Bui the hiH'k was running a debt and though we were making
headway it wasn t a lot
Vice chancellor position added
Ihe University ot North . aroltna at c hapel Hill will soon
reinstate the position of vice chancellor tor graduate studies and
research Ihe position was abolished in 1989duetoa la kol money
The faculty has urged me to reinstate the position, said
i hancellor Paul Hardin.
MarvSueCoteman a iate provost and dean o( resean h was
chosen by Hardin to be promoted to vice c hancelloi 1 If Board of
(rtnernors and the Board ot rrustees must approveoleman's
appointment before she is officially elected
Textile center opens
N.C State recentJ) anmunced the establishment t .1 new
Textile L enter. Ihe center 1- not a place but an $8 million endow-
ment from the federal government Ihe -rs million will be split
between tour schools with the purpose ol "enhar mi: thecompeti
tiveness of the U.S apparel industr)
David Buchanan, theoBegeoi Textiles associate dean saidthe
t undine will bnng puhlii ityand prestige to date as well as keeping
la�room knowledge up todate
Dorm residents more balanced
A survey conducted b the student development office at
Appalachian State University revealed that students living in
campus may bo more well rounded than those h ing off campus
Ihe survey found onampus students to be more involved
with student activities happier with their social lives and perform
ing slighth hotter academk all
Students that live onampus are mere exposed to other stu
dents and faculty thus alkiwing them to gnnv stKialh said W
Vice hancellor for Student! )e ekpment I ft (ireg Blimling
Ihe study also showed that students living in the dorms have a
better appreciation for university sponsored art must andtheatei
('(�mpilrd h f- liah Ih shimmrl I k n from CPS aiul atht i . ampus m wspapt n
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
In the tir-t week of March,
! I students were asked to get
the word out about the nomina-
tion of College View to the Na-
tional Register ot Historic Places
and to assist in improving the
quality of life in the neighbor-
hood
In I Vi ember, the C ireenville
Historii Preservation Commis-
sion of fit lallv recommended the
c ollege View area to the N.C.
Historic Preservation Office tor
nomination to the National Keg
tstcr t I listori Places.
1 he National Register, main
tained In the National Park St
u e, is the nation's official list ot
districts sites, ami buildings sig-
nificant in American history, ar-
chitec hire and 1 ulture
I he proposedollege lew
I listorit I )istri t will encompass
approximately $50 houses, lo-
cated in Jl blocks hounded by
Holh Street, last first Street,
Eastern Street and Fifth Street.
I he state approved the pro-
posal .it a lanuary meeting and
has forwarded the nomination
to the federal government for fi-
nal appro .il
I pon tax arable review, Col-
lege View should be placed on
the National Register o't I listoric
ria.es in March or April 1992,
becoming Greenville's first Na-
tional Register Historic District.
In a letter written bv Mayor
Nam M lenkins and EC L
c han ellor Rit hard I 1 akin, they
thank the ovt ners and tenants in
the � ollege iew area, many of
whom .ire statt and students of
ECl tor their support of the
nomination and ask tor their help
in neighborhood improvement
efforts
In the letter the) -a that
the 1 it and the university share
a common commitment to pre
serve, protect, and enhance the
special community setting ot the
College View District
The city ami university want
to entourage "responsible own
ershtp and tenant living "
"We are really pleased that
the city asked us to help spread
the word said Brooke Driskall,
president of Alpha Delta Pi, a
social sorority. "1 think it's im
portant that other Students gel
this information from us so that
we can let them know that we
support this action
Others helping to distribute
the information are members of
Sigma Phi I psilon, Chi Omega,
Alpha Omi ron Pi, Sigma Sigma
Sigma, and Delta eta
Designation ofollege iew
as a National Register Historit
would officially recognize the
neighborhood as hamg archi-
tectural, historical, and cultural
value worth) of preservation.
I designation can also bestow
eligibility for certain benefits.
such as income tax incentives for
rental or commercial properties
within the district .mil protec
tion from state or federal projei ts
which might ad erselyaffe tthe
neighborhood
I he city w ill otter stru t en
forcement of laws and ordi
nances related to the area said
Marvin Davis, assistant city man
ager.
I he 1. itv re ognizes that
College iew as w ith any neigh
borhood, is an integral part of
the (itv as a w hole. Day is said
, mg livable neighborhoods
is a cornerstone for a strong i
able city. Improvements inol
lege View will also positive!)
impact the entire city
As a u hole the project w ent
reall) well, and all the resident -
in the area were cooperative and
glad to be a part of the efforts t
help clean up Greenville said
Driskall
BICYCLE
215 E, Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
(919)756-3301 (800)682-7050
1. MendenhaJI Student Center
2. Student Supply Store
3. Croatan
4. Bottom of College Hill Drive
5. Belk Building (Allied Health)
Fight
Apathy!
Vote SGA
Wednesday!
The East
Carolinian, like
it, or recycle it!
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1992
Bring you student I.D. and vote and possibly
win this Schwinn Frontier Bike
6. General Classroom Building
7. Jones Cafeteria
8. Front Entrance of Joyner
9. Between Jarvis Hall and Jenkins
10. Health Science Library
Must vote to enter, may enter only once
at the poll in which you vote.
Must have student I.D.
Poll open 9am-6pm.
EBERTING:
SECRETARY
lot
w
NORTH TOPSAIL
Presents
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER .
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18. 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11 00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC
WRQR 94.3
1109 Charles Blvd RADIO
Phone 758-4251 Phone 830-0944
S22 50 DAY OF SHOW S150 IN ADVANCE
- ! T 4 ACCOMMODATION INI 19 128-4745 1-800-359-4745
APRIL 2. 5, 4, 6, and 7 at K:15 pjn.
APRIL 5 at 2 IS Pj7i.
I im theatre F"t 1� than Mmie" So Bring UaHl!
Ml sl is M.50
Call: 757-6829
TONIGHT!
Willy Porter
Musician
The Underground
8:00 P.M.
Movies:
fLa Femme Nikita"
Wed April 1
'Thelma & Louise"
Thurs Fri & Sal April 2-A
n
'TheHjtcher
Sun April 5
PORUNk
Harvey Wasseiman
from Greenpeace
How to Save
the Planet
TuesApril7
Hencfcix Theatre
sm p.m.
Barefoot
is coming
APRIL 23!
Entertainment
'Crucible't
By joe Horst
Stiff VNnlr
- April .
Playh � i ili present ijs fourth
and last drama ol trie 1991 � -
son, Arthur Miller
" Ihe c ru ible is Mil -
sonal ii � �
Salem Wit I liialsi � :� �. ��
U) parallel d � M
it the 2i �
anniversan the Plavhou -� . � �
formances �vill hi ni �
stor ftK

h) teria,inti ilerai . �
�in, the dire toi
of Miller � �
rks Ihe plaj i
truth ol the huma:
Iheplav illu tral tailtl
. oui - � � � �� �
starting wit!
growing into th � � �
insanitv trvU end with 19 p
being -ent to the gallo
har .
ing as Miner him I
'handing i I
- be it
tern t ; - � thei
. .
ml i internal
-nth
'Basic Instinct7
c
Bvlke Shible)
Staff V ritei
PaulVerhoe i1
wereRoh. .7 and Tot A ��1
them, he transformed
an art form1
Uith hi- latest eft I
� ' Verhoe-en must v� rl
the 1 cmtemporaryworl
an imagined one 1 �St
future
In the process th .
scaled down so as ti ipp irn
tk Unfortunateh :� -�. �� ��
ism Bflsu Insl nci anv 11
le� believable than either 1 I� J
�ther pictures
Ihe director tne diligenth to
elevate hi- characters above the
much hvped but essentially bai
script
Michael Douglas plays v. 1
Curran a San Francisco cop
bad memories of shooting nnc
tnun-t His troubles with
drugs and smoking are we d �
mentevi in the' film but th.
never understands ho Cun
pa-t drove him to hi- rruin �.
Nor does the ston examineC urran -
ml-j- v:
� �
tiSR
;�.
V
UJednesd
t -
IV'
Mr'
Progressivi
Donee Nig
10 Drof 1
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00Komik
�Ladies Free til 1
9
lr?





A
iday!
The East
Carolinian, like
it, or recycle it!
BKRTINGE
SGA
SECRETARY
RTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� NORTH TOWER
K & THE HOT NUTS
IE MAD HATTER
WEEKEND �APRIL 18. 1992
11 Beach Airport (Gate opens 11:00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
ST MUSIC WRQR 94.3
RADIO
830-0944
N ADVANCE
� 28 4 "45 1 800-359-4745
icolina L991,1992
ivnousc Reason
&KU�
:��
In 1692, witches were
hunted in Salem.
Three hundred years
have not erased the horror.
2, 3, 4. 6, and 7 at 8:15 pjm.
PRll, 5 at 2.15 pjn.
: Less ilian Vfoie So Bruin Date
Ml Ml DENTS S4.5A
ill: 757 6829
Coffeehouse
TONIGHT!
WlLLyPOJRTER
Musician
The Underground
8:00 PM.
Movies:
La Femme NmnA"
Wed April 1
'Thelma & Louise"
Thurs, Fri, & Sat April 2-4
'TheHjtchsr"
Sun, April 5
FORUM:
Harvey Wasserman
from Greenpeace
How to Save
thePlanet
TuesApril7
Hendrix Theatre
8:00 RM.
Barefoot
is COMING
APWL23!
n
Entertainment
�lie SaHt (Earoliman
March 31, 1992
'Crucible' to bewitch audience with Salem trials
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
On April 2, the East Carolina
Flayhouse will present ijs fourth
ami last drama of the 1991-92 sea-
son, Arthur Miller's "TheCrucible
"The Crucible" is Miller's per-
sonal insight and passion into the
Salem Witch Trialsof 1692, thought
to parallel the McCarthy hearings
of the 20th Century.
Occurring on the trials' 300th
anniversary, the Playhouse's per-
formances will chronicle Miller's
Story of the events and cha racters of
a generation that was consumed by-
hysteria, intolerance and greed. John
Shearin, the director, says "This is
one of Miller's most powerful
works. The play rings out with the
truth of the human condition
The play illustrates in detail the
course of events of the witch trials,
starting with vague suspicions and
growing into the overwhelming
insanity that end with 19 people
being sent to the gallows to be
hanged as witches. The theme be-
ing, as Miller himself states, the
"handing over of conscience to an-
other, be it woman, the state, or
terror propels the main characters
into internal conflict.
Each of the 22 characters in "The
Crucible" was a real participant in
the events that unfolded. Miller
portrays the community with the
question of having human dignity
and correct moral behavior in the
face of temptation.
Shearin says "The character's
Eionysian Greek god of carnal and
physical pleasure urges will come
out no matter what. Their moral
code will force it into other outlets,
and even into dangerous forms
This moral code characterizes the
major participants in various and
extreme ways.
Abigail Williams, played by
Kelly DeHaas, is a bi-dimensional
figure � a vengeful, sadistic girl
and the young girl passionately in
love with a man who rejected her.
These performances will have an
additional scene between Proctor
and Abigail that,inShearin'swords,
"fleshes out Abby, makes her more
human
John Proctor, played by Win
Craft, is seen by many as Miller's
typical tragic hem. Miller describes
Proctoras "powerful of body, even-
tempered, and not easily led But
having committed one of the most
mortal sins in his philosophy, Proc-
tor maintains an internal struggle
with his conscience. In the end,
Proctor's heroism is evident with
his refusal to violate his relation-
ship with God by making a dishon-
est one with the State.
Deputy Governor Danforth,
played by Matt McCulloch, isa man
who sees himself as a person driven
and focused.
"In his eyes he is right; he is
driven by the State, but even more
so by God McCulloch says.
Danforth is the ultimate theocrati-
cal authority when he enters the
community, but even his respected
decisions are influenced and
swayed by the overall frenzy.
Though all the characters are
essential to the coherence of the
plav, Reverend Parris, played by
Donn Youngstrom, rounds out the
major characters. Parris always be-
lieved that he was persecuted and
along with the rest of community,
as Miller quotes, "never conceived
that the chi Idren were anything but
thankful for being permitted to walk
straight, eyes slightly lowered,arms
at the sides, and mouths shut until
bidden to speak
Shearin states that the ultimate
question posed to these Puritans is
whether their "moral soul is more
important than their physical life
McCulloch relates that the religious
aspect of Puritan life is very strong
in the play. "The only thing that
they had to hold on to was their
religion McCulloch says.
Critics have raised many prob-
lems inherent in Miller's "Crucible
The script has very little depth of
characterization in it; therefore, the
intensity and ferocitv needed is al-
most entirely left to the actors. The
first scene sometimes overpowers
any apparent motivation and the
final scene changes points of view
randomly. These two scenes, along
with the explosive trial scene, will
make or break the effectiveness of
the play.
The plav will run until April 7,
with a matinee performance on
April 5at2:15 p.m. All other perfor-
mances start at 8:15 p.m. Two spe-
cial high school matinees will be
held on April 6 and 7 in addition to
the night performances.
Individual tickets are $750 for
the general public and $450 for stu-
dents with a valid ECU student I.D.
The box office is open from 10:00
a.m. until 4:00 p.m except on per-
formance nights, when it closes at
830 p.m. For more information or
MastercardVisa ticket reserva-
tions, call (919) 757-6829.
'Basic Instincf displays vivid sexual scenery
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Paul Verhoeven's last two films
were Robocop and Total Recall. With
them, he transformed violence into
an art form.
With his latest effort, Basic In-
stinct, Verhoeven must work with
the contemporary world rather than
an imagined one of some distant
future.
In the process the violence is
scaled down so as to appear realis-
tic. Unfortunately, despitethis real-
ism, Basic Instinct came across as
less believable than either of the
other pictures.
The director tries diligently to
elevate his characters above the
much hyped but essentially barren
script.
Michael Douglas plays Nick
Curran, a San Francisco cop with
bad memories of shooting innocent
tourists. His troubles with alcohol,
drugs and smoking are well-docu-
mented in the film, but the viewer
never understands how Curran's
past drove him to his many vices.
Nor does thestorvexamineCurran's
psyche. Nick's decline into drink-
ing, after three months on the
wagon, is plaved up as a monu-
mental example of Nick's growing
fascination with a prime suspect in
a murder case rather as much
needed information about his men-
tal state.
The suspect whom Nick falls
for is Catherine Trammel (Sharon
Stone), a novelist writing about a
murder.
Whena retired rockstaris mur-
dered exactly as detailed in
Trammel's novel, she is bmught in
for questioning. Thus the suspense
begins as Nick and Catherine play
psychological games with one an-
other while frequently engaging in
erotic sex.
Early in their relationship she
relates the plot elements of her lat-
est work: The story of a detective
falling for the wrong woman before
eventually getting killed. The
premise is satirical yet is played as
being serious.
Catherine's initial interrogation
about the rock star's murder pro-
vides the most entertainment in the
film.
.
�,v:
The scene occurs in a barren
cement- block room where a line-
up platform stands behind glass.
Catherine sits in front of the glass
while five detectives question her.
She brazenly replies to every ques-
tion uttering expletives like prepo-
sitions.
At one point she slowlv
uncrosses her legs to reveal the lack
of undergarments beneath hershort
dress. The detectives sitting oppo-
site her stare in uncomfortable si-
lence.
Verhoeven punctuates the stac-
cato repa rtee by cu tting q u ickly and
frequently from questioner to
questionee and back again.
Clever camera angles, mostly
in the opening forty minutes, pep-
per thefilm. Several overhead shots
early in the filn. provide an over-
view of several scenes before the
camera narrows its focus to close-
ups of the characters.
This is when the film should
have picked up the tension but in-
stead proved thedropping off point
The sex in the film grows dull
after the first few encounters be-
tween Nick and Catherine. The
erotic urgency leaves after their ini-
tial encounter. The result is sex
without substance, without sensu-
ality, and without any real mean-
ing in the context of the story
The story supplies enough
twists to beentertaining. The screen
is littered with fake leads, surprise
revelations and deceptiveclimaxes.
At the riskof giving too much away,
the audience actually smirked
loudly at the ending
The final scene, being tongue-
in-cheek, leads one to favor the hy-
pothesis that the film makers have
created a satire. Yet Jerry
Goldsmith's score sounds heavy-
handed.
The music is that of a senous
film. The images, also, are that of a
serious work. The violence seems
real as opposed to the surreal kind
in Verhoeven's last two efforts.
The cast does a respectable job.
George Dzunda providesgreatsup-
port as Michael Douglas' partner.
His cha racter rises above the stereo-
typical role to which he should have
been relegated in another cop movie.
Sharon Stone sizzles at times
but her character is inconsistent.
Her smug, liberal attitudediesdown
in some of her conversations. Since
this fault lies in the script, she can
not be held responsible for some of
her mood changes .She does relish
the role of a psychotic.
Basic Instinct is basically enter-
taining. Verhoeven has done much
better work and there have been
much better thrillers, but in the midst
of a theatrical drought of passable
entertainment, this will do.
On a scale of one to ten, this film
rates a 6.
Wednesday
v
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30 �
Till
E?F
hn
yyriMAX
GREENVIUE,NC
QAPW14-5,1992
T HELIOS & IRATESO
sponsored by ecu recreational services
no alcoholic beverages or glass allowed on playing fields
Intramural Fields Located Adjacent to Ficklen Stadium
Photo courtMy J.D. Whttmlra
Abigail Williams (Kelly DeHaas), is a vengeful, sadistic girl passionately
in love with the man who rejected her, John Procter (Win Craft).
New company
challenges Marvel
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
The largest comic company
in the United States is under
siege.
Marvel Comics Group has
lost several important creators
in the past weeks to an inde-
pendent comic publishing com-
pany, Malibu Graphics.
A move this strong is des-
tined to have an impact
unheralded m Marvel's history.
Rob Liefeld, Todd
McFarlane, Jim Lee and Erik
Larsen are only a few of the
eight creators who have re-
signed from Marvel.
When Liefeld began to
work for Marvel he was "just
another artist but people be-
gan to notice him and desire
more from him.
Then Liefeld re-created ex-
isting characters and turned
them into a team, starting their
own comic.
Liefeld made history with
Marvel characters by breaking
the copy sales record with one
issue.
When X-Force hit the
stands in July of '91 it sold over
15 million copies. This broke
the previous record, held by
Todd McFarlane, of one mil-
lion.
Leifeld then made a Levi's
501 commercial on the success
of X-Force, but after only 11 is-
sues of X-Force, Liefeld left.
Jim Lee has been Marvel's
golden child for close to a year.
Lee was given the premium title
of Marvel's line, X-Men.
The writer, Chris
Claremont, had logged over 15
years of perfect service on the
title but when Lee and
Claremont couldn't see eye to
eye, Marvel cut Claremont
loose. Claremont had worked
years to establish the charac-
ters, new X-Men.
After setting a new record
for sales (over 3 million) and
working less than one year on
the title, Lee has left Marvel
and signed on with Malibu.
McFarlane, who quit mar-
vel in October '91, has also
signed on with Malibu, along
with four other creators from
Marvel.
This surge of talent head-
ing toward the independent
market could mean the end of
the reign of the "BigTwo Mar-
vel and DC Comics.
Marvel and DC Comics
combined own over 80 percent
of the comic market, but with
Malibu having the top three
money makers in the business
working for them their share is
assured of taking a bite out of
the Big Two's share.
Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
offering
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your completed Adviser Evaluation
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She
You'll Get Nothing and Like It
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
PBS attack comes from all sides
Letters to t
Jennifer Wardrep, Neus Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
By Parker Editorial ColumnistA
The EMM Cawliman has served the East Carolina campus commun.ty since 1925. emphasizing information that affects FX U
students The Efltl Carohman publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday The masthead editorial in each ed.t.on
is the or.n.on of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
tor publication. Letters should addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C .
27838-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, March 31, 1992
Brooks offers change to SGA
The staff of The East Carolinian has
wholeheartedly selected its candidates of
endorsement for the 1992 Student Gov-
ernment Association political positions.
The following candidates were individu-
ally determined to be the best candidates
for their respective postions:
PRESIDENT: Jonathan Brooks
Brooks was selected based on his abil-
ity to communicate and translate his po-
sitions clearly. His lack of student gov-
ernment experience will be counterbal-
anced by his dealings in state politics.
Also, his lack of experience gives him a
fresh look at the workings of the student
government system. Brooks' high level of
determination along with the aforemen-
tioned qualities seem to be the right com-
bination for the demanding position of
president of SGA.
VICE PRESIDENT: Crystal Cross
Cross was chosen over her counter-
part partly for her decision and ability to
run a single campaign. Even though it is
not against SGA guidelines and regula-
tions to run a joint campaign, one must be
as strong as the other and not rely on one's
past. In addition to the similar qualifica-
tions of both vice presidential candidates,
Cross' overall schedule is better suited to
devote a proper amount of time to the
position SGA vice president demands.
TREASURER: Brad Osborne
When one runs for political office, the
least one can do is make hisher sched-
uled appearances. In the event that some
unforeseen circumstance may arise one
should at least send a representative or
contact the event office in advance to
explain the absence. One of the main
reason's for Osborne's endorsement stems
from his opponent's absence at the March
27 SGA forum. Osborne was also selected
for his past involvement with the current
treasurer and his knowledge of current
events dealing with the SGA Treasurers'
position. With a little more grooming
from current SGATreasurer, Eric Hilliard,
Osborne should contribute greatly to the
1992 SGA staff.
SECRETARY: Lisa Berting
Berting's overall experience and
dedication played key factors in her se-
lection. She possesses the qualities so
desperately needed to hold together such
a diversed group of individuals. With
her strong work ethic and easy-going
personality, the 1992 Student Govern-
ment Association should far exceed the
expected goals.
In the wake of the recent con-
servative attack on the National En-
dowment of the Arts, Public Televi-
sion is being taken to task for its
alleged liberal bias Though the gov-
ernment pays but a fourth of PBS's
funding, if the tax dollars cut off
we'll be seeing Big Bird and cajun
chef Justin Wilson in This Old Unem-
ployment Line
Though attention was origi-
nally focused on the network's in-
frequently-run documentaries con-
cerning subjects like abortion and
religion, now the real offenders are
being exposed "Leftist" purveyors
like The MacNeil-Lehrer Report, the
Bill Movers series, and Charles
Kuralt. That pinko Masterpiece The-
atre OUghtl get it next
Unfortunately, even the venue
of censorship looks better than what
opponents of government-sup-
ported media have in mind� pull
all the tax support and let PBS make
the rest oi the money, or the indi-
vidual programs can go hunting
across the dial for new homes For
most staples of Public Television,
that means death. The Children's
Television Workshop has looked
intocommeraally relocating Sesame
Street for years with no success
Most of the shows featured on
Public Television simply aren't
popular enough to make it on net-
work TV The average viewer still
cannot watch a science-based fea-
ture that lasts longer than two min-
utes The statelv reserve of Austin
City Limits cannot compete with Hee
Hr'iv's scantily clad models and
knock-knock jokes Most PBS pro-
gramming needs an outlet that
doesn't bow to the whims of public
trend in the constant search for big
bucks. It is nice that we have a chan-
nel with some integrity Or do we7
Recently the UNC-Center for
Public Television held its bi-annual
telethon that drums up viewer dol-
lars to supplement sponsorship in-
come "Festival 92" was very aware
of the financial danger facing them,
and responded accordingly In the
manner that network television com-
petes in sweeps weeks by featuring
sex, violence and controversial sub-
ject matter, so did PBS alter format
with a barrage of Lawrence Welk �
the likes of which this world has
never seen Shows of political na-
ture such as Firing Line and The
McLaughlin Group were temporarily
replaced with every stock nature
documentary and "up with people"
type program the UNC affiliate had
For two weeks PBS beca me the Fam-
ily Channel sans Willard Scott
promos.
I myself disappointed one vol-
unteer manning the phones by ex-
plaining why I wouldn't be making
a pledge, which she graciously prom-
ised to pass on to one of the higher-
ups If PBS is going to alter format
for a "money audience" or give in to
the pressure of a single group � one
that 1 dare say probably doesn't
watch that much public television
anyway, then I will have a hard time
supporting them during this fund-
ing debate
This may have been a response
solely endemic to North Carolina,
but if this is our only outlet to that
programming, then that is enough
If PBS trusts their audience and is
counting on the viewer's help, then
they cannot cowtow to another, and
possibly lesser, denominator
Now some of you NOV A-hat-
ing. Bill Moyers-despising taxpay-
ers out there may be thinking like
the pressure groups � well, I don't
watch that stuff or even like it, so
why should I pay for it' My re-
sponse is simple turnabout 1 don't
like a lot of things the government
funds, but 1 don't stop paying taxes
now, do I? In direct respects, there
are also many PBS shows I do not
enjoy, yet I realize that many people
do, and should be able to
This is on one level, a problem
of toleration Anyone bothered by
the piddling amount of their taxes
funding public television should, as
John Frohnmeyer suggested to NEA
cntics, worry about something that
is really costing them money like
the Savings and Loan fiasco
But as the problem is said to
be with news and educational-ori-
ented programming, it exemplifies
an age-old mi. conception Hardcore
conservatives cannot distinguish
unbiasednessfromliberalness That
is historically proven by the nght-
wmg's view of the news media as
leftist, because of the tendency to
report establishment in unobjectivr�
fashion, which is not always flatter-
ing
Worse yet is the fear of mere
ideas.
Personally, I'll occasionally
watch something that displays a
viewpoint I do not agree with, if
only to better understand the idea in
order to argue against it Whether I
see merit in it or not, I'm still learn-
ing something Then again, maybe
that's what we're really afraid of
Watch out. National Public Ra-
dio, they're coming for you next
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Anti-drug campaign misleads viewers
By
Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
On The Fringe
Job market dismal, grad school OK
By Tim E.
Hampton
Editorial
Columnist
While reading (yes, I can read,
thank you very much) the JOBS OF-
FERED section of the classifieds, this
came into the vortex of vision:
SOON-TO-BE COLLEGE
CRADS: Job market looks pretty
grim and down right bleak. If you
can't find that 30K front office job,
with perks like daily massages, free
cappuchino and personal booths at a
barbecue restaurant, then come work
for us. Now hiring for monotonous
work in a pickle factory at $4.45 an
hour in beautiful poverty-stricken
Eastern N.C. Free jar of pickles ev-
ery week Apply at Exploitation
Temporary Service
A recent study estimates that
of the 1 million college graduates in
1992, only 40 percent will find jobs
in the their preferred fields. The other
600,000 will just have to pray they
don't become caught in a pickle.
So, in hopes that members of
the class of 1992 don't become like
one of my graduate friends who
works as a floor mopper at a Pee
Wee Herman theater, or another
post-morter-board amico who is em-
ployed by City Services (the sewer
division), it is time to assemble "The
I Want A Good Job Really Bad Hand-
book "
Consideration No. 1: Make
sure the resume emphasizes those
good qualities and doesn't mention
the bad For example, under EXPE-
RIENCE, follow this lead:
1991 to Present
Campus leader, with responsibili-
ties of: planning nonviolent ice cream
socials, and making sure eivrybody was
harmonious.
There is no need to point out
that nothing was really accom-
plished during your administration
and corruption was swept under the
carpet.
Another example of 'Resume
Beautification' falls under
AWARDS
Service Award from the ECU
chapter ofMu Nu Omega for dedication
and commitment.
Here again, there is no need to
write that the dedication involved
breaking into apartments and beat-
ing people up, or that the commit-
ment was writing the check for the
keg deposit.
Remember that Resume Beau-
tification works like Campus Beau-
tification: bushes and bricks give the
facadal illusion of no inept behavior
or wrong doing.
Consideration No. 2: Look
Act like a conformist during the job
interview. Personal demur should
be as non-radical as possible with
not even the hint of patchouli oil.
Clothes should be of a dark, serious
color that speak volumes of your
willingness to be a faceless drone.
Most employers are of the upper-
class bourgeois, so lay hints that you
are also a brainwashed Republican.
Here is an example of this:
EMPLOYER: "Mr. Loser, we
have exponentially upgraded our
employee's work environment in
sector 7G. We call it Industrial Plant
Beautification
PEON (you): "Yes, I noticed I
Really like plants and Bushes around
here. You know, it reminds me of
happy hour at Rabbit's where we
drank BuschL I liked Australia, a lot
of Bushmen down there "
Consideration No 3. Sell your
soul During the job interview, it is
important to convey the willingness
to do anything immoral (except sell-
ing Amway) or unethical for the sake
of a good salary Fudging account-
ing records to hide a SI 50,000 disap-
pearance of funds, No Problemo
Entrapping employees with stolen
candy bars. Hey I'll do it. Paying for
a pig pickin' with company money,
You Bet'ya.
Consideration No 4: Cower to
future employer until the Cadillacs
comehome. This is the time in which
to suck-up, have nose of brown, to
have total humility and love total
humiliation When pleading on
hands and knees, remember to keep
a Faustian conscience and say
"Yesssss, you are correct sir ma-
dame, I am a subservient low life at
your beckoning call
On the putting surface � A
little more than a month from now,
the graduation ceremony will be
held in Ficklen and people will be
crying. Crying not so much for the
cessation of the pain-filled years of
NoDoz, bubble sheets and blue
books, but because there ain't no
jobs.
In the worst case scenario (a
business cliche, sorry), graduates
send out resumes, interview for
months on end until the point of
frustration, until they become fix-
tures of the Emerald City for years,
living in shotgun shacks, working
sub-par jobs and hanging out at
Rabbit's. The extent of the four, five
or six year's education is held to a
slurred grovel of argumentation on
topics as pertinent as One-Way
streets and escalating fastfood prices.
But then again, there is always
graduate school.
Their most famous ad goes like
this: "This is your brain This is your
brain on drugs Any questions7"
That's fairly typical of the ad-
vertisements produced by the omni-
present Partnership for a Drug-Free
America it's meant to scare, it's mis-
leading, and it has no factual content
Those PDFA ads that do have
tactual content are usually incorrect
Until 1987, the PDFA was running
ads that purported to compare the
brainwave activity of a "normal"
teenager to a teen who was using
marijuana, the user's brainwaves, as
measured by EEC, were markedly
flatter
As it happens, the ad was a lie
The brainwaves that the PDFA
claimed were those of a marijuana-
smoking teenager, were actually the
brainwaves of a teenager who was in
a coma Only after an angry outcry
from doctors who could tell the dif-
ference did the PDFA pull the ads
The truth is, marijuana use in-
creases brainwave activity Specifi-
cally, marijuana use increases the
smoker's alpha waves � the
brainwaves associated with relax-
ation and creativity � while he's
under the influence.
Another example. Until about
a year ago, one of the doors in The
East Carolinian was graced by a PDFA
poster which claimed that illegal drug
use costs American businesses $60
billion per year.
Wrong. To begin with, the
PDFA's claim is based on a study
carried out by the federal National
Institute on Drug Abuse, which actu-
ally claimed only that the use of ille-
gal drugs costs American businesses
$47 billion per year. (I guess the Part-
nership just rounded up.)
But John Horgan reported in
the Apr. 2, 1990 issue of The New
Republic ("Your Analysis is Faulty")
that the NIDA study is flawed in
several respects. When reviewed
carefully, the study actually shows
that drug use can't be said to cost
American businesses any measurable
amount.
The NIDA study's flaws are
too extensive to go into here; suffice
it to say that, among other things,
NIDA deliberately confuses correla-
tion with causation. Horgan's article
is thoroughly chilling and well-writ-
ten; it's available in Joyner Library; I
urge you to read it.
The best that can be said of the
PDFA poster is that its creators didn't
bother to check the accuracy of their
source; even then, they gratuitously
added $13 billion to an already bogus
figure.
The May 1990 Scientific Ameri-
can pointed out lies in another PDFA
ad In "An Antidrug Message Gets
Its Facts Wrong Horgan dissected a
PDFA advertisement that claimed
that "last year, 15 million Americans
used cocaine � and 5 million of those
vho survived required medical
helP"
Horgan points out that NIDA,
� which, as we've already seen,
bends over backwards to exaggerate
the effects of drug use � estimated
only 8 2 million cocaine users in 1989,
about half of the PDFA's claim
What's more, NIDA counted only
62,141 medical emergencies involv-
ing cocaine (and 3,300 deaths) So the
PDFA's report of the "medical help"
needed by cocaine users is wrong by
at least two orders of magnitude
Also, the PDFA's numbers im-
ply that one out of three cocaine us-
ers needs medical help Even if
NIDA's statistics are correct � al-
ways a highly questionable assump-
tion � the actual figure is nearer to
one out of 132.
Counting free air time contrib-
uted by individual radio and televi-
sion stations across the country, the
PDFA has a million-dollar-per-day
ad budget to spend on ads like these.
A million dollars' worth of lies, half-
truths and assorted propaganda, each
and every day.
Now, ask one question: who
stands to benefit most from a barrage
of advertisements designed to scare
people by exaggerating the dangers
of illegal drugs?
I can think of exactly three
groups. Tobacco and alcohol compa-
nies are one; legalizing other drugs
would diminish the market for their
products.
What's more, if you focus on
illegal drugs, you won't notice what's
being done with the legal ones. In
1990, according to annual actuarial
information published by the office
of the United States Surgeon Gen-
eral, alcohol killed more than 28 times
as many people � 130,000 � as did
all illegal drugs put together. The
only drug that's a bigger killer is
tobacco, which killed 360,000 people.
No wonder they want you to look in
the other direction.
Even after adjusting for the
greater number of users of legal
drugs, legal drugs are deadlier �
cocaine, for instance, is roughly twice
as safe (or half as deadly) as alcohol.
And that's not counting drugs in-
volved in traffic accidents, in which
alcohol figures prominently.
Pharmaceutical companies also
benefit from keeping illegal drugs,
most of all marijuana, illegal Despite
the Drug Enforcement Agency's
claims to the contrary, medical and
anecdotal evidence demonstrate that
smoking marijuana is an effective an-
tidote to nausea and other symptoms
of cancer, glaucoma, and a long list of
other ailments.
Pharmaceutical companies
produce pills that contain THC, the
active ingredient in marijuana, which
also relieve the symptoms. Some-
times. Patients usually vomit up the
THC pilla before they can take effect,
wasting a lot of their money but fat-
tening the drug companies' profits.
Worse yet � from the drug
companies' point of view � patients
can grow their own marijuana, the
drug companies can't patent it and
profit from it the way they can patent
and profit from their own pills
It cannot be a coincidence that
marijuana remains a Schedule I drug
� a category reserved for drugs with
no medical uses � despite over-
whelming evidence that it is benefi-
cial
The third group that benefits
from a public scared of drugs is the
rapidly expanding circle of drug-test-
ing companies When you have con-
vinced people that drugs lurk every-
where, waiting to threaten theirlives,
thev are more willing to allow and
expand drug-testing programs
The media can take credit for
helping to fight the war on drugs, but
they don't stand to benef it financially.
And traffickers in illegal drugs stand
to benefit from the war on drugs �
exactly as bootleggers benefited from
Prohibition � but they don't benefit
from scare-type ads
So the primary beneficiaries of
the Partnership's ads are tobacco
companies, alcohol companies, phar-
maceutical companies and d rug-test-
ing companies.
And who funds the Partner-
ship for a Drug-Free America7
Overwhelmingly, it's tobacco
companies, alcohol companies, phar-
maceutical companies and drug-test-
ing companies.
I quote from an article titled
"Condoning the Legal Stuff? Hard
Sell in the Drug War written by
Cynthia Cotts, from the Mar 9 issue
of The Nation. Cotts studied the
PDFA's 1991 tax return and discov-
ered the following:
"From 1988 to 1991, pharma-
ceutical companies and their benefi-
ciaries contributed as follows the J.
Seward Johnson, Sr Charitable
Trusts ($1,100,000), DuPont
($150,000); the Procter & Gamble
Fund ($120,000); the Bristol-Myers
Squibb Foundation ($110,000); John-
son & Johnson ($110,000); SmithKline
Beecham ($100,000); the Merck Foun-
dation ($75,000); and Hoffman-
LaRoche ($50,000) "
Not incidentally, Hoffman-
LaRoche makes more than half a bil-
lion dollars per year from its drug-
testing operations. Cotts goes on to
write:
"Pharmaceuticals and their
beneficiaries alone donated 54 per-
cent of the $5.8 million the Partner-
ship took from its top 25 contributors
from 1988 to 1991. That 54 percent is
conservative. It doesn't include do-
nations from the tobacco and alcohol
kings: The Partnership has taken
$150,000 each from Philip Morris,
Anheuser-Busch and RJR Reynolds,
plus $100,000 from American Brands
(Jim Beam, Lucky Strike)
The Partnership for a Drug-
Free America lies shamelessly. Its
avowed aim is to get you scared of
illegal drugs. And it's funded prima
rily by companies mat financially
benefit from your fear.
Be mad as hell.
Another response
to Mandelker
To the Editor
After reading Dr Mandelke- -
response to the letters from irate read-
ers of The Eust CaieltniawJ feel it's my
duty to respond to what he had to suv
about me
It seems that once again Dr
Mandelker has misconstrued what he
has read It doesn't occur to him that
his warped opinion is what got him
the responses he receded
First of all, let me clarity that 1
did not threaten to shoot or kill any-
one, least of all someone as insignifi-
cant to me as Dr Mandelker What 1
said was people like him don't under-
stand what rape is, and what it di ies u
the victim Because people like him
can't understand the big picture with
the big words 1 volunteered some
words that hirr and people like him
could understand
I'm not livstt - lent, and
by no means a radical feminist, al-
though I do classify myself as a femi-
nist
Women are starting to stai
and defend themselves, verbally �
physically We've decided that we n
not going to take any B S " from any
idiot on the street or some man with a
Ph.D who knows nothing ot what he
talks about
So don't insult our intelligence
by saying that you said something
different that what you origu
wrote Because what you wrote Sp ��
for itself
I'm not afraid to stand by my
words I know that I'm not going to
shoot someone because they disagree
with me, Dr Mandelker But 1 won't
hesitate to "pop a few rounds" into
someone frying to physically rape me
So take the criticism like a de-
cent human being and stop whining
tiboutevery little article that cuts you
down
Sheleathea Wright
Senior
English
Class president
supports Jones
To the Editor
I've been involved with Student
Covemmentforfiveyears From fresh-
man class representative to student
bodv president last year and senior
class president thisvear, Ihaveleamed
many valuable lessons along the way-
One thing I have learned is to
hold a great deal of respect for those
people who sacrifice their time and
efforts m servicetoother students They
take the action and worry about the
issues that affect us SO we don't have
to
Whether it's Student Govern-
ment, Residence Hall Association, Stu-
dent Union, or one of a number of
organizations, their efforts often times
go completely unnoticed
Onesuch individual isCourmev
Jones Her efforts through StudentGov-
emmentand many other organizations
have given her notice I have Watoned
her experience and leadership ability
grow over the past three vears in SGA
Her hard work has b
she now holds the higtj
responsibility in the
speaker This position hi
trol over the branch 0
ernrnent which alloc at
your student fees to sti
tiani and acts as your
student issues She ha
standing job at tins p�
strafing her t.n.tfulnes
I verv difficult role
As boil ba �
student body president
earned an that verj
There is nothing mo
you plan on being efl
dent, than ha
"know how" to I
When you take off
1
tor someone to t
on If you want I �
must � � � . . - lund n
to know vn hat admini
ertainiss i
what timer- I
. in place � - �
� avetokni i
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:th and can count
kn
crisis in S l
hmd it, and h
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where)
km - � '�
aren't items j
ute-
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Court
price Student body
position you I
resume Anyone h
siboncan vou
a position "t honor
of extreme p. -
countabilitytothest
looks to you I
ership WhetJ i
and which di I
pus, can all depenc
ence and direction
office
With he-
system and close w
two student body p
no question that G
the ability to be an i
dent It you would
an open ear to) "I
experience and abili
about it, then 1 urc�
support and vote tci
tor Student Body Pn
No matter who v
vour student I D
tiondav ' � '

Jones sh
support
To the Editor)
I am wr
coming Student Go
Onecandidate Ms
aligned herself with j
date, Mr BilIDansW
mg in which Mr Da
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Qliie East Carolinian March 31, 1992 s
Letters to the Editor
� neficiariesof
� � Partnershi - ads .ire tobacco
v. mpanies, phar-
u . - mddrug-test-
: who funds the I'artner-
America7
Overwhelmingly, it's tobacco
1 companies, phf;
eutical companies and drug-test
ng companies
I quote from an article titled
� ring the Legal Stuff7 Hard
in the Drug War written by
fts from the Mar 9 issue
� I he I its studied the
PDF A s 199 tax return and discov-
ered the ' � wing
Ft -r 1988 to 1991, pharma-
ceutical companies and their benefi-
ciaries contributed as follows: the J.
Seward Johnson, Sr , Charitable
Tr s, . DuPont
($1! the Procter & Gamble
Fund ($120,000); the Bristol-Myers
Squibb Foundation (SI 10,000); John-
son & Johnson (5110,iXX)),SmithKline
Beecham (S100,0tXl), the Merck Foun-
dation ($75,000), and Hoffman
La Roche ($50,000) "
Not incidentally, Hoffman-
LaRoche makes more than half a bil-
lion dollars per year from its drug-
testing operations Cotts goes on to
write
"Pharmaceuticals and their
beneficiaries alone donated 54 per-
cent of the S5 8 million the Partner-
ship took from its top 25 contributors
from 1988 to 1991 That 54 percent is
conservative It doesn't include do-
nations from the tobacco and alcohol
kings The Partnership has taken
$150,000 each from Philip Morris,
Anheuser-Busch and RJR Reynolds,
plus $100,000 from American Brands
(Jim Beam, Lucky Strike)
The Partnership for a Drug-
Free America lies shamelessly. Its
avowed aim is to get you scared of
illegal drugs. And it's funded prima-
rily by companies that financially
benefit from your fear
Be mad as hell. -
Another response
to Mandelker
To the Editor
After reading Dr Mandelker's
-espouse to the letters from irate read-
ers of The East Carolinian, 1 feel it's mv
duty to respond to what he had to say
about me
It seems that once again Dr
Mandelker has misconstrued what he
�i i read It doesn't occur to him that
his warped opinion is what got him
the responses he received
First of all, let me clarify that 1
did not threaten to shoot or kill any-
one least of all someone as msignifi-
cant to me as Dr Mandelker What I
said w as people like him don't under-
hand what rape is, and what ltdoes to
�he victim Because people like him
in t understand the big picture with
the big words, 1 volunteered some
words that him and people like him
could understand
I'm not hysterical, violent, and
by no means a radical feminist, al-
though I do classify myself as a femi-
nist
Women are starting to stand up
and defend themselves, verbally and
physically We've decided that we're
� going to take any "BS from any
dioton the street or some man with a
Ph D who knows nothing of what he
s about
So don't insult our intelligence
5 saying that vou said something
different that what you originally
rote Because what you wrote spoke
�or Itselt
I'm not afraid to stand by my
words 1 know that I'm not going to
shoot someone because they disagree
with me, Dr Mandelker But I won't
hesitate to pop a few rounds" into
someone trvmg to physically rape me.
So take the criticism like a de-
cent human being and stop whining
about every little article that cuts you
down
Sheleathea Wright
Senior
English
Class president
supports Jones
To the Editor
I've been involved with Student
Govern ment for five years From fresh-
man class representative to student
body president last year and senior
class president thisyear, I ha velearned
manv valuable lessons along the way
One thing I have learned is to
hold a great deal of respect for those
people who sacnfice their time and
efforts in service toother students They
take the action and worry about the
issues that affect us so we don't have
to
Whether it's Student Govern-
ment, ResidenceHall Association, Stu-
dent Union, or one of a number oi
organizations, their efforts often times
go completely unnoticed
One such individual isCourtney
Jonas HereffortsthnnjghStudentGov-
emment and manyotherorganizahons
have given her notice I have watched
her experience and leadership ability
grow over the past three years in SGA
Her hard work has been awarded as
she now holds the highest position of
responsibility in the legislature, as
speaker This position holdsdirectcon-
trol over the branch of Student Gov-
ernment which allocates $166,000 of
your student fees to student organiza-
tions and acts as your official voice on
student issues She has done an out-
standing job at this position, demon-
strating her tacrfulness and fairness in
a very difficult role.
As I look back at my term as
student body president last year, I also
learned another very valuable lesson
There is nothing more important, if
you plan on being effective as Presi-
dent, than having the experience and
"know how" to make a difference.
When you take office, with your one
year term, you don't have time to wait
for someone to tell you what's going
on. If you want to be effective, you
must hit the ground running You have
hi know what administrators can help
you on certain issues You have to know
what University Committees are al-
ready in place todeal with certain agen-
das You have to know what individu-
als in Public Safety, Business Affairs,
Student Life, etc have a relationship
with and can count on You have to
know why we expenenced a budget
ensis in SGA last year, the history be-
hind it, and how you can prevent it in
the future You just plain have to know
'where you've been" if you want to
know "where you're going " These
aren't items you can leam in five min-
utes These are attributes you must pay
the price through experience
Courtney Jones has paid the
price Student body president is not a
position you hold just to put on your
resume. Anyone who has held the po-
sition can vouch for that Although it is
a position of honor, it is also a position
of extreme personal sacnfice and ac-
countability to the student body which
looks to you for knowledgeable lead-
ership WTietheryou"sink'or "swim
and which direction you pull the cam-
pus, can all depend on what experi-
ence and direction you bnng to the
office
With her vast knowledge of the
system and close work with the past
two student body presidents, there is
no question that Courtney Jones has
the ability to be an outstanding presi-
dent If vou would like someone with
an open ear to your concerns and the
expenenceand ability to do something
about it, then 1 urge you to cast your
support and vote for Courtney Jones
for Student Body President on Apnl 1
No matter who you support, bring
vour student ID on campus on elec-
tion day and let your opinion be heard
Allen Thomas
Senior Class President
Jones should not
support Dansey
To the Editor
1 am writing in regard to the up-
coming Student Government elections
Onecandidate, Ms Courtney Jones, has
aligned herself with one mayoral candi-
date, Mr Bill Dansey. Iattendeda meet-
ing in which Mr Dansey stated that he
had Ms. Jones working for him. I do not
believe that a candidate for SGA presi-
dent has any business getting involved
in such a way with a mayoral candidate
If Ms. Jones is so concerned with im-
proving relations with the city, then
why is she getting involved with a can-
didate that in my opinion does not de-
serve to be our mayor nor has a chance
of winning?
This brings up another topic of
my concern Ms. Jones is being backed
by our currentSGA president, Mr Alex
Martin Mr Martin has yet attended a
single city council meeting Is this
"good" representation for East Caro-
lina University? I think not!
We need new leadership in our
SGA leadership that is willing to work
with the city of Greenville, not try to
meddle in the affairs of city govern-
ment Jonathan Brooks is the kind of
leadership that we need. He will work
with the city and the mayor whoever
heshe may be We need a president
that will represent all the students on
campus, not a continuation oi under-
representation I hope that the student
txxiy realizes thisand will vote in accor-
dance
David Reid
Sophomore
Political Science
Current secretary
recommends Jones
To the Editor:
As the SGA Secretary for the
past two years, I have had the experi-
ence of dealing with every member of
the legislature. This experience has
enabled me to know just what it takes
to run the Student Government Asso-
ciation office. Theelection for the 1992-
'93 executive officers is going to be
held April 1, 1992. I am writing this
letter to give you my opinion on who
is the best person to fill the job as
president of the Student Government
Association, Ms. Courtney Jones.
This year, 1 have had the oppor-
tunity to work very closely with Ms
Jones during her service as speaker of
the legislature Her commitment to
the SGA and her desire to serve her
fellow students to the best of her abil-
ity has been shown in the past three
years that she has held a position in
the SGA
Working closely with the past
two SGA Presidents, I have seen what
is needed to be a competent and suc-
cessful in the office as president I am
positive that Courtney embtdies all
the needed characteristics to be one of
East Carolina's best SGA President
This past yea r alone Ms Jones is
speaker of the legislature, a vohng
member of the Fine Arts Funding
Board and a voting member of Transit
Board She has also co-coordinated
the two SGA Leadership Training
Retreats, coordinated the SGA Proce-
dures and SGA Programming Com-
mittees, as well as organized and con-
ducted the Double Funding Hearing
A vote for Courtney Jones
would be a vote for a hard working
individual who is her for you, the
students of East Carolina University!
Sincerely,
Katie Carstens
SGA Secretary
6R0WTU HAS S��N ftlWEO
FROM THE PRESIDENTS FACM
Letters to the Editor
Berting deserves
secretary position
To the Editor
For those students who are un-
aware, the Student Government elec-
tions are Wednesday There is a candi-
date running who is concerned about
vour awareness and involvementin stu-
dent organizations on campus Due to
her desire of informing me about SGA
issues, I was challenged to become in-
volved also.
Lisa Berting has been an active
memberofSCA forfwoyears Thispast
yearalone, Ms Bertmg is active in SGA,
a member of the Student Pirate Club, a
sister in Alpha Om icnn Pi, a small group
leader in Inter-varsity and on staff at The
East Carolinian. With that m mind, it is
important for us to elect a person who
has the experience and leadership skills
to handle the position of secretary.
This year, 1 have had the oppor-
tunity to work very closely with Ms
Berting cm the Screenings Committee
within SGA She is always willing to
assistourchairman in any waypossible.
Also, for the past semester, Ms Berting
has been working with Katie Carsteus,
the present SGA secretary By working
with Ms Carsteus, she has acquired the
knowledge necessary to serve as your
sectary Thistypeof dedication proves
she ls the best candidate for the job!
Berting ls theonly nameyouneed
to know for SGA secretary
Kimberly Ross
Junior Class Vice President
Brooks works
for change
To the Editor:
It is election ti me again at ECU,
and regardless of the outcome, the
election results for SGA President will
dramatically affect our student body.
Jonathan Brooks' main focus in
his campaigning forpresidenthas been
to actively work to improve relations
between the university and theCity of
Greenville, which can best be classi-
fied now as awful. Mr. Brooks, unlike
his predecessors, will participate in
City Council debate, and already has
a strong relationship with our current
mayor, Mrs. Nancy Jenkins. Unlike
his opponent, Mr. Brooks has not for-
mally campaigned for any mayoral
candidate, he instead has remained
neutral without burning any bridges
with Mrs. Jenkins or her opponents.
If your concern in student gov-
ernment is for more of the same mal-
aise and stagnation, then vote for Mr.
Brooks' opponent or you could stay
at home. If you are ready for a change
and are tired of inactivity and impo-
tence, then vote for a NEW EXPERI-
ENCE, vote Jonathan Brooks for SGA
president
LenDameron
Economics
Wholehearted
support for Jones
To the Editor:
As a graduate student, a
former SGA member, and a candi-
date for City Council, I would like to
extend my wholehearted support to
Courtney Jones for President She
exemplifies the ideals of responsi-
bility and competence in govern-
ment, two qualities that are always a
necessity in any elected representative.
Having been a student at East
Carolina from 1985 to 1990 as an under-
graduate, and having served on SGA as
a day representative for two years, I
have seen many people elected who
had no business in Student Govern-
ment. Most students do not realize the
responsibility that the SGA has on this
campus, nor do they realize the impact
that SGA can, and has, had on the af-
fairs cf thestudents and the University
And the SGA need a strong, reliable
president to lead it. Courtney Jones
would be that president.
Everyone at East Carolina knows
that it is difficult to get any work done
when you don't know what to do or
how to do it. The same maxim applies
to student government Ms Jones has
several years experience in SGA, which
would allow her to accomplish a great
deal for the benefit of the student body
Furthermore, Ms Jones has ex-
cellent ideas on how to lead and help
the student body. Two of the most im-
portant are the bringing back of Hal-
loween and working with the City
Council. Halloween is an ECU tradi-
tion, and that great tradition should be
brought back That cannot be accom-
plished properly unless the SGA works
with the city Council, and Ms. Jones is a
strong leader who would be able to
work positively with the City Council
for the advancement of the student in-
terests and to better the relationship
between the City and the university.
Courtney would be able to do this eas-
ily. She knows what the students need,
and how to get what the students need
And we need someone like her to go to
the city and help the student interests
Overall, there is no other candi-
date who is as qualified to be student
body president as is Courtney Jones
She is one of the best student body
leaders that East Carolina has had in all
my time here. So on Apnl 1, bring your
I.D. to a voting area and vote for
Courtney Jones, the best choice!
Porter Good
Graduate Student
Public Administration
Jones best choice
for president
To the Editor
After working unclose con tact with
Courtney Jones I have come to the con-
clusion mat she is the best candidate for
the SGA presidency. She has been very
involved in the SGA for the past two
years and understands how every as-
pect of how student government oper-
ates. Courtney's motives in seeking the
presidency are genuine and she is very
committed to the university and its stu-
dents.
By the way, I am a member of the
Greek system at ECU, yet I am casting
my support for Courtney Jones. She has
proven her dedication and is very famil-
iar with our student government. The
other candidate has never been involved
in SGA and believes he can win on Greek
support alone. Before you cast your bal-
lot, I urge you to look at the track record
of the two candidates. I believe you will
find you wantCourtney Jones tobeyour
SGAPresident
Please get out and vote for
Courtney Jones on April 1.
Sean C. Smith
SGA Attorney General
f
Reviewer's opinion
of Cochrane unfair
To the Editor:
Congratulations By printing that
ridiculous article on Tom Cochrane in
the March 17 paper, you have elevated
Jim Shamlin's idiocy and cultural big-
otry to the level of editonal policy If
you're going to con tin ue to publish dia-
tribe like this, at least have the decency
to print your publication on toilet paper
so that people will pick it up with more
realistic expectations.
Mr Shamlin, 1 have this picture
of you in my mind � I figure you must
be what, 11 or 12, nght7 Your parents
probably patyourhead a lot and scratch
you under your chin. "Cute little
Jimmy they say Well Jimmy, they're
lying Let me explain something cul-
ture bashing isn't cute In fact, it's em-
barrassing For someone in college who
makes pretences to being a writer, it's
pathetic. (And it doesn't constitute a
musical reviewCanada � let me see:
Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bruce
Cockbum, Robbie Robertson, novelist
Saul Bellow, poets Daryl Hine and John
McCrae � God, Jimmy, you're nght!
Just intellectually and musically barren
tundra up there.
I could pick your "review" apart
part by insipid part, line by badly con-
structed line, but that's really just too
easy. Still, it's unfair to the album and
artist in question to not rake your un-
educated butt over the coals for some of
this bilge. For starters, try to get the
album title right in print It adds just a
touch of credibility to things. And you
could use it.
Now then, you noted Capitol
Records apparent pity for Mr. Cochrane
by releasing this gosh-awful record
upon the unsuspecting ("real") Ameri-
can music scene where it will die a
horrible, dust-ridden death in record
retail outlets all across the country Fact,
Jimmy: This album is four times plati-
num in Canada. Cochrane's last one �
and all the Red Rider albums � at-
tained at least platinum status as well.
Capitol Records wasn't taking much of
a chance. Next time you open your
mouth, Jimmy, instead of speaking �
dose it.
As for us "trivia buffs" who re-
member Red Rider's "Lunatic Fringe"
and its "brief appearance" on thecharts
a while back and its subsequent dip into
obscurity�badcall,Jimmy. Really bad
call. The song is an AOR staple Call
WRDU: It's been on their playlist con-
sistently since its release in 1981. Try
another major market AOR station and
you'll be a fool again. Research, Jimmy,
is a good thing.
Lyrics a problem for you? Too
personal for you to understand?
Mr. Cochrane's "most original "
tune. The Secret is to Know When to
Stop probably makes sense to only
two people Made sense to me. Made
sense to my friend Jeff over on Meade
Street. My friend Joe in Boone thought
itwaspretty great stuff, too Made sense
to more than 400,000 Canadians. Go
figure.
This is hardlyfandl mean hardly)
an exhausbvecrinqueof your noodling
little article, but 1 think I've more than
made my point I have no qualms with
someone negatively reviewing what 1
think of as a good album if it's a fair
treatment of the music, but this stuff is
ridiculous.
Frank WRabey
Graduate Student
English





Classifieds
CHi?e lEaat Carolinian
March 31,1992
Sports
R )R RENT
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twobedroooi apartments Energy efficient,
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washer drver hookups Now taking ap-
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TWO BEDROOM, one bath, heat and
x ater furnished S39B per month No pets,
dost to campus Call 756-3563
SUMMER SUBLET AVAILABLE:
jRinggoid Towers. Efficiency apt. 9360
'month, fullv furnished, dkm to campus,
MCtaft) Aailable May 15 756-32J0
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
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FOR RENT: 305 East 13tfl St, 2-3 bed-
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Thanks Susan Sloan. Any questions or
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CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place lo Ijvr
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UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
299 � SihSirtet
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�Near Major Shopping Ccm-rs
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
ljmtied Offer - S330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Cacao and qe,�n one taedrtjcro fWrnahed �nwncntav
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Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
FOR SALE
SElFD CARS: trucks, boats, 4-wheelers
motor homes, b; FBI, IRS. UFA Available
your area re w Call B00-338-3388 Ext C-
SERFV'ICES OFFERED
able at reasonable cost Excellent typing
and pnxfreading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure, etc). Call
Pauline at 757-3693
GRADUATING STUDENTS: Introduc-
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firms Save time, monev, effort while maxi-
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to National Collegiate Resume, P.O Box
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BETTERRESUMESGETJOBS.Don ttake
chances when first impressions count A
better resume will open the nght dinars 1
can help you apply for work with a person-
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designed to showcase vourtal en ts If you're
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call Mark at 830-0772 anv time
MILLER'S TYPING AND WORD PRO-
CESSING: fast, accurate service guaran-
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3196
HELP WANTED
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Manv posi-
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P-3712
FREE TRAVEL: Air couners and cruise
ships Students also needed Christmas,
spnng and summer for amusement park
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$10 - S360UP WEEKLY: Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull time Sat own hours'
Free Details' Send self-addressed stamped
envelope Publishers (s) P.O Box 51037
Durham, NC 27717.
BE PART OF THE ACTION! Roofed
managers wanted' Contact Fred Spvnhaltz
in equipment riom. sports medicine build-
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WANTED: Gamers to start gaming group
in Greenville Send resume of experience
with name, address and telephone to P.O
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EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
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THE CREDIT BUREAU of Greenville is
seeking part-time collectors We will train
Apply at 120h Charles Blvd.
IMAGE CONSULTANT NEEDED. High
income potential Excellent parttime or
fulltime opportunity Complete training
For appointment, call (919) 734-6953
PERSONALS
PAY IN-5TATI ILIFION? Read Resi-
sieno tfuaiIuiUojitlu practical pam-
ph. n attorney on the in-state
resident . application process For Sale
i Student Stores, V right Building
RENT OR BUY A LOFT at a reasonable
; price Order now for the tall" 758-2018.
� FOR SALE; Diamond Back bike (great con-
i ditu si I $275 and Smith-Corona typewriter
! (Hke new) $125
; FOR SALE: Crate f80XL guitar amplifier
" 80 watts $250 830-1182
SERVICES OFFERED
NEED MONE V FOR COLLEGE? SFAMS
beats private sector financial aid for col-
lege students Call Marshall Yount. 1-800-
238-8771.
LEARN TO FLY NOW! Aero Sales fbght
training Pitt-Greenville Airport Introduc-
tory flight S20 Call 752-1984
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS SUM-
MERlet there anytime f m on! v SI M with
A1RHITCH' (Reported in LefsCo and the
New York TimesAlso, super low round
tnp fares to West coast AIRH1TCH 212-
864-2000.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.
fishenes Earn $5000 month. Free trans-
portation! Room At Board' Over 8000 open-
ings. No expeience necessary Male or fe-
male For employment program call Stu-
dent Employment Services at 1-206-345-
4155 ext 1649
TKE R1NGGIRL REGISTRATION: Call
Lem at 758-9177 Leave name and number
Contest at the Elbo April 16 First prize
SI00, 2nd S50, 3rd $25 Ten bathing suits
will be given away.
TYPING: Error-free, quick and depend- SPRING ON THE OUTER BANKS. Sun
PERSONALS
Realty extends a special invitation to stu-
dents at East Carolina to vacation this spring
on the sunny Outer Banks of NC through
May 23 Certain restrictions apply. $300
security deposit required Call for
availabilities 1-800-3344745
LISA BERT1NG: The only expenenced
candidate vou should vote for S.G. A. SEC-
RETARY
JULIANNE?You drank out of someone's
shoe1 That's HARDCORE!
VOTE Chef Ra for S.G.A President!
IT'S TIME FOR A CHANGE-Vote
Jonathan Brooks SGA President
TO THE SOUTH PADRE CREW: Padre
was ablast, and the Pikes from Southern
Miss were Leaches, they found us every-
where - the bars, Mexico and the beaches.
They were lots of fun and of course
Courtney met her spouse; Imagine our
surpnse - we met PIKAS with a house! To
the Ruggers Bob, Bert, and Scott thanks for
protecting us. and singing along with La-
De La-De's on every drunken bus (Re-
member Scott: stir those beans!) Charlies,
Dunes, and Burmuda's will never be the
same; with our songs. Limbo and Congo
we made everyone else look lame! Tnna
soon came down for a few days and par-
tied nght along. She joined nght in on all of
our obnoxius East Carolina songs Dana
tried to keep order to much of her dismay;
Wedrank tequila every sigleday Angela's
limo service helped a lot when we were
drunk, but there wasn't room for all of us
so Leslie and Michelle passed out in the
trunk' While Teme was busy doing in-
verted keg stands; We found Mary and
Melise passed out in the sand with beers in
their hand Of course we can't forget about
Jellv and her Mexican twin. She was so
cute Not - with one eve out and one eye in.
As we got on the plane and waved goodbye;
we heard one guv say, "If girls at ECU are
like that - I'll tranfere any da v
ZTA The Shonev's" social was a blast!
Let's do it again soon- AOPi
LEADERSHIPTHATWILLWORK-Vote
lonathan Brooks SGA President.
AOPi "Betty" Beta Pi's: Keep up the good
work' Not too much farther' Love the Sis-
ters
WAY TO GO AOPI SOFTBALL TEAM!
Keep it up' Love the sisters and pledges
SGA PRESIDENT REPRESENTS YOU -
the students if ECU You elect someone
who KNOWS how to get things done and
has a history of working hard for you. Vote
for experienced leadership. Vote for
COURTNEY JONES tommorrow!
VOTE BRAD OSBOURNE FOR SGA
TREASURER: Bnng your ID Wednesday
April 1st and Vote
ELECT CRYSTAL CROSS FOR SGA
VICE PRESIDENT: Bnng vour IDon April
1st
HEIDI HICKS: Good luck on the running
for SGA Secretary' Your Alpha Xi Delta
sisters are behind you all the way'
VOTE FOR A NEW EXPERIENCE. Elect
Crystal Cns.s for SGA Vice President. Bring
your ID on April 1st
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The night started
out for Alpha Xi nght, kidnapped by boy's
on a Saturday night, we started off with a
tequila shot, then to the back house, the
more fun it got. Upside-down margaritas
were poured. Limbo was played, nobody
w as bored We had so much fun, let's do it
again Love always your Alpha Xi friends.
Love the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
BRAD OSBOURNE FOR SGA TREA-
SURER Bring your ID Wednesday April
1st and vote.
EFFECTIVE REPRESENTATION-Vote
Jonathan Brooks SGA President.
PERSONALS
DISPLAi CLASSIFIED
ALPHA PHI'S AND DATES: We came to
the house for a chapter meeting, but little
did we know they were deceiving We
needed a date in a big hurry, those wout
dates began to worry We piled on the bus
with "Hard Times" in mind, this grad a
date social was one of a kind Hope all
those dates had a good time. Love, Alpha
Phi.
SAM MATHENY, SCOTT BROWN,
AND ROB STEVENS: To the sexiest men
there, we had a blast at the Delta Chi For-
mal (and at the pool Party) Wish it could
have lasted longer! We love y'all, Camille,
Michelle, and Debbie.
ELECT CRYSTAL CROSS FOR SGA
V1CEPRESIDENT. BnngyourlDon April
1st.
ZTA It was great getting to know you all
We had a good time Love AOPi
LISA BERTINC: The choice of EXPERI-
ENCE for SGA Secretary
S1GM AS SUPPORT SHERI SMITH FOR
SGA VICE PRESIDENT! Remember to
bring vour ID Wednesday, April 1 and
VOTE
ALL PIRATE BELIEVING ECU STU-
DENTS: Vote for LISA BERTINC for SGA
SECRETARY- the ONLY candidate with
real SGA expenence
HHC: Thursday night was outta sight'
Earlier I ask if you thought the w eather was
nght, we took a vote and I got the green
light The burgers and dogs weren't top of
the line, but the class six made em' just fine.
Later on, with beer in hand, we slammed to
Metallica's "EnterSandman" Now wi thirty
fish tank out of danger, congratulations to
the PR's and new Rangers Conan
VOTE FOR A NEW EXPERIENCE. Elect
Crystal Cross forSG A Vice President Bnng
your ID on Apnl 1st
LISA BERTINC: Were behind you all the
way for SGA Secretary' Good luck
tommorrow in elections Love, the sisters
of AOPi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Had a great time
out with you all Wednesday night. Let's do
it again sometime Love, ZTA
VOTE TOMMORROW! Jonathan Brooks
SGA President
KIM BUFFK1N, JENNY CLENDENIN,
AND ROBYN SMOLEN: Congrats' You
all will make terrific Rho Chi's' Love your
Sigma sisters.
PI KAPPA TAU: Cowboy hats, boots, coun-
try music, and hay' A great time was had,
whatmorecan we say'Thanks again! Dive,
the Sigmas
SIGMAS: Founder s Day is almost here'
Get psyched'
BRAD OSBOURNE FOR SGA TREA-
SURER; Bring your ID Wednesday Apnl
1st and VOTE
ELECT COURTNEY JONES SGA PRESI-
DENT. More experience Betterideas Nuff
said'
BERTINC: The ONLY name vou need to
know for SGA SECRETARY
SGA STANDS FOR STUDENT GOV-
ERNMENT ASSOa ATION. This means
that every student has a right and an obli-
gation tii vote on Apnl 1st. Bring your
student ID and enter the raffle for the
mountain bike SGA is giving away!
HEY WILDWOOD 34 kegs and one thou-
sand people. Saturday is your day, try to
beat us! From the fellas at 12th and Forbes.
ROSES ARE RED VIOLETS ARE BLUE,
Duke isn't sh-t compared to E C U! Wouldn't
you like to be a pirate too!
Happy 21st Birthday -
LISA LEE WARREN L�
PERFECT
IMPRESSIONS
HAIR SALON
Located Near Harris Teeter
University Center
830-1987
ia� caw a����
(Vm
WwnMcn
Wet Cut�10.00�8.00
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"Where Perfection And Fara
Imnrcaaaoaa Re ally Count
�Our Mliau are Aperieaced
aatd are coattauallv learaiag
laaaeat aav atyira and tecaaauea.
COURTNEY
JONES
S.G.A. PRESIDENT
��
Vote for Experience on April 1st!
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Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
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Applications are now being accepted for
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES.
� Candidates must have and maintain a minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
� Must have own transportation
Must be able to work at least the summer and fall of 1992
Apply at Cooperative Education, second floor GCB
or with The East Carolinian
second floor publications bkjg
ication Deadline is
April 3. 1992
Announcements
THE GAY -LESBIAN
i Social support, advocacy, activities Ev-
i eryone welcome - gays, lesbians, bisexu-
i alt, concerned family and friends Call
! ECU counseling center 757-6661 for in-
formation regarding meeting time and
place
NEWMAN CATHQUC
STUDENT CENTER
The New man Catholic Student Catholic
Center invites you to worship with them
Sunday Masses 11 30a.m. and 8:30p.m.
At the Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St
Two houses from the Fletcher Music
Building For more information contact
Fr Paul Vaeth, 757-1991
HEALTH
FR0M0T10N
AND WELL-BEING
BACCHUS meeting Wednesday, April
1,3 pm-4 p.m room 248, Mendenhall
Student Center All committee members
are urged to be in attendance.
POSITIONS
SOUGHT FOR 1993 REBEL
Use your creative impulses to publish
the 1993 student literary and visual arts
magazine. The Rebel is seeking applica-
tions for the following positions: Art Di-
rector (10-month paid term). Assistant
Editor (8-month paid term), Poetry Edi-
tor (8-month paid term). Prose Editor (8-
month paid term). Apply by April 15 to
Media Board Office Secretary, Publica-
tions Building (near library). All levelsof
students encouraged to apply
�VALUATIONS
During the week of April 6-10, a survey
of student opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Questionnaires will
be dishbuted in classes with enrollments
greater than five. All students will have
an opportunity to express opinions on
the teaching effectiveness of their in-
structors. The survey will be conducted
during class time and will take approxi-
mately 15 minutes to complete. Student
participation is voluntary and no identi-
ties are requested. Instructors have been
requested to leave the classroom while
the questionnaires are completed. Re-
sults or the survey will be distributed to
instuctors afier final grades have been
posted The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire wascreated by the Faculty Sen-
ate Committee for Teaching Effective-
ness and the Offkeof Planning and Insti-
tutional Research The results of the sur-
vey, along with other information and
.t
factors,are used for administrativeevalu-
ation of the instructor by the supervising
administator within the department or
division.
SUMMER SCHOOL
1992 ROOM RESERVATION SIGN-
UP INFORMATION
Residence hall room payments for Sum-
mer School 1992 will be accepted in the
Cashier's Office, Room 105, Spilman
Building, beginning April 6,1992. Room
assignments will be made in the Depart-
ment of University Housing, 201
Whichard Building, April 8-9. The rent
for a term of summer school is $185
(Cotton and Jarvis Halls�$225) for a
semi-private room and $270 (Cotton and
jarvis Halls�S315) for a private room.
Residence halls to be used for summer
school are Cotton(women);Jarvis(men);
Slay (co-ed).
ECU. FAMILY
PRACTICE CENTER
Winding Your Weigh Down, a nine week
weight loss program will be held at the
Family Practice Center beginning Thurs-
day, April 9 from 5:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.
Call Mary Memer at 551-5459 Monday
through Friday from 8-5 to register or for
more information. Class size is limited
and a foe is charged.
7
STUDENT EXCHANGE
ECU students Ifs not too late to apply
for NSE, Leicester, England, or Acadia
University for fallor spring replacements.
The deadline is approaching so stop by
the office NOW! Openings are still
availableNew Mexico, Maine, Califor-
nia, Utah, Nova Scotia, or England
Spend an exciting semester or year in
another state or country! And remem-
ber, you only pay ECU Tuition! Come by
and see the list of universities available.
Contact Stephanie Evancho in Brewster
A-l 17 or call 757-6769 for more informa-
tion
PUBLIC SERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT
The merchant of Jones Industrial Park,
Hwy. 264 northeast, Greenville wilt be
hosting the second annual 'Frying for
the Children" ballon rally Saturday, May
2 from 2 p.m. until 9 p.m. The event will
include helicopter rides, hot air balloon
rides and other various attractions in-
cluding live bands and local talent dem-
onstrations. AU activities will take place
at Jones Industrial Parkacross from Agri-
Supply m Greenville. All proceeds from
theevent will be donated to theChildren s
hospital of EiMUm North Carolina dur-
ingfte televised Ouldrsn'sMiracle Net-
work Telethon May 30 and 31. To volun-
teer or more information contact Beth
Porter 919-757-3310.
SENIOR SHOW
Dawn Edwards exhibits her senior show
in Environmental Design at the
GreenviDeMuseumof Art. During March
29 through April 5. Reception is Satur-
day, April 4,1 p. m to 4 p.m.
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
PLANT SALE! ECU Biology Club.Thurs-
day and Friday, April 2-3 from 730 am
to 1 p.m. in Roon BS111, Biology Green-
house
ECU SCHOOL
OF MUSIC EVENTS FOR MARCH
31-APR1L 6.1992
TUES, MAR. 31�Jonathan Jolley, voice.
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
p.m free). THURS APR. 2�Eddie
Turnage, string bass. Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,7 p.m free), and
ECU Concert Choir, Brett Watson, direc-
tor (Wright Auditorium, 815 p.m free).
FRI, APR, 3�Dale Aucfon, saxophone.
Graduate Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
pm, fine). SAT. APR. 4�Horn Work-
rinp(FletdieuskCenter,aiMay,757-
6331). SUN APR 5�Faculty Concert
featuring FritzGearhart, violin, and Paul
Tardiff, piano (Fletcher Recital Hall, 3:15
p.m, free), and Nicole Byrd, accompa-
nying. Graduate Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 p.m, free) MON APR 6�The
Percussion Players, Tony Cox and Stacey
Loggire, directors (Fletcher Recital Had,
8:15 p.m, free).
ECU POETRY
FORUM SET FOR APRIL 2
GREENVILLE- The final spring semes-
ter meeting of the ECU Poetry Forum,
will be held Thursday, April 2, in MSC
Room 247, at 8 p.m Dr. Peter Makuck,
the forum's director, said listeners arc
invited to attend. He said poets who
would like some feedback on their po-
ems should bring along five to seven
copies.
CHUCK YEAGER.
ANniffYYIfCrRliV.MiP
What do these people have in common?
Answer. They could be coming to cam-
pus next year to speak if you vioceyoor
opinion TUESDAY MARCH 31 kit
MendenhaU242atlpmCormt�torjart
in the Student Union FORUM commit-
tee. For more information call 7574711.
Beck pitches
By Robert S. Todd
A�iUnt Sports Editor
ECU pitcher Johnny Beck came
within two outs of a no-hitter in the
first game of a doubleheader
against UNC-Wilmington The
Pirates shot the Colonial Athletic
Association leading Sea out of trie
sky by scores of 1-0 and 3-2 and
improving their record to 15-11
Beck faced two batter ova
the minimum, walking two and
striking out seven UN(
Wilmington's sole hit came on a
bunt that died in the thick infield
grass before third baeman Glvnn
Beck or johnnv Beck could field
and throw the ball in to first
"It was a perfect bunt, "johnnv
Beck said. "When he put it down I
knew it wa: going to be good i
could only hope it would mil foul "
Beck imid
ing was getting,
enabling him tj
balls and work
ECU squ
porturuties in ttj
innings. The 11
innept until thej
extra- innings.
Dave Leist)
inning with a doi
to third on Heal
ball to third,
struck out, Lee
out to the seco
the inning.
Morse led
ing first on a SJ
taking secondoj
Beck with on�
caught trying ti
Watkins strucki
rung
Roseboro, Lady Pirate
By Rick Chann
Surf Writer
Over 21) schools from up and
down the East Coast competed in last
weekend's Raleigh Relays held on
the campus of NC. State. The ECL
women's track team sent several in-
dividuals to the two-day meet ti I com-
pete against s 'me oi the top compeu -
tion in the hast.
On Friday, Damta Rosebom ran
the 100-meter dash finishing second
mherheatwithabmeof 12.0 seconds
In the 400-mt.er dash, Lauren Guy
ran a 5937 w hKh mo ved her on to the
finals held turj
rana5V.4whichi
ninth piace. Als
dash, Marvina
and loannelho
Mar .
finals were held,
lessii Montgo
ha fastest tun? cj
Harlev compete
ning a 527
Freshman
other fine perti
competing in
time of 1037
eighth place ani
'Girls of Summe
Campbell tournal
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Staff Writer
The Lad v Tirates bnught home
first place honors this weekend as
well as three individual awards
LauraCmwder,LisaCoreprew and
Jenny Parsons w ere selected to the
All-Tournament Team. In addi-
tion, Crowder was the recipient oi
the Golden Glove award
"The ladies plaved very well
defensively and lennv pitched well"
said Head coach Sue Manahan. And
played well thev did. as the defense
assisted in two shutouts and al-
lowed just three runs in 28 innings.
In game one against Wright
State, Jenny Tarsons pitched five
Linings while allowing )ust one hit
In short relief Georgeann Wilke re-
corded the save while preserving
the shutout.
In the two innings pitched
Wilke allowed only one hit. From
the plate, Crowder and Cheryl
Hobson led the hitting attack while
going 5-for-5 and Mor-4, respev
tiveh Chanel Hooker also Swung
ahotbatgoing2-for-4wimtwoRBl.
In the Pirates second game of
the tournament, Parsons pitched a
complete game shutout against the
host team Camels. Campbell did
manage to slap out six hits but had
all of their scoring attempts extin-
guished by the
the Girls of Sur
The Lady
get clutch hits
most. Coreprev
Parsons who oj
of the contest
Thedefeos
seemed to rai?
notch higher
ThePiratt-
si e Drake Li
Parsons went
allowing ust
hits while Croi
sive charge w ij
tour assists
ECL scoret
aggTessieba-
hitting Crown
balls then stoU
Ward then droi
an RBI singie ttj
Cheryl Ho
athmwingerrcf
after a success!
fmm Wilke wj
With runners
Coreprew droij
held which
third to aOOOt
the inning
Inthefinaf
the L ni ersit'
See Car
h
All ECU Residence Hall Studerk
allQIy
1992
Wednesday, Api
Central Campu:
4:00-6:00p:
(Volleyball Tourney begins
'
d
Ej
CARNIVAL FUN
Grand Prize awardi
top Residence
Sponsored by RHA and RccrcaUol





DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
t Birthday
WARRKN k
COURTNEY
JONES
S.G.A. PRESIDENT
�����
v Experience on April 1st!
' 4

.
Y
3Hf (Caralinum
IE SENTATIVES.
minimum 2 0 G.P A
ner and fall of 1992

�.
mdPaul
. taJHaU.315
� accompa-
etcher Recital
' ' �. �; �� The
� indStace)
� . � - talHaB
FORUM SF1 FOR WRIL2
e final spring semeS-
�� 2 � � . � etrj Forum,
� . � � rsda) pril2 inMSC.
I it 8 p.m. Dr IVtvr Maku k
ItractOT said listeners .ire
�� � I He said potts who
� � some feedback on their po-
EQft MFC Hd bring along five to seven
�SIMM 111.
aiLCKHAGEfL
�AiNBUEVVlS OJUZZARD
r m � � � � indWhat do these people have in common'
line-� r Thev could be coming to cam-
: m freelextyearto speak if you vkxeyow
opinion TUESDAY MARCH Jl in
Mendenha0242atl p m. Come tike part
� �� n rlin the Student Union FORUM commit-
nter all-da 757-tee For more information cajl 77-4715
Sports
uJlje i�aat (Earolinian
March 31, 1992
7
Beck pitches Bucs by Wilmington
Bv Robert S. Todd
Vvsi.sUnt Sports lititor
E( L pitcher Johnny Beck came
thin twooutsofa no-hitter in the
l game ol a doubleheader
unsl UNC-Wilmington. The
ites shot meoionial Athletic
n iation leading Sea out of the
t� scores ot 1-0 and 3-2 and
i ng their record to 15-11.
leek faced two batters over
Imum walking two and
out se en UNC
gton s sole hit came on a
� died in the thk k infield
before third baseman Clvnn
ik or johnny Rock could field
1 throw the ball in to first
tv, asa perh t bunt lohnnv
� said When ho put it dov n I
� it was going to be good 1
nl hope it would mil toul
Ikvk said the key to his pitch-
mo, m ,is getting ahead in the count,
enabling him to throw breaking
balK and work the corners.
ECU squandered scoring op-
portunities in the first and fourth
innings The Tirate offense was
innept until their last at-bat before
extra-innings.
Dave leisten led of the first
inning with a double and advanced
to third on Heath Clark's ground
ball to third. After Stancil Morse
struck out, Lee Kushner grounded
out to the second baseman to end
the inning.
Morse led the fourth off reach-
ing first on a Seahawk error and
taking second on a single bv C .1 vnn
lkk with one out. Morse was
v aught trying to steal third and Tat
Watkins struck out to end the in-
ning
With runners on firt tno sec-
ond, attempting to steal third takes
the bat out of the hands of the
batter and does not increase run
scoring potential signifigantly.
With one out, there .ire possibly
two chances to score from second
on a single An extra-base hit might
clear the bases and produce a
crooked inning.
Davey Breeden, pinch-hitting
for catcher C halrlie Mine's won
the game for the Bucs.
With a one out and a 2-Ocount,
Breeden hit a sharp single oft the
short stop's glove with the bases
loaded. G. Be k and Watkins led
off the inning v ith singles and ad-
vance to second and third on a
wild pitch. UNC-Wilmington
brought in relief pitcher Brian
Baucom to intentionally walk pinch
hitter Iom Move 1 le then gave up
the game w inning hit to Breeden.
E L waited until their final at
bat, again, to put the game away. In
the top half ot the seventh inning,
relief pitc her l.vle 1 lartgrove gave
upa singles to theSeahawks center
fielder Perry Currinand catcher
c orey Broome, allowing the tving
run to score
In the bottom half of the in-
ning, left fielder Chad Inplett
walked and short stop Chad
PiK kett putdow n .i bunt that UN( -
Wilmington's pitcher tumbled
I lines grounded out to the piu her
and Leisten walked to load the
bases.
Second baseman Heath Clark
won the game on a full-count single
to left to sweep the double header
and mo e the Pirates to 3-5 in the
Colonial Athletk Association.
Erskine College
sweeps Pirates
Roseboro, Lady Pirate tracksters finish well in Raleigh Relays
By Rick Chann
suff Writer
- er 20 schools frvn up and
. n the East C oastcomf etedinlast
ekend's Raleigh Re'a' � held on
campus of NX State the ECU
men s track team sent everal in
� lalstothetwo-da) meettocom-
i � against some i t the u p c mpeti
n in the1 ast
ii 1 ndav DanitaRosebororan
i -meter dash finishing sei ond
err atwithatimeoi 12X)seconds.
the 400-meter dash Lauren Guv
I ?937 w hie h n ed her�m to the
finals held Saturdav to the finals, she
rana59.4 which was good enough for
ninth place. Also in toe 400-meter
dash, Marvina Hamilton ran a 1:05.6
atxl kvinne Thornton ran a 1:10.2.
Many of the top races and event
finals were held In the 5j000meters,
essica Montgornerv ran a 1934 and
her fastest time of die vear.i etc hen
H.irlev competed in the 1,500 run
ning a 527
Freshman Stacy Green had an-
other fine performance at the meet
competing in the 3,000 meters. 1 ler
time of 1037 wa gixxl enough for
eighth place and is only six seconds
off the school record hold bv team-
mate Anne Mane Welch.
he schools top performance of
tiie day came in the m itational 200.
Roseboro placed third with a time of
26.07. Justice said it was a good race
for her, the time w asn t great because
i t the headw in. but ttiero was S 'me
gvxxi competition
Senior Susan Schram made the
finals of the shot put but fouled on all
but one of her throws. I leronegixx.1
throw was 42' hi 2iood enough
for sixth place.
Ihewomen's team will travel to
Raleigh April 4 to compete to a meet
Girls of Summer' win
Campbell tournament
By Ch.irles Mitchell
Senior sun W riter
Ihe I ady Pirates brought hi �me
first place honors this weekend as
well as thnv individual awards.
LauraCrowder 1 iic oreprewand
enn Pars tns w ere seltx ted to the
ament ream. In addi
� � ler was the n ipient ot
� i � ilo e av ard
Ih,
defensh
IHea.
adies placxl erj we
. and Jenny pitched we
at hSueManahan And
� II tiie did as the defense
d in two shutouts and al-
-1 just three runs in 2 innings.
In game one against Wright
enn Parsons pitched five
nings w hi le allow ingust one hit.
snort rehet Georgeann Wilke re-
I the save while preserving
� shutout.
In the two innings pitched
lu alk wtxl onl) one hit From
ite Crowder and Chc'rvl
ibson ted toe hitting attack while
.� J-for-5 mm 3-for-4, respec-
hanel Hooker also swung
tbatgoing2-for-4wimtwoRBl.
In the Pirates second game oi
� I ornament, Parsons pitched a
plete game shutout against the
� teamamels Campbell did
anage to slap out six hits but had
of their scoring attempts extin-
guished hv the aggressive "D" of
tiie C iris of Summer
The Lad lir.ites continued to
get clutch hits when needtl the
nist c oreprew went2-for-3asdid
Parsons w hocollei u the lone RBI
ot the contest.
The defense of the 1 k1 Pirates
seemed to raise its level ust one
notch higher
he Pirates downed an aggres-
sive Drake University team 3-2.
Parsons went toe distance while
allowing ust two runs on seven
hits while Crowder ltl the defen-
sive charge with six put outs and
tour assists.
ECU scored theirthreerunson
aggressive base running and timely
hitting Crowder drew a base on
halls then stole second. Michelle
Ward then drove Crowder in with
an RBI single to right field.
Cheryl I lobson reached first on
a throwing error, then went to third
after a successful suicide squeeze
from Wilke which scored Ward.
With runners on the corners,
C oreprew drove a deep shot to left
field which scored Hobson from
third to account for the final run of
the inning.
In the final game, ECU tinik on
toe University of MarylandBalti-
See Campbell page 8
All ECU Residence Hall Students Eligible
Wednesday, April 1
Central Campus Mall
4:00-6:00pm
(Volleyball Tourney begins at 3:OOpm)
tfi

!�
AT
s'Mr
TS
,MAS
Grand Prize awarded to
top Residence Hall
Sponsored by R1LA and Recreational Services
hosted by St Augustines.
SeanC onnolh and Mark Mathis
ran toe 5AX) finishing in 1M and
h5 respectivdy. Rickv Charm ran
3450 in the lt),(U) meters.
Ihe metis track team competed
in thnv events at the Florida Relays
held Saturday. In the 400-meter
hurdles, I, iniesRobbius placed eighth
with a time of .f-d while Hamon
DeSueran the 100-meterdashin 1055
for ninth place
Ihe 4x4i) relay team ran the
fastest time bv any team trom orth
( aroiina this year withatimeol tih.s
aixl ,1 tourm place tinLsh.
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports i ditor
IU'sbaseball team will not
soon torget the living Ikvt of
ErskineColiege, from I HieWest
Suitharoiina.
E Ukst four straight games
going into their doubleheader
in Friday, and toe Pirates ex-
tended the streak to six bv the
end of the d Ihe Bins, 14-1 1
on the year, lost to the Flying
Fleet J (land 2-1.
"We made a couple of mis
tikes that wore very, ver) im-
portant in the (first) game so
ant ither tw ock ise l sses 1 lead
coach (.ar CK'erton said. Ve
seem to find ways to tose the
close games and that's not a
characteristk of last c aroiina
baseball We've got t�� get out of
that element
Sixtv -fi e people hra txl die
w ind and temperatu res t i w ah h
game one EC I pitcher C Kven
! i is pitched a complete game
with four strikeouts, no walks
and one earned run shortstop
( had I nplett committed errors
in the top of the sixth and se
enth innings. Moth errors re-
sulted in Flving Fleet runs
I nplett s hand s w ereni t toe
onh factor in the first loss '
I rskine( ollege Misseii oppor-
tunities tost the Pirates. ECU
stranded nine runners on base
and had runnuers in scoring po-
sition fi ur times
With two out in the bottom
of the first inning, lee Kushner
flied "lit dvp to left field. A
strong wind, blowing in, kept
the hall from making it past the
warning track
Ihe bottom oi the third in-
ning lost its potontial when lead-
off hatter I ave Leisten singieand
was caught trying to steal sec-
ond on the first pitch to the Pi-
rates leading hitter, C ilynn Beck
P k ft illt iwed with a single that
would have put Leisten on third.
I eft fielder Stvanc il Morse Hied
deep to left which could have
s� ored I eisten fnm third.
Pne Buc were threatening
in the bottom ii the sixth with
runners on tip.t and second and
one out. Pinch-hitter Iom Move
lined to too second baseman who
doubled up Heath Clark
11 L lost toe second game in
tri'nt o 23 die-hard fans who
narowly escaped witnessing
brskine pitcher Charlie
Constantino throw a no-hitter.
1 riplett's second-inning lead-off
See Erskine page 8
Intramural champions are crowned; the winners are:
'Legit Contenders'
Legit Contenders" won the Independent Gold All-Campus Crown
'Ball Hogs'
The Ball Hogs captured the Purple All-Campus Campionship
nKA-A
nKA-B
Pi Kappa Alpha won the Fraternity Gold Championship
Pi Kappa Alpha also took the Fraternity Purple Championship
"CillVlIVIK A . . . .
CillVIlVIK A, . . . .
c;iiviiviK A
REDNECK C;iRI
T ��
coupoiQ
2forl
Ed
Get Two Sets of 3M w
i Prints From Every Roll .
I of Film Developed
Receive � �ccond set of standard alxe
3" print absolutely FREE frith jrour
next roll of 35mm. dlac, 110 or 126
color print film left for developing at
our everyday low priceI C-41
proceaa only - exclude larger 4" ilir
print. Coupon must be attached to
ouUlde of order envelope. Not valid
with any other coupon offer.
I S'JIP� April, April t3i��2 � � � J
ECU Student Stores
Wright Bldft.





8 �he �not(�arulinian
March 31, 1992
Box Scores
Game 1
L i. V ilminRh�i
ah r h. hi hh
lotata
I a�t v mhnj
ah t h bi hb �
1992 NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Kansas(11
LJTEPJ9
MichifflnSU?)

I'TEP
Duke
Dukll)

.Cincinnati
uc
Duke
l v,(rpi!utri 0 0 0 0 I t1 0
tj-4 � Jn.4ma t1 0 0 0 i' i� 1 1
I S 1-lmn tf,r V II N IK BH �
IFP I l � �� � 1 - V.
I Game 2
rYtlrrl inuh'n
ib r h hi hb
Cincinnati (41
Memphis St. (6)
Arkansas G
Cui. Ithu
MIDWEST
Memphis St
USC (2
Ukil
MSU
UC
Duke
Ohio St.
Ohio St,
� �, k, �
-
II 3 II 1 1
jb t h hi bt-
4
, 1 S Wirminjtlir.
0 0 0 110 1 !
-i. . . r
I . H
n SI �. .
I M VNianiniehr ir
I J . jn nu
M R IK BH s�'
I Conn. (
Alabama (?) i v,
UNC 14)
Ohio St.
Michigan (hi SOUTHEAST
Michigan
ETSU 14
ulant -(in
Oklahoma St. (2
ilhhmiSt
Mich
Mich
lowa
12L
Seton Hall
jMissoufiS)
EAST
Sc-ton Hall (4)
Campbell
Continued from page 7
more C ountv Iheseasonand finished thee enine
ECU ended the weekend tour- 2-Jbr-3 with five RBI
namentwithabi�bang.samngl3 roday the Lad) Pirates (2 6)
runs and finishing the tournament tra el toC V.ingeount) to take on
undefeated. tn rarheelsoi I N( hapel Hill
Stephanie Hobson and Parsons (25-8). UN( His ranked fourth in
letlthePiratehittingattxuk. Hohson ft�e Southeast Region, two -puts
went 2-for-3 with two RBI, as Par- aheadofEl I rhegame is sched
sons notched her first home run of uled tor 3 p m
UK
n a Syracuse (6)
U.Mass. �
LMass,(3)
Kentucky
Iowa St. (10)
Kentucky (2)
UCLA
IU
UCLA CLA"I
Louisville (8)
Erskine
Continued from page 7
MSl
4
Mexico St (12)
S.W.Louisiana(13)
WEST
single was al' the Bucs would he
allowed. Constantine also walked
SIX batters.
The second half of the second
inning was wasted. Triplet! anil
(lark were on second and third
with one out after a double steal
Shortstop Chad Puckett popeI up
to the second baseman and pinch
hitter Moye ground outtopresen e
the Erskine lead.
The first two batters in the bot-
tom of the third inning were aboard
with right feilder! it Vs atk ins ,it the
pi.He and no outs
Watkins missed a buntattempl
and Leisten was pi kedi n tr, ingto
advance to third Watkins and
Kushnt-r proceeded to grounded
out anil end v. hat (i uld ha e rnvn
a crooked inning.
The oni) h i run� ame i tt an
error In the Flying Fleet's first
baseman Seth isetsberg.
Fla. St.
Georgetown (6,
�a�
IU
Fk
a. St (3)
Indiana
'SI 17)
Indiana (2)
UNC keeps win 'out of reach'
Ti
lv"
Cro
W
tor .i complete wrap Up of I- C I
sports in under 2 mintitt-s -
rralh!
By Jeanne Shaffer
suff Wnt.T
the women's soccer (luh met
toe L c Pioneers inhapel Hill
over the weekend Ihe Pioneers'
strong defense kept ECU's loelle
Pierce, loili Pittenhouse Miss)
���None Alison Russell and Eileen
�-v Moore working hard the entire
game while Pirtt� goalkeeper
aime nPieriep a dHloi'tofSO
game minutes m goal
Pierce defended the goal inly
letting two balls get into the net I he
hrst Pioneer goal sas on a
�hninn
breakaway bv Kim( rabbe and the
second was .1 shot h arolyn
1 larle that was too high for the 5
ti x (t-2-inch Pien e U get her hands
on
Ihe Pirate offense also had to
work hard to get by the Pioneers
and the team finally succeeded by
storing with 8:00 left in the name K
liK'lle Pierce hut the goal was not
enough for the Pirates as the tram s
record drops to 0-2 3 for the season
Outstanding offensive Pirate
players wereMargitS) Ivester.Kerri
( .rittiths, K'rr Myers ,n. Ann
Warren. UNC Pioneer goalkeepers
were leth Huber and s.irah Allen
Goingir)forE( I goalkeeper Pierce
was Bridget Kruse who also had to
fight the Pioneer offense while in
goal
Overail,theE( L women'ssoc-
ier 1 luh has lost three games on the
seasonbyascoreof2-1 (totheN SL
C luh, Jacksonville and UNC Pio-
neers), anil tied tlie other two 4 4 to
Raleighluh and 2-2 to L V
Wilmington.
I he team w ill plav in
1 avetteville at 2 p.m Sunday, be-
fore finishing the seasonal Virginia
Tech on April UM2.
i.r.1
MALES AND FEMALES
rOPUmCIPATEINTffflE
�TH VNM ALGIEA1 I'IRVIKI'l RPU
(iOI.IU'KJSKIV (, (H I l'Kh
�MISS HAWAIIAN TROPIC
SI vrwKIklNICONTES1
MENS'BEST LKGS CONTEST
ipsii 11 i�:
H'M is m um M
WIN CASH: 'STPcct Jioc ?ndpiace tso
lulMlK Oi'KH HH MoKUV KMUl'A' III
IM vim lip vhiki:ii, �i 1 T 1S74UI
Tt.i � jv)iv.i 1 (JIM HIWM K1 A r n �� t MMWIM
ihl.MI'itl'X vMHI.i'lUM.I. i' vHUfNHi.l
PLANT SALE
ECU Biology Club
Thursday April 2
FridayApril 3
7:30am- 1:00pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
1 RiKimS-Ul
Spring swingpes t leady!
Register for the following intramural sport golf
competitions this semester!
Frisbee Disc Golf
Register: Tuesday, April 7 at 5:00pm in BtO 103
I his is a one day tournament to be held April 8 on the
risbec Disc Golf Course loated by Harrington ! ield.
person teams and individuals can compete.
Golf Singles
Register: Tuesday April 7 at 5"30poi in Hio 10
This tournament will be held April It vr Is at the yden
COuntry Club. Green fees: $H walk, $17 cart, he off
times will be selected at this meeting.
.aJ' Awards will be given k r fewest
putts per round!
For details call ECU Recreational Services at 757-6387
QWU& FOOTBALL VIDEO
1 RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
fe ecu OF THE 1991 SEASON!
1 tfe� Order Your Highlight Video Todav
-f And Believe For A Lifetime
- " CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to:
1991 Pirate Video &
P.O. Box 68618 n
Indianapolis, IN 46268 '�.T
$19 95$5 00 Shipping & Handing INC Residents ado I
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate's
Record-Breaking Season
Great tasting Pirate Pride grape soda available only at UBh
Slot knp for tatigating this fall. Limited supplies available.
SH
0
516 South Cotanche � Greenville, NC 2TO34 � 919-75-l6
mf
tt
ATTIC
,752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St.
1WED
2 Shows
Doors at 7 p.m & 10 p.m.
Sunday Live
Comic Strip Live
Evening at the Improve
WRQR COMEDY ZONE CONCERT 11
CARROT TOP
CALL 752-7303 FOR TIX INFO





8 (Hhe lEnat (Carolinian
March 31, 1992
Box Scores
Game 1
l l Vilminh'n
OilltllTrlui Tb
for) '
�I. . n
M. tui II
Mrflrtdvdh
� i a -
in
Bt irdtM
TI.I.
v r ill
KuriutH lb
Bk lb
MfatkM ft
Injlrlt It
ft Kftt M
M A. I '
total
Ah r h hi bb �o
0 0 11
: t! 0 i'
: 0 0 0 0 l
10 0 1 I
21) 0 t � i
�h r h hi bb �
;� 1 1
l si isitmtfckr 0 0 0 it i� t I it
j i jnilnu l1 I 0 B 0 it 1 I
i-ijv .iifni � i� I v. l
3� i wi i s ' ii Moot
l S �.rmn�tin IP H K I" H SO
4
I
I. .
! 'vf � in.lm
V, . ,
1M' � . HUP' wi �. � ��. to . 1 � V I �
1992 NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Kansas (1)
UTEP(9)

UTEP
Duke
MK'hifflnSt.(5)
VCincinnati
Cincinnati (4)
Memphis St. (h)
r w v Memphis St.
AlkQ
uc
Duke
MIDWEST
�V
Game 2
l t V. ilmmRh.n
N i h bi bb
) 1 1
I
I
l I
'I - ki �
y �
tjl�
I I �t i Jn.linj
ll! 1 1
lb t h bi bb �
irk 21 4
� i �
Mora i
. (rf
. ����
iui� :i t � :
l V tYiJmmgtn U 0 10 10 1 2
w � j 0 0 0 I 1 0 1
i km . . . ih- I idk
n�h � r ' a� i , . H . bn It iik
Mora SOt Bra . � �� I s I i . Ml �
k. '�'� v M k. .s �
IS rt.lran.rhli IP II N IK HH �
- - .
t Min law
I I V I.
Gi.Tah(7)
ISC (2)
Ohio St. (1)

IkliiJL
MSU
UC
Duke
I" Conn. (M)

Ohio St.
Alabama (3) rivi
UNC (4) )
Ohio St.
SOUTHEAST
.Michigan

EISU(U)
TulanedO
Oklahoma St. (2
OHahomaSt
Mich
Mich

Puked)
Iowa (9)
Seton Hall
Missouri 13
Campbell
Continued from page 7
EAST
S�
Seton Hall (4)
U.Mass. acuse(6)
UK
S
Mass. (3)
Kentucky

Iowa St. (10)
Kentucky (2)
UCLA
IU
UCLA UCLML
Louisville (8)
more County.
ECU ended the weekend tour-
nament with a big bang: scoring 13
runs and finishing the tournament
undefeated.
Stephanie Hobson and Parsons
ledthePiratehittingattack. Hobson
went 2-for-3 with two RBI, as Par-
sons notched her first home run of
Erskine
the season and finished theevening
2-for-3 with five RBI.
Today the Lady Pirates (23-6)
travel to Orange County to take on
the Tarheels of U'C-Chapel Hill
(25-8). UN'C-CH is ranked fourth in
the Southeast Region, two spots
ahead of ECU. The game is sched-
uled for 3 p.m.
Continued from page 7
MSU

.MexicoSt(12)
S.VV. Louisiana(13)
WEST
Fla
Georgetown
IU

16)
Fla. St. (3)
Indiana

LSI" (7)
Indiana (2)
single was al' he Bucs would be
allowed. Constantine also walked
six batters
The second half of the second
inning was wasted. Triplett and
Clark were on second and third
with one out after a double steal.
Shortstop Chad Puckett poped up
to the second baseman and pinch
hitter Move ground out to preserve
the Erskine lead.
The firt two batters in the bot-
tom of the third inning wereaboard
with nght folder Pat Watkins at the
plate and no outs.
Watkinsmisseda buntattempt
and Leisten was pa ked i 4i trying t I
advance to third. Watkins and
Kushner proceeded to grounded
out and end what could have been
acnxiked inning.
The only ECU run came off an
error by the Flying Fleets firsl
baseman. Seth o-eNherg.
UNC keeps win 'out of reach'
Ti
E
rpr
o
Cr,
lmun
For a complete urap up of ECU
sports in under 2 minutes -
realU!
Bv Jeanne Shaffer
Stjff Writtr
Ihe women's tKicr club met
the UNC Pioneers in Chapel Hill
over the weekend. Ihe Pioneers'
strong defense kept ECU'S liM'lk'
Pierce, lodi Pittenhouse, Missy
Cone, Alison Russell and Eileen
Moore working hard the entire
game while Pirate goalkeeper
Limit' m Piercep a .d si octoi i
game minutes in goal
Pierce defended the goal only
letting two balls get into the net. The
first Pioneer goal was on a
breakaway by Kim Crabbe, and the
second was a shot bv Carolyn
Harley that was too high tor the 5-
f(Ht-2-inch Pierce to get her hands
on.
The Pirate offense also had to
work hard to get by the Pioneers
and the team finally succeeded bv
scoring with 8:00 U-tt in the game bv
ItH'lle Pierce. But the goal was not
enough for the Pirates as the team's
record drops to 0-2-3 for the season.
Outstanding offensive Pirate
phivers were Margit Sylvester, Kern
Griffiths, lerry Mvers and Amy
Warren. UNC Pioneer goalkeepers
were Beth Huber and Sarah Allen.
Going in for ECU goalkeeper Pierce
was Bridget Kruse who also had to
fight the Pioneer offense while in
goal.
Overall, the ECU women's mk-
cer club has lost three games on the
season bvascoreof 2-1 (totheNCSU
Gub, Jacksonville and UNC Pio-
neers), and tied the other two 4-4 to
Raleigh Club and 2-2 to UNC-
Wilmington.
The team will plav in
Fayetteville at 2 p.m , Sunday, he-
fore finishing the season at Virginia
Tech on April llV-12.
ilM
MALES AND FEMALES
TO PARTICIPATE IN THE
91H ANNUAL CHEAT PIRATK PURPLE
COLD PIGSKIN PIG-OUT. PARTY
�MISS HAWAIIAN TROPIC
SI NTAN-BIKIM CONTEST
vnd
MKNS' BEST LEGS CONTEST
A.PRH ii. i�:
H KLINSUDllM
WIN CASH: ist poet sioo 2nd place � $50
TO Cm CSDKKl OYI MORV'ISHiUNHTloM Cll
HI Mill HH MAKKEmC0mCtAT7ST4BI
Ull HI ill (OMKimM iv; � :o n id iimwui
M�M? TOIT��H MM in! 1 Ml �����. U IM.I IHI��UI
niy�i
PLANT SALE I
ECU Biology Club
Thursday April 2
Friday April 3
7:30am - 1:00pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
Room S-lll
Spnng swingers get ready!
Register for the following intramural sport golf
competitions this semester!
Frisbee Disc Golf
Register: Tuesday, April 7 at 5:00pm in Bio 103
This is a one day tournament to be held April S on the
Frisbee Disc Golf Course located by Harrington Field. 4
person teams and individuals can compete.
Golf Singles
Register: Tuesday, April 7 at 5:30pm in Bio 103
This tournament will be held April 14 & IS at the Avden
Country Club. Green fees: 510 walk, S17'cart. Tee off
times will be selected at this meeting.
XP Awaidswillbegivenfariewesl
putts per rund!
For details call ECU Recreational Services at 757-6387
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate's
Record-Breaking Season
Great tasting Pirate Pride grape smla available only at UBE.
St(h k up for taUgating this fall. Limited supplies available.
(?Vtfle FOOTBALL VIDEO
1 RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
. ecu OF THE 1991 SEASON!
$&- Order Your Highlight Video Today
: ;� And Believe For A Lifetime
CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to.
1991 Pirate Video
P.O. Box 68618
Indianapolis, IN 46268 Aeo
$19 95 $5 00 Shipping & Handling iNC Residents add 6 tax

516 South Cotanche � Greenville. NC 27834 � 919-758-2616
ATTIC
,752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St.
2 Shows
Doon it 7 p.m 4 10 p.m.
Sunday Live
Comic Strip Live
1WEO Evening at the Improve
WRQR COMEDY ZONE CONCERT 11
CARROT TOP
CALL 752-7303 FOR TO INFO





8 ebc t;mu (Inrnlitmui
March 31, 1992
Box Scores
Game 1
11 . �
lime 2
1992 NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Kansas (1)
UTEP(9)
MemphbN �"�
Arkansas (3)
in-T
)uk
Dukt'ili
Cincinnati
uc
Duke
MIDVV
Memphis St
c.1 ivi' �"��
US( 2)
Ukvh
MSU
UC
Duke
Ohio Si
All bam a (3)
Ohio Si

i v
Ohio St.
Michigan
(14)
SOt rHEAST
Michigan
.ularu
Oklahoma N 2
MiixiiuH
Mich
Mich
IowajW)
SetonHall
,Miouri(5)
EAS1
donllalii4i
Campbell
Continued from page 7
more ount) ' ' ! ��' '� ' ' !Mi
I ended the weekend tour
rwment with a big bang: scoring 13 loday the Lady Pirati
runs and finishing the tournament fcravelto' rang�
undefeated !l" rarheel of UN'1 � I ��: �I fill
Stephanie Hobson and Parsons ��' - ��"� i
ledttePiratehittingattack. Hobson the Southeast :
went 2 for 5 with two RBI as Pat aheadi fl
sims notched her first home run o( uled foi m
UK
L Mass � �L
L. Mass p)
kentikk
Iowa St fll
Kontuckv 2
U LA
c 1 Ail
UCLA
IU
Louisville (8)
Erskine
Continued from page 7
single was al' ihe Bu s would be ton
allowed Constantine also walked with nght fetldei atl
six batters plate and ni
rhe e i nl hall of the e ond �'� �
inning vs.�- wasted friplett and andLi �
'R
MexkoSt(12
sU LxnsBna(13)
( lark were on second and third .1 mce 1 thu
with 'nt' out aftei .i double steal � pi
Shortstop had Puckett poped up out u I
to the second baseman and pinch
hitter Move i;r iund out to preserve
t!i. i r -km lead � ' � ' '
Hi fn -t11 batters in the b it - "
�.
WES1
Fla.St
Uvrgt'town ft
IU
Fla.St ;
SI
Indiana
ndiana
UNC keeps win 'out of reach'
Ik I I. SI
H Jeanne Shaffer
breakaway by Kim rabbi and the were Beth Huber and Sarah Allen
second was a shot h arolvn GoinginforE( I poa I keeper Tiei i
Harlev that was h I rth� was Bridget Kruse who also had to
women's soccer club met foot-2-inch Piero ' � � tr hands fight the Pioneer offense while in
Ti
the I V Honeers n ipel Hill
ovei th' weekend Hie Pionet i
li fense kept II s livlle
Pierce Ih1i Pittenhouse 1i
v s n �� rking hard th�
ie, while Pirte j -
Lotirtian lun"r m ' � � � I
ime minutes in g i
Kor a complete wrap up of KC'I Pierce defended thi
sports in under 2 minutes rtingtwoballsgetintothi el
really, tnt Pioneer uim! was on i
ni goal
rhe Pirate offenst also had to � erall thelI women's six
- rk hard to get K the Pioneers cer lubhas kst three games on the
ind the team finalh succeedeti b season by a score f2 l(tntheNCSI
one Mison Russell and Fileen coringwithSKHeftinthegameb Iuh lacksonville and I V Pio
loelle Pierce But the goal was not neers), and tied thi therrwo4-4to
.����� ratesastheti am - Raleig ilub and 2 2 to i .
- � � �� fortheseason W ilmingt i
Outstanding offensive Pirate rhe team will pla in
rswereMargitS . � ter.Kern Fayettevilleat 2 p.m Sunda be
� ffiths ern Myers and Ann fore finishing the s � i it Virginia
Warren I N( Piineergtalkeepers fechon April It) 12
PLANTSALE
ECU Biolcv Club
Thursday April 2
I rida April 3
7:30am - 1:00pm
at tht
fgsr Biology
� Greenhouse
RoomS-111
(tyrte
. i
d
FOOTBALL VIDEO
RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
OF THE 1991 SEASON!
Order Your Highlight Video Tod
And Believe For A Lifetime
CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to
1991 Pirate Video �
PO Box 68618
Indianapolis, IN 46268

$&&
J
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate s
Record-Break ins Season
Great tasting Pirate Pride qrape soda available only at I BE
Stock up for tailgating this Jail. Limited supplies available.
UrilversityiloolvExKhang?
5l6SouthCotanche � Gneenville. NC 27834 � 919-758-2616
ATTIC
,752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St.
1WED
2 Shows
Doors at 7 p.m & 10 p.m.
Sunday Live
Comic Strip Live
Evening at the Improve
WRQR COMEDY ZONE CONCERT 11
CARROT TOP
CALL 752-7303 FOR TIX INFO





Title
The East Carolinian, March 31, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 31, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.869
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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