The East Carolinian, July 10, 1991






Recycling 4
Items are stored because they are not marketable.
"The Nerd" 5
The latest summer production provides humor.
Otfje i�uBt danrittutm
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.36
Wednesday, July 10,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
Celebration extends over weekend
Investigation for violations
Five fraternities were accused of violating the Inter-Fra-
ternity Council Risk Management Policy at N.C. State Univer-
sity. In a letter from the IFC rush chairman, the fraternities
were accu sed of in vi ting incoming freshman to parties held on
Fraternity Court.
The letter accused the fraternities of distributing alcohol
to minors and advertising the parries at freshman dormitories.
Witnesses reported that several freshman went to the parties
and returned later in the evening intoxicated.
The Director of Orientation reported that the freshmen
involved were mostly female.
Student arrested for assault
Enc Blount, a UNC-Chapel Hill student from Ayden, was
arrested on charges of simple assault, along with four others,
after attacking a bouncer at a nightclub in Chapel Hill.
According to the police reports, Blount and the others
attempted to enter the establishment, but being underage,
were told they had to leave. After a brief confrontation, the
reports stated that one of the suspects hit the bouncer in the
face, then the others knocked him to the ground and repeat-
edly kicked and hit him.
Blount was arrested shortly thereafter and later released
on $230 unsecured bond.
Student newspaper denied access
The University of South Carolina's student newspaper.
The Gamecock, was denied a copy of one of the South Carolina
Law Enforcement Division's investigative reports.
The newspaper's Freedom of Information request was
denied, according to a letter from SLED officials, because of a
pol icy to "protect persons who provide i nforma tion d uring an
investigation
TheState.a non-student newspaper serving the same area,
was able to get a copy of the report.
"We expect better cooperation from an agency that is
supposed to help the citizens of South Carolina said David
Bowden, editor in chief of the newspaper.
One of the paper's editors, Aaron Shemin, protested that
they were receiving unfair treatment because of their student
status.
"I think that if we were anything but a student newspaper,
they would honor our request he said. "Instead, they turn us
down, thinking we're going to go away. They'll soon find out
it's just not going to happen
State may try new grading system
The plusminus grading system which wasexperimented
with on some North Carolina campuses in the mid-1980s may
be back soon at N.C. State University. The Faculty Senate ha
advised the chancellor of the University of the return of the
system.
The plusminus grading system's supporters say that it
allows professors to record more accurate grades. A student
who has an 89 in every class would have a 33 average,
whereas all 80s would be a 2.7. Under the current system both
students would have a 3.0.
Student Body President Ed Stack said that he is not sure
that the students will accept the system. "I think the students
are generally against the system he said.
Stack said that he believed that it would be more of a
hindrance to students' scores than a help.
Violence erupts in Chapel Hill
As many as 800 people were reportedly involved in a
melee in Chapel Hill last week. The fighting started about 3
a.m. outside of the Car's Cradle, a downtown bar.
Police reported that the crowd consisted predominantly
of area college and high school students. Two people were
reportedly shot at and two others were assaulted and treated
for bruises and cuts at UNC hospitals.
The local Hardee's restaurant was forced to close as the
fighting worsened.
Authorities had no idea what spurred the fighting;
however, Chapel Hill PoliceCapt. Ralph Pendergraph reported
that he believed alcohol to be a contributing factor.
Tuition raised at U S C
Students attending University of South Carolina will pay
almost 5 percent more tuition in fall than in the past. The raise
in tuition is attributed to a reduction in South Carolina's
budget.
USC President John Palms said that the school was re-
ceiving $800,000 less in appropriations than the previous year.
"I don't like doing it, but because of the state's economy,
we had to raise tuition he said in an interview with USC's
student newspaper.
Inside Wednesday
Crime SceneJ2
Classifieds73
EditorialJ4
FeaturesVS
Sports
By Keith Abluton
Staff Writer
In recent years, students
attending summer school
have been given a day off from
class on the Fourth of July.
This, however, hasn't always
been the case at ECU.
Before last summer, the
only time students received a
holiday on July 4 was if it fell
on a Monday or a Friday. Jim
Hicks, chairman of the Cal-
endarCommittee,said that an
amendment was passed in
1989 to make July 4 a school
holiday regardless of the day
of the week on which it fell.
One of the biggest reasons for
this was the amount of stu-
dent complaints.
The Greenville Parks and
Recreation Department and
the Greenville Jaycees had a
whole day of activities
planned for July 4 this year.
Unfortunately, nature
had other ideas. Most of the
morning events on Thursday
went as planned. The event
were held in four areas: Stage
1 (amphitheater),Stage2, town
commons and streetside. The
events that were held included
the5K Freedom Race, arts and
craft show, car show, celebrity
dunking booth, and a concert
by Cold Sweat. Tickets were
sold for 25 cents a piece to pay
for food, drinks and activities.
However, because of rain,
the Chairman of the Board
concertand thefireworkswere
postponed until Sunday. An
estimated 40,000 people from
Greenville and the surround-
ing areas went to the town
commons to see the concert
and the fireworks show.
The Chairman of the
Board played at 4 p.m. The
Supergrit Cowboy Band,
which was already scheduled
for Sunday In the Park, played
at 7 p.m. Patriotic music was
played before the fireworks
display.
Carnival rides and food
vendors were also present on
Sunday. Items were pur-
chased by tickets on Sunday
also, giving people a chance to
use any they were unable to
use on Thursday.
Also present was a crane
which proudly displayed a
huge American flag above the
crowd. The Zambelli fire-
works show started about 9:30
and lasted for about 15 to 20
minutes.
Heavy rains cause journal
damage in Joyner Library
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
Water leaks damaged
over 100 journals in Joyner
Library after thunderstorms
on July 4.
Rainwater reached all
four levels of the East wing
stacks but only the third and
fourth levels were seriously
damaged.
The leaks were caused by
a build up of water due to
clogged drainage pipes on the
roof of the library, according
to University Archivist Mor-
gan J. Barclay.
Most of the books dam-
aged were business and ac-
counting journals. Approxi-
mately 30 such books were
damaged badly.
Barclay said the library
staff is attempting to repair
the damaged books by inter-
leaving each couple of pages
with newspaper.
This may save the library
from having to replace the
journals completely, accord-
ing to Barclay.
Although he expects the
drying process to last three or
four days, Barclay said it may
be longer because the journals
were comprised of clay-based
paper which is harder to pre-
serve.
After the journals are
completely dry another prob-
lem will face the library staff
� where to reshelve the
journals?
This is a problem because
the books will grow, "at least
one-third larger" during the
drying process, according to
Barclay.
Barclay said mat the li-
brary has no extra room to
reshelve the bloated journals.
If the journals are unus-
able after they dry out, they
will be replaced on microfilm.
Barclay said that the roof
of the West wing of the library
was replaced recently. He
called this timely repair "a
godsend
He said that the East wing
roof will be patched, but not
be replaced because the reno-
vations that are planned for
the library will uproot the en-
tire East wing.
Barclay, in his position as
university archivist, is the
chairman of the disaster
committee for Joyner Library.
He said a new disaster pre-
paredness plan was being
completed at the time of the
flood.
The committee'snew plan
is centered upon disaster
prevention, evacuation and
replacing damaged materials
after a disaster, according to
Barclay.
The committee is eom-
prisedof representatives from
aUoftheUbrarsdepartrnents
and has borrowed ideas from
other libraries, as well as cre-
ated original plans for Joyner
Library.
J
Barclay said that Western
Carolina University suffered
a tremendous toss to their li-
brary in a fire two years ago.
"A lot of libraries have a
disaster plan Barclay said.
Peorjle don authertocostucnes to participate fc in
a town held by Union occupation force from 1862 to 1865.
Now Bern,
Greenville's firework display on Sunday lights up the sky.
Depositions in suit
to be completed
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
Depositions from the
two defendants in the ECU
wiretapping case will be
completed inbetween 30 to60
days, said Herman Caskins,
the Plaintiffs lawyer.
Monday, June 25,
former Public Safety Chief
Johnny Rose filed a lawsuit
against Evan Midgette, assis-
tant director of human re-
sources for employee rela-
tions, and Teddy Roberson,
former director of telecom-
munications. The lawsuit
seeksdamagesof $10,000 from
the defendants for an illegal
taping of a conversation over
phone lines.
Midgette declined to
comment on the case.
Roberson could not be
reached.
Caskins would not
speculate Monday on the pos-
sibility of criminal prosecu-
tions resulting from the
depositions; however, he did
say that the proceedings
would take a lengthy amount
of time.
In an interview with
Gaskins on June 26, he said
that after the initial deposi-
tions were made, he expected
to add other persons involved
to his lawsuit. Caskins said
those people should be named
in the depositions.
Director of Public
See Tap, page 2
New Bern site
of Civil War
re-enactment
By James Browning
Staff Writer
The chill wind of March
1862 wasa gentle precursor of
Union army soldiers ap-
proaching the town of New
Bern, North Carolina's Con-
federate defenders.
Unlike the bone-chilling
cold of March 1862, the sun
blazed down on the peaceful,
picturesque town of New Bern
July 6,1991 as individuals from
all walks of life gathered to re-
enact and remember the Civil
War that so greatly affected
the riverside community
many years ago.
In 1862, the newly-formed
22nd Norm Carolina unit of
roughly 2,000 untested re-
cruits was hardly prepared for
the union advance. The 22nd
was so new in fact that they
had no official uniforms or
weapons.
The union federal forces
under the command of Gen-
eralBurnsidehadjustdefeated
Confederate forces in
Roanoke, Virginia and
Harteras. They were moving
up the Neuse River toward
New Bern with over 8,000sea-
soned Federal troops.
Faced with four to one
odds, little help from the town
of New Bern (when asked for
workers to dig trenches
against the attackers, the
mayor of New Bern sent only
four people) and untried,
poorly supplied troops, it was
no doubt that New Bern was
captured in March of 1862.
The defenders were
pushed back to Kinston. Two
later attempts to retake New
Bern in 1863 and 1864 failed
and the town stayed in Union
hands until Robert E. Lee
surrendered at Appomattox
Courthouse to General
Ulysses S Grant in 1865.
The people who took part
mtrusandotherre-er�actrnents
include teachers, doctors,
businessmen and others,
dressed in the uruformsotfthew
forefathers. They consider
themselves historians re-
minding us of how differing
ideologies can place man in a
bloody arena against his fel-
low man or, as in the Ameri-
can Civil War, against his





f
(The CnBtdarolinian July 10, 1991
(Officers respond to paper silhouette
on steps of Jenkins Art Center Gallery
u .
Uing: responded U report of suspicious person,
is unfounded
fVlk Residencel lall (easl I responded 'ervfortot loud noise
I from the bdskert all court
fill) )
11 M Whichard Annex investigated report of suspicious person
. area Same was gone on arrival
v eslampus hecked out ,in of White Residence I (all,
u'tit Residence Hall and Mendenhall Studententer in response to
(Tt vt tvo suspicious subjects Same were gone on arrival
fuly 4
lr McCiinnis rhcati , nded to drain overflow and air
iditioner problem �i!k) maintenance crew
0001 arvis Residence I I.ill rcpuvUxl to report of pyrote� hnics
vorks) in the area Same w as unfounded.
(oyner I ibran found the flag had been stolen from the pole
� . 1 ,�t th KHt in
Tap
lulv 5
kl
hi flail talked v nh subiecl aKuit larcen of
nee Ha ; nded to i all of bio i le larcenv.
ill ' Buildinj : tudent for traffn light viola-
itii n Same was given a verbal warning
Fleming Rt adenci Hall topped male non-student for one-
1 a , i! ition given Subje I . n iouslv
inned pus and I w ith trespassing
uly7
. - rnded to a n port of subject
is found to be prank all
10 14th and ets: responded to a report of breaking
strcngtl lei Subject was apprehended and
i to his pare!
lenkins Artrut. i hecki d on possible subject lying on the
Same was found to be a papei silhouetteofanuman
iu S
: � �- - Residence Hall verbal warning given to non-studeni
irele cbecktvl on suspicious person in the area
id to be a student counselkr
41 StudentStores provided escort for female to ampusSuites
Continued from page 1
Safety lames TXpuy is expected to
be one of the additional defendants
in the lawsuit His involvement was
cited in a state auditor's report that
was released in March and involved
aninvesrigationofthewiretappings.
Depuy was unavailable for
comments as he left for vacation on
fune27andisnot expected to return
until lulv 21.
The FBI has confirmed that
thev a re investigating the same alle-
gations although thev gave no in-
formation concerning details. Ac-
cording to Tom lxsby of the Char-
lotte FBI division it is against FBI
policy to make any statements
concerning ongoing investigations
July W. 1991
The East
C iiroliniun
is now accepting
applications for the
positions o
News Editor
and
Features Editor.
So get off your
butt and apply.
For information.
details and such.
call
757-6366.
Don't
Monkey
around
with other
newspapers.
Read lite
East
Carolinian
PLACE
TOGO
BEFORE
AND
A FXF R pleasurable evenir
THE SHOW
Enjoy a relaxing
meal at Chico's N
the how and have i
cocktail or appear -
after the show
to conclude a
M"i: Xtn Restrrjnr.l
U
521 Cotanche street � 7
hbn
Newman Catholic Student Center
would like to
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus MaSS Schedule: Summer Sessions May 19 - Jul 2S
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman (enter
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman (enter
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information call or v isit the Center Jails between 8:30am and 1 Ipm
It. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
3 East 10th Sl(Ai the Fdol GfCoIleee Hill) Phone: 757-3760 7s7SOTX
USED FURNITURE
LARGE SHOWROOM
,S-i
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416 Evans (Downtown)
Mon-Sat 9:30-1:00 2:00-5:00 752-3866
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services iS: c ouns ilii
Carolina Pregnancy Center
7 "7 0003
111 l- 3rd Street
The I ee Building
Greenville NC
I tours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:1
MQs s
Saigon
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � Nove
Your Miss Saigon New York Tour Includes:
? Roundtrip air via USAir
QTwo nights hotel accommodations
? Orchestra seat for Miss Saigon
Q Lunch or late dinner at the Stage Dell
Q Lower New York or Upper New York
sight-seeing tour
L) Admission to the South St. Seaport
Museum
Q Air and hotel taxes
? New York City information packet
ITG Tours USAir
mber 1-3, 1991
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489
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"
'
(Elic EmuCarolinian July w. 1991
Tap
Officers respond to paper silhouette
m steps of fenkins Art Center Gallery
inh und xi
IVIk RoSldt in i I l.i
dti i' j� : s v t � ipi. iousperson.
! .i' rpj ort( fl ikI noise
ul) )
chard Vnnex investigated report of suspicious person
?ared Same was cone � n .irrn .il
122 West i ampus chet v.t .nit areas of White Residerw e I.ill.
nt Resident e I Kill .n�1 Mench rh.ill Studententei in response to
suspicious -u1'k ts Same were ci �ne �n an n ,il
it ponded lo drain erflin and air
ince 111w
Residence I lall responded to report of pyrote hniis
�� ,
in the area Sd unfounded
. found � - had b
Continued from page 1
Safety )anx"s I Vpuy is expected to
be one of the additional defendants
in the lawsuit His involvement was
cited in a state auditor's n-port that
was released in March and involved
an investigation of the wirefcippinps.
IVpuv was unavailable for
comments as he left tor vacation on
une27andisnot expected to return
until lulv 21.
l"he FBI has confirmed that
theyare investigating the same alle-
gations although they gave no in-
formation concerning details. Ac-
cording to Tom lesbv of the Char
lottc 1HI division it is against FBI
policy to make any statements
i oncerningongoing investigations.
July 1Q, 1991
stolen from the fxle
� � irxuil laroenv et
� � � .in i t l'ii v ir Ian cm
� lent I . : il . iola
� n .i verbal a aming
ned malenon stud� nt for one
pvei � � �uslv
The East
('arolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
positions o'
News Editor
and
Features Editor.
So gel off your
butt and apply.
For information,
details and such.
call
757-6366.
Don't
Monkey
around
with other
newspapers.
Read The
East
Carolinian
PLACE
TOGO
BEFORE
AND
AFTER
THE SHOW
y ,t relaxing
meal at c !hicos bx
the show and ha
uKkt.nl or
IT ll I
after the show
tii anclude a
pleasurable ever
21 Cotanche stnvt
Newman Catholic Student Center
would like to
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule: Summer Sessions Max- Juh 2S
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman Center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information call or visii the Center dail) between 8:30am and 11 pi
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Camj us Minister
953 East 10th St.(At the Fix I 61 Colleee Hill; Ph � � i) -7-
� � � i �
USED FURNITURE
LARGE SHOWROOM
, GOOD SELECTION
' BARGAIN PRICES
FREE DELIVERY
USED, NEW, LIKE NEW

The Estate Shop
416 Evans (Downtown)
Mon-Sat 9:30-1:00 2:00-5:00 752-3866
FREE
PREGNANO
TESTING
'n( , ntid
Carolina Pregnancy Centei
7"7 0003
111 I $rd StT
. i �� I �
MQs s
Saigon
ITG Tours USAir
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Your Miss Saigon New York Tour Include:
? Roundtrip air via USAir
QTwo nights hotel accommodations
LJ Orchestra seat for Miss Saigon
Q I-uruh or late dinner at the Stage Dell
Q Lower New York or Upper New York
sight-seeing tour
? Admission to the South St. Seaport
Museum
? Air and hotel taxes
? New York City information packet
MILFORD PLAZA
$459
ppdbl occ. single
�upp: 108
OMNI PARK
CENTRAL
$489
PPdbl occ. single
�upp: 131
JTG Travel Centers
RALFJGH 782-2662 CHAPEL HILL 967-1438 WILMINGTON 392-2315
DIIRHAM-RTP 941-5014 OR 1-800 831 11 �
GKLLNVILLE 355-507 5 OR 1 -80562-8178
SERVICES OFFERED
Tx?(, SIRVK ES


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July ?& 1991
iBht gaat Carolinian
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SERVICES OFFERtD
TYPING SERVICES: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters Fast turn-
around' User Pnnter. Call 75b-1783.
NEED TYPING WORD PRO-
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FOR SALE
WANTED. Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - keyboards drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2bb7. 20 commission cost im and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
to you if you order non-stocked items.
We order direct from warehouse
Example: SHOO horn - You pav 5480
plus $fi shipping plus $24 tax - lotal
$510. Gilberts music, 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville 757-2667.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per than
nel, excellent tone, great reverb all .it
a quality price. $30000. Call Serb at
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RALEIGH SUPER COURSE BIKE
with training stand. 50 lb. recurve
bow with sight and quiver. Nice
couch, rediner, Sharp EL-55O0 II
pocket science and finance computer,
4.2 RAM.40 W Kcnwcxxi revr, ALTEC
5 spkrs. Call 758-6925.
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER: Brother
Excellent condition.Will sell for 535
758 fjfjGO, (gave message.
FOR RENT
EASY-GOING FEMALE: (1st yr
gradwanting to move in with 1 or 2
other female students, preferably
duplex in August. Please call Sarah
collect at (919) 933-0073.
WANTED: Responsible student to
share a two bodrixim apt at 1312 1
14th Stlnear Elm St) Smoking or nun
smoking. $137.50per month. C all Sam
at551-2730(davs)or758 174Unights)
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Profes-
sional graduate, or mature under
graduate. $21X1 per month plus 12
utilities. Very nice townhouse
Washerdryer included Non-
smoker Call 757-0467.
FOR RENT
CLASSIFIED RATES
RiRggoM Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1W1 - 1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom.
& Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752 2865
PRQCEPURESFQR
ANNOUNCEMENTS
An v organization mav use the arm m mcernen ts section oi The East Canbam
to list activities and evvntsopen to thepublic2 times free of charge After the
first 2 times the charge will be. 1 st 25 words
For students. $200
For non-studentsS3.00
Each additional wordS .05
All announcements aa to be typed or neatly pnnted.Due to the limited
amount oi space available, The bast CarMmun cannot guarantee the publi-
cation (t announcements It is not ad visible to rely on these announcements
as a sole means of communication SUMMER DEADLINE: MONDAY,
4:00 PM.
MtMuulul Race i" 1 iv-
�All Nc�-
� ViKJ K�il 1" Kcnl-
IMVKRSITVAPARTMKMS
2M9 r ih Sued
�Located New EC1
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� V mv. In'in Itighk4 i'aln-l Slaii.m
1 imacdOftci Wi ninih
t oMai ill "f I obwsj ilium
F56 '815 t 830 193 '
Office "XTl Vpt 8, 1- 5 lpiii
�AZALEA GARDENS
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A1NT
CURE
FOR THE
JUMMERTDN
BLUES.
CLASSIFIED
AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1st 25 words
Students$2 U)
Non-students$3.00
Each additional word 05
Display Ads
Open Rate per column
inch. $550
Please notify the paper immedi-
ately it your ad is incorrect We
will not be responsible tor incor-
rect ads after the first day of pub-
lication Ail classified ads Ml SI
be prepaid We reserve the right
to reject anv ad for libel, obscen
ity, andor Kid taste Fraternities
and sororities MUST wnteout all
Greek letters.You must fill out
your name, address, phone num-
ber, and ID number
SUMMER DEADLINE:
Monday, 4.O0pm lor
Wednesday issue.
Advertise in
THE EAST
CAROUNIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
student
0
and BUY ONE-
GET ONE FREE!
-a complete professional eye exam for $29
AND
-Buy ane pair of glasses at regular price
and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $29 eye exam, or just Mop
by to cheek out our wide selection of frames.
Offer valid through August 30. 1991.
Some restrictions appry Contact lavs exam and contact Irises not included at thi pnrt
perolumn in h
Bulk & Frequency Contra t
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Fridav
7:30 - 11:30
757-6366
OnOMCTNC
�Y�CAR�C�MT�B
PA
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
Gary Harris 703 E- Greenville Blvd. Dr Lewis L
�� 756-4204 SL.
Open Monday & Wednesday 9 to 7
Tuesday, Thursday & Friday 9 to 6
Closed Saturday
The East Carolinian is
now accepting applica-
tions for the positions oi
News Editor
and
Features Editor
For details, drop h our
office in the Publications
Building across from
Joyner Library, or call
757-6366.
L
A New Delivery
from GUC!
ATTIC WRQR
The
CoMedY
ZONE
209 E 5th St.
752-7303
Those old postcard utility
bills will soon be a thing of the past.
Watch your mailbox for a white
envelope containing Greenville
Utilities' new, improved bill. Our
new larger bill will be easier to
read, with more space for important
information. We've even enclosed
a return envelope for your conve-
nience.
Rememberwatch for an
envelope from Greenville Utilities in
your mail.
Greenville
Utilities
HBO
Comedy Concert 10
Ritch
Shydner
Wed. July 10th
Late Night with David letteiman Tonight Show
Back By Popular Demand
Prop Comedian Extraordinare
Carrot
Top
Wed. July 17th
WRQR
The.
CoMedY
�250NE





JulyJJLmL
�hz iEaBt (Karoltnfan
3
H
CLASSIFIEDS
�X
1 s before
d have a
nnetizer
vening.
)V
lil
!�
9
st uvicisom-Htu
TYPING SERVICES: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters. Fast turn-
around! Laser Printer. Call 756-1783.
NEED TYPING WORD PRO-
CESSING? Call 355-3611 after 5:30 or
leave message. 15 years experience
includes spelling and grammatical
corrections. Work guaranteed!
HELP WANTED
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to 520,000
yr.). Call 24 - hr. message for more
details: 213-44166,ect95. Nograde
or income restrictions. All majors.
WE NEED SELF-MOTIVATED
STUDENTS: Earn up to SlOhr.
Market credit cards on campus.
Flexible hours. Onlv 10 positions
available. Call now 'l-800-950-8472,
Ext. 20.
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT UNDER THIS HEADLINE:
You can earr. good money asa college
intern for Northwestern Mutual Life.
Plus vou get flexible hours and valu-
able business experience. If vou're a
junior, senior, or grad student, call:
Sandi or Linda for an interview, 355-
7700.
FOR SALE
WANTED. Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
to you if you order non-stocked items.
We order direct from warehouse.
Example: $800 horn - You pay $480
plus $6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total
$510. Gilberts music, 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville. 757-2667.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per chan-
nel, excellent tone, great reverb, all at
a quality price. $300.00. Call Seth at
757-2597.
RALEIGH SUPER COURSE BIKE
with training stand. 50 lb. recurve
bow with sight and quiver. Nice
couch, recliner, Sharp EL-5500 II
pocket science and finance computer,
4.2 RAM. 40 W Kenwood rcvr, ALTEC
5 spkrs. Call 758-6925.
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER: Brother
Excellent condition.Will sell for $35.
758-8060, leave message.
FOR RENT
EASY-GOING FEMALE: (1st yr
gradwanting to move in with 1 or 2
other female students, preferably
duplex in August. Please call Sarah
collect at (919) 933-0073.
WANTED: Responsible student to
share a two bedroom apt. at 1312 E
14th SKnear Elm St). Smoking or non-
smoking. $137.50per month.CallSam
at551-2730(days)or758-1741(nights)
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Profes-
sional graduate, or mature under-
graduate. $200 per month plus 1 2
utilities. Very nice townhouse.
Washerdryer included. Non-
smoker, ail 757-0467.
FOR RENT
CLASSIFIED RATES
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
PROCEDURES FOR
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Anv organization mav use the announcements section of The East Carolinian
to list activities and events open to t he public 2 times free of charge After the
first 2 times the charge will be: 1st 25 words
For students52.00
For non-students53-00
Each additional word$ -05
All announcements are to be typed or neatly printed.Due to the limited
amount of space available, The East Carolinian cannot guarantee the publi-
cation of announcements. It is not advisable to rriv on these announcements
as a sole means of communication. SUMMER DEADLINE: MONDAY,
4:00 PM.
� Beautiful Place U Ijvc
�AU New
�And Ready loKc-ni-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2H'W I )th Strci-l
�i i- aii'd Near ECT
�Scar Major Shopping i'iiii H
�AcfOU 1 rum Highway I'alr.il Suirnci
UmilcdOllcr SUXlam.MUh
t'tmlact J T. of U�nm William-
756-7815 or 8W 1937
Office open Ap� 8.12 5 lupn
�AZALEA GARDENS-
(Van and ict '� bciMn (uniuhrd faMnli
etij -f!�.ei�. free �lci audic-cr. ��hcrv -to "� I
caMsTV mftm inim" onh SVOtanafc.
rr�.rthle�� MMUHOMcRENTM S�pic.�
iiiigle Aparonen ami mobile (MUM m AMlraC'ii
,trn� nr�i Bmi V�lltv f'iunli Cluh
Contact J.T orTcmm) WiHiwii
7S 781
AWT
CURE
FOR THE
JUMMERTO
BLUES.
CLASSIFIED
AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1st 25 words:
Students$200
Non-students$3.00
Each additional word 05
Display Ads.
Open Rate per column
inch$5.50
Please notify the paper immedi-
ately if your ad is incorrect.We
will not be responsible for incor-
rect ads after the first day of pub-
lication. All classified ads MUST
be pre-paid.We reserve the nght
to reject any ad for libel, obscen-
ity, andor bad taste Fraternities
and sororities MUST write out all
Greek letters.You must fill out
vour name, address, phone num-
ber, and ID number.
SUMMER DEADLINE;
Monday, 4:00 pm for
Wednesday issue.
lent (enter
; Worship
mis Ma) 19 -Juh 2S
lit V wman Center
manenter
'pro
ind 11pm
7OTW
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
III
In Concert-
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
166
identiaJ
jeling
nq Center
II i 5
Street
tilding
. - 10-3:00
ThimsdAy, July U
9:00 piM CentraI Campus MaII
Rajn Site: HiNditix Theatre MencIenIiaII Sudan Center
SpoNSOREd by t4ie ECU Stu(1ent Union SpeciaI Concerts Committee
Advertise in
so frightening it will
hove yoo running to
your kxol army recruiter.
V
7f&m
Kf EP REMINDING YOORSEtf
IT SONUAMOVIt'
PC 13
ours US Air
vembcr 1-3, 1991
MILFORD PIJZA
$459
ppdbl occ. single
supp: �108
OMNI PARK
CEfSTTRAL
$489
ppdbl occ. single
�upp: 131
Centers
!� WILMINGTON 392-2315
-800-833-1151
100-562-8178
MoncIay, July 1 5ih
9:00 p.M. HencIrIx TNeatre
Free AdwissioN Wiih VAlid ECU SiudENT ID
SpoNSOREd by ECU SiudENT Unjon Films Commjttee
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
and BUY ONE-
GET ONE FREE!
-a complete professional eye exam for $29
AND
-Buy ane pair of glasses at regular price
and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $29 eye exam, or just stop
by to check out our wide selection of frames.
Offer valid through August 30. 1991.
Some restrictions apply. Contact lens exam and contact lenses not included at this pnee.
�onoMenuc
�Y�CAR�C�M1�R?
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
Gaiv Harris 703 E- Greenville Blvd. Dr. Lewis L.
SS 756-4204 oJSZ
Open Monday & Wednesday 9 to 7
Tuesday. Thursday & Friday 9 to 6
Closed Saturday
CAROUNIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Friday
7:30-11:30
757-6366
j
The East Carolinian is
now accepting applica-
tions for the positions of
News Editor
and
Features Editor
For details, drop by our
office in the Publications
Building across from
Joyner Library, or call
757-6366.
A New Delivery
from GUC!
ATTIC
Those old postcard utility
bills will soon be a thing of the past.
Watch your mailbox for a white
envelope containing Greenville
Utilities' new, improved bill. Our
new larger bill will be easier to
read, with more space for important
information. We've even enclosed
a return envelope for your conve-
nience.
Rememberwatch for an
envelope from Greenville Utilities in
your mail.
Greenville
Utilities
The
209 E 5th St.
tmmrn l nc , EOT t Din X.
WRQR CoMedY 752-7303
ZONE ' W
Comedy Concert 10
Ritch
Shydner
Wed. July 10th
Late Nisht with David Lctterman Tonight Show
Back By Popular Demand
Prop Comedian Extraordinare
Carrot
Top
Wed. July 17th
WRQR
The, -
CoMedY
2PNE





(
�be
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew B. Skinner, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
LeClair Harper, News Editor Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator
Margie O'Shea, Classified Ads Technician
iou Nicoiim
OVERwilCrHT
OF T He F�R
lAfTfcKj Of
fJOZ,V
KrUftCAN FWj MN RAhPANT
Matt King, Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sporfs Editor
Steve Reid, Layout Manager
Lewis Coble, Copy Editor
Kerry Nester, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5.000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view. Letters should he limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The EastCaroliman, Publications Bldg
ECU, Greenville, N.C 27834. For more, call (919) 757-6366.
IS
ftfrf OF Fw
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Business causes, kills recycling Protestors overindulge in controversy
dj;�� fV.o vCfarri nf hia hu;inp business for the same reason The East Caro- � lr� Vl
Recycling, the bastard of big business,
is being stifled by the very system that
spawned it.
On April 3, the Greenville Public Works
Department began a pilot curb-side recy-
cling project aimed at saving landfill space.
The city would accept materials such as
paper, cardboard, aluminum and plastic.
At the time, The East Carolinian com-
mended the city for their action. We also
called upon the student body to cooperate
with the city in efforts to improve the envi-
ronment. We had hopes for the project's
success and expansion. Those hopes are
waning.
Four months after the project began,
loads of recyclable materials are in storage
at the Public Works Department.
Mavo Allen, the director of public
works, said in an interview Tuesday that
there is not a present demand from recy-
cling companies to purchase certain
recyclables.
"Right now there is no market for mixed
(color) paper and newsprint he said. "Card-
board sells good aluminum sells like
hotcakes Allen also said that the city had
loads of compacted plastic in storage, wait-
ing until there is a demand on the recycling
market.
The problem results from all businesses,
not just recycling companies.
Professional recyclers of all kinds are in
business for the same reason The East Caro-
linian is in business: to make money.
If they cannot make a profit with cer-
tain products, then they will not market
them. Recycling companies do not want to
buy multi-color paper and newspaper, sour-
ing the market for professional collectors. It
comes down to money: office supplies made
from virgin paper materials are cheaper
than those made from recycled materials.
Look at the paper before you � not the
text, the open space between stories and on
the margins. Notice it is gray, not white.
This paper has been recycled.
When you next see a newspaper such
as USA Today or receive a letter from an
office with a prestigious reputation (law
firms and universities, for example) look at
the paper. If the paper is a clean, polished-
looking white, chances are that you are hold-
ing a piece of virgin paper. It has not been
recycled.
That paper has come to you straight
from a dead tree via a paper company and
an organization that is more concerned with
its reputation that the world in which we
live. For the sake of vanity they are sacrific-
ing every living being's birthright to a
healthy, clean planet.
More of a conscious effort needs to be
made by all humans to protect our home.
We all need to realize that oxygen is more
important than dollars
The Other Side
Foreign investors buy American
By John Carter
Editorial Columnist
As the world'slargest debtor
nation, the Untted States sank
further intodebt in 1990. America's
net debtor position has now
reached $360 billion. This means
that, in comparison to what
America owns overseas and what
foreign nations own here, we are
$360 billion behind.
The deficit is due in part to
the fact that U S. holdings in either
nations were purchased years ago
at lower values. Most purchases
in the United States by foreign
nations are relatively recent and
at a higher value.
Having other nations invest
in our nation is beneficial to the
US. economy. Japanese investors
own buildings and businesses
here. Japanese investments create
more jobs for Americans. Wages
earned by these employees are
taxed by the federal government
and some of the production is
taxed. This puts someof the money
earned by foreign businesses back
into the coffersof ournation. Most
of the profit goes abroad.
Foreign investment helps to
stimulate our own economy and
create jobs. Unfortunately, we
have no reasonable balance be-
tween this and our holdings
overseas. Ultimately, the imbal-
ance puts me United States in hock
to the rest of the world.
What happens when one
nation owns more of the United
States than Americans own? I fear
that we are rapidly on our way to
finding out the answer. Japanese
investors already own a sizeable
portion of the United States and
are quickly buying more busi-
nesses in corporate takeovers.
When one company buys
another one, the first move is to
begin buying as much stock as
possible in the other company.
Once company "A" owns enough
stock in company "B it is in
control of that company. In a buy-
out, a buyer only has to have more
shares than other shareholders. A
majority is not always necessary.
Can this happen between
nations? Another nation can seize
control of the United States by
owning moreof it than the nation's
citizens. Foreign investors are
buying stock in the United States.
Again, this is beneficial to our
economy, providing that the other
nation does not own too much.
If this happens, who will
have controlling interest in our
nation? We worry right now about
if our government officials are
democrats or republicans. Soon,
we may have to worry about if
they are Americans or not.
Now, as for the United States
owning so much lessoverseas than
other nations own here, other na-
tions are making vast amounts of
money off us and we are not
making much at all off of them.
Again, this unequal balance con-
tinually sends us further into debt
to the rest of the world. Also, as
more US dollars are spent on
foreign goods, less are spent on
American goods. This cycle takes
money right our of our nation's
pocket and sends it to the other
side of the world. American fac-
tories close while foreign factories
prosper.
The U.S. economy is con-
trolled by the rest of the world and
soon our government will be
controlled as well. When this hap-
pens, can our democracy survive?
We won't have much say in our
government. Another nation will
own us and we would be their
subjects. We could declare war
ar.d fight it our, but they would
probably be smart enough to but
our military also.
With the economy of the
Soviet Union in so much trouble
right now, maybe we should buy
them out. Then we will have
somewhere to go once we don't
own the United States anymore. I
state this sarcastically; I don't
support conditional aid to the
Soviets. Economically, the United
States would benefit from aiding
the Soviet Union, but not neces-
sarily by providing monetary aid.
Some U.S. business could expand
into the Soviet Union. McDonald's
and Pepsi have, so we know it is
possible. This would help reduce
out net debtor position. What the
SovietUnion needs now is money,
not business, but the United States
needs both.
Somewhere, some balance
needs to be achieved. If not, the
United States will continue to sink
further into debt to other nations.
This could possibly lead to another
recession on even a depression.
Also, we must consider the pos-
sibility of
another nation obtaining a
controlling interest in our nation
financially. I do not know that this
will happen, but if it does, it would
be catastrophic to the United
States.
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Nothing is officially contro-
versial in this country until we've
been treated to lots and lots of
photographs and films of people
marching around, carrying picket
signs and chanting slogans.
Bov, do I hate those spec-
tacles. For one thing, they become
less effective every time they're
performed � the more common
the sight, the more it's taken in
stride.
Those spectacles also bug me
because, frankly, any thought
worth having is too complex to fit
conveniently on one of those
blasted signs. A thought worth
having can rarely be expressed as
an easily chanted slogan without
removing most of the underlying
assumptions and explicit ratio-
nale.
Of course, that's just why
slogans are so popular: chanting
is easier than thinking. Slogans
are pre-chewed political positions.
They free speakers � or shouters
� from having to defend what
they say, because, for the most
part, they're simply statements of
opinion, which cannot easily be
argued.
Consider this perennial fa-
vorite: "Helms sucks That's not
a statement of fact (at least, I don't
think it's meant to be a statement
of fact); it's a statement of opin-
ion, and in itself it's of little value.
As debate fodder, it's worthless,
even counterproductive.
Some other slogans are state-
ments of fact. Manv are true as far
as they go � but they don't go
very far. For example, consider
this bumper sticker: "Abortion
stops a beating heart Well, yes, it
usually does, but when was that
in doubt?
Microwave ovens can stop a
beating heart, if the heart has a
pacemaker attached to it. Suicide
stops a beating heart. Catching a
fish stops a beating heart (well,
the fish's heart actually stops
around the time the fish asphyxi-
ates, but don't get picky). Burger
King stops a lot of beating cow
hearts. But what does that have to
do with the proper relationship
between the state and the indi-
vidual, or women's rights, or the
question of when a human fetus
becomes a human being, or any of
the other issues in the abortion
debate?
In short, what is the use of
displaying or shouting slogans?
If, for whatever reason, prospec-
tive owners of the aforementioned
bumper sticker wish to declare
themselves against abortion, they
ought instead to get bumper
stickers saying "I oppose abor-
tion If they want to change
anybody's mind, or contribute to
the process of national discourse,
they're on the wrong track.
Public debate is much better
served by carrying on dynamic
discussions either in print or in
public forums where individual
speakers may be heard, and their
positions considered and opposed
� in other words, by carrying on
some sort of actual debate, as op-
posed to chant-tests.
The old exercise of march-
ing around in a circle and yelling
slogans is likely to continue,
though, because it's still effective.
It hasn't been beaten quite to death.
Despite the fact that they are com-
monplace, pro testsare still treated
as newsworthy.
Why are protests thought
newsworthy? One reason: it's a
vicious circle.
Groups engage in these dis-
plays because news media report
on them, so the groups get their
presence and their positions (but
littleoftheirreasoning) mentioned
in the news.
News media report on them
because, among other reasons,
them because among other rea-
sons, it's quicker and easier than
conducting rational debates
among representatives from all
sides. (The MacNeil I eh r
NewsHour is one blessed excep
tion.)
Since the leaders ol the
groups don't spend very much
timedefending their position from
criticism, as they ought to have U
do, thev have nothing better to do
than lo stage yet another protest
rally.
Moreover, these things maki
the troops feel good. They can g
toa rally,carry signs, scream them
selves hoarse, and thereby delude
them into Blinking they've con
tributed something valuable to the
national thought process.
Certainly everybody is per-
fectly within their rights toengage
in these worthless displays. It's
just that they would better serve
the First Amendment by spend
ing that time wnting letters to the
editor or putting together adehate
to be presented on the local cable
public access channel. Or writing
editorial columns.
Naturallv,that snotasmuch
fun � not as viscerally satisfying
� as mindless marching and
yelling. Debating requires a far
greater outlay of time and energy.
So it happens very infrequent! v
which is a loss.
As long as we're stuck with
protest marches, how about
making a small change in the tor-
mat?
From now on, protesting
groups should write their griev-
ances in full on just one Wjg sign
which they would hold parallel to
the ground, tacing up - like
firefighters hold those lite nets thtA
use to catch people lumping from
buildings.
Spectators could climb lad
ders, or go to the top of nearb
buildings, and read the message
in its entirety.
Not the least of the benefits
of thisapproach is that everybodv
could get underneath the sign it it
rained. You can't beat that.
"The Nerd
ff
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
On July 3, the Summer Theater
I of ECU began its run of Larry Shue's
I play, The Nerd. It has been wel-
j corned by audiences as a lightbeat
way to relax for an evening and
remember that laughter is still the
Ibest medicine.
The Nerd is a delightful comedy
I which concerns a rising architect,
iWillem Cubbert, whose life is d;s-
Irupted by the appearance of an un-
avory house guest.
The guest is Rick Steadman
(a.k-a. The Nerd), a man who saved
lubbert's life in Vietnam. Upon
lediate exposure to Steadman,
lubbert realizes that they are not at
ill compatable. In fact, it would be
to say that Steadman is not
rompatable with anyone.This
icompatability is not surprising as
ie has few if any redeeming quail-
in his character.
He has a simple job. He's an
spector at a chalk factory. He
loesn't actually inspect the chalk tor
defects or anything, he just inspects
the boxes to be sure that there is
ideed chalk in them.
When it comes to social graces,
ie has none. He has a way of offend-
ing anyone who surrounds him, but
never notices who
Andinhisspa
practicing his tar
Rick Steadma
The pta) j
the unbelu j
Steadman en
play deals with t
while the second
tics of Cubbert I
they try I i
It
Lai�.
�-�
dormna:
Shue shoulc I -
coming up v
oept

actersandad I
Ker � �
The i
weS as
the � �
Cul -
proved I - i
ever, he can
parent t
1
-J
was peri
Pickering, in par
H
Jam I
Roller skating has come out of the nnk and onto tht
rugged new revolutionary toy dubbed the "Roller
Roller skating r
By ARS
Information Services
A computer technician for an
auto manufacturer uses in-line skates
to commute to and from work.
In-line skating has become so
popular that OSA, the Intemationai
In-line Skate Association based in
Minneapolis � has undertaken a
"SkateSmarf campaign. The pur-
poseofthecampaign is to help inform
and educate both skaters and the
public about this new sport.
lncaseyou don" tyet know what
in-line skates are, they are skates
with a singierow of "in-line" wheels.
As far as is known, the concept
for in-line skates was first created
almost three centimes ago when a
Dutchman tried to simulate ice skat-
umttesummerby nailing wooden
spools to strips of wood and attach-
ingthem to his shoes.
Joe Janasz, national director of
DSA, agrees that there is a tremen-
dous grow in the popularity of in-
line skating. This has brought an
abundanceof newcomers to thesport
who are hungry for information on
how to get started and what to do
with their new skates.
Says Janasz, "While in-line skat-
ing is easy to learn and exdting, we
want skaters to take the time to learn
tousetheskatesproperiy andsafely
Janasz recommends that skat-
ers follow a few simple rules, respect
the rights of others and use common
sense. USA has developed the fol-
lowing ten rules of the road tor in-
line skater
�Wear protective gear such as
a helmet, kne
wrist guards
� Advevi
level before
� Stav alt
all times.
� Alwav�
� Skatei
trails and sic
� Overt;
and other
� Stay a
debns on thej
even or broV
� Obs
� Avoid
mobile traffi
� Alwai
The I1SJ
few more h
beginneri
Before
out on lor
should lc
a quiet gras
yard, a quij
carpet at
Next,
tennis
surfacetoi
and
Skat
their equip
sure hanh
autom
be rotated
even wear j
should be
comes
In adt
in-line
sanctions
hockey e





t
Iver Hammer
lge in controversy
ic�
it to h.r

good hi
. signs, rt ;
s hoarse ind tl � rcby delude

�' nal tl ight pro � ss
�-( r.bod) is per
eiri htstoenj
� � ���'�� ; aj s fs
vould better serve
the first Amendment by spi
rime w ril rs to me
radi
� i
imns
tasmu h
fun nol .�s viscerally satisfy
mindless man King and
iting requires t un
� timeandenergy
So it 1 � ��- quently,
is we're stuck with
� il
. � m the i. t
king a
� .ith n
' a protest
d write their griev-
' ' agn,
id hold par illel to
facing up like
- lifenetsthey
USI ' jumping from
� �
Speetatoi I climl
�Mit ' the top ot nearby
Hidings, and read the message
eportonthem
IthtT reasons,
' 'her rea-
ii easier than
in its entirety.
Not the least of the benefits
i f this approach ia that everybody
could get underneath the sign it it
rained You an t beat th.it
RECVCLE 7
A It fc ntv �f
ANP n� pt A� I
T (rt

0tl
� i
�hc 3EaBt (Earoltnian
July 10,1991
The Nerd" smiles on Summer Theater patrons
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
On July 3, the Summer Theater
oi BCD began its run of Larry Shue's
h The Nerd. It has been wel-
comed by audiences as a lightbeat
v�av to relax for an evening and
remember that laughter is stUl the
best medicine.
The Nerd is a delightful comedy
which concerns a rising architect,
v em Cubbert, whose life is dis-
rupted by the appearance of an un-
savory house guest.
The guest is Rick Steadman
a k. The Nerd), a man who saved
Cubbert's life in Vietnam. Upon
immediate exposure to Steadman,
Cubbert realizes that they are not at
afl eompatable. In fact, it would be
safe to say that Steadman is not
eompatable with anyone.This
ireompatability is not surprising as
he has few if any redeeming quali-
ties in his character.
He has a simple job. He's an
inspector at a chalk factory. He
doesn'tactually inspect the chalk for
iefects or anything, he just inspects
the boxes to be sure that there is
indeed chalk in them.
When it comes to social graces,
he has none. He has a way of offend-
ing anyone who surrounds him,but
never notices when he does so. Shue wrote the part for him.
And in his spare time, he enjoys Pickering did an excellent job
practicing his tamborine. In short, encompassing the character. In fact,
Rick Steadman is a nerd. it would be hard to seperate
The play concerns itself with Pickering from Steadman during a
the unbelievalbe chaos which
Steadman creates. The first act of the
play deals with the nerd's arrival
while the second examines the an-
tics of Cubbert and his friends as
they try to force him to leave.
It is hilarious.
The Nerd was was written by
Larry Shue, who has written manv
other plays w hich are produced pre-
dominantly in the Milwaukee area.
Shue should be complemented with
coming up with an ingenious con-
cept for which to place a play. He set
up the perfect combination of char-
actersand actions tocreatea constant
laugh-rearing performance.
Kenneth Albers, the director of
The Nerd also should be praised. As
well as directing Albers performed
the role of Warnock Waldgrave,
Cubbert's boss, which must have
proved to be quite difficult. How-
ever, he carried off the job with ap-
parent ease.
The perfomers in the play were
the performance. She appeared un-
easy with the rest of the performers,
seemingly more concerned with say-
ing her lines than giving a believable
performa nee. This of course could be
performance. He played the role an isolated event, everyone is en-
immpecably.
The laughs, however, were not
solely attributed to Pickering. The
role of Axel Hammond, played by
William McNulty, produced the
greatest lines of the evening. Partly
due to the script, partly due to
McNulty's performance, Hammond
undoubtedly stole the show.
The role of Cubbert was played
by Paris Peet. He gave the character
justice and was perhaps curtailed
somewhat because he often had to
be serious while the other actors got
the punchlines.
Rose Pickering (married to
James), played the role of Clelia
Waldgrave, Warnock's wife. Al-
though having a comparatively
smaller part, she gave much to the
overall play. She offered some of the
play's funnier moments and proved
that actions alone could be as funny
as words.
Onedisappo in ting aspect of the
for the most part superb. The diffi- play concerned Catherine Lynn
cultroleofplayinganirritatingnerd Davis who played the role of Tansy-
was performed masterfully by James McGinnis, Cubbert's love interest.
Pickering in part perhaps because Davis seemed robe withdrawn from
titled to a bad night.
The final performer was Scott
Ray who played Thor, the
Waldgraves's child. Ray gave an ad-
equately believable performance,
however his timing and delivery was
a littlebitoff. It would seem however,
that considering Ray's age of 14, it
would be more upon the director's
shoulders to work with his control of
the technique.
The play's overall success can-
not be contributed to theactorsalone.
Robert Alpers should be mentioned
for his incredibly realisitic set design
right down to the autographed por-
trait of Geraldo Rivera.
If, by the way, you are wonder-
ing what an autographed portrait of
Geraldo Rivera was doing in the pro-
duction, you must simply go and
find out.
The Nerd is plaving nightly at
830 at McGinnis Theatre from now
until June 13. Tickets are $15, but
may be obtau . v students for half
price if purchased between 8 and
8.15 at the box office on the night of
the performance.
Photo coutaay of ECU Thoalr Department
The Nerd is an upbeat comedy aside from often heady theater
It will be presented nightly until June 13
To color or not to color, that is the question
JtiiM Browning- ECU Photo Lab
Roller skating has come out of the rink and onto the road of late with the
rugged new revolutionary toy dubbed the "Roller Blades
Roller skatine returns
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Watching Bogart, Davis, Cary,
Bing and others in color in scenes
that were originally monotone is no
new news, but the controversy sur-
rounding the ethics of coloruation
continues to be waged.
Colonization, of course, is a pro-
cess in which black-and-white films
are given color. Colonzahon, Inc
Color SystemsTechnology (CST)and
American Film Technologies (AFT)
are the three primary colorizahon
companies to date.
The colorization processes of all
companies arc actually similar. First,
a list is made oi every scene, object
and person. Researchers, colorists
and art directors then collaborate to
assign colors for each scene. Finally,
engineers and videotape operators
begin work with instruction from an
art team.
Art directors will dig into ar-
chives for still pictures that show
exact colors whenever possible. Many
directors used highly diverse colors
on sets and costumes for better con
trast on bw film, so art directors
choose color at will in these situations.
Stars and crew of original bw
films are sometimes sought after to
ensure color accuracy.
Many film buffs and profession-
als in the film industry have been
lashing out against the process over
since the first colorized version of a
movie, Topper came out in 1983.
One cntic said: 'The colors arc
washed out and heavv on the earth
tones, like Technicolor in the early
30s In films from Colonzahon, Inc
things look pretty bleak; living sepia
At times colors follow characters
around like laggard halos
Director Hal Roach refused to
comment on the process.
The late John Huston denounced
the idea as being vulgar and urged
people to boycott all prod ucts whose
makers bought commercial time of a
colorized picture.
The Directors' Guild of America
called the colorists "cultural butch-
ers who) are lifting their legs on
other people's work
Stars of bw films cameout, too
James Stewart, star of the Chnstmas
classic If s A Wonderful Life' had
this to say after he saw Colonzahon,
Lie's newer version: It's A Won-
derful Life' was filmed in black-and-
white, the lighting for which differs
radically from that used for cotof
photography.
Converting the movie to color
doesn't add anything. In fact, it de-
tracts. Why don't people learn not to
tamper with a winning combina-
tion?"
Other people say they think the
"winning combinahon" can still be
improved, jack Petnk is executive
vice-president of WTBS,a stahon that
airs many colorized films. He said
"We're not trying to make bad films
great. We're trying to make great
films better
Meanwhile, some film actors
have openly praised the process.
Cary Grant, the star of Top-
per wrote a letter to Colonzatiiw,
Inc. in praise of their work on the
film. The letter read, in part, "1 found
the process extremely interesting and
trust your company will continue to
color other memorable films in the
same manner
Nancy Reagan wrote to
Colonzahon, Inc that she and her
husband were "most impressed"
with the colorized "Topper" and
wished the company further success.
Pro-colonsts point out a sudden
revival in bw films when
colonzahon hi t the market. Colonzed
videocassette sales and rentals fre-
quently outnumber those of bw tape
sales. Many video store operators
said sales and rentalsof bw versions
have picked up, too.
Many TV stations can maintain
their color-broadcasts-only rule.
Viewers who do not want the new
color are told to rum off the color on
their TVs.
One magazine wnter wrote in
1985: "The color isn't in the dazzling
Technicolor tradition of such films as
'Adventures of Robin Hood The
Wizard of Oz or 'Gentlemen Prefer
Blondes but rather is a portrait of
life-like hues � subtle, real, and
earthy
ByARS
Information Services
A computer technician for an
autorranufacturerusesin-lineskates
to commute to and from work.
In-line skating has become so
popular that IISA, the International
In-line Skate Association based in
Minneapolis � has undertaken a
"SkateSmarr" campaign. The pur-
pose of thecampaign is to help inform
and educate both skaters and the
public about this new sport.
Incaseyoudon"tyetknowwhat
in-line skates are, they are skates
with a singlerowof "in-line" wheels.
As far as is known, the concept
for in-line skates was first created
almost three centuries ago when a
Dutchman tried to simulate ice ska t-
ing in the summer by nailing wooden
spools to strips of wood and attach-
ing them to his shoes.
Joe Janasz, national director of
IISA, agrees that mere is a tremen-
dous growth in the popularity of in-
line skating. This has brought an
afoindaixx of newcomerstothe sport
a helmet, knee and elbow pads and
wrist guards.
� Achieve a basic skating skill
level before taking to the road.
� Stay alert and be courteous at
all times.
� Always skate under control.
� Skateontherightsideof paths,
trails and sidewalks.
� Overtake pedestrians, cyclists
and other skaters on the left.
� Stay away from water, oil and
debris on the trail. Stay clear of un-
even or broken pavement.
� Observe all traffic regulations.
� Avoid areas with heavy auto-
mobile traffic.
� Always yield to pedestrians.
The USA director also offers a
few more tips specifically aimed at
beginner skaters:
Before novice skaters venture
out on long-distance runs, they
should learn balance and control on
a quiet grassy area such as the back
yard, a quiet park or even a thick
carpet at home.
Next, go to a parking lot, empty
tennis court or large unused hard
surface to practiceskatestrokes, turns
SILVER

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who are hungry for information on
how to get started and what to do and techniques for stopping
Skaters should always check
with their new skates.
Says Janasz, "While in-line skat-
ing is easy to learn and exciting, we
want skaters to take the time to learn
tousetheskatesproperiyand safely
Janasz recommends that skat-
ers follow a few simple rules, respect
the rights of others and use common
sense. IBA has developed the fol-
lowing ten rules of the road for in-
line skater.
�Wear protective gear such as
their equipment before use to make
sure hardware is secure As with
automobiletires,skate wheels should
be rotated periodically to avoid un-
even wear and the skate's brake pad
should be be replaced when it be-
comes worn.
In addition to helping develop
in-line skating as a sport, USA also
sanctions in-line races and roller-
hockey events.
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?






IS
Hhe gagt (Earolftitan
SPORTS
July 10,1991
AL wins on Cal Jr. three-run shot
By Joe Caldwell
Staff Writer
All-star Most Valuable Player
Cal Ripken Jr. cranked a three-run
homer in the third inning, propelling
the American League to a 4-2 victory
over the National League Tuesday
night in Toronto's celebrated Sky
Dome.
Ripken, who set a major-league
record with 12 home runs in the
annual home run derby, swatted
Dennis Martinez's belt-high curve
over the Sky Dome's centerfield
fence for a 425-foot blast. The Bal-
timore Oriole shortshop, who is
leading the league with a 349 bat-
ting average, drove in Rickey
Henderson and Wade Boggson the
momentous crush.
Hometown hero Jimmy Key
picked up the win for the prevailing
team as the Expo's Martinez, a
former Oriole, suffered the loss in
the 62nd All-star contest.
The Cubs' Andre Dawson, one
oi Harry Carey's notables, touched
Boston's Roger "Rocket" Clemens
for a solo homer in the fourth in-
ning. Perennial batting champion
Tony Gwvnn scored the National's
first run on Bobbv BonniUa's beat-
out singleoff Atlanta'shopefulRhett
Bu tier, not to be con fu sod wi th Brett,
Tom Glavine.
However the Braves were well
represented in their first vie for the
N .L. Pennant in nine years as Player
Personnel Director Henry "Ham-
mering Hankester" Aaron joined
World Champion Lou Pinellia in
the National's dugout. But the Hall
of Fame charisma could not shake
off the American League stars, par-
ticular the exploits of one future
Hall-of-Famer Paul Molitor of the
Milwaukee Brewers.
With two outs in the seventh,
Molitor who is presently batting
.320, became the fi rst player to reach
base in an All Star game because of
catcher interference. Molitor, who
batted 356 in the Brewer's 1982 A.L
title,did not score, but the play gave
the dying blow to the hungry Na-
tional fans, fans that have not seen a
win in four years.
Carl ton Tugs" Fisk also set
another All Star game record by
landing a bloop single in center held
in the sixth to become the oldest
player to reach base in the Mid-
Summer classic at age 43. Fisk sur-
passes Ted Williams who singled in
the 1954 All Star game at age 41.
Dennis Eckersley picked up the
save for the A.L.
Ripkenisona triple-crown tear,
but conceded after the game that
his Baltimore team would not out-
distant Milwaukee for fourth place
in the American League East Divi-
sion and that beers would be
drunken by Brewers's fans.
Is there a conference for ECU ?
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
On the foothal! field, ECU is
one of the last remaining Indepen-
dents in the area and that needs to
change.
It is inevitable that in order to
Teate a better football program,
ECU needs to join a conference.
The ill-fated Metro Conference
looked like it might hold some
promise, but there is no security
in a new conference.
Among others, Florida State
and Miami were leaning towards
making the new conference along
with ECU but the almost-Metro
Conference schools went with a
site bet and joined preexisting
conferences; except ECU.
Miami joined the SEC along
with South Carolina and Florida
State joined the ACC. ECU, along
with the likes of Akron, Tulane
and Southern Mississippi are left
in the cold to make do for the
present
If ECU is to have a top rate
football program, then a competi-
tive bid for joining a gcxxi confer-
ence is necessary. One of the big
drawbacks that is hindering
ECU's conference joining hopes is
a small stadium.
Ficklen Stadium holds 35,000
people and it is not enough.
Accommodations for 15,000 more
seats are needed before ECU can
hope to join a conference.
But what is the sense in
building a bigger stadium if
Ficklen rarely sells out now? An
important thing to remember is
This Week's Entertainment
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758-0080
that if ECU does get into a
conference like the ACC and play
UNC and N.C. State on a regular
basis, then filling up Ficklen
would not be a problem.
In order to play those teams,
however, ECU needs50,000-seat
stadium and without it Tulane
and Akron will keep coming to
Greenville.
If the N.C. State series with
ECU were to start up again, after
ending in a post-game melee at
N.C. State in 1987, and this time
come to Greenville there is no
doubt that Ficklen will sell out. Or
against UNC or Ouke, the fan
support from the Eastern North
Carolina area would be tremen-
dous.
Perhaps after a few years of
playing the ACC schools in N.C.
there would be enough money
and fan support to be seriously
considered to join a conference.
Concerning the old N.C.
State-ECU rivalry, N.C. State
alumnus and Lieutenant Gover-
nor, James C. Gardner, wrote a
letter to both schools chancellors
admonishing them to begin the
series anew.
There is some speculation
that, with Gardner's prodding
and other efforts to bring the
schools back together to play
football, the two schools may play
again on the same field in 1994
U.S. team wins xinprecidented five-in-a-row
LOS ANGELES (AP) - As the
United States prepares to play host
to the 1994 VVorld Cup, its soccer
team is beginning to look like an
international contender.
The Americans won their first
major soccer title ever on Sunday,
beating Honduras 4-3 on penalty
kicks, after a scoreless tie, for the
championship of the North and
Central American and Caribbean
region.
The victory in theCONCACAF
Gold Cup championship game
continued the Americans' dramatic
rise under new coach Bora
Milutinovic. It was the fifth straight
victory for the Americans, the
longest winning streak since the
United States began keeping such
records in 1885.
After Fernando Qavijo scored
on the eighth US. penalty kick, Juan
Carlos Espinoza missed for Hon-
duras, giving the United States the
title with a 5-0 record.
"Coach Bora doesn't scream at
SkyDome is
TORONTO (AP) - Big and
brassy, gli ttery and glamorous. Real
bud.
The best in thebusiness,maybe.
Everything a fan could want and a
lot, lot more. Truly a superstar.
Not Rickey Henderson or Roger
Clemens, or even the All-Star game
itself.
The SkyDome.
us Clavijo said. "He said, lust
relax; if you miss, you miss He's
made us play with alot of confi-
dence. And in penalty kicks you
have to have some luck, and luck
was with us today. This has been an
incredible tournament for us,
something we're going to remem-
ber for a long time
Milutinovic a former Yugoslav
midfielder who earlier coached
Mexico and Costa Rica with great
success, said the U.S. team hascome
a long way.
"After all of this, I'm sure we
will have a better team he said.
"You don't measure soccer in terms
of one week, but the games that we
have played, we have played with-
out any great problems.
"I'm truly very surprised with
the quality of my players. What
they did in the games since I've
been their coach is not normal. Only
great athletes could have done it.
We have been progressing well but
we still have alot of work to do
The U.S. team is 6-1-1 in full
internationals since he took over in
April. The United States (7-4-2)
failed to qualify for the World Cup
between 1950 and 1990 and madeit
last year only by winning its final
game in Tnmdad. The Gold Cup
was the first championship of
soccers regional body,
CONCACAF,theConfederationof
North and Central American and
Caribbean Association Football.
After 90 scoreless minutes of
regulation and 30 more scoreless
minutes of overtime, the game was
decided by penalty kicks, where
five shooters alternate taking shots
from 12 yards.
The score was tied at 2-2 after
five shooters, with U.S. goalkeeper
Tony Meola making three savesand
Marcelo Balboa and Paul Caligiuri
scoring.
Brian Quinn then missed for
the United States and Luis Calix
missed for Honduras. Dominic
Kinear gave the Americans a 3-2
a host of wonders for All
It's gorgeous Pittsburgh's
Bobby Bonilla after his first look
Monday. Tm really mad at myself
that I didn't bring my camera. I'm
DHing, and I'd be able to sit on the
bench the whole game and take
pictures of the dome
A year after rain dripped off
the ivy at history-draped Wrigley
Field, there's no chance of that hap-
pening tonight. At the first hint of
showers, the 22-million pound roof
will shut in 20 minutes - it takes less
than $20 in electrical costs to close it
'To try to figure out how the
roof opens and closes is just amaz-
ing to me Milwaukee's Paul
Molitor said. "We played the first
game here, and what I remember is
that it started raining and as the roof
KINSTON
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lead, but Luis Vallejo made Hondu-
ras' seventh kick.
Qavijo then scored the game-
winner, beating Wilmer Cruz, who
had replaced Belarrruno Rivera for
the penalty kicks. Espinoza's shot
went over the crossbar giving the
Amencans the victory.
Rivera made a leaping save in
the 17th minute of the overtime to
keep the game scoreless, tipping a
header by U .S. captain Peter Vermes
just over the bar.
In the closing minutes of the
first half, Meola deflected Marco
Ananba's curving comer kick just
over the bar.
The United States was playing
withoutits top two mid fielders, John
Harkes of Sheffield, England and
Tab Ramos of Figueras in Spain.
Harkes is recovering from a pulled
stomach muscle, and Ramos, who
was a college All-American at N C.
State, got married last week.
The game drew 39,873 specta-
tors to the Los Angeles Coliseum.
-Star game
started closing tne pitcher and nat-
ter were in a dry area, but in be-
tween them it was raining
"I know some players have ac-
tually walked along the catwalk
here he said. "I'd love to do that
Tom Glavine will start for the
Nationals and try to stop the
Americans' three-game winning
streak.
I
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 10, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 10, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.817
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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