The East Carolinian, February 18, 1992






Speed it Up
Speed limit should be raised to 100 m.p.h
4
Monkee-ing Around
Formei band membei helps create MTV.
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SGA questions auditor's report
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1 )onns increase di ersitv
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! raternities chance Rush
Career Day
offers jobs,
opportunity
Byolleen I
Opportunity for exchange
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Students ride across U.S.
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ition and asked the group to sponsor
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CPS and other college newspapers.
Inside Tuesday
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Beer industry attempts to educate consumers
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Senior class hopes to
create new traditions
H ulie Roscoe
ssi .tjiM rws I ditnr
I he senior l.iss is preparing to make
ntribution to the university and the
president of the class of 1992, Mien rho
mas, wants to make tradition thethemeol
tht gift
I homas' idea is I ice the tempo
ture 1 �n thf 10.ill in the
� 1 1
time 1 i
�.built 11 I
v. cneed a pen rtl 1 ut there
and '� hen it's not beingused forfum I
it , . � � me to use for .1
pu 111. or lunch or anything, 1 homas said.
it ft
pils "
itif that parl ol cam
"he traditi n wt mid st.irt with the
class of 1992 s collection ol items repre-
senting the events of the year and would
contin r yi 11 until it isfull 1 henin
80 years or so it could be opened and
ex a mi n 1 I
Even year there would be .1 ei
emony when the senior (lass would put in
their block area things from that year
I homas said 'It would have a little vault
where you put information, maybe a pro
gram from the Peach Bow 1 a paper from
He ! ast� '�'� ��� different things from
our university that happened this year
Building the stage v ill require an un
usually large sum ol mom s for .1 senior
1 lass gift and cooperation from the v hole
university
rhe SGA usuallj pays foi the senioi
i lass gift, bul this year theS !A is short on
funds (only having $7,435 to spend on
appropriations) and will nol be able to
give verv genei I mly makes
; ht'in.1 .more di termined to � I ra sis
tarn c from diffen nl rgai zations.
'To do it we are g lit � '
eration and help from .ill gi im
I mis 1 homas said "Si nee this will benefit
our entire university and help begin tradi
tion, it should bt thing all groups get
excited about being .1 art of, including
faculty,stafl and students
1 homas said he wants to gel help from
any groupon campus It.) groupt an help
supply materials or man power 01 even
brain p iwer, rhomas is willing to use il
"he next step for rhomas is visiting
t hancellor Richard Eakin and Di M
Mathews, vice � hancellor for student a;
fairs rhomas wants to get their advic
and input on theprojet t sinitial problems.
such as tundmf, and constrw tion
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Beer page 3
Photo by Kevin Amos ECU Photo Lab
George: membei � the Society tor Creative Anachronism,
nor tor a Middle Ages re C reabon





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SGA questions auditor's report
. � uin 'os iiradim
(Opportunity forexchanj
Career Day
offers jobs,
opportunity
Beer industry attempts to educate consumers
Students ride across I .S.
Senior class hopes to
create new traditions
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Speed it Up
Speed limit should be raised to 100 m.p.h,
4
Monkee-ing Around
Former band member helps create MTV.
II
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Stye lEast darnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vcx.66No.10
Tuesday, February 18, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
N.G State changes grading
Ilu'l acuity Sena to at North Carolina State
Univcrsit) recenth approved a resolution that
will avid a plus and minus sstem to the
�h Ii. el s grading s) stem
Fhe resolution has no grandfather clause,
and graduate students arc not exempt from
the grading svstem, although 'hat was origi
n.iiK proposed
1 he resolution i � theimplemcnta
tion ot the svstem for re ordingfinal grades
as soon as possible, but not later than tall
semesterl-l Sonathair Robin Dorff said
Dorms increase diversity
A plan to increase racial diversity in the
dormitories at the University ol orth Caro-
lina at Chapel 1 Ml -ill be implemented this
spring.
In an effort to increase the number ot
Mack resklentson the school'sNorth Campus,
15 spaces will be reserved in each ot the North
Campus dorms tor any black student who
wishes to move there.
Currently, blacks represent one to six
percent ot the total Ivqi Northampus
dormresidents-Ifallofthereserved nnmisarv
tilled by black students, they will then repre-
senl nine to 15 percent ot the total residents
1 want black students to know that the
opportunity is there it they want to move
Amie Epps, president ol the Bla ck Student
1oement, said.
Fraternities change Rush
rhe i niversity of Missouri Intra frater
mtv Council is changing the fraternity's for-
mal Rush from spring to fall
"he new plan haschanged Rushfromone
weekend in March to tour days in August.
Rush parti ipants will visit all 30 fraternities
tor the first two days, then they can visit the
fraternities ol their choice on the second two
days.
IFC leaders attended a conference last
year, bringing the idea tor tall Rush back with
them. The plan was then ratified in December
after meetings with fratemirj members.
"It will give the opportunity to those who
are unable to get here in the sumnx r (Ireg
Mudd, Rush Chairman for Phi Kappa Psi,
said, "And the houses who aren't tnil will
have a chance to till the spaces
All ot the fraternities accepted the plan
well, except tor rushees having to return to
school early, Mudd said.
Students ride across U.S.
When Rutgers I niversitv students Sam
Hitman and Mark Rupert got bored last
summer, they decided to hop on their bikes
and ride from coast to coast �- but neither of
them had any pnor biking experience.
The two wanted their trip to hive a pur-
pose, so they contacted the American bung
Association and asked the group to sponsor
them. In arum, the men raised $10,000 for the
organization.
"Our original goal was to raise $1,000
each Hitman said.
But, car washes, candy sales, writing let-
ters and meeting with local businesses for
donations brought on mom money than the
two ever expected.
"WedippedourtininthoAtlanticOcean,
then when we ended up in LA, we dipped
our tims in the I'acitnVe.in 1 htman said.
The two plan to ride again this summer,
and are looking tor 2" adventurous riders to
ride with them from Seattle to Atlantic City.
I litman said this time, the group will not
only raise money for the Lung Association,
but also for D.A.R.E Drug Abuse Resistance-
Education.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from
CPS and other college newspapers.
Inside Tuesday
Crime Scene 2
Editorial4
Satire5
Classifieds6
Entertainment7
Sports19
SGA questions auditor's report
By lulie Roscoe
Asm -l.in! New I dltOI
SG egislator Matthew
Gilbert questioned the state
auditor s Man h 199 I report on
Publu Stifet) Monda) nighl al
the S( .A meeting
1 he report states that allega
lions were made in reference to
student bi in mistreated b)
PublicSafct) officersduringdrug
campaigns
"1 low were students mis
treated what does it mean
( albert asked
gave a recommendation tor
Public Safety to consult outside
law enforcement agents to help
investigate cases involving ille-
gal drur, use
"I want to know it they've
done what the stale auditor's
report suggested or it they've
iust ignored the recommenda
tion (albert said. "1 lave tht j
done anything, are they going
to oo anything, do they want to
do anything?"
Most ot thebody requested
a copy of the state auditor's re-
port from March 1991 from
I1 aud ti �! s report also i albert
(albert also voiced disap-
pointment ol theWI ITMnewsseg
menl on ireenville police whk h
recently aired.
( alberl said studentsdohave
a positive impact on the commu
nitvand televisionstationsshould
t�H us the positive view.
I he resolution from the
Fantasv s ietv e 1 krtion t )rgani
zation as(. ing U r ahange in the
Resident Education rule disal-
lowing psychological games in
the resident halls failed in coin
mittee w nh a 7 2 ote
! he body v iti d to not bring
it up for debati
The Student Welfare com-
mittee chair, Keith Tilghman
said two resident education
representatives were at the
commi ttee meeting and said t
rule did not apply to board
games su h as "Morn pol) " or
"Trump
"The commit! el I the-
re duti eded to be rewrit-
ten ' Mr i ilghm
sa
I he resident tii it
repn t affirmed theban
did include games such as
"i hiija" .ii i ' I Kingc r
! trag ns i ilghman said.
The Rules and Judiciary
lir, Bill Carroll, introduced a
resolution clarifying the class
officer's election process.
"It's ,i matter of making all
the rules clear Carroll said.
A replacement pay scale for
thei T vtii n committee chair and
vice-chair was passed. The chair
in the past rei eived $200 for the
general election and $200 tor a
run-ott election. Now the chair
will rei eive SI"1' tor the genera
elecri inand$50foranm-offetec-
The qualificationof class sta-
See SGA. page 2
Career Day
offers jobs,
opportunity
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
Staff Writer
Opportunity for exchange
Photo by Jill Cherry � ECI Photo Lab
Kristen Harris inform? students about the study abroad program at her booth in General Classroom Building.
The ntei ted in becoming an e in je student should contact Stephanie Evancho at 757-6769
Education majors looking for jobs will find an
advantage at Mendenhall Student Centertoday
when representatives from over 85 school systems
will be looking for teachers to hire.
Ine annual Education Careers Day will be
held from 9 a.m. to 12 pm in the Gmat Room and
Multipurpose room ot the center.
The Career Services office and the Education
l Ypartmentan1 sponsoringtheannualevent. Over
85 school systems in North Carolina, Virginia,
s iuth (an lina and Maryland will be represented
in this year's : i �� im
the schi � 11 be pre-
pared to give information about their school and
their system's employment needs.
All education majors and those considering
education as a future career are welcome to attend
the program.
Seniors should bring copies ot their resumes
tor the recruiters
See Career page 3
Beer industry attempts to educate consumers
By Brian Kerns
Special to I ho t ast Carolinian
The beer industry, while
spending millions ol dollars on
advertising, isalso trying to edu-
cate consumers. ECU'S market-
ing students received the real
lesson on the importance of edu-
cation Wednesday night.
lorn Atkins vice president
and general manager of C.(
Tankard (iompanyofWashing-
ton, was the featured speaker ol
the American Marketing Asso-
ciation last Wednesday.
CO. Tankard Company,
which is a Ivor wholesaler, pri-
marily handles Miller Brewing
Company. Thecompanyserves
13 eastern North Carolina coun-
ties and services nearly halt a
million people, with Greenville
Iving their largest and most
important market.
Atkins discussed the growth
of t he Ixvr industry from its small
market size in the early '70s toone
ot the largest industries in the
world.
Around 1970, Phillip Morris
bought Miller BrewingCompany,
which then was a small operation
with one production facility.
Phillip Morris then trans
totied ihe beer inJustrv by
implementing their "Marlboro
Man" mentality and competi-
tive marketing strategy into the
beer industry.
By 1981, Miller High Life
was the number two beer in the
country and Miller had awak-
ened a giant industry. With
Anheuser Busch being the
leader in the beer market, the
industry became more creative
and marketing competitive.
The beer companies were
doing everything to gain brand
loyalty and increase1 per capita
consumption, but the industry
and the nation forgot one impor-
tant element �- education.
The increasing death tolls
due to drunken dnversand alco-
holism set off public concern
about the message that the beer
industry was sending out.
See Beer, page 3
Senior class hopes to
create new traditions
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
The senior class is preparing to make
its contribution to the university and the
president of the class of 1992, Allen Tho-
mas, wants to make tradition thethemeof
the gift.
Thomas' idea is to replace the tempo-
rary stage structure on the mall in the
center ot campus, with a permanent one.
He then wants to include time capsules
representing each class built into the back
ol the stage.
"We need a permanent area out there
and when it's not being used for functions
it's always there for someone to use for a
picnic or lunch or anything Thomas said.
"It will help beautify that part of cam-
pus
The tradition would start with the
class of 1992's collection of items repre-
senting the events of the year and would
continue every year until it is full. Then in
80 vears or so it could be opened and
examined.
"Every year there would be a cer-
emony when the senior class would put in
their block area things from that year
Thomas said. "It would have a little vault
where you put information, maybe a pro-
gram from the Peach Bowl, a paper from
The East Carolinian, different things from
our university that happened this year
Building the stage will require an un-
usually large sum ot money for a senior
class gift and cooperation from the whole
university.
The �GA usually pays for the senior
class gift, but this year the SGA is short on
funds (only having $7,435 to spend on
appropriations) and will not bo able to
give very generously. This only makes
Thomas more determined to ask for assis-
tance from different organizations.
"To do it we are going to need coop-
eration and hclp from all groups on cam-
pus Thomas said. "Since this will benefit
our entire university and help begin tradi-
tion, it should be something all groups get
excited about being a part of, including
faculty,staff and students
Thomas said he wants to get help from
any gToup on campus. If a group can help
supply materials or man-power or even
brain-power, Thomas is willing to use it.
The next step for Thomas is visiting
Chancellor Richard Eakin and Dr. Al
Mathews, vice-chancellor for student ar-
fairs. Thomas wants to get their advice
and input on the project's initial problems,
such as funding and construction.
Armor all
Photo by Kavin Amos � ECU Photo Lab
George Sartiano, member of the Society for Creative Anachronism,
prepares his armor lor a Middle Ages re-creation





2
BI?e East (Eamlfnfan February 18, 1992
CRIME(SENE
Greenville Police arrest Aycock Hall
residents for fireworks possessions
Feb.12
0154� Aycock Hall: Vehicle stopped. Student given verbal
warning for stop sign violation.
0159�Garrctt Hall: Towed vehicle on tow list. Same towed by
Plaza Exxon.
0208�W! lite Hall: Subjects involved in fight, assault and serious
injury.
0257�White Hall: Subject involved in earlier fight transported
to emergency room for treatment. Subject's name unavailable at
press time.
0456�Magistrate office: Assisting Greenville Police Depart-
ment in arrest of two Aycock Kill residents, David Douglas Roberts
and Carlos James Williams. The charges were for possession of
fireworks.
0656�Minges freshman parking lot: Security' check for car with
freshman decal with spray paint on it. Unable to determine if paint
was old or new.
0951�Nursing building: Checked out vehicle on the tow list.
Vehicle was not towed.
1031�Mendenhall Student Center: Checked a vehicle which
had rolled out of the parking space. Owner had moved vehicle.
1 io4�Police Department Checked out larceny report.
2154�Slay Hall: Investigated possible illegal drug violation.
Same unfounded.
0352�Charles Street and Greenville Boulevard: Vehicle stopped
in reference to suspicious activity west of Minges. Subject identified
as a student.
Feb.13
2125�Minges: Vehicle stopped for picking up cans. Verbal
warning given to non-student
2154�White Hall: Checked out subjects soliciting.
2332�White Hall: Checked out suspicious subject. Subject
banned.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safety Logs.
SGA
Continued from page 1
tus to run for office was clarified.
After the confusionin the falll
of 1991 with several students run-
ning for offices and later finding out
they were ineligible because of lack
of hours, the committee listed the
hours needed to qualify.
"Students puttime,energyand
money into the campaigns only to
find out they did not qualify, this
resolution would solve that prob-
lem Kristie Hoffsteddcr, of the
committee, said. The qualifications
are freshman: 0-31, sophomore: 32-
63, junior: 64-95 and senior: 96 plus.
Students must be enrolled full-time
which for undergraduates is 12 se-
mester hours and for graduates is
nine hours or six hours plus an
assistantship.
During debate, John Washko
objected to the hours qualification.
The point was also raised that
business majors graduate with 120
hours so they could possibly have
onlv 90 before elections and then
they would not qualify.
The resolution passed.
Businesses donate computers, software I Ryan White gran'
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Staff Writer
IBM and Digital Equipment
Corporation are donating nearly
$400,000incomputersand software
to help ECU's "Academic Com-
mitment to Excellence Through
Technology" program from the fall
of 1991.
The grants from the two com-
panies will be used to expand the
computer workstationsavailable to
students and faculty and to develop
high-tech computervideo class-
rooms. The classrooms will have
projection monitors that will allow
facultv to use multi-media and
computer assisted instruction
technologies in their lectures.
Having a partnership with the
two companies represents "a bold
approach (by ECU) to strengthen
undergraduate educational excel-
lence in teaching, and commitment
to research, scholarship and ere-
ativeactivities Ernest Marshbum,
director of ECU Academic Com-
puting, said.
The university isadding nearly
$1.5 million to the corporation part-
nership monies, in order to support
a set of initiatives in the "Academic
Commitment to Excellence
Through Computing Marshbum
said. The money from the univer-
sity will be used to increase the
number of workstations in campus
computer labs and to expand the
usage of computer technologies in
all of ECU'sacademicdepartments.
Included in IBM's $180,000
grant were 28 of its 386-class per-
sonal computers, 11 laser and dot
matrix printers, CD Rom and acces-
sories and numerous licenses fur
personal computer software.
Digital Equipment
Corporation's $190,000 grant will
provide funding for a VAX 4001)
high memory minicomputer sys-
tem including disk storage devices,
printer, 13 terminals and more than
400 licenses for software.
EXCITING CAMP OPPORTUNITY!
L
Interviews being conducted
on Tuesday, February 18 at
The Methodist Student Cen-
ter (corner of 5th & Holly).
For application or more in-
formation, call 758-2030.
D
Recreational Services Co-Rec activities spring into action!
Don't miss out on the fan!
Clarifications:
� In the Feb. 13 article, "Photo Lab Requests New Equipment Tim
Hampton was misquoted as saying, "In my opinion, no one could
misconstrue that J ames DePuy was in the grassy knoll on November
2,1963 The date should have read, "November 22,1963
0 The East Carolinian regrets that the last line of the Feb. 11 story,
"Minorities encourage student involvement was not included
with the article. This omission stemmed from a computer error.
� In the Jan. 14 issue of The Exist Carolinian, an article inaccurately
reported that Jim Burns made the first wiretapping recording of
Brooks Mills phone line along with Teddy Roberson. Burris did
not. The state auditor's report states that Roberson made the first
tap after consultation with Burris. It is unclear whether Burris
authorized the taping.
WILD AM) WACKY IT N
FOR GROUPS 01: FOUR!
Roman Relay. Singiii' in
(lit- Rain, All Iressed Up
witJh No Where to Flow,
Scooperbalh Blow Blow
Blow Your lioat and
more
M
WATER GAMES
REGISTER: Tuesday, March 3 at
5:OOpm in Bio 103
The Games will be held Wednesday, March 18
at 7:30pm in CG Pool -
It can't do laundry or find you a date,
but it can help you find more time for both
The new Apple" Macintosh" Classic' II
computer makes it easier for you to juggle
classes, activities, projects, and term papers�
and still find time for what makes college
life real life.
It's a complete and affordable Macintosh
Classic system that's ready to help you get
your work finished fast. It's a snap to set up
and use. It has a powerful 68030 micro-
processor, which means you can run even
the most sophisticated applications with ease
And its internal Apple SuperDrive� disk
drive reads from and writes to Macintosh and
MS-DOS formatted disks�allowing you to
exchange information easily with t t
almost any other kind of computer.
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In addition to its built-in capabilities, the
Macintosh Classic II can be equipped with up
to 10 megabytes of RAM. so you'll be able to
run several applications at once and work
with large amounts of data.
If you already own a Macintosh Classic,
and want the speed and flexibility of a
Macintosh Classic II, ask us about an
upgrade�it can be installed in just minutes
and it's affordable.
To put more time on your side, consider
putting a Macintosh Classic II on your desk.
See us for a demonstration today, and while
you're in, be sure to ask us for details
about the Apple Computer Loan.
It'll be time well spent.
Introducing the Macintosh Classic II
, Wright Building Telephone: 757-6731
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C1�mt is a rqpsicrrd tradctr-art used under license bv Apple Compuier Irx Th� ari ��s awwd using Macintosh compute

By Angela DeRosia
Staff Writer
AIDS patients living in East-
em North Carolina mav now be
able to receive financial assistance
through a $146357 grant given to
the AIDS Service Agency of East-
em North Carolina H1VA1DS
Consortium
This grant, awarded by the
Ryan White Comprehensive A IDS
Resources Emergency Act will be
used to provide support sen
and relief funds to cover the cost
of medication, home delivered
meals and transportation to and
from physicians wh ilize in
HIVAIDS treatment
"hi purj - � of the '��
White Comprehensive AIDS Re-
sources Emergency Act I un 1 �
tablished b) tl �� nati �nal g �vern-
ment, is to improve service
AIDS patients. Only states ha
at least a 1 percent diagra d
population quahfv for this
The fed era 1 gra nt will si
efforts to coordinate supp
tal services, providecaserrt
ment and create a temporal
fund for AIDS patients lij
the 17 rural eastern count)
The federal fund all
$900,000 for lb
cording to Dr Er
grant's principal lr i
assistant professor in thl
Schoi . � ' - '
adequate i
phj �� al ai I
ing imber I
' u
it
Professors fight
Bv Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Fighting illiteracy is becoming
an important task of many people
today, including ECU profess r
The ongoing efforts to stop .
graphic illiteracy may be' paying
off.
"We are witnessing a renais-
sance (for geography) Dr. Dou-
glas Wilms said.
Wilms, ECU professor and the
cooordinator of the North Caro-
lina Geographic Alliance, is in-
volved in a statewide effort to dis-
tribute maps and globes in school
classrooms. Wilms also travels to
discuss geography with other
teachers, encouraging them incor-
porate an emphasis on geography
into their classrooms.
Id 1987, North Carolina was
selected for membership into the
National Geographic Society's
Geographic Education Alliance
Network �
William Imp ral i
State Univei
� linal i

tied as a
pre

Aswel
him that introdw
foundarj I -
kindergarten thn
grade, th v. rti
Education has a; : I
cial studies unit ir ge g
the 10th grade
"We're going t.
phvt come back I
whenlwasa youngs!
schools Wilms said
In the 195CS, classr
tained a variety of nv I
Classroom pre nt
time emphasized the 1
countries and the Ea
graphical features
Beer
Continued from page 1
Thebeer industry began spend-
ingmillionsonstudyingothcT coun-
tries and their attitudes towards al-
cohol. These countries had higher
per capita consumption, but less
instances of alcoholism and traffic
related accidents. The attitudes and
perceptions of alcohol in consum-
ers were the major differences be-
tween societies.
The results of Americans'
attidutes resulted in the raising of
the drinking age from 18 to 21,
tougher DW'l laws and insurance
premiums for autos and industry,
the banning of happy hours and
dnnking incentiver �
"The current situation in the
beer i ndustrv is promotion and exiu -
cation Atkins said. "The industrv
iscurrently facing proposalsmCon-
cjess to mandate equal time for a
health warning ad on every beer
commercial
The beer industry contributes
billions of dollars annually to our
nations economy.
"We as an industry have an
obligation to market our brands re-
sponsibly Atkins said.
REACH
3
F
LAST
CHANCE
OFFER ENDS
SOON!
10.0c cm to
(Pf n House Su
-FULL SEVICE Ij
-EUROPEAN TR,
-WOLFF TANNDj
-LATEST IN FA
-SKIN & NAIL Cl
-PROFESSIONAI
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
Ml si K in S WITH





February 18, 1992 abe lEast (�arulinian 3
puters, software I Ryan White grant assists AIDS patients
Career
Continued from page 1
s 186 v lass por-
its 11 laser and dot
lomandacces-
� ius Ih rust's tor
iottware
Equipment
- � 100 grant will
, tor a 40QQ
Kunputer ss-
igedev ices.
ind more than
I vs .trr
MP oworh ITY!
s being conducted
i. February 18 at
lodist Studenten-
r �f 5th & Holly).
cation or more in-
i. call 758-2030.
spring into action!
YLAZY
R GAMES
tu s(ia . March S at
Mart h 1H
Bv Angela DeKosia
SUIt Writer
AIDS patients living in East-
em North Carolina may now be
able to receive financial assistance
through a $146357 grant given to
the IDS Sen ice Agency of Fast
i m North Carolina HFVAIDS
i, onsortjum
This grant, awarded bv the
Kvan Whiter ornprehensivo All 5
Resources Emergency Act will be
i si to provide support services
ind relict funds to cover the cost
ot medication, home deli
� Jll!
from phv;
Ml
White v o
turces 1
transportation N
w lii- spe ial
�it least a 1 percent diagnosed All S
population qualify tor this grant.
I he federal gran) will support
ettorts to coordinate supplemen-
tal services, providecase manage
ment and create a temporary relief
fund ttt All S patients living in
the 1" rural eastern counties
The tederal fund allocated
$900,000 tor the entire state, ac-
cording to Dr. Eri Massey, the
grant's principal investigator and
assistant professor in the E( U
School et Nursing
N' .i: ioI have
adequ ite i uro I fulfill the
physical and mental needs of ns-
ill of the i vail
uninsured AIDS patients living in
eastern North Carolina Massey
said.
As AIDS patients' disease
progresses, their ability to care for
their own personal needs dimin-
ishes, Massey explained.
Many AIDS patients in east-
ern North Carolina live in small
communities with limited or no
transportation services, home
health programs or community
programs such as home delivered
meals and personal care services.
� hensive
l : ind
. .
se r vi ce s
i i il statcsha
Representatives in the con-
sortium are working to develop
service centers in Wake, Wilson
and Northampton counties. 1 he
i enter tor Pittount has not Ct
n designated.
I hese i enters will refer,
lie, distribute the relief funds
and assess the AIDS patient's are
tsano inij i
is and lo
inn �.
al
T
ieas
ices in their
ssments will
decide which, it anv. ol the exist-
ing services can provide assis-
tance
"It's a new health care ch.il
lenge for the state, especially east
em North Carolina said Massey
If a patient lives in a town that
cannot provide needed services,
that patient will be referred to a
centrally located project coordi-
nator. The coordinator will then
arrange cimtractu.il services.
temporary relict funds or referral
to other funding sources.
I hree-fourthsol the grant will
be used to provide home health
care Mi one-eighth will cover
medical servii sand pres ription
expenses tor qualifv ing Ml "� pa
tients. Funds will be administered
through the Al DSSei n� y
b the 1 n ision ol Adult 1 lea 11h in
the North Carolii i De irtnn
it Environment 1 lealth and
Natural Resoun �
"We encourage professors and
students to meet with the people
from the sch(xls said Dr. Jim
Westmoreland, director of Career
Services
"It's a great chance to meet
people and find out about the an-
tn i pa ted openings
I "he Career Day at EC I is a
opportunity to provide students
with a tace-to-taee contact with fu-
ture employers
Students who are interested in
improving their inter iewing skills
and nsumes can attend one of the
nianv workshops ottered bv the
Career Services staff at the Bloxton
I louse located on campus.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications for the
Summer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
Professors fight geographic illiteracy
B) Christie I awrence
Staff V filet
ghting illiteracy is bc� n
riant task of man peoj
iding ECl I pi
� orts to sti :
�� � i v may K
ire witnessing a renais-
� r gei graphy ), Dr. 1 '��
A ilms said.
I professor and the
r ol the Ni rtl
. raphic Alliance, is in
volved in a statewide effort todis
tribute maps and globes in school
classrooms. Wilms also travels to
discuss geography with other
tea hers, encouraging them incor
� � ite an emphasis on geography
I their classrooms
fa 1987, North Carolina was
� ted for membership into the
National Geographic Society's
� graphic Education Alliance
and Prote i
-
� �, re named e
lumthat introdiK � �� asa
. � -
kindergarten through sevi
i Roard of
cial studies unit raphy 1 �r
the 10th grade
' We to sec it (go
whenl wasayoui . ublic
schools Wilms said
In the ! � - �
taineda variety ol maps ind globes
t ! issroom presentations at thai
time emphasized the location ol
tries and the 1 arth's
iphu al features
1 owards the end of that de-
� iph bo anie a part of
. � ii studies curru ulum and
wasq � vcrshcvi- wt d by his-
t. �rv �s onomii -p ilitii sandculture.
result maps were seldom used
in the v lassroom
� ' iihter.K v
. � i v itizens that have been
tested on geography consistently
score low
Surveys conducted in I984and
again in 1987 revealed th.it about
hah ot the college students tested in
North Carolina could identify
Alaska and Texas as the largest
states, but could not locate Japan on
a map Eighty-five percent of those
testoi could not find Afghanistan.
(neinsevenl S citizenscoukJ
not identity their own country on a
world map. according to a 1988
C .allup Poll. About one in four
could not find the Soviet Union or
the Tacit Ocean Even fewer could
identify Japan, Egypt or the Persian
Gulf.
The N leograpl i Alliance
isworkingtowardscorreel
kinds c -
r mhv instituti he n nind the
statefoi social studie; teachei tea
hve geography themes location,
movement and ri . 1 uman
environmental interaction
�10 week Summer Research Project with UNC-CH Faculty Mentor
�Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
�Humanities, Social Sciences. Natural Sciences, Biomedii lU
a Emnn iifnentai Engineering
�Skill Enhancement Workshops Available
�Housing plus $950 Food.Allowance anil$24'hi Stipend
�Application Deadline February 28, 1992
�Period cf Program: May 26,1992 uJidyJl. 1992
-( H Contact is: Asmtnte Dean Henry T. Frier m
I he Graduate School
2(H) By num Hall CB4NI
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Telephone: 6-2o 11
For application Forms and Additional Informationontact:
Dr. Farr Smith
2(M VV hicnard Building � Easlarolina I niversity
NOBODY
KNOWS
LIKE
DOMINO'S
How You Like Pizza Ai Home.
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW AS
$6.00
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Order any
LARGE pizza with up to 3 toppings between 6 PM and 10
PM, and the time you order is the price you pay!
30 minute guarantee does not apply
1 pizza per call
CALL 758-6660
Beer
Continued from page 1
hebeerindustn -
rattil
th major different i
ei ����-
ihe results ot Americans'
ites resulted in the raisii
tl � drinking age from Is to 21
.�� . - I W1 laws and in irai
ims for autos arid, industry,
� � ! � ; py hours and
Kingii �nti -v
� rrent situatii n ii th
heei I i " � ispronx tionand edu
'� �- ; aid. " I he industry
iscurn nth I n ingproposaIsin on
p"css I ' mandate equal time tor a
th warning -d on every beer
rnmen ial
Ihe beer industry contributes
billions ot dollars annually to our
nations economy.
"We as an industry have an
obligation to market our brands re
. nsiblv Atkins said
REACH YOUR GfaAMJW
3 MONTHS
FOR $69
LAST
CHANCE
OFFER ENDS
SOON!
STRESSED OUT?
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
JUST IN TIME TO
USE OUR NEW
POWERCISE
AND STEPS
" Stjd�n?�
�Jttion�l
�y ioooo� id
� n
The Club
for women only
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
MonThur. 9-9 � Frl. 9-8 � Sat 9-1
Then don't miss the Health Promotion and
Well-Being Kick-Off presentation!
5"
. �
MuuJ.n
'First-time members only.
foMt
georges
hair designs
-FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFF TANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL CARE
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Fri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
S2.CK) Ol I ALL SERVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 3-15-92
Donald A. Tubesing, PhD,
nationally recognized ex-
pert in stress manage-
ment & wellness promo-
tion, will be the featured
keynote speaker.
"HOOKED ON HELPING - THE CAREGIYER'S DI-
LEMMA" - Thursday, Feb. 20,3:30-4:30 pm,MSC Great
Room: This session will teach students preparing for care-
giving professions how to manage their everyday chal-
lenges, maintain their personal vitality, and continue to
derive personal satisfaction from their work.
"STAYING EVERGREEN" - Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30-
8:30 pm, MSC Great Room: Attend this session and learn
how to carefully use your time and energy resources for
maintaining and, as necessary, regaining your personal
vitality! This session will be open to faculty, staff, students
and the community.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 757-6793





18, 1992 a lie fEasl (Carolinian 3
mtiM'S s()t ware
Ryan White grant assists AIDS patients Care
Continued from page 1
r ngchi l vKonu
�SJMI
� nt�
.
��'

t"s�

l ,11
NITY!
led
IcS at
I in-
llolh I.
in-
i�: i fi � ���� 'i � i: i i ���' � tuuri
uninsured AIDS patients living in decide which it an Indents to meet with the people withatao to-tao . �� � .
rn North iirolina, Massev ing service; can provuli i from the schools said Mr im tureempl , i
�j tance Westmoreland, director Iareer ,vh in rested n
s KIDS patients' disease "It's a new healtl ire cl cr impi zing their inten
A their ahilitvtocare for lenge for the state, � '�� �� chance to meet and resume? ai it!
I heir own personal needs dimin em North Carolina - ;� I find out about the an mai
Massev explained Ifa patient lives in a . tl it ticipated openings Career Services Lafl toi
Manv All S patients in east cannot provide ruvdod sei i i Career Day at ECU is a House located on campu
. irtharolina live in small thai p.) I in it will I - i to a
communities with limited or no centrally located project ordi
tran tion services, home nator Hhe cixrdinator will then
health pi rams or community arrange contractu i i � es,
uch as home delivered temporary relief funds
pel ire servii es to other tund
tati �: � lourl
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications for the
Summer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
Professors fight geographic illiteracy
I aw HMiv o
action!

�' . Siunnu ' Rt w hPr, k : ��� '� '� '
. � Win � I ndt � ukiai
. � '� . � . i u
mulEngineer i
'SkillI nu nl W i wksht I ��
. � n
I-Cil Contact is: Associate Dean Henn r.Frierson
I he iraduatt St lil
200 Bynum Hall CBftMMO
I nivenat "l Northarolina at (!hapel Hill
rdephone: 966-2611
1 or application Forms and Additional Information ontact:
Dr. I .urn Smith
204 Whichard Building � East Carolina I niversit) J
YLAZY
GAMES
h � At

ka ai is t irgesl
�let
�, �! those
11 � ' I AI hanistan
n sevei
.��
i " �S8
NOBODY
KNOWS
t iLIKE
DOMINO'S
How You Like Pizza At Home
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW A3
$6.00
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Order any
LARGE pizza with up to 3 toppings between 6 PM and 10
PM, and the time you order is the price you pay!
"� ' -
30 minute guarantee does not apply
1 pizza per call m.
CALL 758-6660
Beer
REACH YOUR GOALS IN '92
3 MONTHS
FOR $69
STRESSED OUT?
LAST
CHANCE
OFFER ENDS
h.
URIAL MEMBERSHIP
JUST IN TIME TO
USE OUR NEW
POWERCISE
AND STEPS
iH,

1 us.
The Club
for women only
301 Plaza Drive
Cal! 756-1592 Today!
Mon -Thur� 9-9 � Frt. 9-8 � Sat. 9-1
I hen don't miss the Health Promotion and
Weil-Being Kick-Off presentation!
� i
-1
'First-time members only.
T
'����
georges
hair designs
V
-FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFF TANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL (ARK
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sal 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tei:756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Kri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
. II $2.00 OFF ALL SERVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 3-15-92
Donald A. TYibesing, PhD,
nationally recognized ex-
pert in stress manage-
ment & wellness promo-
tion, will be the featured
keynote speaker.
"HOOKED ON HELPING - THEARFGIVI R'S DI-
LEMMA" - Thursday,Feb.20,3:30-4:30pm,MSCGreat
Room: This session will teach students preparing for care-
giving professions how to manage their everyda) chal-
lenges, maintain their personal vitality, and continue to
derive personal satisfaction from their work.
"STAYING EVERGREEN" - Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30-
8:30 pm, MSC Great Room: Attend this session and learn
how to carefully use your time and energy resources for
maintaining and, as necessary, regaining your personal
vitality! This session will he open to faculty, staff, students
and the community.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 757-6793





' � ahc fcasst iXaruhnian 3
It ware
Ryan White grant assists AIDS patients Career
Continued rom page 1
B
KOM.l
�� patients In m� in .1'
-t ih. lrohn.i Masse int
-
l

patients disease
� abiiitv ti i arefoi
own personal needs dimin
s I'xplainevl
I ients in east
ma lii' m sm.ill
th limited or no
i
MTY!
i U (I
IN it
11-
II) �.
in-
homo
ommuniU
v delivered tem

lenge tor th
i ! � " .� I '
Ita pal � '
i anm it pi
that patu
i enti ill �
nali ir

i great chance to meel n
:��.���� �
- � iv at I i - -
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications for the
Summer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
. �
Professors fight geographic illiteracy
m!
i

I t Hi untactLs: Vssotiate Dtan llenn r.Frkrson
I luiiadu.iU S(.hiil
200 Bynum Hall BMMO
I nivcrsit) 1 Northarotinu .ithapel 11
Iekphone: 966-2611
I or application Forms and iditinul Information 1 ontact:
Dr. I arn Smith
2(M N hichard Building � KiMarolina I niv i
Y
1ES
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW
$6.00
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Ore
LARGE pizza with up to 3 toppings between 6 PM and 10
� - � . -m . m a
NOBODY
KNOWS
PI LIKE
DOMINO'S
How Vbu like Pizza Al H
PM.
e price yon pay!
tt
30 minute guarantee does not apply
I pizza per call
CALL 758-660
Beer
R GOALS IN '92
3 MONTHS
FOR $69
LAST
CHANCE
OFFER ENDS
SOON!


ITRIAL MEMBERSHIP
JUST IN TIME TO
USE OUR NEW
POWERCISE
AND STEPS
STRESSED OUT?
1'hen don't miss the Health Promotion and
Well-Being kick-Off presentation!
The Club
for women only
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
Mon -Thurs. 9-9 � Frl 9-8 � Sal. 9-1
'First-time members only.
W
george5
hair designs
-11 LLSEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFF TANNING BIDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
SKIN & NAN (ARK
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun I:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
STAMON SQUARE
Open Mon - 1 ri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 OFF ALL SERVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 3-15-92
DonaldA.Tubesing, PhD,
nationalh recognized ex-
pert in stress manage-
ment & wellness promo-
tion, will be the featured
keynote speaker.
"HOOKED ON HELPING - THE CAREGIVERS DI-
LEMMA" - Thursday, Feb. 20,3:30-4:30 pm. 1S( Great
Room: This session will teach students preparing for care-
giving professions how to manage their evervda chal-
lenges, maintain their personal vitality, and continue to
derive personal satisfaction from their work.
"STAYING EVERGREEN" - Thursday. Feb. 20. 7:30-
8:30 pm, MS( Great Room: Attend this session and learn
how to carefully use vour time and energy resources lor
maintaining and, as necessary, regaining your personal
italit! This session w ill he open to faculty, staff, st udents
and the community.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, (ALL 757-6793





Stye fEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Margi Morin, Asst. Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
STEPHEN Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
f East Carolinian hjrttrved the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,060 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
fffimoftm1 of thfdUileriai Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited t'o 250 woraH� vftli �p � Mm ofllttMf y and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
ftifiiatouoatuHV I ejffAshoul&bc adire,sscd'aial Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville N C
mSMWH Forftq,immiiwi; call iW&i 757 6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, February 18, 1992
Pitzer need student's support
After Patrick Pitzer's announcment of
his candidacy for one of Greenville's at large
city council seats, the question of student
involvement in local politics comes to mind.
The city of Greenville has a long history
of conflicts with our campus (or more spe-
cifically students than the university itself).
In the past, student issues such as noise
ordinances, restriction Halloween festivities
and various other affairs have differed with
city positions.
When one city manager stood up for
the students concerning the noise ordinance
which curtailed social events, he shortly there-
after lost his job. The city seems to be indif-
ferent to the wants of the students.
We do not have to endure this treat-
ment.
ECU students figure prominently in the
population of Greenville. This is apparent to
anyone who has spent a stuffy summer in the
emerald city. Traffic, an arguable measure of
population density, vastly increases as stu-
dents return.
Students bring more than their stereos
and pictures of mom when they arrive in mid-
August. They also bring dollars. Apart from
tobacco, students fund Greenville.
With this in mind, a truth is evident: We
need a voice in city affairs.
Because we live in a democracy, the
students of our university have a chance to
stand up to the city and exercise our control
our right to influence. With a student popu-
lation of 17,000, over a third of the entire
city's population, the campus could easily
elect a student to the mayor's office, much
less a student to the city council.
The last person to win a city council seat
won with 5,000 votes. It would be appalling,
if not slightly embarrassing, if Pitzer does
not win as many votes.
Thus, The East Carolinian hereby whole-
heartedly supports Patrick Pitzer and rec-
ommends highly that fellow students should
follow our lead.
After all, it takes only a few minutes to
vote, but it takes two years to makea change.
Letters to the Editor
Condom photo
found unamusing
To The Editor:
The purpose of the Pee Health
Educators ad East Carolina University
is to help students improve the quality
of their lives by creating awareness of
crucial health issues and assisting stu-
dents in making personal behavior
changes that contribute to personal
health and well-being. These issues
include those that relate women's
health, men's health, AIDS and sexu-
ally transmitted disease infection pre-
vention, contraception, skin cancer
prevention and alcohol awareness.
Every year the second week of
February is designated "National Con-
dom Week
This year Peer Health Educators
organized events and educational pre-
sentarionstoeducatesrudentsconcern-
mg sexually transmitted infectionsand
to promote personal responsibility for
their sexual health.
The message the Peer Health
Educators sent out in their educational
programs is that the only 100 percent
effective way to be free from sexually
transmitted d iseases is to abstain from
sexual activity.
For those who choose to be sex u-
ally active the Peer Health Educators
promote the proper and consistent use
of latex, lubricated condoms to red uce
the risk of contracting a sexually trans-
mitted infection. They emphasize that
condoms do not eliminate these risks
but just reduce thejn.
The Peer Health Educator ap-
preciate the publicity from The F.at
Carolinian but I think the picture of the
Peer Health Educator on the front page
of the East Carolinian putting a con-
dom on a penis model sends the wrong
image of the Peer Health program and
may actually trivialize the purpose of
the Peer Health Educators and Na-
tional Condom Week. AIDS is nothing
totrivializeorlaughat It is no joke that
the most recent joint study by the
American College Health Association
and the Centers for Disease Control
indicates that from a sample of 19 col-
lege campuses, two samples per 1,000
blood samples were infected with HIV,
the virus that causes AIDS. Nationally,
20 percent of those sufferi ng from AIDS
are between the ages of 20 and 29. This
is no joke and no laughing matter. Peer
Health Educators work and spend end-
less hours of training time to conduct
educational programs for their fellow
students. They should be praised for
their efforts not condemned.
I would like to congratulate the
Peer Health Educators for their efforts
to educate their fellow students and
bring the issue of AIDS and sexually
transmitted diseases out in the open on
campus. I wish the best of luck.
Suzanne Kellerman
Health Education Coordinator
Student Health Service
Possible censorship
worries student
To The Editor
In reading the article on the pro-
posal for updates in the photo lab, I
became somewhat disgruntled. The
tenor of the article seemed to be that
Mr Alexander implied the needs of
the newspaper were going to be held
hostage in order to assert editorial
changes which will satisfy the admin-
istration. These comments clearly sug-
gest a from of censorship through the
budget.
I,asa student, value thecontent
and oppositions expressed in The East
Carolinian.The ad ministration has had
adequate opportunity to state its' po-
sition on every and any issue. The East
Carolinian should havethenght, with-
out the of budgetary threat to print
the satire section and to continue "the
paper's crusade on the wiretapping
case
The student body has the right
to hear both sides of an issue.
I hope that I have misinterpreted
Mr. Alexander's comments concern-
ing his disagreement with the articles
and opinions expressed in The East
Carolinian, in the discussion pertain-
ing to resource needs.
Kevin M. Doheny
Sophomore
Criminal Justice
My Way Or The Highway
U.S. should adopt 100 mph limit
By
Matthew
Builey
Editorial
Columnist
ZL
(Editor's note �The following
is the first of a two part editorial.)
Highway 261 That vatexpanv
of boring nothing between Greenville
and Raleigh Nothing to slow you
down but Wilson and their "welcome"
sign. "Welcome to Wilson, a town
dedicated to about 15 words follow,
but I'm always going too fast to read
them.
The speed limit on 264 is 55
miles per hour. Needless to say, trav-
elling the limit is a rare occasion, usu-
ally preceded by sighting a large
American sedan, bristling with anten-
nas.
If I had a dollar for each person
whoexceeded the speed limit this past
weekend on our nation's highways, I
could buy the chancellor's house and
pave a new parking lot.
Seriously, when was the last
timeyouactuallydrove55mphina55
zone? Once, during your driver's test?
You're not alone.
Dick Ceppos, a writer in the
automotive press, performed an in-
formal survey of vehicle speeds re-
cently. The report revealed that close
to 80 percent of highway travelers
totally ignore the speed limit, some
blow by at more than 35 miles per
hourover.Ohersobeythespeed limit,
but would d rive faster if the law would
allow.
I have a modest proposal. In the
America of the 90s, with the cars of the
90s, and the roads of the 90s not only
is it possible to raise the speed limit,
but it would be rather inane not to
increase it to 100 mph, under certain
conditions.
Suburban dwellers now
struggle through hour-long commutes
that could be quicker. Those who live
in states like Arizona or Texas, where
major cities lie hundreds of miles apart,
arecrippled by the65mph speed limit.
The national speed limit should be
100 miles per hour. Bear with me, ye
motorists of little faith.
Mv criteria to safely raise the
limit are simple. Three qualifications
would have to be met in order for this
system to work, each deals with a
separate aspect of safety. Specifics of
these standards later
First, let's understand why there
is a 55 mph speed limit, and how
"Chicken Little" insurance lobbyists
have brainwashed lawmaners and
good drivers into believing that
"Speed Kills thus keeping the limit
from being raised.
In 1972 a shortage of oil forced
the government to take drastic action;
the speed limit was dropped from 65
or 75 mph to 55 mph nationwide. The
country, tired of long gas lines and
high prices at the pump, groaned and
swallowed the decrease, hoping it
would iast only until oil supplies re-
turned to normal.
It only took a few years though
beforetheSafetymongers-of-the-Uni-
verse, insurance lobbyists, were jump-
ing up and down, waving not-so-star-
tling statistics; deaths by motor ve-
hicle had dropped since the new law
was put into effect How dumb do
they think we are7 It doesn't take a
physics professor to understand that
the slower an object moves, the less
the impact it will suffer in a collision.
On the basis of the insurance
companies' statistics, why don't we
drop the national speed limit to 45
mph? Or how about 15? We could
outlaw cars altogether. If people
would return to walking, fewer would
die in motor vehicle accidents. The
point is clear; there has to be a com-
promise between speed and safety
despite the savings to insurance com-
panies. As we will see, later in this
riveting article, that compromise
might come through the human de-
sire to live a long life with all of one's
body parts
This "human nature" limiter
has gotten lost under all the scarv
"Speed Kills" propaganda Accord-
ing to Richard Ceppos, in his essay for
Car and Driver, "Bv nature, human'
are self-limiting. They're nut inclined
to perform any activity that the
is potentially dangerous to their
The only way to talk people into tak-
ing risks is to give them a reward that
they feel counterb klances the r �
American dawn are not Mi -
ently MOOfMtbk or reckless Few de-
sire to speed as Mst a- their vv
can take them. However, eaostpeoph
todav ret dial the ben fits � jetting
quickly from point A to point B fax
outweigh whatever risks there are a
going 75 miles per hour
Look around vou on vour next
road trip. People are not buyir.
the insurance industries yelps -
some gruesome, tortuous fate awa:t
them at speeds above 65
Since the time of the speed limit
drop, most methods of transportar -
have grown continually safer and
faster while automobile speeds have-
lagged tar behind. In 16, MTM
tmmm New York and Los Aagt� -
would have taken about 12-14 hours
by common air, and 72 hours on the
high way. Today, the air trip takes on a
4 and one-half hours, whilethetr.r - �
road is still 72 hours The air trip has
been cut to two-thirds of what it was
while the auto trip has stayed about
the same
Insurance agencies are not the
only ones to fight the raise in the speed
limit. Brainwashed into believing that
the speeder is a vicious enemy to pub-
lic safety, law enforcement officials
rail against tne idea of motorists zip-
ping around at higher speeds, like $5
mph
(The conclusion may be read in
Thursday's edition.)
Fearless Primary Forecast
jrrr Picks for the 1992 New Hampshire Primary
Nancy Jenkins
Mayor
City of
Greenville
Republicans:
Bush - 60
Buchanan - 40
Democrats:
Tsongas
Clinton
Kerry
Brown
Cuomo
Dr. Robert
Thompson
Political Science
Chair
Republicans:
Bush - 60
Buchanan - 40
Democrats:
Tsongas
Clinton
Harkin
Kerry
Cuomo
Allen Hoffman
WNCT
News
Anchor
Republicans:
Bush - 60
Buchanan - 40
Democrats:
Tsongas
Clinton
Kerry
Harkin
Cuomo
Jeff Parker
Editorial
Columnist
East Carolinian
Republicans:
Bush - 68
Buchanan - 32
Democrats:
Clinton
Tsongas
Kerry
Harkin
Brown
Matt Jones
Managing
Editor
East Carolinian
Republicans:
Bush - 58
Buchanan - 42
Democrats:
Clinton
Tsongas
Kerry
Marrou (Lib.)
Cuomo
Tim Hampton
General
Manager
East Carolinian
Republicans:
Bush - 66
Buchanan - 34
Democrats:
Tsongas
Kerry
Clinton
Harkin
Jimmy Hoffa
Scott Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
East Carolinian
Republicans:
Bush - 65
Buchanan - 35
Democrats:
Tsongas
Clinton
Harkin
Kerry
Brown
Greg Jones
Director of
Advertising
East Carolinian
Republicans:
Bush - 66
Buchanan - 34
Democrats:
Tsongas
Clinton
Kerry
Harkin
Cuomo
TheC
Clinton sea
infidelity
Ti (i
Den
didan Bill . un-
able u
marital inhv
ttteQintoi
with anothi r
terlude
Dan .
hon that
dirt
affair �.
president : Hart.
Har �
mor ffair
callir
of a
-
to S
ButQu
anor.vmuuj
story
with mub.hr j
.ilgamatedPn
� inter, h
told the
I nev
e dar
confl
bo a;
narn .medl
ioubj

rttoi ;id H
kidding. AH
- . is was inv
� i
Students c
The
Who Lake to Din Fic-
tion And O
Satan chalier
Indoctrination's :� -ing
the SAG meeting Mond i
Canng Deep well, president
ASYVLDSFAOWS. referred t
policy printed ir the
official guide for students living
m the dorms.
The policy states -rudents
using their imagination in the
dorms will be severely flogged
"Resident Indoctrination is
trying to prove there's a correla-
tion between students using their
imaj
lending dorm.
Deepwell. "Corrj
break when wj
student had the
est to cr
here?"
Deepwell a;
dent Indoctnnal
Mr. nota
dents ca par
nationsatai.
brain cells thev
cohol, usually rrq
rouble.
According
SAG meeting,
duced a resohiti
verse '��
SchmendrixTh
makes movie hi:
By IMMr O"
ECt
Student d an en-
tertain D
ing j
Mender . St tdt Rt
Sondan, 1 rthefirst time m
� - iter
sIm thont
glitches
Tata
"Ihadaiwayswant!
tapping � ' rut I
thought tb �.�: a! Mendta
weald sen
somehow. Btttw ea old actually
hear the diak � I entire
frame M ason the screen and the
film didn't break H
"Like when I sa -
ers" theimrediblv long-named
student dl Md on the film
broke and d the entire
�his inn- -
vvb - ' '
I
the part when
The V
'


hard as
Then aga - I Jl
he RudeE. L
he had no idea
film showings.
"I don't gj
things he said
my office am
5 metimes 1 eaj
ECU SNAPSHOTS
don't take 'em seriously
We re Avoiding More Dral
�oooo
8000 -
� 6000 -
M
a
a
$ 4000 -
2000 -
1984 1986 1988 1990
Year
-4 �





Opinion
Ullje �aat ffiarolintan February 18, 1992 15
100 mph limit
iman de
'� .Tl' S

tnitcr
,lost ui " scary
� .1 i i �rd -
icssa tor
.�� � ins
. �. pie into tak-
� . � � ! tward that
renol inher
11 . de-
r vehicles
'�i iple
� getting
nt B fa?
ire in
Look ai id
. � into
: � th.it
� i fate iwaita
ipeed limit
orl i"on
f � .nd
h i e (H.
i Angeles
taki 1 hours
� � on the
i'Mmlv
rs while thetripby
hours. 1 he air trip haa
� � � Is of vh.it it was
- stayed about
� ' � Mflies are not the
limit h 1. � e raise in the speed
�'�limn Brainwashed into believing thai
It pithe speeder tsavk ious enemy to pub-
pwcr wouldlic safety law enforcement officials
ldt'Ptvigainst the idea of motorists dp
i be .i com-ping around I - poods, like 85
,ird safetymph
iraiu e v om
�ter m this(The conclusion mav bo read in
mpromisoThursday's edition )
(aO
-s-C��
MaxwellOeg lones
iitorialDirector of
lumnistAdvertising
l arotmumtrotmkm
ublicans:Republicans:
sh - 65Hush hh(;
man - 35 Buchanan - 34
mocrats:I Vmocrats:
songasi songas
lintonClinton
firkinKerry
KerryHarkin
IrownCuomo�
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
� Thu nfflntai Mttre naufe of the 1992 Winter Olympics
The official satire page of the 1992 Winter Olympics
Clinton scandalized by
infidelity accusations
hit Amalgamated Press
Democratic presidentia can-
didate Hill c linton has been un-
iblc to quash persistent rumors of
trital infidelity. Now it appears
( linton campaign must deal
with another alleged romantic in
tde
According to Via- President
fan Quayle, who spoke on condi
tion that he not be identified,
i, 'linton i arried on .1 torrid 12 year
ittair with former Democrats
residential candidate(irv 1 lart
l (art denied the persistent ru-
mors of the homosexual affair,
calling them "persistent rumors
(it a homosexual affair
1 deny thru 1 lart wont on
�tv
Hut Quaylc, the Amalgamated
Press' anonymous source, tells a
different story. "Medium pizza
with mushrooms Quaylc told
Amalgamated Press reporters in a
telephone interview. "Alsoan Ital-
ian sub, hold the oops, sorry.
Wrong line. I never could get the
hang of these dang phones
With the confusion sorted out,
Quayle, who asked not to be
named, resumed his story of the
attair. "No doubt about it the
anonymous vice president said.
"Clinton and Hart were lovers.
No kidding. And, uh Paul
Tsongas was involved in it, too.
He's theother fop Democratic guy,
right? Okay, good
At .1 press conference, Clinton
strongly domed the allegations,
calling them "possibly untrue, I
think
"Look, you people are idiots
Clinton told the assembled report-
ers. "You give credence to these
unfounded rumors by reporting
them and then reporting on the
fact that they keepbeingreported,
and and
At this point a dazed look
came into the candidate's eyes.
Foaming slightly at the mouth, he
jumped on a mighty darn attrac-
tive female reporter in the first
row.
After four other reporters
dragged Clinton away from the
woman, he began to scream, "1
didn't do it! It's a lie! Nobody can
prove anything! Don't print that
In an apparently unrelated
Statement, Mr. Clinton also re-
vealed that his hair is not his own.
Clinton scandalized
by 22-year-old letter
The Amalgamated Press
A 22-year-old letter released
to the press by Bill Clinton's cam-
paign committee revealed surpris-
ing new factsabout the candidate's
attempts to avoid serving in the
Vietnam War.
In the letter, Clinton lavishly
praises the man who helped him
avoid serving in the war. That man
was none other than j. Danforth
Quaylc, now the vice president of
the United States.
"All my friends have told me
that you're the man to go to if you
want to avoid the draft Clinton
wrote in the letter. "Of course,
unlike you, 1 oppose the war rather
than advocating it, so I'm not be-
ing a hypocrite by staying out of
Partial Text of Clinton's Letter
Dear Mr. Quayle:
First I want to thank you, not just for saving me trom the draft, but
also for the lovely basket of fruit you sent me .
Let me try to explain to you why I sought your assistance in
avoiding the draft. Basically, I don't want to die. I mean, that's at the
heart of it. Can you really blame me?
However, I've decided to join ROTC. I don't want to fight in
Vietnam or anything, but I don't think I want to be unelectable two
decades from now, either. I'm sure you know what that's like, ha ha.
Thanks again for the fruit.
Sincerely, or anyway as sincere as I get,
Bill Clinton
the army but still, thanks
In a telephone interview,
Quayle angrily denied his role in
the sordid mess, saying, "You darn
guys in the press stop repeating
anonymous, unfounded accusa-
tions! Except the ones make
When informed that the accu-
sations were neither anonymous
nor unfounded, Quayle suddenly
remembered he had a doctor's
appointment and hung up.
Students challenge new dorm policy
Tin Amm camati d Press
The Association of Students
Who Like to Discuss Science Fic-
tion And Occasionally Worship
Satan challenged one Oi Resident
Indoctrination's policies during
the SAC. meeting Monday.
v anng I Xvpwell presidentof
ASWl 1 6FAOWS, referred to the
policy printed in Mein Kttmpf, the
official guide tor students living
in the dorms
The policy states, students
using their imagination in the
dorms will be severe!) flogged
"Resident Indoctrination is
trying to prove there's a eorrela
tion between students using their
imaginations and students chal-
lenging dorm policies said
Deep well. "Come on, gimme a
break when was the last time a
student had the guts or the inter-
est to challenge a policy around
here?"
Deepwel! asserted that Resi-
dent Indoctrination's policy is
unfair, noting that those few stu-
dents capable of using their imagi-
nationsat all, consideringall those
brain cells they've drowned in al-
cohol, usually manage to stay out
of trouble.
Accordingly, at last week's
SAG meeting, Deepwell intro-
duced a resolution that would re-
verse Resident Indoctrination's
ban on imaginative activities.
Naturally, the resolution hit a
big old bureaucratic wall o'
trouble. Rita Violatin Fashist, a
senior Resident Indoctrination of-
ficial, convinced the SAG to send
the resolution to a committee for a
vote.
"I'm sure you can see why we
have a policy against students us-
ing their imaginations in the
dorms Fashist told this reporter.
"People start using their imagina-
tions, and pretty soon they'reques-
tioning authority, and you know
what that leads to. These rules are
necessary in order to preserve the
master race from � er, 1 mean, to
keep order
Fashist later convinced the
committee that the anti-imagina-
tion policy posed no threat to stu-
dents' rights. "You people on the
committee don't have any imagi-
nation anyway said Fashist.
"What do you care?"
Deepwell objected to Fashist's
comments before the committee,
asking her, "Have you ever used
your imagination, lady?"
"Well, of course not Fashist
replied, chuckling. "Why should I
have to have any idea what it's
like to do whatever it is I'm ban-
ning?"
Deepwell was then soundly
laughed at by the committee mem-
bers, and her precious little reso-
lution was ceremoniously
dumped in the trash.
When the committee an-
nounced the results of its vote, the
SAG was almost completely unin-
terested.
"Frankly, I don't really care
whether students' rights are be-
ing violated said one typical
bored SAG legislator. "Doesn't
bother me in the slightest. I'm just
here for the babes
A few of the assembled legis-
lators valiantly attempted to stick
up for their fellow students' rights,
but they were quickly decapitated,
and the SAG meeting settled down
to its usual nice, soft, useless,
Gerald Ford-like self.
Mini-satire for busy readers
LEAK PROBE: This has
nothing to do with that reporter
who refuses to talk to the Senate
about his source for the Anita
Hill story. We just wanted to
have an adolescent snicker at the
heading "Leak probe
LAW: Clarence Thomas sexu-
ally harasses Associate Justice
Scalia�and Scalia asks for more!
OZONE LAYER: jeez,
this thing is developing more
holes than the plot of a Danielle
Steele novel.
Schmendrix Theater
makes movie history
President affirms,
extends Haiti policy
By imm Oi �,v-
E( u rooA
Students witnessed an en-
tertainment breakthrough dur-
ing .1 movie screening at
Mendenhcll Student (enter on
Sunday 1 orthefirst timeinhis-
t,r. Schmendrix Theater
showed a movie without
glitches
"1'mama sed" said shocked
studmt 1 oastdeodoi intsoap.
"I had always wanted tosee Wire-
tapping r I un and Profit, but 1
thought the staff at Mendenhell
would .crew up the projection
m imehow. But wecould actually
hear the dialogue, the entire
frame was on the screen and the
film didn't break once.
"Like when I saw Silly Slick
m the u rodiblv long-named
student droned on, "the film
broke and we missed the entire
greased-calf scene where Billy
Krystle, who's going through a
mid-life crisis, comes to terms
withhisinnerchild.lmean,that's
why I went to see the movie in
the first place. Oh, and we missed
the part when the lady cowboy
took her shirt off
The Mendenhcll projection-
ist can't comprehend the flaw-
less screening.
"1 don't understand why the
movie didn't stink projection-
ist Dontno Zhitt said. "I tried as'
hard as 1 could to screw it up.
Then again, 1 don't know what!
I'm doing
Supreme Ruler of Menden- j
hell Rude E. Underhander said
he had no idea about the flawed I
film showings.
"1 don't go to the damn
things he said. "1 just sit here in
my office and make money.
Sometimes 1 eat lunch
The Amalgamated Press
The Bush Administration has
decided to stick to its policy of
deporting Haitianrefugees,asscrt-
ing that the Haitians came to this
country fleeing destitution rather
than political persecution.
Thousands of refugees have
already been sent back to Haiti,
where they have been jailed,
beaten, and hacked into little tiny
bits with machetes.
However, the administration
intends to continue its deporta-
tion policy, and today announced
plans to extend it even further.
"Our position is that fleeing
economic hardship, coming to this
country for economic reasons, is
no t acceptable said W hi te House
spokcsweasel Merlin Spitzwater.
"Even if economics was only part
of it. Accordingly, we're deport-
mgeveryone whoseamresiorscame
to this country for economic rea-
sons, too. After all, we want to be
fair about this
The revised policy will mean
the deportation of damn near ev-
ery American with any European
background at all, including Presi-
dent Bush himself. American In-
dians are reportedly pleased.
Rec center to rise from
Joyner Library's ashes
ECU SNAPSHOTS
don't take 'em seriously
We're Avoiding More Drafts!
100
00 V
a
8000 -
6000
4000
2000 -
az
The Amalgamated Press
ECU librarian Bea Quiet tear-
fully informed Amalgamated
Press reporters yesterday that
plans for the university's $18-mil-
lion rec center will be changed a
bit.
Rather than build a new facil-
ity, administrators plan to throw
out )oyner Library's books and
periodicals and install ping-pong
tables and a pool in the building.
Chancellor Dick Achin was
quick to defend the change of
plans.
"When you think about it,
every dime we sink into that new
rec center could just as easily be
put into expanding existing, use-
ful facilities like the library Achin
pointed out. "You could say that
every new ping-pong paddle
means one less paperback.
"So, what the hell. Let's be
honest about this. If its allocation
of funds is any guide, this univer-
sity cares more about athletics and
crap like that than it does about
providing students with one of
the most basic resources they need
to complete their educations: a
well-stocked, up-to-date library
"This whole thing is a trav-
esty Quiet whispered fiercely,
straining to make herself heard
above the sounds of construction
workers. She tried to say more,
but one of the workers dragged
her from the building and depos-
ited her on top of a heap of dis-
carded books.
7
1984
1986 1988 1990
w
1992
1994
Vote for David Duke in '92.
Because at least you'll know
you'll never do anything worse.
Why is there so much
suffering in the world?
Why is it that we're the
richest nation on Earth, yet
millions of our citizens are
homeless and hungry?
Why are people mean to
each other, when they don't
really have to be?
Why do elected officials use
their power for evil and self-
aggrandizement instead of
helping the people who
trusted them enough to
vote for them?
Why Ask Why?
Drink Budd Dry
'til you can't think straight
any more, and avoid
dealing with any of the
world's problems for yet
another guilt-ridden day.
-�-





Classifieds
ZUe iHast (Earoltntan
February 18,1992
m
Entertainment
K)R RIV
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: $16150 per month,
1 2utiliu.es. Near campus. Avail-
able immediately. Call 758-3311
LUXURY SUITE: A seventh
story luxury suite hanging over
the white sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful
beach. Completely furnished,
sleeps five in unbelievable
luxury; minutes from Jai- Alai,
airport, horses, dogs, Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for week 37 - 314 at Holly-
wood Beach TowerA Call (305)
472-2870.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: For apartment half a
block from campus, 2blocks from
downtown, supermarket, and
bundramat. $220 per month, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and
cable. 758-6418.
FOR SAtf
FOR SALE: Macintosh llci cpu
only. 8-meg RAM; 120-meg hard
disk. $3500 firm. Will trade for
Faberge egg or date with that
chick in the Pepsi commercial
757-O05 ask for Stephen.
1986 TOYOTA CEL1CA GT:
Black with grey interior,5-speed,
AC, stereo cassette, power pack-
age, very good shape. Call Jeff
and leave message. 752-8454.
FOR SALE:Sleeper sofa,recliner,
and chair. Tleasecall 321-0560.
FOR SALE: Mistubishi HS-400
UR Hi-Fi stereo VCR $75. 355-
0141, leave message.
1986 HONDA REBEL: 9221
miles, well ma in ta ined, new tires,
brakes and batten with accesso-
ries. $800.7524428.
HELP WANTED
SFKVOSOFHKfn
dows, bathroom, etc. $4 hour.
758-6998.
EXCrriNG SUMMER CAMP
OPPORTUNITY: Interviews
being conducted on Tuesday,
Feb. 18 at the Methodist Student
Center (corner of 5th and Holly)
For application or more informa-
tion, call 758-2030.
COURIER FILE CLERCK TO
WORK PART-TIME: Must have
d rivers liceaseand reliabletrans-
portation. Hours are mostly in
the morning (9a.m. to 1 p.m.).
Phone 758-1747 and ask for Mr.
Rush or apply at Pitt Surgical,
P.A. 905 Johns Hopkins Drive,
Greenville, NC.
SERVICES Of H KID
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
papers. Laser printer. 752-8595,6
to 9 p.m. or leave message.
BABYSITTER: Retired nurse
available to babysit your
preschoolers. My home,$8 day.
You bring their food and I'll pro-
videT.LC. Call Roseat 752-4358.
PERSON MS
K1NGSARMS APART- FAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
MENTS: 1 and 2bedroom apart-
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locations in town, carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer and
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EFFICIENCY AT RINGGOLD
TOWERS: Sublease immedi-
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bv Mendenhall. Fully furnished.
$260 a month. Call 752-6993.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now raking 1 eases tor 1
bedroom. 2 heilioom &
Efficiency Apartments
(ALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place 10 Live
�All New
�And Rudy To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�AcHM From Highway Patrol Station
Ijmiled Offer $330 a month
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756 78.5 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
QeflD tnd qut ixw beAtxwn fumutod ifai 'jiruii,
cnertrerTk ��.&���� and lever, ���hrn. c�-yrji.
cable TV Conie o iirikl only SMOt month. 6
moMbleae; MOBILE HOME RiVTALS coopks of
wv Brack Vallry Country Club.
Contact J.T or Tommy Williams
7567815
fORSAif
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheelers, motor homes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 800-338-3388 Ext. C-
5999.
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities,
student clubs. Earn up to $1000
in one week. Phis receive a $1000
bonus yourself. And a tree watch
just (brcallingl-800932 0528Ext
65.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 800-338-3388 Ext P-3712
FREETRAVELAircouners.ind
cruise ships. Students a 1st)
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
employment. Oil 800-338-3388
Ext. F-3464.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED: Playhouse nightclub
isGoldsboro, cash $$$. Call Paul
736-0716 or Sid 735-7713 or Club
731-9962.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY Assemble products at
home. Call toll free 1-800-467-
5566 Ext. 5920.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Staff Referral Ser-
vices provides a network of
camps, now hiring, from the
"Keys" to Wise-Minn. One ap-
plication reaches all camps. Ap-
plications at Career Services -
Bloxton House.
HOUSE CLEANER NEEDED:
Overworked graduate student
needs help with vacuuming,
sweeping, lots of dusting, win-
GIRLS, YOU TENSE?
STRESSED? What you need is a
practiced niassusse to relieve that
everyday tension, through deep
muscle and full body therapeu-
tic massage. Call 758-6418 for
appt.
RESUMES: Professionally com-
posed and typeset. 1 asei printer.
$25.752-8595,6 to9 p.m. or leave
a message.
PAPERS: Professionally typeset
class assignments and research
STUDY ABROAD IN AUS-
TRALIA: Information on semes-
ter, year, graduate, summer, and
internship programs in Perth,
Townsville, Sydney, and
Melbourne. Programs start at
$3520. Call 1-800-878-3696.
BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE: 6
days $279! Panama City $99, Pa-
dre $199, Cancun $499, Jamaica
$399!Call Jasa at 758-5165 or
Wayne at 757-1369.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE
WEEKTO LIVE! DO IT RIGHT.
Spring Break in Jamaica from
only $429 Hotel, Air, Transfers,
Parties! Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
LEARN TO FLY NOW Aero
Sales flight training. Pitt-
Creenville Airport. Introductory
flight $20. Call 752-1989.
INTERESTED IN SORORITY
LIFE? We're interested in you!
Come meet the sisters of Zeta
Tau Alpha! February 24,25,26,at
7 p.m. Call Pamela at 752-8490.
KATI MULLIGAN: You'll do a
great job as assistant vice-presi-
dent for Panhellenic! We're
proud of you! Love, your Sigma
sisters.
SABRINA: We're all so glad
you're OK! We love you! Love
your Sigma sisters.
PHI KAPPA PSI COOL AID
PARTY: Feb. 19, at New Deli
featuring Queen Sara Saturday.
Buy tickets in advance, $4. None
will be sold at the door. Call 757-
2573.
ROBIN BLACK: CongTats on
your Greek Woman Leadership
award! We'reproud of you! Love,
your Sigma sisters.
CONGRATS! To all the sorori-
ties on vour awards at the ban-
quet, and to Angela Sutton for
Outstanding Greek Woman!
Love, vour Sigma sisters.
LONG LIVE THE CHEE-BA
POSSE! Let 'em know that we're
all in this together.
CONGRATS:To the new sisters
of PS Delta! The Gamma Pledge
Class; J.J. Armstrong, Debbie
Balch, Suzanne Blizzard, Jen-
nifer Carboni, Michelle Carrier,
Missy Christenbury, Christine
Craven, Jennifer Crawford, An-
drea Earp, Nicole Frazier, Amy
Handley, Candy Holt, Heather
Howard, Lyn Lincoln, Gloria
Long, Lisa Mariani, Katina
Marshall, Jodi Moore, Amber
Oakes, Frances Powell, Christine
Priestley, Michelle Reinhardt,
Susan Rives, DeAnna Smith,
Cynthia Stancil, Jennifer Stilley,
Hope Stocks, Lisa Strickland,
Amy Trowbridge, and Joy Zang.
Love, the sisters.
LAMBDA CHI, SIG EP, AND
PHI TAUS: Thanks for the live
Rock n' Roll this weekend! Get
readv for Reggae on the Lake.
THEPIKAPPS.
DELTA CHI: What a great way
to celebrate Valentine's Day! JEAN, i hanks fer bean' such a
Thanks tor a great time Thurs- cooichickand helpin' meoutlast
dav! Love. theSigmas. Thursdav.TheClairied'sMan.
TO THE WOMEN OF AZD:
Looking toward to tomorrow
night at the fizz. Love, Delta Chi.
I BELIEVE! I'llhaveanotherbeer.
DISPI AY CLASSIFIED
j Manager's Special
every Sun, Mon, Tues
I $1.50 pitchers
I All pizza slices 1 top-
j P'ng 75�
I
I
I
I
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 topping
$6.99
(with this coupon) J (with this coupon
CLASSIFIED RATES
Students52.00
Nonstudents300
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LUNCH FOR $2,99
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At OMAR'S! WHERE ELSE!
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r
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Custom Logos, Colon
& Gift Wrapping
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FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Sen ices & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E.3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
Announcements
CAMMABETAEHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Price at 931-8282.
fjQSfJTAllTY MGMT. ASSQC
HMA is looking for a respon sible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call 931 -
7399 if interested.
QEiSmADQN
TQ CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office invites se-
niors and graduate students to at-
tend a program designed to acquaint
them with the services available to
them as they prepare to enter the
work force. Included will be registra-
tion and interview sign-up proce-
dures, how to establish a credential
file, and a tour of the Career Services
Center are included. These sessions
will be held in the Bloxton House on
Thursday, February 13 at 3 p.m.
18993
MSJBE��LHALL S1GN-UT
All students enrolled Spring Semes-
ter, 1992 will have priority for resi-
dence hall housing for school year
1992-93 if they reserve I space during
sign-up week, Feb. 17-21, 1992. On
campus students will receive infor-
mation regarding the procedures for
sigh-up in their residence hall mail-
boxes. Off-campus students may re-
ceive information from the depart-
ment of University Housing, 201
Whichard Building or call 757-6450.
INTRODUCTION
TQ CAREER EXPLORATION
This program introduces students to
career planning services, assesses ca-
reer development needs and facili-
tates career decision making process
in a systematic manner. Students will
be given the opportunity to take the
Strong Interest Inventory and regis-
ter for follow-up workshop. Tuesday
February 11 from 2-4 p.m. in 313
Wright Building.
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt. To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Maloney at 757-4532.
rrROlJP ADVISING
IQAERlL-flT STUDENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of each month from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m. starting January 21st in
room 203 Bclk building. Please see
the video at either Joyner or Brody
libraries before you come for advis-
ing.
SHAM DUNK MEETING
All interested in participating in Rec-
reational Services Slam Dunk contest
should attend an important informa-
tion meeting on Feb. 19 at 5 p.m. in
Biology 103. For more information
call 757-6387.
CATCH ALL OF THE ACT1QNJ
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timersare needed for Feb.
27, 28 from 10:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
from 6:15 to 9 p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10:15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 8:30
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Volunteers of East Carolina Friends
should plan to meet from 3 p.m. - 5
p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 20 at
Sportsworld. Bring S2 for yourself
and $2 for your Little Friend. This
price includes skate rental. Bring ex-
tra money for videos and refresh-
ments. This is a mandatory evenj.
Call yourDirectorof Services for more
information.
RESIDENT HAH ASSOCIATION
"RHA; A Homeless Pizza Social"
Pizza and Pepsi for a buck! Central
Campus Mall, Feb. 26,1992 4 p.m. - 6
p.m. Come out and show that Pirates
care about the Homeless Shelters of
Greenville.
rEVELOPEMT.NT PROGRAMS
fQUNC" OF STUDENT ORGA-
NIZATION LEADERS MEETING
Mark your calenders for Wednes-
day, Feb. 26,1992, at 5 p.m. to attend
the next COSOL meeting. Mayor
Nancy Jenkins and Assistant Direc-
tor of Housing Inez Fridley will share
views on important leadership quali-
ties. The organization speakout will
follow the presentation. COSOL will
meet in the MSC Social Room. All
student leaders invited.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
Department of Physics Visiting In-
dustrial Scientist Seminar. "From
Simulation to Reality - The Thrird
Waveof Science" by Dr. Riaz Abdulla,
Head of Supercomputing Applica-
tionsand Molecular Design,The Lilly
Corporate Center, Indianopolis, IN.
Friday, Feb. 28 at 3 p.m. Room BN-
109 in the Howell Science Complex.
FINANCIAL
MQMT ASSOCIATION
There will be an FMA meeting
Wednesday,Feb. 19at3 p.m. in Room
3009. Benita Demery, Director of Fi-
nance for the City of Greenville, will
be the guest speaker.
PRF-PHYS1CAI THERAPY CLUB
A Social! All students who are think-
ing about P.T. are welcome. Come
join us! Bring refreshments (sodas,
chips, cups, plates) Come meet the
membership and join if you like! Feb.
24 in the social room of Mendenhall
at 7:30 p.m. Questions? Call Beth at
931-7853.
SENIORS
GRADUATING FALL 1992
Don't be stuck with a nine month
lease! If you are interested in a place
to live Fall Semester 1992 only, check
out Umstead and Slay Hall during
residence hall sign-up Feb. 17-21. The
Department of University Housing
will close Umstead and Slay at the
end of Fall Semester 1992 to begin
renovations. The $100 deposit will be
refunded to Umstead and Slay resi-
dents and the contract obligation will
be met at the end of Fall Semester. For
more information, call the Depart-
ment of University Housing, (919)
757-6450 or stop by 201 Whichard
Building to pick up an Application-
Contract and sign-up information
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS FOR FEB. 18-24.1992
WED FEB. 19 � Faculty Chamber
Concert featuring FntzGearhart, vio-
lin; SelmaGokcen, cello; Paul Tardift,
piano; Lenny Schranze, guest violist,
with Nathan Williams, clarinet, and
Mark Ford, percussion (Hetcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:15 p.m free). THUR
FEB. 20 � Ashley Thorton, piano,
David Gore, voice, senior recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 p.m free).
FRI, FEB. 21 �Allison Gentry, trom-
bone, and Paula Elliot, clarinet, se-
nior recital (Hetcher Recital Hall, 7
p.m free),and William Bridges, saxo-
phone, senior recital (Hetcher Recital
Hall, 9 p.m free). MON FEB. 24 �
Faculty Chamber Concert featuring
Nathan Williams, clarinet, Selma
Gokcen, cello, John b. OBrien, piano
(Fletcher Recital Hall,8:15 p.m free).
DOWN EAST CYCLING CLUB
Local Cycling Team seeking new
members for 92-93 racing squad, all
levels and Cats (IV -I). Sponseship
and limited perks included. For more
information call Miles 752-0012, Bill
758-8616'Eric 830-0435.
Storyteller
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
The GreemnBe RotkArts S -
ety invites the public to a special
performance when- fht i :
may let their m aginations nir
in a world of make-believe
lov( r( lrear,anAfi meri-
can storyteller, will give a long-
aw.tited performance this week in
cclebrationof Black Hist rv Month
Great teib the classics that i .
Syone lo(s to hear such as 'The
Little Boy Who Cried Wolf and
"i v Duckling" Shea �
At' folktales and num �
original stories
type f stoi loe
not teV rc scarv ones Her audi-
em es w ill never hear any jacktales
org't � I stories
i tildren in this world i
�cared enough as it is said (a
ace m ling b i her manager, elda S.
D,u
I rearfindssomeofhertali
rr ling mem in books Sheleams
others by word ol mouth or simplv
bv mai tl m up
What make her stor
unique is that sht
own t. r ' tns
� - .
uglv du kling that the aud
heard as children ma) not be the
one they hear at i i
�once she errd �
story, ad some ol
personal it
Crear's tales always i I
theme or a moral in
The theme ma
or self-esteem or
positive Davies s.ii
ik message, then she
According to
grew up in a farrulv
just outside of Wiin
where she- was a
Macedonia Miss
Church
As a young mi
church, Grear acted
on the stage tor thi-
lter, she- : -
riesatWillistonHigl
she received thr
award.
Grear devt
k h and comn
her involvement u
sent � ' ms.
- a run
English teacher in
from 1970 to 1u4
After teaih
Grear went ba -
Carnegie-Mellon L n
University I H
te studies in 11
Dunnp thi
. ffng
AttheDithridg
Grear employed h
ing and
educationandl I
guide the pris
Uponreturni
she began workj
Wilmington Parks
Jm �

W i
r
Levitat-on has managed to do what few uands in progij
sound and identity Their album.Coferve. has whs I I -
Blurp Balls are coi
Blurp Balls are cor
Photo co-ri�
Blurp Balls represent the best and brightest, alt ho
imaginations of the toy creators in the United State
Bonev
By Helen Hammond
Staff Writer
You can heave on your room-
matenow withouthavmgtoclean
up a disgusting mess with the
latest party craze around college
campuses.
They're Blurp Balls� � a
ball of grotesquely detailed foam
that when squeezed, "thro wsup"
a smaller foam ball.
'They retch it! You catch it
is the slogan for these little barf
balls that are "tossing up" all over
America.
Blurp Balls are six different
characters who have their own
distinctive charactensbes.
Biff Barfball is a catcher who
hurls a spirball faster than any
major league pitcher.
Retch-A-Rat Tomcat likes to
toss up his mousy meal later
on so that hecan play with it later.
Toj
trouble keeping
place.
Tvranosaurol
cavemen and he I
keeping them do
Sharky Skult
ing up an occas
had for an apr.
Toady Cr
bulimiacprobk
to flies.
Spitooey
barf up anything
Finally, CoJ
Heart blows out
two when least
Responsibili
ranged idea bes I
of toys such as M
and Mad Balls1
Company.
So put the
grab your fnenci
Retell and play sj





PERSONALS
PERSONALS
LONG 11V1 1111 CHI 1 BA
POSS1 !1 it cm know thai were
all in this togethei
11 11 . ON v Ba iRATS o the new sisters t'lta! 1 he (iamnvt 1'ii i s;i Armstrong Debbie mne Blizzard, en
V. UlniterM c ravei iii wit �1 1 w IBEL1- i Michelle Carrier � m v hristint lennifer I rawford s � i iei Ann t, andv ! loll ! leather d, Lvn l.incoli (iloria 1 isa M � mi Katina , � Moon Ambei Chri tino . Mil hi Hi veinhardl �eAnna Smith ncil leni i Stilk?) . Strickland e and lo Zang DA CHI S1G 1 1 AND VUS ' live v, tvkei ; Ciet a ki itied sMan 1 ' � ith( rbeei

RESEARCH INFORMATION I ages: I t"ary of in'orniitlon In U 5 .t rj
- i . . a . .� COD EEi 800-351-0222
I rophie;
slli s 11, N s
K N Wll I'l ll s
757-1388
v IS YOl K ORDER
7S7.MH
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & ('ounseling
ilina Pregnanointer
757-0003
111 I .3rd Street
I lu I n Building
Greenville (
Hours:
Vlon - Fri 8:30-3:00
11'�
-


-His, HQQJ Ql MUSIC
1 VI NTS i'KliH. ls21, 1222
; aculh Chamber
� �.�( earl art,vk
i i mi h n CLl Bkcen.o ilTardiff,
test violisl
A illiams clarinet, and
� Fletcher Re
-8:1 �:� Free IHl'K
sl k . orton, piano
senior recital
Betl at7 p m free)
VI - n (ientry, Bon
lula Elliot clarinet, se
Retcher Rental Hall. 7
SENIORS�'� am Bridges, mmo
MS. T1NG FALL ISBrredtal Retcher Redtal
1 stud nthfree) MON FEB 24
nested in a a1 n bet i or-art featuring
1 .irinet, Selma
) Hihi O Bricn, piano
a rial sign-up Feb 1 .1 Ihe(FletcherRedtalHaD B I5pm.free).
I it ot University Housing
Mead and Slay at the
i Semester 1992 to begin
ns rhe $100 deposit will be
u to Umstead and Slav resi-
ko the contract obligation will
It I he end oi Fall Semester For
! Ypart-
wwsiry Housing, (919)
nous lasroaLNGCLUB
l oca! C yding Team seeking new
members tor 92-93 racing squad, all
levels and Cats (IV -1). Sponseship
mited perks included. For more
information call Miles 7S2-M12, Bill
758 B616 Eric 830-0435
Entertainment
Hire iEaHt (Eutalimuti
February 18,1992
7
Storyteller expands audience's imagination
By Pamela Oliver
Suit Writer
not
em
(! I
rhe I IreenvtBe Folk Arts Sod-
ety invites the public to a special
performance where the audience
ma) let their imaginations run inv
in a ncrld of make-believe.
Joycet irear, an African Ameri-
can Storyteller, will give ,i long
aw titcd performance mis week in
cetebrationofBtackl ustory Month.
I ireai tolls the classics mat ev
ei loves to hear Mich as "Hie
Lit! ! ?) Whonod Wolf and
"lii. i Duckling She also tells
Afri it olktales and numerous
origin I itories
Iht tixsot stones sho iliw
ire scary ones, I lor audi-
i! never he.ir any jacktales
I stories.
lildren in this world are
scan : nough as it is said c Irear,
�' ng to her manager, NeldaS
D �
u findssomeol her tales by
n ig them in books. She learns
otfx rsby word oi mouth or simply
In making them up
What makes her stories so
unique is that she always tells her
own crsi ins
1 oi -� ample, the stor) ol the
ugl) duckling th.it the audience
heard as children ma not be the
one the) hear at Grear's perfor
manor She omK'llishes on each
stot adding in some oi her own
personal it),
'�roar's tales alwavs have a
theme or a moral involved.
"The theme may be friendship
or self-esteem or something, else
positive Davies said. "It there is
no message, then shedoesn'ttefl it
According to Pavies, (.irear
grew up in a familv-orionted town
just outside of Wilmington, N.C
whom she was a member of the
Macedonia Missionary baptist
Church
As a voung member of the
t hurch. Great acted out her stories
on the stage tor the congregation.
loiter, she performed her sto-
riesat WilHston 1 lighSchool where
she received the best Actress
award.
(Irear developed her abilities
to teach and communicate through
her involvement in several public
schtHl systems.
She was a junior high school
English teacher in Pittsburgh, Pa.
from 1970 to 1974.
Alter teaching in Pittsburgh,
(.rear went back to school to
c anrvegie-Mellon University and the
University ot Pittsburgh tor gradu-
ate studies in English and Theatre
1 hiring, this time, she w.is the
i oordinatoroi the I Hthridge 1 lome
fort lirls
At the 1 hthridgel lomefort iirls
t Irearemployed herskillsforteach-
ing and counseling. She used her
education and talents in theatre arts
to guide the girls there.
Upon returning to Wilmington,
she began working with the
Wilmington Parks and Recreation
Departmentas an artist in residence.
During the seven vears that she
worked there, she organized
programs such as the Arts C amp,
the Annual Youth Storytelling Fes-
tival, and the Children's Theatre.
Grear also co-founded
Wilmington's Sacred Storytelling
Theatre.
C un-entlv,C;marisontheNorth
Carolina Arts Council's lour Pro-
gram, touringasa full-time profes-
sional performing artist.
She is also on the approved
roster of the South Carolina Arts
C ommission
C.rear is in high demand all
over the country. She was the fea-
tured storyteller at Philadelphia's
International Children's Festival in
before the Philadelphia festi-
val, C .rear was the featured story-
teller at the 1989 and h) South-
eastern Regional Young Play-
wrights and I hildren's Theatre in
Winter Haven, Ha the 1988 a
tional Festival ol black Storytelling
in Oakland, Calif, and NAPPS in
lonesboro, lenn.
C .rear will travel to Illinois this
spring tor an extended stay. CHhcr
states on her agenda include:
Florida, Georgia, New York, len
nesoo. Virginia,oith( arolmaand
south arolina.
rhese states are slightly differ-
ent than last year s locations be-
cause (irear is s.vn in a new state
each season
In each state where she per-
forms Grw is always invited to
return for a longer residency.
Grear machos a great number
of people whea'ver she travels. An
average number of audience
members for the year is 120,(XX)
people.
l"he Greenville Folk Arts Sod-
ety has had Grear perform in
Greenville for the past two years.
Becauseof her increasingpopu-
lanty, the Sixiety had to work hard
to nuke this showing possible. This
year she will stay for three daysand
visit numerous locations.
During her visit here in
Greenville, Grear will perform at
Wintergreen School on Feb. 19, and
two other focal schools on Feb. 20.
In addition to her visits to the
scrnx'ls, she will perform for the
Greenville Folk Arts Society on Feb.
20 at 7:30 p.m. I"be performance
will bo held in the Greenville Parks
and Recreation Teen Center located
at 1703 E. 14th St.
I'he Greenville Folk Arts Soci-
ety sponsors many community
events that involve folk arts.
Storytelling is only one of the
arts which are supported by the
society.
Contradance, music and the-
atre are other examples ol tolLirt.
rhe next performer the
C.reenville Folk Arts Scoetv will ho
is a folk singer named Ada Kory.
She will be at The Upper C nist bak-
ery on Fob 28
lor more information on
Grear's performance call 752-8281.
Pholc by Jodie
Joyce Grear takes listeners on a magical trip through an imaginary
of a child s mind by telling stories passed down to her.
Orbsch
:
41W 4?
�i

Levitation produces original music
Bv lini Shamlin
Staff Writer
Photo by Lian� H�ntsch�r
Levitation has managed to do what lew uands in progressive music have tried to do � produce an orignal
Sound i I identity Their album.Coterie, has what it takes to make it big on the progressive charts.
Imagine a group of attention-
hungry English musicians whose
selt-pnxlaimod interest in reincar-
ivition, numerology and primitive
religion reeks of smarmy superfui
ality
Beneath al 11 he hype,one would
exped to find a pack of snot-nosed
upstarts, a no-talent garage Kind
that sees music as a rake to gather
profits from the gullible American
audience.
Most of this may ho tnie oi
Levitation, a new arrival on the
American scene Even their name
has a sappy quality and coupled
with the fact that they claim to have
met several lifetimes ago, anyone
who listens to the hype they spew
would be likely to turn away with-
out giving thema listen. That would
ho a mistake.
In the wild scramble to find the
next generation' in music, a lot of
bands churn out the same dreary
drivel, a stomach-souring blend ot
folk music and 'bOs rock.
Levitation is one band that s
managed to break the mold, to turn
away from the conventional and
reach out in new directions.
Billed as "New I lead Music" or
"Mind Punk Levitation's unique
brand oi music defies categoriza-
tion.
Their new album, Coltrw, has a
distinctly '80s feel, with the jangle of
the Psychedelic Furs, the haunting
tones of the Cum and the drive oi
pro-sellout Icicle Works.
While their sound is compa-
rable to that of those other artists, it
doesn't seem to draw heavily from
a single source. It is by no meai
clear-cut imitation, but a svntht - -
of styles that has resulted in s :
thing entirely new.
While the band has found i
constant stylistic identity, the sep
rate tracks demonstrate a dynamic
range of forms, from the up-beat
driveof "Squirrel" to thelight.swav-
ing "Nadine" to the mournful la-
ment of "Smile
In every piece, there is a com-
plex interplay among the instru-
ments, like layers of sound th.it
blend to forma swirling pattern.
The strength of the bind is a
product of five talented musicians
from a vaneryot backgrounds, from
jazz to new wave, that blend to
create Levitation's distinctive
sound.
Bass and drums combine to
See Levitation, page 8
Blurp Balls are coming,
Blurp Balls are coining
Musical 'Monkee' procreates MTV
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Photo cojrUsy o! Em Company
Blurp Balls represent the best and brightest, although deranged,
imaginations of the toy creators in the United States
Bonev Tossteeth has
By Helen Hammond
Staff Writer
i oucanheavoon your room
matenow without having toelean
up a disgusting mess with the
latest patty erase around college
campuses
They're Blurp balls� - a
Kill ol grotesquely detailed foam
that wliensqueezed, thmwsup"
a smaller foam ball.
They retch it' You catch it
is the slogan for these little barf
Kills that am "tossing up" all over
America.
Blurp Balls am six different
Characters who have their own
distinctive charactenstics.
Biff Barfball is a catcher who
hurls � spitKill faster than any
map r league pitcher.
Retch-A Rat Tomcat likes to
toss up his mousy meal later
onsothathecanplav with it later.
trouble keeping his dentures in
place.
Tvranosaurous Retch eats
cavemen and he finds it difficult
keeping them down.
Sharkv Skull enjoys throw-
ing up an occassional diver he
Kid for an appetizer.
Toady Croakenchoke has a
bulimiac problem when it comes
to flies.
Spitooey Sooey just likes to
barf up anything he can.
Finally, Count Heave-A-
Heart blows out a heart valve or
two when least expected.
Responsibility for this de-
ranged idea lies with the niakers
of toyssuchas My Pet Monster�
and Mad Balls� and the Ertl
Company.
So put the frisbees away,
grab your friend Tyranosaurus
Retch and play some catch
"1 lore we come, walkm' down
the street
c lettin' the runniest looks from
everyone we meet.
1 ley, hey we're the Monkees
These are the words that the
public is most likely to associate
with MikeNesmith. In the late '60s
esmith. Peter Fork,Mickey Dofenz
and the evor-irrepmssible Davy
fonesentered American homes ev-
ery week as the Monkees. They worn
a whacky, fun-loving rock'n'roll
combo whose lives were so inter-
esting that a sitcom could be built
around them.
The Monkees released albums
as well, most of which hit the Top
40, though tew people would actu-
ally admit to owning any. Their
theme sting (quoted above) was a
chart-busting hit, as were several
other Monkees singles, including
the classic "Last Train to
Clarksville The Monkees were a
genuine, popular culture phenom-
enon, not so forgotten. Nesmith was
the tall one in the stocking cap.
The Monkees werealso the big-
gest manufactured rock outfit ever,
even more plastic than the New
Kids on the Block � if a bit mom
talented. Basically the "band" wasa
bunch oi actors with little musical
experience who were hired to bean
"American Beatles.
Nesmith, the only member who
actually knew how to play, went to
the casting call and won the role of
"Mike Nesmith His was the role
of the quiet, introspective guitarist.
Charles Mansen also tried out for a
role but was unsuccessful.
Nesmith's musical expertise
was put to little use with the
Monkees; he was able to play his
own instrument, and he wrote a
couple of the group's hits. His mass
media experience with the Monkees
project, however, seems to have
proven valuable in light oi his sub-
sequent activities.
Through the 70s, Nesmith re-
corded many solo efforts, pioneer-
ing in theeountrv-mck field. In 1974,
Nesmith formed the Pacific Arts
Corporation, his own communica-
tionscompany. The first Pacific Arts
release was The Prison, a book aiid
record combination that was the
first part of a major work by
Nesmith.
In 197b, Nesmith's LP From a
Radio Engine to a Photon Wing was
released and pnxl uced the hi t "Rio"
�not to be confused with the Duran
Duran tune of the same name.
Nesmith filmed a video accompa-
niment to the song, and thus was an
idea born.
While touring in Australia,
Nesmith noticed a television show
that featured performances by vari-
ous recording artists ai J proposed
an idea fbra similar sho v in America
called "Popclips
After much resistance anJ s-
difference to the idea in the United
States, Nesmith sold it to Warner
Brothers, who turned it into the 24-
hour music network known as
MTV,which has become the mu-
sk fashion dictating ultimate mass
media super-giant duly elected
bought and paid for voiceguru of
a generation. And to think it all
started with the Monkees
Nesmith. once the MTV net-
work was up and running, was of-
fered a position in shapingthefledg-
Photocourt�y of Pacittc A, is Vd�o
Starting out as a comical musician on "The Monkees Mike Nesmith has
made several major contribution to the music industry.
ling music channel. He turned it
down to work on his own projects,
a move that Nesmith refers to as "a
really dingKit decision
Nesmith's projects have proven
to be valuable in their own right.
After releasing Infinite Rider on the
Big Dogma, his last album for a de-
cade, Nesmith turned to video.
He produced several short films
for Saturday Night Live. He then
released those films and some oth-
ersasahomevideocalled "Elephant
Parts winner of the first Video
Gmmmy in 1981. Nesmith's fea-
ture film productions include cult
favorites "Timerider" and "Ropo
Man in addition to the screen de-
but of Winona Ryder �� Square
Dance and 'Tapeheads.
More recently, Nesntith has
released two "Greatest Hits" music
collections ti tied The'Newer Stuffand
TheOlder Stuff. HisPaofic Arts Cor-
poration has expanded greatly aiid
now distribu tesall PBS Home Video
projects
Nesmith is also working on the
second part of The Prison, entitled
"TheMulh Purpose Tour The clos-
est the tour gets to Greenville is
Alexandria, Va.





8 fffte �aat (Uarolfnlan February 18, 1992
'Boys' unveils mysterious world of mentally impaired 12
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Iast Thursday night the East
Carolina Playhouseopened its third
performanceoftheseason with Tom
Griffin's The Boys Next Door
The story of four mentally im-
paired men and the struggles they
go through just living their lives,
"The Boys Next Door" mixed won-
derfully a sense of child-like won-
der and emotionally hard-hitting
seriousness to create a performance
that opened the mindsand hearts of
the audience.
Though the play dragged occa-
sionally in the first act, the second
act had a nice flowing rhythm that
balanced out the entire play.
Along with the lack of speed in
the first act, some of the musical
segues were inappropriate and de-
tracted from theaudience'sconcen-
tration.
Though at times fitting nicely
with the action on stage, at least half
of the segues seemed to have been
placed just to fill up the time be-
tween scenes.
Also, the light changes that
occurred stage right during the
dance scene (one of the most impor-
tant in the play) continually drew
the attention away from the charac-
ters and bothered the eye.
Even with these minor techni-
cal glitches, the actors carried off
their roles brilliantly and wi th great
reality.
Derrick Parker, who played
Lucien, gave a wonderful perfor-
mance as a severely retarded man
trying to live a full life. Parker's
Levitation
character choices were consistent
throughout the play, culminating
with his speech in the second act.
In this speech, Parker broke
from his character to concisely and
intelligently tell the audience just
how it felt to be trapped at the emo-
tional age of a five-year-old.
After the speech, Parker re-
verted into his character and gave
one of the most memorable lines of
the play. "He's( Arnold, one of the
four mentally impaired men) like
nuts or something With this line
and his child-like character, Parker
stole the show and the hearts of the
audience.
Bray Culpepper, who played
Barry, also gave a performance that
tugged at the hearts of theaudience.
Playing a grandiose schizophrenic,
Culpepper dominated the stage in
Continued from page 7
all of his scenes.
Fantasizing that he was a golf
pro, Culpepper made outstanding
transitions from his outgoing, exu-
berant character to one that is
deathly afraid of his father visiting
him.
TheclimaxofCulpepper'schar-
acter, and the play, came when
Barry's father visits and causes him
to revert into a catatonic state to
escape his father's violence.
Watching Culpepper curl into
a ball on the floor and chant end-
lessly, 'Tlease don't hit me, daddy.
Please don't hit me, daddv the
audience is moved with sympathy
and compassion for the character.
J. Ayscueand David Berberian,
playing Norman and Jack respec-
tively, performed their characters
with admirable honesty, sincerity
and reality.
Avscuedelighted the audience
with his fervent hold on his keys
and his passion for doughnuts.
Ayscue's constant line, "1 gotta
have my keys. I can't get into any-
thing without them' summed up
his innocent character and its over-
whelming need for security.
Berberian gave a truthful look
into the hopesand dreams of a man
caught in a position that he doesn't
know if he can continue in.
Berberian fought between his
love for the men hecared for and his
knowledge of his own deteriorat-
ing state.
Tom between his responsibil-
ity to the men and his responsibility
to himself, Berberian finally makes
the hardest decision of his life � to
leave the home.
To round out the group, Jack
Prather, playing Arnold, gave a
performance that showed theaudi-
ence a character, as Prather puts it,
"that's just a normal guy with some
problems
As reluctant to change as the
rest of the group, Prather highlights
scenes with lines like "Loose lips
sink ships and constant threats to
move to Russia.
'The Boys Next Door" shows
audiences the true life of the men-
tally impaired.
An honest and realistic look,
this play will change forever the
stereotypesand misconceptions into
one single fact � these people are
just like the rest of us, with hopes
and dreams.
As the program says, "They
hold the key to your heart
form the foundation of the music,
but not in the traditional sense of
simple, beginner-book progres-
sions.
There is constant variation in
the rhythm, which lapses into syn-
copation and occasionally rises to
blend with the harmony.
Meanwhile, the guitarand key-
board seem to battle for prominence,
like the trumpet and clarinet of a
Dixieland combo.
The result of their competition
is not a discordant clash, but an
elegant interweaving of sound.
The only constant in the aural
chaos of music is the vocals that,
when pleasing tonally, are often
unintelligible, quite repetitive and
somewhat illogical � but if the lis-
tener can get beyond the need to
find significance in the lyrics and
focus on sound quality alone, this
minor flaw will be all but invisible.
While the complex interplay of
Lcvitation's music will confound
audiences who are used to the
simple, straightforward and bland
drivel of mainstream artists, it will
amaze listeners who can analyze
the interweaving of complex com-
positions.
In many ways, Levitation is a
musician's ensemble, designed for
listeners who can sense and appre-
ciate the ingenuity of its construc-
tion.
While Coterie is Levitabon'sfirst
American release, it is their third
album � their two English EPs,
Coppclia and The After Ever may be
available from retailers who stock
imported recordings.
-
The East Carolinian:
Read it
or
Recycle it
Pianist and symphony to perf orm
Slatt Reports
A famous pianist will be ap-
pearing with the ECU Symphony
to perform a collection oi hits and
also to take requests from the audi-
ence.
Pianist Roger Williams will be
performing in Wright Auditorium
on Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. lis appearance
is part of the 1991-92 Performing
Arts Series.
Williams will be conducting
from his piano.
"Autumn Leaves "Girl from
Ipanema" and "Feelings" are just a
few of the songs that will be per-
formed.
In addition, Williams and the
rhvthm section of the orchestra will
be taking requests from the audi-
ence during a portion of the show.
During three decades of per-
forming and recording, Williams
fas become known as "Mr. Piano"
and "King of the Keyboards
Williams has played for every
president since Truman. He has
recieved several gold records, hon-
orary- doctorates and other awards
Williams began hismusical ca-
reer as a post-graduate at lulhard
School of Music. He won the
Arthur Godfrey and Dennis Jame
music contests and was offered a
recording contract.
His first single, "Autumn
Leaves sold over three million
copies.
Williams' musical ability is
one of the greatest in the world
and his performances reflect it.
Singleticketsperchasedinad-
va nee are $20 for the genera 1 pu b-
lic, $17 tor faculty and staff and
$15 for students and youth.
For more information, cal!
7574788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
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February 24: "Romper Room" Party
February 25: Color Analysis and Makeover Party
February 26: Zeta Night
7 pm each night
Zeta Tau Alpha
508 W. 5th St
For rides and
information
Call Pamela:
752-8490
ECU LACROSSE
� William & Mary - Sat, Feb. 22,2:00 pm
� UNC-Greensboro - Sun, Feb. 23,1:00 pm
"Come support Lacrosse, America's fastest growing
sport started by the Native Indians
Commentary
J
Expansion
on Tobacco
Road would
be beneficial
By Brad Wiese
Staff Writer
Pira
store
win
By Robert
I'd like to raise an
issue with all the i wners
executives of the major
professional sport
leagues: Why i �
in North Car i
Haven't you fi
seen how our tans stand
behind a team regardh
of their success?
Charlotte H m tsl
been the worst team it �
NBA for the past three-
and-one-half years
each game is a sellout
fan support is unparal-
leled.
Don't you guys realize
that the most popular
minor league baseball
franchise in the country
resides in Durham" At
every Bull's game, tans
have to be turned away af
the gates because the
stadium is packed
In early January, an
estimated 4,000 tans had
to be turned away trom a
Greensboro Monarchs
hockey game Inside the
Greensboro Coliseum
there was a standing-
room-onlv crowd of 13,000
screaming faithful. Did
anv of you hear about
that?
The Raleigh Icecaps of
the East Coast Hockey
League and baseball's
Kinston Indians from the
Carolina League have also
proven they can hold their
own in this sports-craved
state. Even the Raleigh
Bullfrogs or the brand new
Global Basketball Associa-
tion have acquired a loyal
following.
There has. however,
been one professional
failure in the state, Ra-
leigh-Durham's
Skyhawks. The Skyhawks
were simply victims of a
make-shitt football league
that was poorly managed
and started in a rush.
Ownersexecutives
are supposed to be intelli-
gent, and common sense
says that North Carolina
has three areas that can
support major profes-
sional sports: Charlotte.
the Triad area (Greens-
boro, High Point. Win-
ston-Salem), and the
Triangle area (Raleigh,
Durham and Chapel Hill).
The financial base is
here � that is, the popula-
tion level has continued to
increase over recent years
and more and more busi-
nesses are relocating to the
Tar Heel state. The geo-
political layout of the state
also weighs heavily, in that
those sport, not as promi-
nent as others have an equal
chance for survival (look at
the ECHL's Icecaps and
Monarchs).
So you owners of the
NBA, NFL, NHL and
Major League Baseball are
going to have to under-
stand that North Carolina
is starving for "big time"
pro athletics.
Only in North Caro-
lina can struggling teams
fill their stadium or arena
night after night. Don't
you think that teams like
the New England Patriots,
Sacramento Kings, Phoe-
nix Cardinals, and Seattle
Mariners wish they were
here?
What this means,
owners, is that next time
your leagues expand, you
must make the right
decision. You must
expand in North Carolina
Suit Wi
-
fl

Ron- � -
I

mtn
. got I �
I
25 points ��
Mason cut I
ures late ir i
By Robei
Start
Trv 199
kef!
three word
The I
toconne I
in the final 9
gan
and the I
was the t
in a i �� '

'T:
La
Bv Mil
Aft ' �
the history of thdj
gramlastyeai I
sights once a
championship!
schedule and a
fromlasfyear'stQ
this season very
Tslobod I
on scholarship bi
mon goal of beinl
rung" Head a a
�'Nobodv;nthe
more or works h
this team can rrwii
60 minutes e erl
to be reallv hard
Nopal
Inthelntral
Ray Tayto
were all n?





tally impaired Sports
eUje SEast Carolinian
February 18, 1992
a
ited the audience
h ent hold on his keys
ii tor doughnuts
ronstantline, gotta
is I can't get into any-
lit them, summed up
ind itsovet
i lor v unt
truthful look
and drcamsofa man
sition that hedoesn t
i continue in.
�.Sit between his
nru ared for and his
u n detenorat-
nsibility
makes
to
lo round out the group, lack
Prattler, playing Arnold, gave I
performance that showed theaudi-
ence a character, as Prat her puts it,
"that's just a normal guy with some
problems
As reluctant to change as the
rest ot the group, I'rather highlights
scenes with Inn's like Uxse lips
sink ships and constant threats to
move to Russia
The Boys Next Door" shows
audiences the true lite ot the men-
tally impaired.
An honest and nihstic look
this play will change forever the
stenvtvposand misanveptionsinto
one single tact the' people are
just like the rest of us, with hopes
and dreams
s the program savs, "They
hold the kiv to your heart
phony to perform
School ot Music. He won the
Arthur lodfreyand Dennis Jame
it contests and was offered a
recording contract.
Mis first single, "Autumn
es sold over three million
Williams' musical ability is
� the greatest in the world
� his performances reflect it
Single tickets perchased in ad-
forth general pub-
- " f �i faculty and st.itt and
� students and youth.
For more information, call
Wor 1 800-ECU-ART5.
9 Nachos
with this ad
ith the purchase of a meal
Try Our Delicious
zh Specials! Only$3951
Irved M-F, 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
hicken Tostada Philly Mex Sand
Ueak Picado Chicken Sandwich
:nchilada Philly Mex Sandwich
Taco Salad Philly Mex Sandwich
ef Durrito Ensalada con Polio
E PARKING
Iss the Street
CROSSE
J (
14

Sat, Feb. 22,2:00 pm
- Sun, Feb. 23,1:00 pm
e, America's fastest growing
the Native Indians
Commentary
Expansion
on Tobacco
Road would
be beneficial
By Brad Wiese
Staff Writer
I'd like to raise an
issue with all the owners
executives of the major
professional sporting
leagues: Why not expand
in North Carolina?
Haven't you fellows
seen how our fans stand
behind a team regardless
of their success? The
Charlotte Hornets have
been the worst team in the
NBA for the past three-
and-one-half years, yet
each game is a sellout. The
tan support is unparal-
leled.
Don't you guys realize
that the most popular
minor league baseball
franchise in the country
resides in Durham? At
every Bull's game, fans
have to be turned away at
the gates because the
stadium is packed.
In early January, an
estimated 4,000 fans had
to be turned away from a
Greensboro Monarchs
hockey game. Inside the
C.reensboro Coliseum
there was a standing-
room-only crowd of 13,000
screaming faithful. Did
anv of you hear about
that?
The Raleigh Icecaps of
the East Coast Hockey
League and baseball's
Kinston Indians from the
Carolina League have also
proven they can hold their
�wn in this sports-craved
state. Even the Raleigh
Bullfrogs of the brand new
(ilobal Basketball Associa-
tion have acquired a loyal
following.
There has, however,
been one professional
failure in the state, Ra-
leigh-Durham's
Skyhawks. The Skyhawks
were simply victims of a
make-shift football league
that was poorly managed
and started in a rush.
Ownersexecutives
are supposed to be intelli-
gent, and common sense
says that North Carolina
has three areas that can
support major profes-
sional sports. Charlotte,
the Triad area (Greens-
boro, High Point, Win-
ston-Salem), and the
Triangle area (Raleigh,
Durham and Chapel Hill).
The financial base is
here � that is, the popula-
tion level has continued to
increase over recent years
and more and more busi-
nesses are relocating to the
Tar Heel state. The geo-
political layout of the state
also weighs heavily, in that
those sports not as promi-
nent as others have an equal
chance for survival (look at
the ECHL's Icecaps and
Monarchs).
So you owners of the
NBA, NFL, NHL and
Major League Baseball are
going to have to under-
stand that North Carolina
is starving for "big time"
pro athletics.
Only in North Caro-
lina can struggling teams
fill their stadium or arena
night after night. Don't
you think that teams like
the New England Patriots,
Sacramento Kings, Phoe-
nix Cardinals, and Seattle
Mariners wish they were
here?
What this means,
owners, is that next time
your leagues expand, you
must make the right
decision. You must
expand in North Carolina
Pirates snap
streak with 748
win over GMU
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
"Praise the Lord! We won
said a delighted Eddie Payne.
ECU snapped a four-game
losing streak by defeating George
Mason University, 74-68 Monday
night in Minges Coliseum. The
Pirates are now 8-15 on the year
and 3-8 in the conference. The
team also broke a 15-game losing
streak against the Patriots that
dated back to Jan. 25, 1986.
The Patriots lost the lead on a
22-0 ECU run with 7:56 left in the
first half. The Tiratcs held George
Mason to 20 first-half points on
29.6 percent shooting from the
floor.
Lester Lyons sparked the Pi-
rates' scoring run and finished
with 21 points, eight rebounds
(equaling his career high) and two
blocked shots. Point guard
Ronnell Peterson contributed 16
points and a career-high eight
boards.
he team came out relaxed
in tne second half Peterson said.
"Guys stopped running the floor
- I've got to keep pushing the
ball
Despite a lead of as many as
25 points, the Pirates let George
Mason cut the lead to single fig-
ures late in regulation.
Only two Patriot players shot
over 50 percent for the game,
while ECU shot an uncharacter-
istic 49 percent as a team. Anton
Gill connected on six-of-eight
shots and ended regulation with
14 points and 12 rebounds, tying
a career high.
"1 thought James Lewis did a
great job Payne said. "He plays
better against bigger people for
some reason
Lewis, the Pirates' six-foot
six-inch center, out-scored and
out-rebounded the only seven-
foot player in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association. He totaled 11
points and four rebounds.
The Pirates travel to Old Do-
minion Saturday, and a win could
put the team in fifth place in the
CAA. ECU hopes to remain out
of the cellar, which would give
them a higher seed in the tourna-
ment-avoiding a first round con-
frontation against James Madi-
son or Richmond.
"To win a game like this gives
us a great deal of confidence
Payne said.
The Richhxxl -Colonial Basket-
ball Championshipisscheduled for
March 7-9 at ther Richmond Coli-
seuminRichmond,Va.The Pirates
last three games will determine ei-
ther a sixth, seventh or eighth place
seed in the tournev.
Photo by Dail R��d � ECU Photo Lab
ECU snapped a four-game losing streak Monday night as the topped George Mason University, 74-68 in
Minges Coliseum The win also ended a 15-game slump against the Patriots dating back to Jan. 25,1986.
Nightmare continues as Pirates lose Whitakei; game
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
The 1991-92 ECU men's bas-
ketball season can be summed upin
three words � a bad dream
The ailing Pirates (7-15) failed
to connect on a three-point attempt
in the final seconds of Saturday's
game with American University,
and the team lost, 69-66. The loss
was the team's sixth straight throe
in a nw in Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation play.
"This game is like a reoccuring
nightmare Head coach Eddie
Payne said.
The Pirates had a chance to send
the game to overtime after Donald
Grant sank one of two shots from
the free throw line, but Lester Lyons
could not get open for the final shot
and Ronnell Peterson's three-point
attempt fell short. ECU is now 1-riin
games decided by five points or
less.
Questionable calls by the refer-
ees left many Pirate players in foul
trouble. ECU shot no free throws in
the first half despite aggressive
Amencan play. The Eagles shot
more than twice as many free
throws as the Pirates in the con-
test, and are eighth in the nation in
free throw percentage.
"1 would certainly take issue
with a lot of the calls that were
made Payne said. "But that hap-
pens every game
Only throe ECU plaversfound
their wav to the free throw line
Saturday night.
"Theretslet the players play
said Lester Lyons, who was the
only Pirate to score in double fig-
ures finishing with 25. "1 prefer to
have every nick-knack call made
Payne, rotating his line-up for
the seventh time this season, found
his team tied with the Eagles at 37-
37 at intermission.
After shixting an anemic 27.8
percent from the floor at James
Madison, the Pirates managed to
find the basket just 31 percent of the
time against the Eagles in the sec-
ond half.
In a game that had 30 lead
Changes, Payne said he felt ECU
could have won.
"It came down to a failure to
execute said Payne. "We need
some help"
Back-up point guard Paul
Childress did not play because of i
bruised back.
Jeff VVhitaker, who missed 10
games waiting on a NCAA eligibil-
ity ruling, was lost for the season
with an anterior cruciate ligament
tear during practiceon Feb. 7. It was
the third anterior cruciate ligament
tear on the team this season. Kevin
Armstrong and IkeCopeland were
lost earlier in the year.
Lacrosse club to field young team
By Mike Ashley
Staff Writer
After posting the best record in
the history of the ECU lacrosse pro-
gram last year, the Pirates will set their
sights once again on the conference
championships. New faces, a tough
schedule and a loss of five middies
fromlastyear'steampmmisvstomake
this season very competitive.
"Nobody is paid and nobody is
on scholarship, but we all sharea com-
mon goal of being committed to win-
ning Head coach John Parker said.
"Nobody in theclubdi vision practices
more or works harder than we do. If
this team can make u p i ts mind to play
60 minutes every game, we are going
to be really hard to beat
This year's team will be led by
attacker Kirt Katzburg, midfielder
Lake Slacum, and defenders Davis
and Larry Fortier. Freshmen will fill a
few vacant spots left from last year's
squad.
"We've got a go(xj crop of fresh-
men Parker said. "We ve been fortu-
nate the last two years in a row that
some of our best players have come
out and played real well as
neshmen.There arc a lot of new guys
that are going to see playing time this
year
This year's schedule includes
tough gamesagainstN.CState,home-
opener William and Mary and a two-
game road trip at Georgetown and
Howard.
"I expect that we're going to do
reallv well this year, because we're all
committed to excellence Parkersaid.
"We don't rune any games that are
goingtobegimrnies. Peoplearegofag
k) be gunning for us this year
Last year's successful 9-1 cam-
paign led the way to the NCLL Divi-
siotulCKimpioaship.Theseasonalso
earned the loam an offioal bid to play
Division 1 lacrosseasan associate mem-
bcr,buta lackof schwl fundingforthe
program caused the team to remain a
club sport.
The season opens Saturday
against William and Mary, a rematch
oflastyeai'sehampKinshipgarne.The
game starts at 2 p.m. on the lacrosse
field behind the Allied Health build-
ing.
New coach, faces
to spark tracksters
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
by J.D. WMtmif� RacrMtloml ScrvteM
No pain, no gain!
In the Intramural bench press competition on Feb. 5, Scott Ostertaunder and Frank Hobgcod( 136 to.).
Ray Taylor (146 to.), Jamie Decatur (163 lb). Mike Chavis (194 lb.) and heavyweight Kenneth Wells
were all named champions in their respective weight classes. Sherry Allen won the women's division.
The 1992 ECU Lady Pirate
track and field team has a good
mixture of experienced athletes
togoalongwitha talented group
of newcomers. Carlie "Choo"
Justice takes over as head coach
for the team, the third coaching
change in as many years.
The goal of the team, ac-
cording to Justice, is to have a
strong showing at the Colonial
Athletic AssociationChampion-
ship Meet. He expects the team
to compete with James Madison
and William and Mary for the
number two spot, behind the
"clear-cut winner" George Ma-
son.
Justice said he was "pleased
with the togetherness (of ihe
team) in the spring During the
fall, the team had a hard time
findingunity. But they have since
come together and are currently
preparing for the season opener
on Feb. 22 at UNC-Wilmington.
In the sprints, the top re-
turner is junior DanitaRoseboro.
She was one of the fastest sprint-
ers in the conference last year
and she will run the 100- and
200- meter dashes, as well as the
relays.
Erica McFarland and trans-
fer Lauren Guy, both of whom
will compete in the 400-meter
open and 4X400 relay, lead the
list of newcomers in the sprints.
The relays should be the show-
case for the team, and die school
record is expected to fall.
The field events portion of
the team lacks depth, but should
prove to be one of the strengths
throughout the season. Susan
Schramand Janie Rowe will com-
pete in the shotput, discus and
jrvelin. Justice said the field
ever, i j wi 11" f i gu re pret ty heavily
on how we do at conference
Senior Ann Marie Welch re-
turns for her final season as the
leader of the d istance events. She
was the conference champion in
the 10,000-meter event two sea-
sons ago and should be the fa-
vorite this season. Marianne
Marinialso returns withoneyear
of experience under her belt.
Marini will compete in the 5,000-
meter run and looks to improve
her four th place finish in the CAA
Championships last season.
Gretchen Harley should
make an impact in the 800-meter
with a year of experience. Cross-
country runner Catherine
Norstand should be a big con-
tributor in the 3,000- and 5,000-
meter races.
FrcshmanStacy Green had a
fine cross country season and
should compete in the 1,500-
mcter run. Fellow frosh Jessica
Montgomery impressed Justice
with her work at practice and
should haveanexcellent first sea-
son.
The team as a whole is look-
ing to bea t i ts fourth place con fer-
ence finish over the past few sea-
sons.
Justice feete he has "the tal-
ent to do it and the combina-
tion of experience and youth
should make up for the lack of
depth.
L





tally impaired I Sports
cUrc lEaat (Earultman
February 18, 1992
o round out the group, lack
Prathcr, playing Arnold, gave a
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ink ships and constant threats to
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Bo s Next 1 loot show s
audierx es the true lite pi the men
I ilk impaired
n honest and realistic looV
is plav will i hange forever the
tpesandmiscinceptionsinti
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. the rest ol us, with hopes
un
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e, Americas fastest growing
the Native Indians
Commentary
D
Expansion
on Tobacco
Road would
be beneficial
By Brad Wiese
Staff Writer
1 d like to raise an
it u ith all the owners
� utivt s ol the major
professional sporting
igues: Why not expand
North Carolina ?
I la en'l von fellows
n how OUT tans stand
ind a team regardless
�l their success? The
( harlotte 1 lornets have
been the worst team in the
NBA for the past three
and one-hall years, yet
each game is a sellout. The
fan support is unparal-
leled
Don't you guys realize
thai the most popular
mmor league baseball
fran fuse in the country
resides in Durham? At
erv Hull's game, fans
ive to be turned away at
gates because the
stadium is packed.
In early January, an
timated 4,000 fans had
to be turned away from a
ireensboro Monarchs
hockey game. Inside the
i ireensboro Coliseum
there was a standing-
room -onlv crowd of 13,000
a reaming faithful. Did
my ol you hear about
that?
The Raleigh Icecaps of
the Fast Coast Hotkey
i ague and baseball's
Kinston Indians from the
irohna league have also
oven they can hold their
a n m this sports-craved
i ven the Raleigh
� the brand new
obal Basketball Associa-
ii quired a loyal
� llowing.
I here has, however.
been one professional
failure in the state, Ra-
leigh 1 Hirhain's
- . hawks. TheSkyhawks
were simply victims ol a
make shift tootball league
that was poorly managed
and started in a rush.
Ownersexecutives
are supposed to be intelli-
gent, and common sense
avs that North Carolina
has three areas that can
support major profes-
sional sports: Charlotte,
the Inad area (Greens-
boro, High Point,Win-
ston Salem), and the
I nangle area (Raleigh,
Durham and Chapel Hill).
The financial base is
here that is, the popula-
tion level has continued to
increase over recent years
and moa- and more busi-
nesses are relocating to the
Tar Heel state. The geo-
political layout of the state
also weighs heavily, in that
those sports not as promi-
nent as others have an equal
chance for survival (look at
the ECHL's Icecaps and
Monarchs).
So you owners of the
NBA, NFL, NHL and
Major League Baseball are
going to have to under-
stand that North Carolina
is starving for "big time"
pro athletics.
(nly in North Caro-
lina can struggling teams
till their stadium or arena
night after night. Don't
you think that teams like
the New England Patriots,
Sacramento Kings, Phoe-
nix Cardinals, and Seattle
Mariners wish they were
here?
What this means,
owners, is that next time
your leagues expand, you
must make the right
decision. You must
expand in North Carolina
Pirates snap
streak with 74-68
win over GMU
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writrr
"Praise the Lord! We won
said a delighted Eddie Payne.
I �'( l' snapped .1 four-game
losing streak by defeating (ieorge
Mason l lniversity,74 68 Monday
night in Minges Coliseum. The
Pirates re now 8-15 on the year
and 1 8 in the conference. The
team also broke a 15 game losing
streak against the Patriots that
dated back to Ian 25, 1986.
The Patriots lost the lead on a
22 -0 E I' run with 7:56 left m the
first halt The Pirates held George
Mason to 20 first-halt points on
29.6 percent shooting from the
floor.
Lester Lyons sparked the Pi-
rates' scoring run and finished
With 21 points, eight rebounds
(equaling his career high) and two
blocked shots Point guard
Ronnell Peterson contributed 16
points and a career-high eight
boards
'he team came out relaxed
tn tne second half Peterson said
"Guys stopped running the floor
- I've got to keep pushing the
ball
Despite a lead ol .is many as
25 points, the Pirates let George
Mason cut the lead to single fig-
ures late in regulation
Only two Patriot players shot
over 50 percent for the game,
while ECU shot an uncharacter-
istic 49 percent as a team. Anton
Gill connected on siv-ol eight
shots and ended regulation with
11 points and 12 rebounds, tying
a career high.
"1 thought lames lewis did a
great job Payne said. "1 le plays
better against bigger people tor
some reason
Lewis, the Pirates' six-foot
six inch center, out scored and
out-rebounded the only seven-
foot player in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association. He totaled 11
points and four rebounds.
The Pirates travel to Old Do-
minion Saturday, and a win could
put the team in fifth place in the
CAA. ECU hopes to remain out
ol the cellar, which would give
them a higher seed in the tourna-
ment�avoiding a first round con-
frontation against lames Madi-
son or Richmond
"To win a ga me like this gives
us ,i great deal ot confidence
Payne said.
TheRkhfood Colonial Basket-
bail Championship isscheduled for
March 7-9 at ther Richmond Coli-
seum in Richmond, VaITic Pirates
last three games will determine ei
ther a sixth, seventh or eighth place
soixl in the tourney.
Photo by Dail R��1 � ECU Photo Lab
ECU snapped a four game losing streak Monday night as the topped George Mason University. 74-68 in
Minges Coliseum The win also ended a 15-game slump against the Patnots dating back to Jan 25. 1986
Nightmare continues as Pirates lose Whitaker, game
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
The 1991-92 ECU men's has
ketball season can be summed up in
three words a bad dream
The ailing Pirate, (7 15) failed
to connect on a three point attempt
in the final seconds ol Saturday's
game with American University,
m the team lost 69-66. Hie loss
was the team's sixth straight, three
in a row in Colonial Athletic Asso-
i ution play.
"Thisgame is like a reoccuring
nightmare Head coach Eddie
Payne said.
Ihe Pirates had a chance ti i send
the game to overtime after Donald
Grant sank one ol two shots from
thefreethrowlinc,butl esterl yons
COUld not get open tor the final shot
and Ronnell Peterson's three ixnnt
attempt tell short. ECU isnow l-6in
games decided by five points or
less.
Questionablecallsby the refer-
ees left many Pirate players in foul
trouble. EC I shot no free throw sin
the fust ha despite aggressive
American plav. The Eagles shot
more than twice as many free
throws as the Pirates m the con-
test,and aRu-ighth in the nation in
tree throw percentage.
1 would (ertainlv take issue
with a lot ol the calls that were
made Paynesaid. "Put that hap-
pens every game
Only three E( Uplaycrsfound
their way to the tree throw line
Saturday night.
" rherefslettheplayersplay
said Lester Lyons, who uas the
only Pirate to score in double fig-
ures finishing with 25. "1 prefer to
have every nick-knack call made
Pavne, rotating his line-up for
the seventh time this season, found
his team tied with the Eagles at 37-
37 at intermission.
After shooting an anemic 27J8
percent from the floor at James
Madison, the Pirates managed to
find the basket just 31 percent of the
tune against the Eagles in the sec-
ond halt.
In a game that had 30 lead
changes, Pavne said he felt ECU
could have won.
"It came down to a failure to
execute said Payne. "We need
some help
Back-up point guard Paul
Childressdid not plav because of
bruised back.
left Whitaker, who missed 1
games waiting on a NCAA eligibil-
ity ruling, was lost tor the season
with an anterior cruciate ligament
tear during practiceon Feb. 7. It was
the third anterior cruciate ligament
tear i'n the team this season. Kevin
Armstrong and IkeCopetand were
lost earlier in the year.
Lacrosse club to field young team
By Mike Ashley
Staff Writer
After posting tlv best record m
the history of the EG lacrosse pro-
gram last year, tlx-1 irateS will set their
sights once again on tlie conference
championships. New faces, a tough
schedule aixl a loss of five middies
(mm last war's team pmmisestoniake
this season very competitive.
"Nobody is paid and nobody is
onscholarship.butwcallshareaconv
mon gtvil of being committed to win-
ning Head coach John Parker said.
"Nobody in theclubdi vision practices
more or works harder than we do. If
thisteamcanmakeupitsmind to play
60 minutes every game, we am going
to be really hard to beat
Tins war's team will be lev! by
attacker Kin Katzburg, midfielder
lake Slaeum, aixl defenders Davis
and Larry Forticr. Freshmen will fill a
few vacant spots left from last war's
squad.
"We've got a good crop of fresh-
men Parker said. "We've been fortu-
nate the last two wars in a row that
some of our best players have come
out and played real well as
freshnxnOxtc aa' a lot of new guvs
that are going to see plaving time this
year
This year's schedule includes
tough gamesagainst N .C Sta te, home-
opener William and Mary and a two
game road trip at Georgetown and
Howard.
"I expect that we're going to do
n-allv well this year, because we're all
committed to excellence Parker said.
"We don't have any games that aa
going toK'gimmies. People are going
to be cunning tor us this war
last vear's successful 9-1 cam-
paign lev! tlie way to the NCI.L Divi-
sionaK.aSampion.ship. 1 "he sea-on also
earned the team an official bid to play
Divisionllacrosseasanassociatemem-
ber,buta lackof school funding forthe
program caused the team to remain a
club spirt.
The season opens Saturday
against William arxi Mary,a rematch
oflastwar'scrumpionshipganxCrhe
game starts at 2 p.m. on the lacrosse
field behiixi the Allied Health build-
ing.
New coach, faces
to spark tracksters
By Rick Chann
Stall Writer
Photo by JO. Whttmlro� Rscrutional SorvicM
No pain, no gain!
i
In the Intramural bench press competition on Feb. 5, Scott Osterlaunder and Frank Hobgood (136 lb),
Ray Taylor (146 lb), Jamie Decatur (163 lb), Mike Chavis (194 lb.) and heavyweight Kenneth Wells
were all named champions in their respective weight classes. Sherry Allen won the women's division

Ihe 192 ECU Ladv Pirate
track and field team has a gixxj
mixture of experienced athletes
to go along witha talented group
of newcomers. Carlie "Choo"
justice takes over as head coach
for the team, the third coaching
change in as many years.
The goal of the team, ac-
cording to Justice, is to have a
strong showing at the Colonial
Athletic Association Champion-
ship Meet. He expects the team
to compete with James Madison
and William and Mary for the
number two spot, behind the
"clear-cut winner" George Ma-
son.
Justice said he was "pleased
with the togetherness (of the
team) in the spring During the
fall, the team had a hard time
f ind i ng u ni ty. Bu t they ha ve si nee
come together and am currently
preparing for the season opener
on Feb. 22 at UNC-Wilmington.
In the sprints, the top re-
turner is junior Danita Roseboro.
She was one of the fastest spnnt
ers in the conference last year
and she will run the 100- and
200- meter dashes, as well as the
relays.
Erica McFarland and trans-
fer Lauren Guy, both of whom
will compete in the 400-meter
open and 4X400 relay, lead the
list of newcomers in the sprints.
The relays should be the show-
case for the team, and the school
record is expected to fall.
The field events portion of
the team lacks depth, but should
prove to be one oi the strengths
throughout the season. Susan
SchramandlanieRowewill com-
pete in the shotput, discus and
javelin, Justice said the field
events will "figure pretty heavily
on how we do at conference
Senior Ann Mane Welch re-
turns for her final season as the
leader ot thedistanceevents. She
was the conference champion in
the 10,000-meter event two sea-
sons ago and should be the fa-
vorite this season. Marianne
Manni also returns with one year
of experience under her belt.
Marini will compete in the 5,000-
meter run and looks to improve
her fourth placefinish in theC AA
Championships last season.
Gretchen Harley should
make an impact in the 800-meter
with a year of experience. Cross-
country runner Catherine
Norstand should be a big con-
tributor in the 3,000- and 5.000-
meter races.
FrcshmanStacy Green had a
fine cross country season and
should compete in the 1500-
meter run Fellow frosh Jessica
Montgomery impressed Jusbce
with her work at practice and
should haveanexcellent first sea-
son.
The team as a whole is look-
ing to beat its fourth place confer-
ence finish over the past few sea-
sons.
Jusbce feels he has "the tal-
ent to do it and the combina-
bon of experience and youth
should make up for the lack of
depth.





10 (Dhc �aat Carolinian February 18, 1992
Recreational Services
The Untouchables' win (hiee-on-three regional competition
(RS)�ECU'S Intramural three-
on-three men's and women's bas-
ketball champion teams recently
competed in the Atlantic Regional
Tournament at Furman University
in Greenville, S.C Both teams were
placed in round robin leagues at the
event and advanced to the single-
elimination competition.
The men's team, The Untouch-
ables, copied the Cinderella story of
the ECU football season. Through-
out the round robin play, The Un-
touchables were led by the slashing
penetration of point guard Greg
Stewart, the rebounding muscle of
Rafael McBroom, Bryan Lee's hot
three-point hand and the smooth
play of Mark Hoch.
After advancing through the
round robin tournament, ECU found
itself in the quarterfinal round play-
ing the Coastal Carolina. With Hoch
and Lee sinking three pointers and
excellent passing around the perim-
eter, McBroom and Stewart wea
able to penetrate and scorea number
ot layups. The team won and ad-
vanced to ptayN.G Wesleyan.
The quick, accurate and physi-
cal N .C Wesleyan team battled hard,
but came up short against The Un-
touchables, 35-30. The win pitted
ECU against the tournament favor-
ite, Voorhees College out of South
Carolina.
The Untouchables jumped out
to a 12-0 lead with each of the team
members contributing a basket.
Voorhees became Frustrated with
their inability to penetrate ECU's
defense, nor could they stop the
sh(xting ot Hoch and Stewart. The
game ended when Voorhees re-
ceived three technical fouls for
unsportsmanlikeconduct. ECU won
40-30. With this victory. The Un-
touchables gained a berth to the re-
gional final to be played in the Char-
lotte Coliseum on against UNC-
Chapel Hill.
The Pirates and Tar Heels
played a highly competitive game
with the Tar Heels mocking Hubert
Davis' three-point attack. ECU was
also scoring from "trey land as
well as tallying points from in the
paint.
At the end of regulation, the
game was tied 39-39. Following a
two-minute overtime period, ECU
won the game 45-44.
The women's team, FT in Mo-
tion, faced Francis Marion College in
the first game and lost 25-23. The
team then faced Lenoir Rhyne, their
only win of the tournament.
ECU stars shined as Katrina
Evans proved to be a dynamic point
guard combining great assists with
an effective left-handed bank shot.
Tonya Komna th played an outstand-
ing game with jump shots and m-
sidesconng, while teammatesCrys-
tal Kennedy and Heidi Schulz made
several nice assists and layups to
spark the team.
Even though the team lost two
out of three games in their bracket,
FT in Motion made it to the
quarterfinal round of eight teams.
The team played a great game, but
fell short to Fayetteville State, 24-22.
Team members included:
Komnath, Kennedy, Schultz, Kim
Jones and Katnna Evans frI in Mo-
tion wascongratulated for itssports-
man-like play and fine representa-
tion of ECU.
Intramural officials 'see'
just about everything
(RS) � Intramural officials are
an important part of the Intramural
Sports program Without them intra-
mural games would be chaos. Intra-
mural Sports use officials in flag foot-
ball, basketball, volleyball, softball,
soccer and water polo. Working asan
official for Intramural Sports doesn't
just mean going out every night and
refereeinga bu nch of college studen ts
as they run around ruving fun. There
are several opportunities that open
up when someone because an intra-
mural official
youth and high school leagues, these
leagues pay mom plus they are great
fun to do. Working as an official for
intramuralscan also lead to traveling
todifferent partsof the country. ECU
intramural officials have traveled to
Virginia, Georgia and even to New
Orleans were they represented the
university at the National Hag Foot-
ball Championships.
If yoe avt interested m becoming
a volleyball official, there will be a
meeting on March 19, at 5 p.m. in
Brewster C-103. The starting pay is
tits, faculty encouraged
swiiraning facilities
pool schedules
One of the things that a person $4.45 and can go as high as $4.95.
can do after he or she gets into the Being an official can be a great
officials program is receive enough way to meet people and obtain worth-
experience to move up to working while experience.
Slam Dunk Contest set
for Minges Coliseum
(RS)� The Annual Slam Drunk
Contest will be held on Thursday,
Feb. 20 from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. This
event has become one of the most
exciting and popular events in the
Intramural program for both the par-
ticipants and spectators
The Slam Dunk Contest will be
held in M inges Coliseum, where the
participants will have the fans cheer
them on as their name is announced
over the loud speaker system. The
Junkers will be judged by local ce-
lebrities such as ECU'S football star
TomSeottand ECU's basketball star
Tim Brown, as well as other well
known personalities in the commu-
nity.
The rules of the contest are the
same as the official NBA slam dunk
rules. There will be three rounds of
competition. Each participant will
attempt two dunks in the first and
second rounds and three dunks in
the third round.
There will be one substitute
dunk per round for each participant.
The dunks will be judged on ability,
creativity and style. The sailing will
be ranged from 1.0 to 10.0, a missed
dunk receiving a maximum of 8.0
pomtsThe top four scores in the first
round will advance to the second
round, and the top two scores in the
second round will advance to the
finals, where they will compete for
the slam dunk crown.
If you are interested in partici-
patingintheSlamlXinkContesUhc
information meeting will be held
Wednesday, Feb. 14 in Biology Build-
ing, Room 103. For a copy of the
rules, stop by Room 104-A in
Chnstenbury Gym.
(RS)� ECU'S Rec-
reational Services pro-
vides a variety of ac-
tivities for its students
as well as faculty and
staff. One oi the most
popular activities of-
fered to students is the
use of the two campus
swimming pools.
The pool located
inside i f Christen! my
Gymnasium is for use
by lap swimmers. Free
swim in this pool is not
allowed because of the
popularity of lapswim-
ming. Students at ECU
have found that swim-
ming is a tun way to
stay in shape, so the
entire pool is usually
filled with fitness
swimmers.
The pool located inside of
Minges is open for both lap
swimming and recreational free
swim. To enter the pool, a per-
son must have proper identifi-
Christenbary
M-F (:45-t:M �.�.
M-P H:3t-l:3t p.m.
MWF 3:M-7:M p.m.
T-Tta 3:M-f :3I p.m.
Sat. Noon-5:M p.a.
Sun. 1M-5M p.m.
Minges
NATIONAL
COLLEGIATE
TALENT
SEARCH
WITH NATIONAL
TELEVISION EXPOSURE
MWF 7:3-�:M p.m.
T-Th 2:3I-I:M p.m.
San. 2:M-5:M p.m.
cation � whether it be school
issued or a guest pass. Guests
are able to use the pool on week-
end s from noon on Fridays
through closing on Sundays.
If you have a special talent or
look Even a different voice
or you want to be an actor,
model, or dancer!
We give you the opportunity!
CALL
THE TALENT LINE
1 -900-420-8887
Information fee of only $25.00
will appear on your phone bill.
Brought to you by S.P.I.
P.O. Box 32088, Bait MD 21208
Follow ECU sports
with
The East Carolinian
Tom GRIFFIN'S
THE BOYS NEXT
"An extraordinary
play that will bring
both laughter and tears
to your eyes
t"
FEBRlARY 13, 14, 15. 17 and 18 at 8:15 p.m.
FEBRUARY 16 at 2:15 p.m.
ECU STUDENTS: $4.50
Live Theatre For Less Than A Movie So Bring A Date
Call: 757-6829
hen your1 re tired of your
textbooks relax with:
CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
� Hardbacks
� Paperbacks
� Magazines
� Greeting Cards
� Trading Cards
� And the only place to
find Local & Out of To
Newspapers
757.7177 �(H II III T 0 m Si'veil D.ls .1 Wii k





10
Hu taat (Carolinian February W, 1992
Recreational Services
The Untouchables' win three-on-three regional competition
(RS) � ECU'S Intramural thnv
on-thnv men's and women's Kiv
ketball champion torn recently
competed m the Atlantic Reponal
Tournament at Furnwn University
in Greenville.SC Both teams were
placed m round nhn leagues at the
event and advanced to the single-
elimination competition.
rhe men's learn, rhe Untouch-
ables, copied theCindcrella story oi
the ECU football season rhrough-
01H the round robin play, rhe Un-
touchables wen? led by the slashing
penetration ol point guard Greg
Stewart, the rebounding muscle ot
Rlfatl McBnxm, Brvan Lee's hot
three-point hand and the smooth
plav ot Mark 1 kx h
After advancing through the
round robin tournament, ECU found
itselt m the quarterfinal round plav
ing the Coastal Carolina With 1 loch
and I ee sinking three pointers and
excellent passing around theperim
etcr, McBroom and Stewart were
abtetopenetrateands nreanumber
ol lavups I he team won and ad
vanced to pl-i X Wesleyan
fhe quick, ao nite and physi-
caINX .Wesleyamteambattledhard,
but came up short against Ihe Un-
touchables, 15 10 The win pitted
E( I against the tournament favor-
ite, Vooihees (. bllegc out ol South
(. arolina.
rhe Untouchables jumped out
to a 12-0 lead with each of the team
members contributing a basket.
Voorhees became frustrated with
their inability I � penetrate E 1 's
defense, noi i i they stop the
shooting ol Hoi I �tewarl I he
came endi I � �� �rhees re
i eh ed threi al fouls tor
imsportsmanBkeconduci ECU won
4iv 30. With this victory, The Un
torn hables gained a berth to the re
gional final to K played in theChar-
lotte C oliseum on against UNC-
ChapelHill
Ihe Pirates and Tar Heels
played a highly competitive game
with the farl lecJs mocking Hubert
1 fcavis' three-point attack. 1-XU was
als.i scoring from "trev land as
well as tallying punts from in the
paint.
At the end ot regulation, the
came was tied 19 19. Following a
two-minute overtime period, ECU
won the game 4-44
Ihe women's team, IT in Mo-
tion, faced I rancisManonColloge in
the first game" and lost 25-23. The
team thin faced I.enoir Rhyne, their
only win of the tournament.
I�'( U stars shined as Katnna
Evans pn ved to ho a dynamic p �nt
guard I ombmmg great assists with
an effective left-handed bank shot
I onva komnathplaved anoutstan.i
ing game with pimp shots and m-
sidescoring,while teammatesC rys-
tal Kennedy and 1 leidiSchuIzmade
several nice assists ,n�i lav ip I
spark me team.
Even though the learn
out ot thnv games in their bracl
I'T in Motion made il I
quarterfinal round ot eight �
The team played a great
fell short toFayettevilleStati I
1 earn member
Komnath, Kennedy, Schu
lonesand katni. i l'i u
bonwa
mai
tlOli
Intramural officials 'see'
just about everything
(RS Intramural officials an-
n important part ot the Intramural
Spot to program Without them intra
mural games would be chaos. Intra
mural Sports use officiab in flag foot
baS, basketball, vollevKill. softball,
soccerandwaterpolo Workingasan
crffidal for Intramural Sports doesn't
just mean going out every night and
refereeingabunch rf ollegestudents
as they run around having fun.There
arc several opportunities that open
up when someone because an intra
mural ofhaal
One of the things that a per-on
can do alter he or six- gets into the
officials program is receive enough
experience to move up to working
youth and lue.h sch k -1 leagues, tin91
leagues pay more plus they are greal
tun lo do Working as an offk ial tor
intramurals can also lead to traveling
todiffercntpartsofthecountr) E( I
intramural officials hue traveled to
Virginia, ieorgia and even to Nt
Orleans were they represented the
university at the National Flag Rml
ball Championships
Ifyi v aieintcrested inbei iming
a volleyball official, there will be a
meeting on March 19, al r p.m in
Brewster C l;i; fhe starting pay is
$4.45 and can go as high as$4 95
Being an official can be a great
wa to meet peoplcand obtain worth
while experience
Students, faculty encouraged
to use swimming facilities
POOL SCHEDULES
Slam Dunk Contest set
for Minges Coliseum
(RS) Ihe Annual Slam I nink
Contest will be held on Thursday,
Feb. 20 from u p.m. to 10 p.m. Ihis
event his become one ot the mtM
t nating and popular events in the
Intramural program for boththepar
bcipants and spectators
Fhe Slam Dunk Contest will be
held in Minges Coliseum, where the
participants will have thefanscheer
them on as their name isannounced
?ver the loud speaker system, fhe
. � a 11 be judged by local i e-
as ECU'S football star
mScottandECU'sbasketballstar
Tim Bn wn as well as other well
known personalities in thecommu-
nity.
Ihe rules ot the contest are the
same as the official NBA slam dunk
niles. There will be thnv rounds ol
competition Each participant will
attempt two dunks in the tirst and
second rounds and tfmv dunks m
the third round
there will ho one substitute
dunk per round for each participant.
Tie dunks will he judged on ability,
v reatix it v and stx le Ihe scoring will
be ranged from 1.0to 10.0, a miss�.i
dunk receiving a maximum ot 8.0
points-The top four scores in the first
round will advance to the second
round, and the top two scores in the
second round will advance to the
tinaK when- they vsill compete tor
the slam dunk crown
It you are interested in partici
patingin the Slam 1 unk ontest.the
information meeting will be held
Wednesday,Feb. l�inBiok�g I
ing. Room 103. For a copy ol the
rules, stop by Im'imh 104 A in
c In istenbun i .x m
(RS) E I sRe
reational Sen
vides a vat ' - l a
tivities tor its students
as well as t.i. ulty and
� f. One of I
fered to students is the
use of the two ampus
swimming pools
fhe pool ated
inside � I ' ter.tory
( iymna .iurn i tor use
by lapswimmers 1 ree
swim in this pool is not
allowed because ol fhe
populanh ol lapswim
mine. Studentsal 1 - I
have found that swim
ming is a fun way t, i
st.iv in shape, so the
entire poo! is usually
filled with fitness
swimmers
Ihe pool I' icated inside
Minges is open tor both 1
Christenbury
M-P MF MWF T-Th Sat. Sunt:45-8:M i.m. n:3l-l:3t p.m. 3:M-7:M p.m. 3:M3� p.m. Noon-S:ll p.m. 1:M-5:M p.m.
Minges
MWF T-Th Son.7:3�-9:�� p.m. 2.3I.8.II p.m. 2:M-5:M p.m.
NATIONAL
COLLEGIATE
TALENT
SEARCH
WITH NATIONAL
TELEVISION EXPOSURE
OJ cation whether it he -h(o
ip issued or a guest pass. (luests
swirnmingaiid recreational free are able to use the pool on week-
swim ro enter the pool a pei ends from noon on Fridays
son must have proper identil through dosing on Sundays
If you have a special talent or
look Even a different voice
or you want to be an actor.
model, or dancer!
We give you the opportunity!
CALL
THE TALENT LINE
1-900-420-8887
Information fee of only $25.00
will appear on your phone bill.
Brought to you by S.P.I.
P.O. Box 32088. Bait MD 21208
Follow ECU sport
with
77t list l awlinian
i 199L1992
Tom Griffin's
THE BOYS NEXT DOOR
"An extraordinary
play that will bring
both lauehter and tears
t( (ur exes
FEBRUARY 13, M, 15, 17 and 18 at 8:15 p.m.
FEBRUARY 16 at 2:15 p.m.
ECU CTUDENTS: $439
Live Theatre For Leas Than A Movie So Bring A Date
Call: 757-6829
hen your're tired of your
textbooks relax with:
CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
� Hardbacks
� Paperbacks
� Magazines
� Greeting Cards
I � Trading Cards
� And the only place to
find Local & Out of Tow
Newspapers
(Jreenville Shopping (enter � 757-7177 � Open Til 9:30 pin Seven Days a Week





Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.859
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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