The East Carolinian, June 19, 1991






Election year?
Bush can learn from a gutsier politician.
4
Fantasticks 6
Summer Theater program opens with the musical.
�Jf� i�uBt (Earairman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.33
Wednesday, June 19, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
8 Pages
Graduate School changes assistantship system
University of Texas offers rides
Since its inception in N88, the IVsignatecl Driver Pn-
gram used by the University of Texas has given more that
S.tW rides to students who had been drinking. The
Interfraternity Council of the university onginallv spon-
sored the 1 tesignated lnver Program. Thev started the
program with the purchase of two old vans to transport
students to their homes and to distribute fivers about rrxxi-
eration in drinking around campus and at area Kirs.
TixTu sL 'mversirvot Texas Desigrated Driver Program
is funded by the government according to program director
Pan Mcdlin.
The ans run every Thursday, Friday and Saturday
between the crucial hours ol 11 p.m. and 3 a.m. Each driver
is accompanied by an assistant who logs information such as
condition of the passenger and location of pick-upand drop-
off. Drivers and assistants are required to participate in a
training course and know CPR. among other safety proce-
dures.
I mm i B�r Pnnkera ol Amrrlca rrlra�
Faculty member receives honor
Randy L lovner. a native of Wilkesboro and an
assistant professor in the ECU Sckxl oi Education, is the
lM recipient of the IXTta Pi Epsilon National Doctoral
Reseanh Award
Joyner was selected to receive the award for his disser-
tatii n, "A Comparison of Errors Detected: Video Display
rerminals vs Hardcopy completed in 1989 at Virginia
Polytechnic institute and State University.
The purpi �seof the DPE national researchaward program
is to encourage and recognize graduate research in business
education Each year two awards are presented, one tor an
outstanding master's degree asearch report and one for a
doctoral dissertation
foyner is the first North Carolinian and the first Virginia
Tech graduate to receive the DPE research award. 1 le is the
second faculty member in the ECU Department of Business
Vocational and Technical Education to receive the award.
Student Development Dean named
An authority on the promotion of healthv attitudes and
life-st) les is mining ECU as Dean of Student Development.
Dr. David Alan Emmerhng, executive director of the
National WeUness Institute, Inc at the University of Wis-
consin-Stevens Point, will assume the new position Julv 1.
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice chancel lor of shident life, said
Emmerhng will direct a comprehensive student development
program.
Under his direction will be the Counseling Center,
Career Planning and Placement Services, Orientation, Resi-
dent Education, the Office of Substance Abuse, Health Pro-
motion and VVellnessand theOfficeof Student Development
of Special Populations.
Teachers to study in high country
Geologists from ECU will lead public school teachers
through the Blue Ridge and Appalachian mountains in a
teaching and study expedition ulv 8-26.
The expedition is part of a course in held geology
designed to help schwl teachers learn more about earth
science and prepare them to become better teachers of the
subiect. The course will be taught by the ECU ScienceMath
Education Center and the Department of Geology.
Teachers selected for the course willaccompany geology
professors on field trips into the piedmont region, to the
fcxithillsand over the mountain rangesof the Blue Ridgeand
Appalachians to theCumberland Plateau. Observations will
be made of the different geological features, and rock
specimens will be collected.
For information about the field study, contact the ECU
ScienceMath Education Center at 757-6885.
Faculty member gets award
Er. Barbara Memory, director of music therapy in the
ECU School of Music, is the 1991 recipient of a regional
award for outstanding achievements in professional music
therapy practice.
She was given the award by the Southeastern Chapter of
the National Association for Music Therapy at the chapter's
annual spring conference at the University of Georgia.
At the conference, Dr. Memory presented 'There Was a
Man in Our Town: Influencing Psychosodal Behaviors of
Lower Functioning Adults with Music Therapy She was
also reappointed a regional legislative representative and
alternate delegate to the national association.
From BCD News Bureau release
Inside Wednesday
Crime Scene72
Editorial4
ClassifiedsComics5
Features6
Sports8
By Jim Rogers
Senior News Writer
ECU'S graduate school
has created a new system that
will limit the amountof money
available to graduate assis-
tants in all University depart-
ments during the 1991-92
school year.
The new norm allows
graduate assistants to make
the same amount of monev
per hour but limits the num-
ber of hours of work to 20 per
week.
Graduate assistants wen1
previous!v allowed to work
up to 39 hours a week.
Traditionally, graduate
assistants in different depart-
ments worked different
amounts of time for the jobs
they did, all jobs paying $833
an hour, Dr. Paul D. Tschetter,
assistant dean of the graduate
school, said. This new norm
of limiting pav to 20 hours a
week or $2600a semester isan
effort to create a consistency
among the graduate programs
at ECU.
Tschetter said that the 20-
hour limit is based on, "a
consistent norm in an over-
whelming number oi Ameri-
can universities
Tschetter said the 20-hour
limit will allow students to
complete their degree in a
timelv manner.
According to the new
policv, graduate students are
expected to complete their
degree programs in no more
than three vears, something
that has not been enforced in
the past
"We have students who
have been in the graduate
school for seven vears
Tschetter said. "The purpose
oi the graduate assistantships
is to aid graduate students,
not support them
Free car care clinic comes
to Carolina East Mall
By Jim Rogers
Senior News Writer
If you have limited
knowledge about car repair
and even less money, the Car
Care Clinic will benefit you.
The Energy Division of
the N.C Department of Eco-
nomic and Community De-
velopment is holding a free
car clinic June 25 and 26 at the
Carolina East Mall.
The clinic consists of a 15
minute diagnostic check of
your auto's tires, belts, hoses
and filters. The examination
will also evaluate engine per-
formance and efficiency.
Persons having their cars
examined will receive a copy
oi the test adults and a list of
recommended repair and
maintenance tips. Those who
participate will also receive a
car care packet containing
manuals on how to increase
engine efficiency.
The Energy Division has
examined 26,000 vehicles since
the beginning of this program
in 1984.
Ninety percent of the ve-
hicles tested during the past
seven summers have not
passed some part of the test.
"Many drivers don't real-
ize that the dollars they try to
save bv postponing a visit to
the mechanic are outweighed
by increased fuel consumption
and shorter vehicle life En-
ergy Division spokesperson
Carol Simon said.
This years clinic is being
co-sponsored by the Inde-
pendent Garage Owners of
North Carolina. It will be held
in 10 cities across the state
between June 18 and July 27.
The Qinic will be open
from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on June
25 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
June 26 in the parking lot at
Carolina East Mall.
The new norm will effect
graduate assistants in differ-
ent departments in different
wavs, providing a possible
raise in pay for some and a cut
in pay for others, Tschetter
said.
Graduate assistants in the
department of English will
receive a cut in pav from ap-
proximately $3200 a semester
to $2600 a semester while the
work load will remain the
same.
Graduate assistants in
departments that require
fewer hours of work per week
will possibly see no change in
pav or even a small increase in department
pay if they were previously
working less than 20 hours
each week.
According to Tschetter,
the 1991-92 school year is a
transition year for the policy
This will allow departments
to request assistantships of 1
14 or 1 12 assistantships.
This would increase the pav
according to the applicable
multiple, he said.
"A department, if thev can
justify (their cause1) can peti-
tion to have the pay rate
changed Tschetter said.
'This must initiate within the
Donation
School of
to reward
By Miriam Driot
Stiff Writer
TheSchool of Nursinghas
set up a fund in order to reward
deserving faculty and enhance
innovation in teaching. This
fund amounts to $10,1X10 and
comes from an anonymous
source who wanted to honor
Sigfned Lowin, an advocate
of advanced education.
The School of Nursing
was first officially approved
in 1961 by the North Carolina
Board of Nurse Registration
and Nursing Education. Since
1977 a Master of Science de-
gree in nursing has been of-
fered.
This is the only nursing
graduate program offered in
the eastern region of North
Carolina and was accredited
by the National League for
Nursing in April 1982.
The purpose of the school
hasalways been to emphasize
quality teaching in helping
aspiring individuals to be-
allows
Nursing
teachers
come professional nurses as
well as those wishing to ad-
vance in the profession.
With thisgenerousdona-
tion theSchool ot Nursing will
now be able to further its
commitment to quality bv re-
warding faculty who develop
innovative teaching methods
and practice's in nursing.
According to Dr. Phyllis
N. Horns, dean oi the School
of Nursing, recipients for this
award will be selected ac-
cording to ideas and protects
that promote the integration
of computer technology into
the nursing curriculum Also
considered will be the en-
couragement faculty research
and creative activities that in-
corporate modern technology
and develop instructional
methods that emphasize
clinical nursing practice ap-
propnatefora diverse student
population.
The first presentation oi
thisaward will take place dur-
ing the 1991 -92 academic year.
Mandatory retirement
in pedagogy should be
banned, panel says
The free car care clinic can help car owners avoid expensive maintenance with helpful tips.
(AP)�A national panel's
recommendation that Con-
gress ban mandatory retire-
ment for college professors
comes too late for a North
Carolina State University sci-
entist.
The National Research
Council's proposal wouldn't
take effect until 1993.
Hans Conrad, an N.C.
State professor of matenal
engineering with an interna-
tional reputation, will be 70
next year and must stepdown
to comply with the University
of North Carolina system's
mandatory retirement policy.
"We need to bring in new,
young people says Carl
Koch, associate department
chairman. "We need people
who will grow here and add
some new insights"
"Right now we're top-
heavy in age. A third of our
professors are over 60 he
said. "We need more balance.
We're not unique in that situ-
ation. 1 fs happening all over
But Conrad said he is
bursting with "innovabonand
creativity" and feels "sharper,
though not faster, than ever
Grants rain down on him
from companies like IBM and
Du Pont.
"Still he lamented, "the
university tells me I've got to
leave
Outside Koch's office, a
thirty-something Ph.D. waits
to interview for a stint as an
assistant professor. The posi-
tion came open after a fi2-year-
old professor took early re-
tirement in January.
Koch, 53, said he can hire
new faculty only after an es-
tablished faculty member
leaves. If older professors
don't leave, younger onescan' t
get in
James H. Shumaker, 67,
an associate professor of
journalism at the University
of North CanMina at Chapel
Hill, grumbled: "You've got
professors who are 35 or 40
who are a hell of a lot more
useless than someone 70 or
75
The younger professors
are concerned mainly about
their careers, he said. 'They
think students are just a nec-
essary evil. I love to teach. I'm
brilliant
He added, somewhat
sadly: "This is a youth-ob-
sessed culture. Age and honor
aren't respected � they're
regretted
At NCSU, 101 of the
university's500full professors
are 60 or older. Onlv 20 are
ages 30 to 39. At UNC-CH,
178 of the 878 professors are
60 or older. Twelve are be-
tween 30 and 39.
The lopsided numbers
See Change, page 3





Election year?
Bush can learn from a gutsier politician,
4
Fantasticks
6
Summer Theater program opens with the musical.
(Bht lEaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vex. 65 No 3J
Wednesday, June 19, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5 000
8 Pages
Graduate School changes assistantship system
ounrf Other
University of Texas offers rides
s- s - . � a ted I )nver Pro
�� "exas has given more that
-���� tudent; who had been drinking rhe
nivcrsih. originally spon
� mgram. The started the
� . �? of two old ms to transport
distribute fivers about mod
, is ind �' in i bars
� � � as Designated Driver Program
. . jram direct i
rsda lav and Safi
tnd � a m ba h driver
ogsinformation suv has
� itionofpick-upanddrop
�� required to participate in a
imong other safety pr - �
Faculty member receives honor
� . m "sbi r
psilon Nat "octora
- i i .s ird fi r his disser
f En rs Detected ideo Dis
I d in 1989 .
� rsitv
itionalresi in h iv ird pr .
luate resean h in
� parrment I
I n re theavi
Student I development I )ean named
�� . ittitudes r :
- ��
it � � i niversit I Ms
thei ��� :�sit � " ulv I
r fstudentlife sa i
ivesrudent development
� -� � � � the � ounselingenter
icement Services, Jrientation, Resi-
ibstance Abuse, Health Pro-
�� � f Student Development
Teachers to study in high country
will lead public school teachers
ind Appalachian mountains in a
edition ul 8 2r
� � fa course in held geo
lesigned � hers learn nion1 about earth
idenc � � be me better teachers of the
ibjecl t etaughtby the ECU Science Math
lucat I the D partmenl of (lei ilogy
icherssi � uise will accompany geology
profess the pudmont region, to the
footl ranges of the Blue Ridge and
mberland Plateau. (Ibservationswill
be mad f tl liffei - gicaJ features, and rink
pecimt
� it the field study, contact the 1
�� � it 757-6885
Faculty member gets award
Dr Barbara Memon director of music therapy in the
� � . t Music, is the 1991 recipient of a regional
itstanding achievements in professional musk
�� � � practice
was cn the a ward hv the S ni theastern Chapter of
the National Association fur Music Therapv at the chapter's
annual spring conference al the University of Georgia.
� rence,Dr. Memory presented There Was a
Man in ur rown Influencing Psychosocial Behaviors ot
Lower i un boning Adults with Music Therapy " She was
also reappointed a regional legislative representative and
alternate delegate to the national association.
a s Hr�'a . re.�-�.�-
Inside Wednesday
CrimeScene 12
Editorial 4
Classifieds"r' i s 5
Features 6
Sports 8
Bvim Rogers
SiIM . w.s Writer
graduate s hool
1 as �vstemthat
will'� noney
�� rv depart
n � nts d�
� 'i, nar

luatitants 1 -
.
i n r 'j work I pei
ivo -
� '� were
work
up to g hoursa week
I raditionally graduate
assistants in different depart
ments worked different
amxunts of time tor the obs
thev did, all yols p,iv ing JH : ;
in hour, W Paul D.Tsi hotter
assistant dean of the graduate
sj hool, slid rhis new norm
of limihng pa to 20 hour a
veekor$2h(K i semesterisan
ettort ' � reate a nsistenc
.inn mgthegradu itep
L .
,s hettersaid that thi
'�our limit is based on, 'a
consistent norm in an i
w helming number i t men-
i ,n universities
I m hettersaid the 20-hour
limit will allow students to
plete their degree ir a
bmelv manner
ording to the new
policy graduate students are
expect ' omplete their
degre
than thnv vears, something
that hasi t beei nt reed in
� � . � tudents wl
� � � en vears
chert � The purpose
� vsjstantships
is ti ,ii � :�. students
� them
Free car care clinic comes
to Carolina East Mall
Bv im Rogers
Senior News Wi lei
. � i. mited
r� it ir repair
andi , the Car
�enefityou
Ei �. . ion ot
I
ai lime lune 25and 26at the
( arolina East Mail
Ihe i link consists of a 15
minute diagnostic check of
vour auto s tin's, belts, hoses
and niters rheexamination
will also evaluate engine per
rormance and efficiency
I � rs ns ha ing tin ii
� cammed will receive i : �
of the test results and a list of
recommended repair and
maintenance tips, "hose who
partk ipate will also receive a
car care packet containing
manuals on how to increase
� : gine efficiency
ITie En� i - dsion has
uUTuned2ci 11 vehicless
the beginning ot thiNprinram
in 1984
inetv percent of the ve-
hicles tested during the past
seven summers have not
passed some part of the test
Many drivers don treal
ie that the dollars they trv to
sav h p � -i visit to
the it lutweighed
bv increased fuel consumpbon
and shorter vehicle life En-
rg n spokesperson
arol Simon said
1'his vears clinic is being
sponsored by the Inde-
pendent (larage Owner- . -
orth an hna It will be held
in 10 cities across the state
between une 18 and ul 27
The Gink will be open
fr m ! p.m. to 7 p.m. on lune
2 and 10 a.m. to 5 p m. on
lune 2m in the parking lot at
C amlina last Mall
Ihe new nrm will effe t
graduate assistants in differ
ent departments in different
ways providing a possible
raise in pay f r some and a cut
in pay tor others. Is hotter
lld
(iraduate assistants u thi
department of English ���
receive a cut in pviv from ap
proximateh ' i semester
; 600 a semester whik
rk load will remain the
same
( iraduate assistants in
departments that �� .
�� werhoursi f work perwei �
will pos-iblv see noch
pav or even a small increase in
Donation
School of
to reward
Bv Miriam Driot
StaH VN r:ter
ichc fN � � huis
setupafundmi irderl vard
desen mgt i mo
ir m ivation in tea hing
fund amounts to $1 "
11 imes from an anonvn
source who wanted to honor
Sigfned �� idvocate
i 't advanced edu it i
Die School f Nui
i- first ot. I '
in 1961 K the North Carolina
rx�an! of urse Registration
anvt Nursing Education Since
Ij a Master of Science de-
gree in nursing has beer I
fered
rhis is the only nur
graduate program offered in
the eastern regioi f Nonh
( arolina and was accredited
bv the National League for
Nursing in April 1982
rhe purp �seof the schoi
has always been to emphasize
qualify teaching in helping
aspinng individua - to he-
p"av it the . � ' prv
working less thai
i ai h wei �
Aii i ird ng I
the 1991 )2 - he
transitit � r the policy
1'his will a Hi ��. �
to re
4 tantshi ps
1'his wi uld �' tsa �
mult

-
tion to ha
chanj hettei
"Thi - � �
lepartmenl
allows
Nursing
teachers
. t .
� �
. � , . n the pro I
� '����
� ntheScho
- i
comrrutn ent I tvbv n
- hngfacu "�

According to Di
Si. Horns leai
of N pients for this
ird will � - -
15 to id '
that proi

thenurs
-
��-
and creative i I sthal
corporate m d
and d '
methods that n p I isize
dim � rsing pi
propnatefi r
populabi t
rhe first pr -
�� saward will take plao
��-��
Mandatory retirement
in pedagogy should be
banned, panel say;
The tree car care clinic can help car owners avoid expensive maintenance with helpful tips
i P A national panel s
recommendation that Con-
gress Kin mandatory retire-
ment tor college professors
comes Uv late tor a orth
Carolina State I niversitv sci
entist.
The National Research
Council's proposal wouldn't
take effect until 1993
Hans Conrad an N C
State professor of maternal
engineering with an interna
tional reputation, will be 70
next year and must step down
to comply with the I niversitv
of North Carolina system's
mandatory retirement policy
"We need tobnng in new
young people saysarl
Koch, associate department
chairman "We need people
who will gnw here and ,uk
sonx' tx'w insights"
Right now we're top-
heavy in age A third of our
professors are over 60 he
snd "We need more balance
We're not unique in that sihi
ahon It shappeningallover "
But Conrad said he is
bursting with "innovation and
creativity' and teels sharper
though not faster, than ev er
Grants rain down on him
from companies like IBM and
Du Tom
"Still he lamented, "the
university tells me Ive got to
leave
Outside Koch's office, a
s
?�sometl ' �� � '
to inh n ew I
assistant pr ifessoi
boncarm pei ift i
ild pr �fessoi ' � k
tirement in January
- - h ; slid he can hire
new faculty only after an es-
tablished faculrv men
leaves II older profess rs
don 'leave voungcri nes
t t in
�es 11 Shumaker r�7
an assoi iate professor of
journalism at the University
ot North Carolina at Chapel
i ill 1 grumbled ou ve got
professors who are or 40
who an- a heil of a lot more
useless than someone
I"he younger profeisors
are roncemed rnairuy about
their careers he said TK-
think students an- tust a ne
evsirvevii I love to teach I'm
bnlliant' '
He added somewhat
sadly "This is a youth oh
sessedcutture Ageandhonof
aren't respected they're
regretted
At NCSU, 101 ot the
universit ssXinillpni,sst'rs
arv Nl or older Only 20 an1
ages 30 to 39 At I NOCH
178 of the 878 professors atv1
60 or older Twelve are be-
tween 30 anil 3.
The lopsided numbers
See Change page 3





2 CBhe Cast (Earolinian June 19, 1991
Joyner Library to gain Library of Congress access � �nv jronmental
Subjects lying in Wright Circle
bushes advised to leave area
June 11
2134 Fletcher Residence Hall (south): investigated a suspicious
chicle Two other officers provided back-up.
001 0 Public Safety: transported subject from madent at 2134 to
magistrate s office
June 12
0739 MendenhaU Student Center responded to an alarm; same
m as set off by staff members
1053 1 ocation unknown: provided escort to the magistrate's
office with a prisoner for Greenville police.
1 -k White Residence Hall subject near the bicycle rack asked to
leave campus
June 1 3
; (7 Mendenhall Student Center: subbed banned from campus
given a state citation tor trespassing.
June 14
2 J03 Eighth and fames streets: advised subjects parking and
loitering to leave
2323 Joy net I ibrarv (south): advised subjects loitering to leave.
2 31 Wright Circle fountain: investigated subjects lying in the
bushes. Subkx ts said they were non-students waiting for a taxi. Same
were advised to leave the area.
June IS
1415 (Ireene Residence 1 lall (south): investigated tires cut on a
vehicle.
1448 Cotton Residence Hall (north): investigated windshield
damage on a vehicle.
5 Rawl Building (north): three non-Students banned from
i ampus tor suspicious activity.
2 J54 (ifth Street passed out subject advised to leave the area.
ifth and Reade streets: provided transportation for an
dcated student
June 16
2013 C otancheStreet:assistedC.avnvillepolicewnthabreaking
i d entering
2141 Public Satetv (east): stopped a subject for driving while
intoxicated same was taken to the magistrate's office.
1319 otton Residence 1 lall: responded to a report of a breaking
and entering and larceny.
I 58 . otton Residence Hall: investigated a report of harassing
phom calls
June 17
(1121 Fifth and Reade streets, assisted Greenville police with an
intoxicated subject
0310 Slay Residence Hall: responded to a report of an assault on
a student Subject was transported to the Public Safety.
0610 Public Safety: transported subject from incident at 0310 to
the magistrate Soffice.
I nme Some is oompileii from official Public Safety los.
(AP) � Students and faculty at
East Carolina University will soon
be able to use computers to access
collectionsof American history and
culture from the Library of Con-
gress.
ECU's Joyner Library, as part
of a planned $17.4 million expan-
sion, was selected as one of 37 sites
for the American Memory project.
The project uses cutting edge tech-
nology to make col lections fiom the
Library of Congress available to
people across the country.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public
Librarv is the only other North
Carolina facilitv with access to the
Library of Congress materials.
The program will allow stu-
dents and faculty at ECU to use
computers, along with compact disc
and laser video discs, to access se-
lected collections of Amencan his-
tory and culture, archival photo
graphs, manuscripts, music, motion
pictures and sound recordings.
"If vou look at what we're look-
ing at doing with the renovation
and the new building and the tech-
nology thatentails, thisisa wonder-
ful opportunity to be out at the be-
ginning, utilizing the technology
essential to the renovated library
said program director Gary
Weathersbee.
Previously, theonly way to look
at a collection fiom the Library of
Congress was to travel to Wash-
ington, DC. Even then, some col-
lections were available only to a
select number of qualified re-
searchers who knew how to handle
old documents, manuscripts and
photographs without damaging
them.
"As you look at things in col-
lections, typically the ordinary stu-
dent at ECU would never have the
opportunity to come in con tact with
these materials for a variety of rea-
sons, " said librarv'director Kenneth
Marks.
The pmgram will allow people
to search electronically through
collections They can also elec-
rnmicallv copy content and take it
with them.
ECU will begin with two work
stations for the program, but there
are plans to expand the program to
allow as manv as 20 people to use
the network.
ECU officials will meet with
1 ibrarv of Congress perst nnel later
thismonth at a convention in Atlanta
and disciiss further implementation
and softWare options for the pro-
gram.
The program is expected to be
running by January 1992.
K HBRAfflr
Fit Ph-�
Access to Library of Congress materials will be available soon
Sunday in the
Park
The Eastern
Symp hone tie
entertained on the
Greenville Town
Commons Sunda,
evening The
Sunday in the
Park senes is m its
seventh year and
will continue with
concerts at 7 p m
throughout July
featunng bands
such as Group
Sax and Panama
Steel
Jam�a Browning � Phofo l�e
:ts� :m aw J�
�J.i. I Illii �
Wednesday
frogrcssive Device Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys $1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:3t

ft
m
t:
Thursday
Bucket Light Night
� t
TflT Landing Seafoods
Restaurant
DAIL SPECIALS
Vfon Chicken Breast Sandwi .2
French Fries $2
Fried Oysters Dini 1 �
1 ues Sirloin s Shi : s' �
� Snow I rah i
A. ; Cai EatS3
Wed � intry Fried Steak S !
� Snow I rab 1 . -
VIM Can Bat $9.99
Thurs Seal Plattei S8 ; I
Kri Shrimp .v Rounder
i h $4 25 Dinnei $6 I �
105 irpin K.i
newsummf:m
11AM 9 PM Mcv
10 Am 8 PM
mmmv,mTOmmrMvv,v.v.v. 3.
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Rivcrbluff
under new ownership
Renovations Underwa)
I Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
l2 price special for June & July (conditional)
"Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
?Pool Lov Deposit
Fets Allowed (conditional) 'laundry Room
Now accepting applications for August l
121 KiverblufT Rd.
758-4015
5 bottles for $4.00!
$1.15 Tall Boys $1.25 Imports
$2.75 Ice Teas
�Ladies Free
� � Bee �
p
I

6vern Tuesday Night get a FR�6
Comedy. Zone Pass, to the Rttic.
rzz
TK"
��!

-
-i�
TT
V
K ll)(Mlll(!iKlil!l
Mis s
Saigon
-JliEaldi Wcskenas
1TG Tours US Air
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Your Miv� Saigon New YorU Tour Include: . rnnn r. -� �
MlLFORD PLAZA
l�J Koundtrip air via USAir c A P f
Q Two nighlt hotel accommodation �" sj 37
Q Orchestra seat (or Mis Saigon ppdbl occ single
? l-unch or Utc dinner at the Stag Dell �"PP1 108
? LmM New York or Upper New York OMNI PARK
sight seeing tour CENTRAL
Q Admission to the South St. Seaport $!OQ
Museum TJr
Q Vir and hotel taxes ppdbl occ ilngl
rr sudd: '131
? New York City information packet yy
M ITG Travel Centers
KAIJJUI 782-2662 QIAPTX Ml 967-1438 WILMINGTON 392-2315
L.
DlTOlAM RTP 941-5014 OR 1-80O-833-1151
GREENVUE 355-5075 OR l-SOO-562-8178
Is
Classic llite
si mi members $2.11 liuest
0 iraft 75o Kamikaze's
$2.88 reas $2.88 Bahama wamas
mi; Best in Classic Reck 1; lance mi Bite
lniniiii(i!l
College iiii.e
01.00 nenlers $2.M finest
$1.75 pitchers $1.88 itmestlcs
yo Kamikaze's o58 .leim Shots
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 I 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
1 lours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
Advertise in
CAROLINIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Friday
7:30-11:30
757-6366
RAl.1 IGH (AP) A national
environmental group is urging
I democrats Sen h-rr Saniord and
US Rep I im Valentine to taki-
i adershiprolesonabillthal w
bmit industry useottoxk chemi
cals
1'ubln Interest Resi
Group said Monday ihi , il
needs to start pressuring legisJ
� take i
protei bon bills rheRi �
servabon and Rei over)
lor re-�uthorizal
and US F'IKC, �
thebmi I
cal rej
rhi grou
� �
Va-
in
ti-l Silvi
director for
!1b i
('
'M ��JbV
i
Battle of the Bands
Local bands pi a
Putt-Putt G
�f E.C.
Students & S
Buy 1 Game)
Play 1
758-1820
106 River BIuSS Rd
Oi
Sun
MO
Late Nigl
Large Mexican Pi:
Large Nachos Gr
Sunday � Thursday Afte
Friday & Saturday Aftet
12 Pric
WashltDowr
With A Drink Spe
Sunday - Thursday





(She gafit CEaroHnlan June 19.1991
3
ngress access I Environmental group urges politicians
MR HBRART
Fit Photo
ess materials will be available soon

Sunday in the
Park
�'
The Eastern
Symphonette
entertained on the
Greenville Town
Commons Sunday
evening The
Sunday in the
Park senes is in its
seventh year and
will continue with
concerts at 7 p m
throughout July,
featunng bands
such as Group
Sax and Panama
Steel
Jsm�a Browning � Photo Lab
BROOK APTS.
tier new ownership
tions I 'nderwaj
2 bedroom townhouses
l r June & Jill) (conditional)
Basic Cable included in rent
"Low Deposit
�onditional) "l aundr) Room
king applications for August 1
�21 Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
7
FREE
m
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & C onfidential
. i( es & c ounseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E 3rd Street
The 1 ee Building
Greenville C
L
1 lours
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00

M!
Advertise in
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Friday
7:30-11:30
757-6366
RALEIGH (AP) � A national
environmental group is urging
Democrats Sen. Terry Sanford and
U.S. Rep. Tim Valentine to take
leadershi p roles on a bil 1 that would
for re-authorization in Congress, North Carolina industries produce
and US. PIRG officials said now is or use at least 1 billion pounds of
the time to strengthen toxic chemi- toxic chemicals a year,
cal regulations. That figure is seven times the
The group is also going door- amount reported in 1988 in an Envi-
ivawiMiii'UMiM'iiaiMiiiikiinwiuM o - r o o �
limit industry's use of toxic chemi- hxloor toget lOOOOsignaturesona ronrnental Protection Agency-study
cals petition calling for Sanford and
US. Public Interest Research Valennneto "playleadershiproles"
Group said Monday the public in getting legislation passed, said
needs to start pressunng legislators Daniel SUverman, assistant field
to take action on environmental director for US. PIRG.
protection bills. The Resource Con- The action comes on the heels
servation and Recovery Act is up of a new US. PIRG study that says
on how many toxins are released
into the environment
"We are trying to let people
know how bad the problem is
SUverman said. "If that means they
are going to get scared, then maybe
they should get scared. I think that's Public Works and Transportation
Committee this month, said Ed
Johnson, North Carolina campaign
director for US. PIRG.
Sikorski's bill would be an
OK the Resource Conservation and
SUverman said that chemical. Recovery Act to make toxic
furniture and paper companies are cherracalsendangered, not people,
the primary releasers of poisonous " " ' . � �-
chemicals.
Rep. Gerry Sikorski, D-Minn
has sponsored a biU that would re-
quire companies to develop plans
to reduce their use of poisonous
chemicals, and to make informa-
tion more available to the public.
The bUl wiU go before the House
Sanford could not be reached
immediately for comment. Valen-
tine did not comment because he
has not yet seen Sikorski's bill or
US. PIRG's study.
U.S. PIRG officials said too
much exposure to toxic chemicals
can contribute to cancer or birth
defects. Silverman stressed that
North Carolina companies use, not
amendment to RCRA to strengthen release, 1 billion pounds of toxins a
regulations on industries that re- year. He said the group could not
lease toxins, Johnson said. determine how much of that was
"Congress should strengthen beingieteasedmtotheenvironrnent.
Some use of toxic chemicals is
unavoidable, Silverman said.
"We are not trying to eradicate
n. �i. w t toxk chemicab he said. "Not ev-
he-M-ffc.�m�yhmitmm i5extothem.Butthere
uwconsutuentsthemtttteywin 3ofaFkoreexPosurethan
have to pay attention to these is- thereneed8tobe.Ifyou don't need
sues Johnson said
to use them, why use them?"
DuPonfs Cape Fear plant in
Leland uses hazardous chemicals
in making polyester. When some of
those chemicals react with other
chemicals, the end product is non-
hazardous, said Jimmy Richardson,
a DuPont spokesman.
"I think the legislation would
be dangerous and detrimental to
some industries I could see some
problems Richardson said. Hesaid
DuPont had spent $80 million since
1988 to reduce harmful emissions.
Change
Continued from page 1
reflect a boom in the late 1960s and
early 1970s when students and
faculty flooded in. Many of these
faculty members will be ready to
retire in the next decade. That could
leave schools shorthanded, said Ri-
chard Richardson, associate vice
president of academic affairs of the
UNC system.
Departmentsarescrambling for
young blood now, to stave off a
shortage later. Fields strained for
new faculty members, said
Richardson, include the natural
sciences, political science and soci-
ology.
If new faculty members can't
be found, schools may have to rely
on their senior citizens to help
handle anexpected boom in student
enrollment during the 1990s.
Thaf s where repealing man-
datory retirement could make ev-
eryone happy, said Carol Reuss,
associate provost at UNC-CH.
"Older professors could help
us in the labs and classrooms as the
bulge of new students comes into
the system Ms. Reuss said.
Meanwhile, Conrad seems se-
rene � even cocky � as he dis-
cusses his reluctance to go along
with mandatory retirement. He is
busy � a conference on aerospace
engineering last week, a meeting
with Ford executives next week.
And he has options.
If NCSU doesn't accommo-
date him, he says, three universi-
ties without mandatory retire-
ment are ready with job offers.
Putt-Putt Golf
Students & Staff
Buy l Game
Play 1 FREE
si
I ll l II
� I ANA
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, Collectibles.
Antiques. Furniture
758-1820
106 River Bluff Rd
Open Daily
9:00 am
Sun 1:00 pm
MO
Mexican Restaurant
All Vintage Clothing
50 Off
417 l.uis si Mill
111 r� n
"2 1750
III
Y SAIL TRADE l
f
A New Delivery
from GUC!
Those old postcard utility
bills will soon be a thing of the past.
Watch your mailbox for a white
envelope containing Greenville
Utilities' new, improved bill. Our
new larger bill will be easier to
read, with more space for important
information. We've even enclosed
a return envelope for your conve-
nience.
Rememberwatch for an
envelope from Greenville Utilities in
your mail.
Greenville
Utilities
Late Night
ftll
Large Mexican Pizza &
Large Nachos Grande
Sunday - Thursday After 10
Friday & Saturday After 11
12 Price !
Wash It Down
With A Drink Special
Sunday - Thursday
-13-
JUNE 19-29
Matinees: June 22 & 26
This charming musical is the longest running slum
in ihe history of the American Tfteatre
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to see a show for half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money,
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15.00
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 year old guest.
THURSDAY
Draft Night
60oz. Pitchers1.50
All Night
r"sPECIAl"MEMBEteHIPi
I With this Coupon

Downtown Greenville
Ship i
rille- I





She ga0t Carolinian June 19,1991
ngress access I Environmental group urges politicians to act on waste
IR HBRART
RALEIGH (AD A national
environmental group is urging
IVmocrats Sen Terry Sanford and
U.S. Rep. Tim Valentine to take
leadership roles onabill that would
limit industry s use of toxic therm
cals.
US. Tublic Interest Research
Croup said Monday the public
needs to start pressuring legislators
to take action on environmental
protection bills. The Resource (x n
stTvation and Recovery Act is up
for re-authonzation in Congress,
and U.S. P1RC officials said now is
the time to strengthen toxic chemi-
cal regulations.
The group is also going door-
to-doortoget 10,000signaturesona
chemicals.
Rep. Gerry Sikorski, D-Minn
North Carolina industries produce
or use at least 1 billion pounds of
toxic chemicals a year.
That figure is seven times the
amount reported in 1988 in an Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency study
petition calling for Sanford and on how many toxins are released has sponsored a bill that would re-
V alontmeto "play leadership roles" into the environment. quire companies to develop plans
"We are trying to let people
know how bad the problem is
Silverman said. "If that means they
are going to get scared, then maybe
they should get scared. 1 think that's
OK the Resource Conservation and
Silverman said that chemical. Recovery Act to make toxic
furniture and paper companies are chemicalsendangtTed, not people;
the primary releasers of poisonous he said. 'The more they hear from
Some use of toxic chemicals is
unavoidable, Silverman said.
"We are not trying to eradicate
toxk chemicals he said. "Not ev-
rsa,dinernorerrrom mem But there
theirconstihientsthenxmwiU iJWkofamoreext)OSurethan
have to pay attention to these is-
in getting legislation passed, said
Paniel Silverman, assistant field
director for US. TIRC.
The action comes on the heels
oi a new U.S. PIRC studv that says
Cl� Ptxrto
- soon
Sunday in the
Park
Fastem
-phone tte
! on the
Greenville Town
Sunday
rig The
'day m the
S3 ts m rts
nth year and
� nue "th
- �; at 7 p m
jt July.
ghands
such as Group
Sax and Panama
St
to reduce their use of poisonous
chemicals, and to make informa-
tion more available to the public.
The bill will go before the House
Public Works and Transportation
Committee this month, said Ed
Johnson, North Carolina campaign
director for US. PIRG.
Sikorski's bill would be an
amendment to RCRA to strengthen
regulations on industries that re-
lease toxins, Johnson said.
"Congress should strengthen
sues Johnson said.
Sanford could not be reached
immediately for comment. Valen-
tine did not comment because he
has not yet seen Sikorski's bill or
US. PIRG's study.
U.S. PIRG officials said too
much exposure to toxk chemicals
can contribute to cancer or birth
defects. Silverman stressed that
North Carolina companies use, not
release, 1 billion pounds of toxins a
year. He said the group could not
determine how much of that was
being released intotheenvironment.
is a heckof a lot moreexposure than
there needs to be. If you don't need
to use them, why use them?"
DuPonf s Cape Fear plant in
Leland uses hazardous chemicals
in making polyester. When some of
those chemicals react with other
chemicals, the end product is non-
hazardous, said Jimmy Richardson,
a DuPont spokesman.
"1 think the legislation would
be dangerous and detrimental to
some industries I could see some
problems Richardson said. Hesaid
DuPont had spent $80 million since
1988 to reduce harmful emissions.
Change
Continued from page 1
reflect a boom in the late l0s and
early 1970s when students and
faculty flooded in. Many of these
faculty members will be ready to
retire in the next decade. That could
leave schools shorthanded, said Ri-
chard Richardson, associate vice
president of academic affairs of the
UNC system.
Departmentsare scrambling for
young blood now, to stave off a
shortage later. Fields strained for
now facultv members, said
Richardson, include the natural
sciences, political science and soci-
ology.
If new faculty members can't
be found, schools may have to relv
on their senior citizens to help
handle an expected boom in student
enrollment during the 1990s.
That's where repealing man-
datory retirement could make ev-
eryone happy, said Carol Reuss,
associate provost at UNC-CH.
"Older professors could help
us in the labs and classrooms as the
bulge of new students comes into
the system' Ms. Reuss said.
Meanwhile, Conrad seems se-
rene � even cocky � as he dis-
cusses his reluctance to gp along
with mandatory retirement. He is
busy � a conference on aerospace
engineering last week, a meeting
with Ford executives next week.
And he has options.
If NCSU doesn't accommo-
date him, he says, three universi-
ties without mandatory retire-
ment are ready with job otfers.
jim�i B'owig Po�o Lab
iKook riv
ntiship
Putt-Putt Golf
Students & Staff
Buy l Game
Play lFREE
I l I 11
JANS .
Vintage (lothin.
Jewelrw Collectibles,
Antiques, Furniture
a I
Rooi
� ! I
Mill! I
758-18ZO
106 River Bluff Rd
Open Daily
9:00 am
Sun 1:00 pm
-
Mexican Restaurant
All Vintage Clothing
50 )��
41" Iins v M.�l
1 w iit v 11
752 l"n
Bl SMI I R 11 Jl
A New Delivery
from GUC!
Those old postcard utility
bills will soon be a thing of the past.
Watch your mailbox for a white
envelope containing Greenville
Utilities' new, improved bill. Our
new larger bill will be easier to
read, with more space for important
information. We've even enclosed
a return envelope for your conve-
nience.
Rememberwatch for an
envelope from Greenville Utilities in
your mail.
Greenville
Utilities

FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Late Night
r
,1
,(!
anc) Center
in B
Advertise in
CAROUNIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Friday
7:30- 11:30
757-6366
Large Mexican Pizza &
Large Nachos Grande
Sunday - Thursday After 10
Friday & Saturday After 11
1 2 Price !
Wash It Down
With A Drink Special
Sunday - Thursday
1 JUNE 19-29 '
Matinees: June 22 & 26
This charming musical is the longest running show
in the history of the American Theatre
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to see a show for half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money,
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15.00
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 year old gruest.
THURSDAY
Draft Night
60oz. Pitchers $1.50
All Night
special MEMBERSHIP i
With this Coupon
i
� Downtown Greenville-





ngress access

'I fHo�.
n the
Tjk' �
crfo i.ib I
I REE
vANCY
riNG
Advertise in
CAROUNIAN
DISPLAY IAIkfSI,
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per olumn in( h
Bulk . Frequent ontract
Dis ounts Available
Business Hours
Mnnd.iv Thursd.iv
7:30 5:00
Friday
7:30 11:30
757-6366
flfre fagtjgaroljntan Jlwe I9t 1991
Environmental group urges politicians to act on waste
.i Mk ('mw�ti�a �rv.intnr.r.vtii.n' OK" ihp Rpsnurre Conservation and
KM! K.tl � � national
environmental group is urging
Democrats Sen rerr) Sanfordand
I S Rep ! im Valentine to Lake
leadership roles ma bill that would
limit industn s use of toxu . hi
cals
I S Public Interest Resean h
Group s.iui Monday the public
needs to start pressuring legi
t� take aetion on environmental
protectionbills rheResourve( cm
servation and Recovery ct
tor re-authorization in Congress,
and I S l'IK(. ofrkials said now is
the time to strengthen toxic cherni
i al regulations
ITk' group is also going d or
to doortoget 10,000signaturesona
petition calling tor Sanford and
alentineto "playleadershiproles
in getting legislation passed, said
Daniel Silverman, assistant field
director forUS PIR!
Ilv a tion comes on the heels
of a nev I S 1'IKi. stud) that says
North C'anilina industries produce
or list1 at least 1 billion pounds of
toxic chemicals a year
l"hat figure is seven times the
amount reported in 1968 in an Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency study
on how n-winv toxins are released
into the environment
"We are trying to let people
know how bad the pmblem is
Silverman said. It that means they
are going to get scared, then maybe
thev should get si arvd I think that's
. r



.
OK
Silverman said that chemical,
furniture and paper companies are
the pnmary releasers of poisonous
chemicals.
Rep (.erry Sikorski, l)-Minn
has sponsored a bill that would re-
quire companies to develop plans
to reduce their use of poisonous
chemicals, and to make informa-
tion more available to the public
The bill will go before the House
Iiblic Works and Transportation
Committee this month, said F.d
Johnson, North( anlina campaign
director for US T1RC,
Sikorski's bill would be an
amendment to RCRA to strengthen
regulations on industries that re-
lease toxins, lohnson said
"Congress should strengthen
the Resource Conservation and
Recovery Act to make toxic
chemicalsendanKered, not people
he said. 'The more they hear from
theirconstituentsthemorethey will
have to pay attention to these is-
sues Johnson said.
Sanford could not be reached
immediately for comment Valen
tine did not comment because he
has not yet seen Sikorski's bill or
US. Pl"RC's study.
U.S. PIRG officials said too
much exposure to toxic chemicals
can contribute to cancer or birth
defects. Silverman stressed that
North Carolina companies use, not
release, 1 billion pounds of toxins a
war He said the group could not
determine how much of that was
being nlenstl into theemironment.
Some use of toxic chemicals is
unavoidabk Silverman said.
"We an1 not trying to eradicate
towc chemicals he said. "Not ev
eryoneisexposed to them But then-
is a heck of a lot more exposu rv than
there needs to be. If you don't need
to use them, why use them?"
DuPonf s Cape Fear plant in
Inland uses hazardous chemicals
in making polyester. When some i
those chemicals react with other
chemicals, the end product is non-
hazardous, said jimmy Richardson,
a DuPont spokesman
"1 think the legislation would
be dangerous and detrimental to
some industnes 1 could see some
pmblems Richardson said 1 lesaid
DuPnt had spent $0 million since
1988 to reduce harmful emissions
Change
Continued from page 1
reflet t a boom in the late lkand
early 1970s when students and
faculty flooded in Manv of these
faculty members will he ready to
retire in the next decade. l"hat could
leaves hiXlsshorthandod,said Ri-
chard Richardson, associate vice
president of academk affairsofthe
UNC system.
Departmentsarescrarnbtirigfor
young blood now, to stave off a
shortage later Fields strained tor
new facultv members, said
Richardson, include the natural
sciences, political science and soci-
ology.
if new faculty members can't
be found, schools may have to rely
on their senior citizens to help
ruuidleanexpettedrxHiminstudent
enrollment during the 1990s.
That's where repealing man-
datory retirement could make ev
eryone happv, said Carol Reuss,
associate provosl at UNC-CH.
Older professors could help
us in the labs and classrooms as the
bulge of new students comes into
the system Ms. Reuss said
Meanwhile, Conrad seems sty-
mie � even cocky � as he div
cusses his reluctance to go along
with mandatory retirement He is
busy a conference on aerospace
engineenng last week, a meeting
with Ford executives next week
And he has options.
If NCSU doesn't accommo
daw him, ho says, three univer i
ties without mandatory retire-
ment an1 ready with job otters
Putt-Putt Golf
Students & Staff
Buy l Game
PlaylFREE
XL-vr.d
iirXLA
7S8-I8XO
106 River Bluff Rd
Open Daily
9:00 am
Sun 1:00 pm
I Al I I I
I is-
.nlathing,
I, h U (� tibles.
Antiques, Furniture

Mexican Restaurant
All Vintage Clothing
50 off

IIM s l I I K l
�a1
New Delivery
from GUC!
Those old postcard utility
bills will soon be a thing of the past.
Watch your mailbox for a white
envelope containing Greenville
Utilities' new. improved bill. Our
new larger bill will be easier to
read, with more space tor important
information. We've even enclosed
a return envelope for your come
nience.
Rememberwatch for an
envelope from Greenville Utilities in
your mail.
r v Greenville
'���' v
" s �
�-
Utilities
Late Night
liUH
Large Mexican Pizza &
Large Nachos Grande
Sunday - Thursday After 10
Friday & Saturday After 11
1 2 Price!
Wash It Down
With A Drink Special
Sunday - Thursday
the
:WiV2iflAIr4�
ot (astern on (,trolin.t
4991-
5EASON-
JUNE W-2M
Matinees: June 22 & 26
Tim harming mush al is the longest running tw
in the histon of the American Theatre.
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to sec a show for halt price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID ami money.
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15.00
Sharky's is a private club for members ami
21 year old guest.
THURSDAY
Draft Night
60oz. Pitchers $1.50
All Night
T " SPECI ALmEMBERSHIP "i
With this Coupon
I
L.
I
J
� Downtown Greenville





The Other Side
�Jf� iEa0t (Eamlttttatt Abstinence, not abortion is the answer
JiineJ9, 1991
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
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The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
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Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, June 19, 1991
'Education president' needs to learn
Politicians have a nasty habit of hedging
their bets as campaign season approaches in
order toguaranteea successful outcome. Some,
like President George Bush, go to extremes
and reveal their true character. In the 1988
presidential campaign, Bush said he would
concentrate on domestic issues such as educa-
tion, health care and the savings and loan
crisis.
Now after bathing in the success of the
Gulf War and three years of waffling, Bush is
turning to those domestic issues he claimed
he would improve upon. It appears that he is
not satisfied with just George Bush: Warlord
President, but George Bush: Leader with a
Conscience.
Bush could learn how to be just such a
leader from an unlikelv source: Louisiana Gov.
Buddy Roemer. The Louisiana republican first
achieved notoriety when he changed political
parries after he was elected governor.
Roemer, who is running for re-election in
October, deserves commendation for vetoing
a strict anti-abortion bill proposed by the state
legislature.
Supporters of the bill and anti-abortion
groups have united to fight against Roemer's
re-election. They had hopes that the bill would
lead the Supreme Court to overturn pro-abor-
tion precedent.
Roemer, who is opposed to abortion in
most instances, said he vetoed the bill because
oi its excessive restrictions.
The bill is one of the most steadfast ever
� abortions would only be available to vic-
tims of rape or incest within the first 13 weeks
of pregnancy.
Further, victims must seek medical at-
tention within five days of the rape; the crime
must have been reported to police within
seven days.
Unlike most politicians, Roemer has cou-
rageously made a bold, possibly disastrous
move in an election year.
"This is not about votes Roemer said
June 14. . This is about women who have
been brutalized. This is something we have
been trying to get right
It is surprising for a politician to be con-
cerned with adequate legislation to the point
of sacrificing his or her career.
Only just now, after three years in office,
is Bush showing his concern over domestic
issues. In his 1988 campaign, Bush claimed he
would be the "education president" who
would, along with a "thousand points of light
would lead America in social reform through
the storm of budget cuts.
So far, the only reform Bui.a has presided
over is the faltering savings and loan bailout.
Administrators of the Resolution Trust Corp
which is overseeing the closing and selling of
troubled S&Ls, said June 11 that they will
need $150 billion from congTess � $20 million
more than the Treasury Department's worst
expectations and three times more than Con-
gress and Bush planned for in 1989.
The onlv cuts Bush has authorized are
not in the budget, but in the size of the Iraqi
armv.
Toughly-worded speeches and political
posturing will not change our under-funded,
mass-production educational system or the
lack of affordable health care. Neither will it
help American businesses to compete effec-
tively in the global market, or even in the
United States, for that matter.
And, no matter how hard he tries, Bush
can't bomb the budget deficit out of existence.
Now, in order to guarantee a successful
November in 1992, Bush turns to neglected
issues � which he has ignored for almost
three years. Let's hope he sticks to his guns
this time.
Letters To The Editor
Student angry
about fees
for new center
In the May 29 issue of The
East Carolinian an article was
printed titled "Student fees to
pay for recreation center Ex-
actly what is the need for a
recreation center? The article
stated that the center will in-
clude racquetball courts, bas-
ketball courts, a weight room
aerobics room indoor and out-
door swimming pools, a lounge
and locker rooms. The facili-
ties that the campus hasalready
are not used to the maximum
amount that they can be used.
Instead of using the ap-
proximate amount of $18 mil-
lion that the center would cost,
why not use the money to pay
for keeping the facilities that
already exist open. The pool
hours between the two exist-
inggyms fordrop-in recreation
are terrible. Too many hours
could be used thai are not, and
I doubt that classes or the swim
team are using them that much.
The maintenance for the pools
can't take up that much time
either.
If the proposed recre-
ational facility is built, and out
next to (Meiyfanh?") Student
Center as Student Government
Association President Alex
Martin proposes, that would
eliminate more of the shrink-
ing number of parking spaces.
I realize that a slight expansion
will occur when the (former)
house lots behind Wendy's (on
10th street) are paved but it
will not be enough when the
new rec center is built. Further,
if the student population is
growing, then we need the
space for that purpose, unless
freshman parking on campus
is eliminated. Those who com-
mute already have to wait for
parking, making them late for
classes during the regular se-
mester. It is the intention of the
SGA to make (those) students
even more late for their classes.
The purpose of East Caro-
lina University is to provide a
better education to itsstudents,
not expand its playground.
Why not use the $18 million to
expand (academic) depart-
ments? The Department of
Geography already hasenough
courses for master's degrees in
both areas, but funds as well as
space are one of the items pre-
venting the separation of the
two curriculums. How many
other programs are also in this
same predicament where they
can't expand for lack of funds
or room? Why not use the
money to build an expansion
to the educational area of the
school? Too much money is
frivolously spent on things not
needed. It is not fair to make
students pay for a facility that
is not needed when the cur-
rent facilities are not used to
their maximum amount.
The parking sticker in-
crease is also not needed if stu-
dent fees are expected to in-
crease. If President Bush in-
tends to cut Pell Grants as ex-
pected, imagine the damage
that it will have on students
that rely on that money to pay
for books and tuition. I would
rather take my share of the $18
million and use it to lower the
priceof tuition, replaceequip-
ment and expand and update
the educational programs
available. Why don't the Board
of Trustees and the Building
Committee use the money for
the "Purpose and Objectives
of East Carolina University
as listed in the Undergraduate
Student Catalog. How about
giving students what they need
for a changeWe're here for
an education, how about pro-
viding more of it?
Thomas D. Alston
Junior
Urban and Regional
Planning
By John Carter
Editorial Column Ut
The recent Supreme Court
decision concerning abortion has
sparked new controversy and
could pave the way for overturn-
ing the Roe v. Wade decision that
legalized abortion. According to
the Supreme Court's ruling, em-
ployees of government-funded
centers can no longer discussabor-
tion with patients as a possible
option, even in rape cases. They
will risk losing federal funding.
Webster's defines abortion
as "the birth of a fetus that has not
developed ful'y enough to live
The word "fetus" is what causes
dispute over abortion. It presents
the question, "When does a fetus
become a living being?" Some be-
lieve that it is alive at conception.
Some believe that it is alive when
the heart is developed and begins
beating. Others believe that it is
alive at birth.
The next key word that
comes to mind in this controversy
is "murder According to the
American Heritage dictionary,
murder is "the unlawful killing of
one human being by another, es-
pecially with malice afore-
thought Abortion is malicious.
How else could one end the life of
her own baby intentionally with-
out thinking about it before hand?
It fits into the murder definition so
far. But abortion is legal and in
order for it to be murder, it would
have to be illegal. Once again, we
are stuck between a rock and a
hard place. Should abortion be le-
gal?
I believe that life begins at
conception. Even though the em-
bryo has not yet become a fetus,
the process of life has begun. Mor-
ally, it is wrong to end this oppor-
tunity of life because you do not
want the child or cannot care for it.
People should think about that to
begin with. Since I believe that
abortion is morally wrong, I also
feel that it should be illegal. There
are more people wanting to adopt
than there are babies available.
That isal waysan option. Still, there
is one option that it seems like no
one wants to hear.
Anything people do always
not control their hormones
Again, I feel that abortion is
morally wrong; I don't want my
tax dollars funding them When
has at least two possible results:
one positive, one negative. For
instance, when I walk across a
street I know that one of two
S is going to happen. I will get my paycheck for writing th,�
eUhe? arrive safely aVYhe other article, the government will a
side of the street or I'll end up a ready have taken moneyout of i,
permanent part of the pavement, so I should have a say .n how ,Kat
These are therwo results that I am money is spent I d.dn t get any
faced with as I take th.s action. I one pregnant so I don t wan, ,
want to arrive safely at the other pay for an abornorv If do gel
side of the street. I am going to someone preg
take the necessary precautions to
accomplish this.
Decide now if you want a
child or not. If you do not, pre-
venting that is as simple as look-
ing both ways before crossing the
street. This way, keeping the child
or aborting it is a decision that
won't even have to be made
pay to support the child and be a
father to it than to kill it.
1 don't understand why this
is such a difficult thing to compre-
hend. The solutions are simple,
but we do not want to accept the
responsibilities for our op-
tions.
We would much rather rind
Two possible results of an easy way out or blame nx-
sexual activity are pleasure and a one else We can do whatev
baby. If you are having sex strictly want and act however we want to
forpleasureanddon'twantababv, because, when things get � .
then it is the responsibility of both the government will ba.l us out
people involved to take the neces- It relates to maturity M
sary precautions to prevent preg- ntvdoesn'tcomeuntil we.)
nancy. If you refuse to use some
form of contraceptive, then be pre-
pared to accept the responsibility
for your own actions.
Think before you act. It
doesn't spoil the mood; especially
if you care about or are in love
with the other person. If you only
care about sex and not the other
person, then what I have to say
won't matter to begin with. If you
do care about the other person,
then communicate. Let each other
know how you feel about this is-
sue. There are so many different
forms of birth control and contra-
ceptives that I am convinced that,
between the two of you, you can
come up with something accept-
able.
Don't think that these meth-
ods are not 100 percent effective
because one is: abstinence.
If pregnancy is not desired,
there are so many simple and logi-
cal ways to prevent it. So why
should the government pay for
someone to have an abortion?
Well, it shouldn't. It is not the
government's fault.
The government is in enough
financial trouble already. Itdoesn't
need to have to bail people out all
the time just because they could
to make our own rules and
sions for ourselves through
cal reasoning.
Take the time to red,
you want to result from your
actions. If vou want to have si
but don't want a babv, t.i�
time to figure out how to at
plish this.
Don't just go do it and then
tell me that I havetopav (through
taxes) to bail you out of this situa-
tion. It is your responsibility
Maturity includes ,i i
the responsibility tor your
actions.
As much as 1 am opp. -
abortion, 1 realize that tht r-
some exceptions to mv opii
I do believe that it a
is raped, (incest included in this
category), or if her own heall
life is endangered through this
pregnancy, abortion could bt
tified. Also, if the child is t
ger of extreme birth defei ts
abortion might be the onl)
mane answer.
In these situations rr
even be opposed tv- mv tax dollars
being used to assist someone who
really needs the aid In an oth r
situation, I'll say go get 'em Si
tor Helms.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Make both candidates president, v.p.
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
As originally written, the
Constitution provides that the
candidate for president who re-
ceives the most votes from the
Electoral College becomes presi-
dent, and that the candidate who
receives the second most votes be-
comes vice president.
Like most things in the
Constitution, this makes good
sense. When a president is elected
by, say, 60 percent of the voters,
the 40 percent who voted against
him should not be ignored.
But the Constitution was
designed for a government with-
out political parties. Under its
original provisions, it's difficult
for a party to ensure it will capture
both the presidency and the vice
presidency, with the right person
in each office. If each member of
the Electoral College who votes
for a given party's Candida tes casts
one of his ballots for the party's
presidential candidate and the
other for its vice-presidential
candidate, each candidate receives
the same number of votes. Then
there's a tie for the presidency,
which tie has to be broken by the
House of Representatives � and
they may vote for the wrong per-
son.
To avoid ties, at least one
elector has to divert one of his
ballots from the vice-presidential
candidate to the presidential can-
didate. But if too many electors
divert their ballots, the vice-presi-
dential candidate might receive
fewer votes than some other
party's presidential candidate. So
one party captures the presidency
and another captures the vice
presidency.
In the election of 1800, Tho-
mas Jefferson and Aaron Burr,
both Republicans, each got the
same number of votes from the
Electoral College. It was under-
stood that Burr was to have been
the vice president and Jefferson
the president, but, as it was a close
election (the incumbent, John
Adams, was only nine electoral
votes behind), no elector had di-
verted a ballot from one to the
other. The matter went to the
House for a vote; there, voting
continued for a week until the
necessary majority was reached.
When the dust cleared, Jefferson
was indeed president�but it had
been uncomfortably close.
The Twelfth Amendment
was ratified a few years later, in
1804. It modifies the Constitution
so that the Electoral College casts
separate ballots for the president
and vice president; therefore,
there's no real danger of ties for
either office.
But I think we ought to re-
store the Constitution's original
provision � though without the
useless Electoral College.
The original system is much
more democratic than the present
one. Presidential nominees tend
to select running mates who think
(or are willing to pretend they
think) pretty much the same way
as their bosses. When elected,
presidents appoint like-minded
Cabinet members (many of whom,
by staggering coincidence, were
formerly campaign officials).
Consequently, the two highest of-
fices in the land are in essence
occupied by two bodies with the
same brain; other clones fill ad-
visers'posts.
Establishing uniformity of
opinion might be intrinsic to the
office�those eager for the power
of the presidency may naturally
prefer subservient underlings �
but ifs also detrimental to the
nation, since dissent strengthens
the brew of debate.
Making the second-highest
vote-getter the vice president
would install a permanent oppo-
sition voice in the White House,
whether the president liked it or
not A reasonably shrewd veep
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could easilv influence cabinet se-
lections, too, resulting in a
healthier mix of opinion than any
administration has over had
Moreover, elections would
leave bitter tastes in fewer mouths
The two top contenders for office
having just spent months tearing
each other down, would be forced
toleam to work productively w ith
each other. One hopes this would
set an example for other members
of both their parties; at anv rat
the inevitable grumbling of the
losers would end sooner, as would
the smug rejoicing of the winners
During the race, candidates
might even be a little more civil to
each other, knowing that thev d
soon have to work with their pn
maty foe � perhaps for their pri-
mary foe. Say good-bye to nega-
tive ads.
What's to keep a parry from
entering more than one candidate
for the presidency? Nothing �
except theother party. If one partv
tries to run two campaigns, it is
necessarily prevented from back
ing each with its fullest resources
The opposing party might also
shareitsresourcesamongmultipk
candidates, or instead it might
mount an higher-pressure cam-
paign for just one individual
They'll probably back just one
person apiece and take their best
shots, but even if each party pro-
vides multiplechoiees, whom does
that hurt?
The net effect of the
Constitution's original plan is to
create a healthier and fairer
democratic process. (Also a more
complex one, not that that's bad )
It dampens divisiveness and
strengthens honest debate.
Taking the most recent
presidential election as an ex-
ample, recall that 46 percent of
those who voted, voted for
Dukakis. Ifs absurd entirely to
exclude the man from national
office. At least he'd have been an
improvement over Quay le.
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Collaboratio
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�m �9. 199�
W$t gagt (HaruHnian
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ssible results
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it one of two
(happen 1 will
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lv at the other
I im cos-
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iok
isurv a
i
not control their hormones
cain 1 fed that abortion is
rnorall) wrong I don t want my
tav dollars funding them When 1
ot m paycheck tor writing this
article, the government will al-
ready have token money out of it
m 1 should have a say in how that
monev is spent I didn t get any-
one ptegnant so I don t want to
pay 'or an abortion It 1 do got
int.l would rather
r � to support the child and be a
father to it than to Will it
11 understand why this
ult thing to cornpre-
v solutions are simple
- int to accept the
s ?vr our own �
� nut h rather find
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-
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x ill bail us out.
� � t Matu-
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� - and d�.vi
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have sex
I take the
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I - i to
it there are
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man
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ilth or
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: bt
I is ii dan
��- lects then
. hu-
�, � � ns nay not
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st someone who
. other
� Sena-
er Hammer
es president, v.p.

vears it -
nst �Jtion
sident
� �
kger of ties tor
(e (Might � -
is - .
fch without the
)dege
? stem is much
Ian the present
Nominees tend
ites who think
pretend thev
the same way
hen elected.
like-minded
lanyof whom,
:idence, were
;n officials)
Iwo highest of-
re in essence
lies with the
clones fill ad-
iniformity of
ltnnsic to the
�for the power
lay naturally
inderlings �
lental to the
U strengthens
:ond-highest
:e president
anent oppo-
hite House,
fnt liked it or
Ishrewd veep
ibinet se-
ng in a
n than any
. er had.
- � "v would
ttcri � mouths.
nths tearing
ild be forced
. with
- WOllld
� mt mbers
it an) rate.
bline of the
ndsooner,as would
� . � winners.
the race, candidates
� -a little more civil to
each ther, ki �� t thev d
soon ha I rk vith their pn-
:� rhaps r their pn-
' �' � od-bye to nega-
tive ads
keep a partv from
entering more than one candidate
� - thi pres iency? othing �
except the other partv It one party
tnes to run two campaigns, it is
necessarily prevented from back-
ing each with its fullest resources.
The opposing partv might also
share its resources among multiple
candidates, or instead it might
mount an higher-pressure cam-
paign for ust one individual.
They'll probably back just one
person apiece and take their best
shots, but even if each partv pro-
vides multiple choices, whom does
that hurt7
The net effect of the
Constitution's original plan is to
create a healthier and fairer
democratic process (Also a more
complex one. not that that's bad)
It dampens divisiveness and
strengthens honest debate.
Taking the most recent
presidential election as an ex-
ample, recall that 46 percent of
those who voted, voted for
Dukakis. It's absurd entirely to
exclude the man from national
office. At least he'd have been an
improvement over Quayle.
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- nrjMtudeiats S3 iV
� iach �dciteM�lwo�d S H
cmentsaiek : typed rnead) edJXi k thi tnkedanonl
man cannot guarantee the pub.K-jr. n
l ivsabVsoT nthesi MwounKmaatsasasoli moansoi
si MM! R DEADLINE: MONDAY, 4:00 PM
SILPFM BRANCH QF IKE
A uumiifcfc working Amateur (Ham)
radio ncld station will be set up on the
campus mall on Saturday, June 22.
For 24 continuous hours, IEEE radio
amateurs will race to contact thou-
sands of other amateur stations set
up across North America IDuring the
devastation of Hurricane Hugo and
the California earthquake, the world
depended on radio amateurs, using
e m rgency power, toget reports into
and out of rhe stricken areas. All are
invited to visit the working amateur
ra. io stafion and leam about the role
"ham radio" plays right here in Pitt
Counrv. Amateur Rad io operators are
licensed by me FCC More informa-
tion about this exciting event is avail-
able by calling 757-6018 or 7574148.
HAMRAP1Q
OPERATORS NEEDED
Operators are needed for this year's
FIELD DAY activities that will be
held on the mall. If you would like to
help operate, or can be of ass. stance
in setting up or obtaining equipment,
please call 752-8590 and leave a mes-
sage, orcall 757-6018 (Dr. StanGarren)
or stop bv Flanagan, Room 133 or F-
0209.
FFF INCREASE FOR
Effective September 1,1991, the fee
for the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
will increase from the current fee of
S30 to S35. This amount reflects an
increase to the Testing Center from
the Psychological Corporation.
IH�JWMAN CLtT?
TheNewma. atlolic Student Cen-
ter invites you to join us for worship.
Summer Session Sunday Mass
Schedule 11:30 am and 8 JO pm at
the Newman Center, 953 E 10th St.
757-3760 or 757-1991.
the time to
RECYCLE
for your
own future.





r Side
tion is the answer
their hormones
� that abortion is
don t w ant my
. them When 1
� writing this
� ' will al-
H'V out of it
a in how, that
lidn't get am -
' ant to
get
li ither
ind hv a
mple
niopt the
i� - m
r we
a i i. ant to
' t -ugh
is out
� t Matu-
in able
wn
�Il' st'
ik� the
it m-
d then
ars
er Hammer
es president, v.p.
id
:
�. , i t n
ould

� �. �� , uld � winners lates ivil tc�
�i.i! tl �� ir pri-
'stem is rr
�tend they
the same i.
'hen ele
ke minded
whom.
icideni �
m of I
Iwo highest (tf
ire in esserw e
idles with the
lones fill ad-
miformitv of
Unnsic to the
f for the power
lay naturally
inderlings �
lental to the
it strengthens
ond-highest
ce president
anent oppo-
hite House,
;nt liked it or
Isnrewd veep
� r their pn-
!nni
� lidate
� � ne
shar tsresoui
tes, o
mount an hii
persi
;1
it is
M k
lllest resoun
. nt als
. riple
i it might
pressure �am-
Dr just one individual
ihlv bai k lust one
and tai � their Kst
' if i i cl : irty pro-
� Tiultiplrc hours, whomdoes
that hurt1
The net effe I of the
( onstitution's original plan is to
create a healthier and fairer
democratic process Also a more
complex one. not that that's bad)
It dampens divisiveness and
strengthens honest debate
Taking the most recent
presidential election as an ex-
ample, recall that 46 percent of
those who voted, voted for
Dukakis It's absurd entirely to
exclude the man from national
office At least he'd have boon an
improvement over Quayle
9, 1991
(She jEagt (Earpltntan
5
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED
CLASSIFIED
P RATES

ratemit

si MMER
MOPi 1:00 PM
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICES: Term Papers.
Reports, Resumes, Letters. Fast turn-
around! Laser Printer. Call 756-1783.
JUST SAY NO TO FLEAS: (luaran-
teed t.r 7 months. Professional ser-
vice. Call Debbyat830 757 or 1-
800 J47 824.1
FOR SALE
WANTED: Musical Instruments tor
ment sales guitars - banjos -
ns - cellos - bass -
-
imps keyboards - drums.
- v isi 2711 E. lOthSt.757-
ssion cost, lim and
Ml SK Ml DENTS: U discount
� . - terns
� from w
: . 5481
. - '� �
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
yr.). Call 24 - hr. message for more
details:213-964-4166ext�.Nograde
or income restrictions. All majors.
ADDING $1000 OR MORE TO
YOUR MONTHLY INCOME IN-
TERESTS YOU? We can show vou
how. 355-3789.
PERSONALS
WIGGILY: The itsy bitsy spiders
crawled up the water spout. Down
came the ram and washed the spiders
out. Up came the sun and dried up all
the rain, and the itsy bitsy spiders
crawled up the spout again. M1SS-
1C, PICTURES AT ELEVEN.
OMN1MLSTER: Tell the priest true
confessions, wash thy face with sacri-
ficial beer, kneel, hope and pray to
Mary, Semi-Happy Bda v, Uncle Mean
FOR RENT
WANTED: Pentecostal Holiness fe-
male roomma te to share mobile home
15 minutes from campus. Deposit
required. $150 monthly rent plus 1 2
utilities. Call anytime. 355-4740.
MATURE, NON-SMOKING FE-
MALE toshare2 bed room apartment
one mile from campus. Free cable.
Furnished. $165 per month and 12
utilities. Call and leave message. 757-
3114.
EASY-GOING FEMALE: (1 st vrgrad
) wanting to move in with 1 or 2 other
female students, preferably duplex
in August. Please call Sarah collect at
(919)933-0073.
FOR RENT
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold Lowers
Now Taking Leases tor August
1991 - 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efficenc) Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Hair to Ijvc
� All New
�And Rc-adv To Rene
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2HW E ih Sirvcl
�Looted Near 1 l
�Near MaJM Shipping (Vntcr
� Air.s I riim High Patrol Sution
ljmitrd Oftcr MU) a monih
Contact J 1 01 Tiwnmv Williams
756 7K1 s r 830-1937
Office open Apt B, 12 5 JOpm
�AZALEA GARDENS
I "r�; ���: aud �� hr�m fumiihed prTmenU,
rrw-rgs rf!� ril frrr htt ndiewr, hrr� drwri.
cable 1 'iwpll m lin)�� w-lv $30 a -it-nih. n
: r, MOBnJF.HOMF.RFNTALS-cnkaoi
M ,� rmrrmr-m aij m�nir h�wnr� m VjueaCtvlrra
r�r�i Rn�A VtJlry Country ("luH
Conlad J T orTommy Williams
r56 7815
FREE
HO HOS
FOR GOOD,
LEGITIMATE
NEWS TIPS.
CAIX
LfriAIR HARPER,
THE EASI CAROUN1NAN.
757-6366
SERIOUS REPLIES ONLY.
PROCEDURES FOR
ANNOUNCEMENTS
nayusethi innoumements section �� Tht Em I atdrnvmtoB
rimesfiw ifchar fterthefir542times
� � � .
S2 V
i
-
- . ��� � � ��. mitedamounl I
. � p . . . . emeritsasa sole means of
si MMt K DEADLINE: MONDAY,4H�PM
STLDLNT BRANCH Of JEEE
A complete working Amateur (.HarrO
radio field station mU be set upon the
campus mall on Saturday, June 22.
For 24 continuous hours, IEEE radio
amateurs will race to contact thou-
sands of other amateur stations set
up across North America !During the
or, of Hurricane Hugo and
rnia oar
sing
eportsinto
rthquake, the world
j on radio amateurs
c power, to gc
: the stricken areas. All are
i visit the working amateur
radio station and learn about the role
"ham radio" plays right here in Pitt
the a
dc x n
cmerg
and 01
invitei
CounK- AmateurRadiooperatorsare
licensed by the FCC. More lnforma-
non about this exciting event is avail-
able bv calling 7574018 or 757-4148
HAM RADIO
OPERATORS NEEDED
Operators are needed tor this year
FIELD DAY activities that will be
held on the mall. It vou would like to
help operate, or can be of issistai �
insetting up or obtaining equipment,
please call 752-8590 and leave a mes-
sage,orcall757-6018(Dr.StanGarren)
or stop bv Flanagan, Room 133 or F-
0209.
EEElNXREASJLfQE
MJUJJEJklNLOGlESJISI
Effective September 1, 1991, the fee
for the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
will increase from the current fee of
$30 to $35. This amount reflects an
increase to the Testing Center from
the Psychological Corporation.
THE NEWMAN CLfB
rheNev 4i StudentC a
ter invites vou to oin us tor worship
Summer Session Sunday Mass
Schedule 11:30 am and 830 pm at
the Newman Center, 9S3 E 10th St.
757-3760 or 757-1991.
the time to
RECYCLE
fbrytir
own future.





6
ZHte gggt (Earolinian
June 19,1991
ECU Summer Theater presents "Fantasticks

By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
For the week of June 19-29
McGinnis Theater will be filled
with sound of music. During
that time the musical
"Fantasticks" will be performed
by the ECU Summer Theater.
In light of an interview with
Gary Faircloth, the director of
the Summer Theater, the musi-
cal should prove to be quite
entertaining.
"It's the longest running
show in the history of Ameri-
can theater' said Faircloth. "(It
has run for thirty years at the
Sullivan Theater in New York
Concerning the plot of the
performance, Faircloth merely
said that "it's a modem day
Romeo and luliet
"1 think it's got some groat
songs like Try to Remember'
and 'Soon it's Gonna Rain" he
commented. "Just songs that
people will recognize once they
hear them
Faircloth said that the actors
performing Fantaskicks come
from a varied background.
"This show has five equity
people, and three local people
he said. "Charles Cambell is
playing thecharacter named El
Gayo,and heworkswithaNorth
Carolina Opera theater.
"And David Hamilton is
here, he's from New York, but
his mother lives in Tittle' Wash-
ington, and his father was
Murray Hamilton, who played
the mayor in the movie 'Jaws
He is playing the young boy
the love interest.
"Then we have Tom Spivey
from New York, James Maxwell
from Vermont and Dan Strickler
from New York.
"We also have Lisa
Edwards who is a student here
in Musical Theater; she's playing
Louisa, the young girl.
"We have Don Biehn on the
acting faculty who's playing the
Old Actor. And we have Kyle
Zimmerman who's a student in
our department
In conclusion he com-
mented that "if s a nice cast
TheChairman of the Theater
Arts Department, John Shearin,
is directing the musical. Faircloth
said that Shearin iscertainly well
adapted for his role.
"I think he's enjoying it he
said. "He'sreallyinhiselement
he loves to direct
Shearin has had a good deal
of experience in the theater, as
well as other acting mediums.
Shearin is probably best known
to audiances through his work
on television over the last 18
years.
He has appeared in New
York on and off Broadway and
in Las Angeles, as well as many
prominant local theaters.
Last semester, he directed
and starred in the ECU produc-
tion of "The Rainmaker
Faircloth thought it impor-
tant to add that over the sum-
mer, the theater would not be
giving out student discounts as
in the past.
"We're supported during
the school year by SG A, but dur-
ing the summer we're self sup-
porting he explained.
However Faircloth did
stress that "if a student comes
with an activity card between 8
and 8:15 on the night they want
to see the show, they get in for
$7.50"
Thediscounted rated 2the
normal price), he reiterated,
would adhere only to the time
guidelines.
Regardless of a discounted
price or not, the production of
Fantsticks certainly proves to be
interesting as well as an enter-
taining one. One and all should
try to attend.
-Pturto Coort��� of ECU Th��l�r Department
Charles Ronald Campbell is featured in "Fantasticks this week
presentation by the ECU Summer Theater Program.
Lenny Kravitz returns strong with Mama Said
By Kendal Vance
Staff Writer
Over the course of time, suc-
cessful artists ha ve found the nerve
to abandon their aMigion.
Whether it be from the lure of
success or the greed of wealth art-
ists have sacrificed their faith for
the tinsel glimmer of generic top40
hits, often times creating dime-a-
dozen cliches void at any creative
elements
Lenny Kravitz however, has
found a way to incorporate his
faith and knowdedge of the Bible
into his music in such a way that it
conveys a unique sound.
His own special signature of
style is marked with )azz, rock
opera, gospel, blues, folk rock and
soul.
Mama Said91 Virgin) is
Kravitz's second LP. It follows Let
nRue(89Virgin),they are both
mainly focused on the enlighten-
ment of the mindset of our society
and the brotherhood of man
women.
With subjects rangi ng from the
environmental hazardsofnon bio-
degradable products, to racism, to
love,and politics Kravitz uses pas-
sages from the bible to take on the
evils that men do.
With such quotes as "I build
this temple of love" he speaks of
the sanctity of marriage.
" Thi ne Ki n gdom Come, Thine
Will Be done combines quotes
with prayersto drive his message
home.
He also makes several refer-
ences to Moses and Jesus.
Unlike RE.M. ("Losing My
Religion") who come across at
timesasdoubtfuland despondent,
kravitz's tone is for the most part
hopeful and optimistic.
One can feel his faith, feel the
chills trickle down the back of the
neck.
When emofions bellow forth
from notes so deep and so long
you can feel his strength, the cha-
risma of this person reaches out.
Lenny Kravitz Believes.
His unique use of violins and
homs, creates an orchestrated chior
devoted souly to the evolution of
sound.
"Fields of Joy I & II dispite
the name, are of a more melan-
cholyflavor. The flutes merge with
electric guitars that march the
drums along in an almost forbid-
ding tone.
"Al ways on the Run a popu-
larly known as Mama Said-isdown
right funk rock, it is a humorous
view on "Mamas" lamentations
on life.
There is a great focus on homs
which adds a unique style and
contributes to the ultima te success
of this song.
"Stand By My Woman is an
idealistic expression of a woman
who is apparently the essence of
his life.
"It Ain't Over Till ifs Over
the beach musk style and smooth-
ness recalls the Style Councils no-
torious flare for groove. This song
had a continuous allure without
the use of blatant referals and ex-
plicirness so frequently used in
todays rap music.
"Rowers For Zoe is obvi-
ously a lullaby where Kravitz
croons softy of angels in heaven
and the sweetness of a childs inno-
cence and niavite.
In what "Goes Around Comes
Around' Aravitz could be the
Moses he has sung about stand ing
on the mountain pointing his fin-
ger fore warning that we must
mend our evil ways.
That a world rooted to a con-
stant climb up the materialistic
tower of babel is bound to come
crashing down upon us.
"Stop Druggin Around an-
other popular song, isa short verse
which mates interesting use of the
word sex-o-lette.
"When the Morning Turns to
Nightis a eulogy to those who
relent to the temptation of sub-
stance abuse. The songisadescrip-
tion of the ultimate death that re-
sults in heroin addiction.
"Butterfly is the last song on
MamaSaid. "Butterfly is not only
the title but also an ageless symbol
of femininity.
It is a romantic love song tell-
ing of a girl who is not only beau-
tiful to look at but also attractive to
love and respect.
If you like good music Lenny
Kravitz is not just another top 40,
make-a-quick-mitiion thendisap-
pear, flash-in-the-pan-artist. Lenny
Aravitz is here to stay.
Willis explodes as summer's classic stealing cat burglar
Ultra-rich,
mega-trendy
Darwin(2nd
from I.) and
Minerva
Mayflower
(Richard E.
Grant,Sandra
Bernhard),
assisted by
their capable
butler Alfred
try to force
Hudson Hawk
(Bruce Willis)
to help them
achieve world
domination.
-Photo Courtoay of
Tri-Star Picture
By Stephanie Tullo
SUff Writer
Bruce Willis is the famed cat
burglar "Hudson Hawk His an-
ticsinthisaction-packed movie take
him to New York, Rome, Budapest,
London and Los Angeles so the
scenery equals the predictable vio-
lence.
The movie begins with Hudson
Hawk finalizing his ten-year prison
term and meeting his old partner,
Tommy Five-Tone, Danny Aiello.
The world's greatest cat bur-
glar is blackmailed into stealing
three pieces of Leonards Da Vincis
Work, in exchange for his partner's
life.
The pieces include the Da
Vinci's model of a house, the vortex,
the coolex, a sketchbook of Da
Vinci's work and a 16th century
heli-copter.
What Hudson Hawk is un-
aware of is the true intentions of the
blackmailers. They do not treasure
these prized possesions themselves,
but for what they contain.
Each object has pieces of crys-
tal, when assembled and placed into
a machine can make the most
worthless objects into the most
priceless.
The intention of the blackmail-
ers is to take over the world.
Bruce Willis must keep his
partner alive, himself and save the
world.
This movie has a serious motif
combined with some theatncal hu-
mor, including witty Three-Stooges
slapstick, sly comments and some-
what unrealistic happenings.
This Week's Entertainment
r,iv,t,Y 21st
Mary on the Dash
Saturday 22nd
Mind Over Matter
?Thursday 27th
The Return of
OPEN MIKE NITE
Hours
Mon.&Tu 11 am-3pm
Wed 11 am-3pm A 9 pm 1 am
Thuri-AFri. 1 lam-lam
513Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
The Arts Council of Wilson presents
LIVINGSTON
Thursday, June 27, 8:00 pm
Fske High School Auditorium
Tickets: $10.00 in advance, $12.50 at the door
For information call the Wilson Arts Center, 291-4329
TTie,
CCMedY
230NE
Every Wednesday
ATTIC
752-73031809 E. 5th St.
Every Thursday
99i Draft
99 Highballs
99 Memberships
SATURDAY, JUNE 9
WRAUD AMERICA
Atlantic Recordins Artist
ItWftD
(99 32oz Draft)
(99 3ftox Draft)
Science Fiction
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Aliens haven't always popped
out of the bellies of unsuspecting
hostson the Sd-Fi big screen. Before
theonset of gory special effects there
were cerebral mohori picture fan ta -
sies. Although graprucs have always
beenaSF picture makers best fnend,
the now hard-to-find content was
once the focal pointofmanyfilmsof
fantasy.
'The Day the Earth Stood
StiH"(1951):
A flying saucer visits Earth,
bringing a humanoid being who
embarks on a mission to wam the
people of Earth that thev will be
destroyed if they conti nue to tamper
with nuclear power He is hounded
by authorities but finds refuge with
an unaware American familv.
Hisindentitvand whereabouts
are revealed, however, leading to
his death and then his resurrection
by Gort, the seven-foot, seven-inch-
tall robot on the spaceship.
The warning is finally deliv-
ered at theend; the film dosing with
the spaceship flying away
Directed by Robert Wise, the
film stars Michael Rennie, Patnaa
Neal, Hugh Mario
"Metropohs"(l
ThisGerman sil
life on Earth in
Workers live underjj
masters on top.
The sets are
screenplay is mesrri
A color-tinted
version with a new I
music soudtrack
recent years it is,
way to see this hlr
FntzLangdiret
Helm and Alfred A
thefilm'stalented
one of the movie's
phers, yeus later
ematographer 4 I
"War of the W'f
Hostile alien 1
land on Earth and
�he planet Mi
centered onht�'
phvsicist.and h; I
Robinson
As the
vival, the aliens col
war with their di-i
ravs
Defeat seems
the Martiaas die
an ordinary baci
All ABC
permits
Special Members
0DfUVttMVt
BLUE
MONDAY
ROCK-N-ROU.
CONCERT VIDEO
NIGHT
Snowtime 9pm
MOVIE
TUESDAY
$95
DOMESTIC
&OTTIES
$1 90
RAIL SHOTS
Newly Released
Films
Starting at 9pm
MID-WEEK
INSANITY
Come roe dinner at;
the FIZZ ana get a i
tree pa� �c Itie
Comedy- Zone
$1 75
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Cape Cods
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MONDAY THRU T�
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Billiard:
r
m
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Sports
Pad
FRE1
OF
for ALL E
One gift cheel
Coupon ex
Free admissic
Downtown Gn





6
ottiz JEaat (Earnlinian
June 19,1991
ECU Summer Theater presents "Fantasticks
n
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
For the week of lone 1s-29
McGinnisTheater will be filled
with sound of rrui.sk Iunng
that time. the musical
"Fantasticks" willhepert irnuxt
bv the ECU Summer Theater.
In light of an interview with
Gary Faircloth, the director of
the Summer Theater, the must
cal should prove to be quite
entertaining
"It's the longest running
show in the history of Ameri-
can theater said lain loth "It
has nin for) thirty years at the
Sullivan Theater in New York
Concerning the plot of the
performance, Faircloth merely
said that it's a modern day
Romeo and hiliet
"I thifiK it's gin some great
songs I like Trv to Remember'
and Soon lt's( ionna Run. he
commented fust songs th.it
people will recognize once they
hear them
Faircloth said that the actors
performing Fantaskicks come
from a varied background.
"I"his show has five equity
people, and three local people
he said "Charles Cambell is
plaving Ithecharacternamed Fl
(iavo.and he works with a North
Carolina (pera theater.
"And Lavid Hamilton is
here, he's from New York, but
his mother lives in Tittle' Wash-
ington, and his father was
Murray 1 lamilton, who played
the mavor in the movie laws '
He is plaving the young boy
the love interest
'Then weHave Tom Spivey
from New York. lames Maxwell
from Vermont and DanStru Tier
from New York
"I We also) have I is,i
Fdwards who is a student here
in Musical Theater; she's playing
1 ouisa, the young girl.
"We have !n Biehn on the
acting faculty who's plaving the
Old Actor. And we have Kyle
Zimmerman who's a student in
our department
In conclusion he com-
mented that "it's a nice cast
TheChairman of the Theater
Arts Department, John Shearin,
isdirecting the musical. Faircloth
said that Shearin iscertainlv well
adapted for his role.
"I think he's enjoying it he
said. "He'sr eaDy inhiselement.
he loves to direct
Shearin has had a gcxxi deal
of experience in the theater, as
well as other acting mediums.
Shearin is probablv best known
to audiances through his work
on television over the last 18
years.
He has appeared in New
.rk on and off Broadway and
in Las Angeles, as well as many
prominant local theaters.
I -ast semester, he directed
and starred in the ECU produc-
tion of "The Rainmaker
Fairc'oth thought it impor-
tant to add that over the sum-
mer, the theater would not be
giving out student discounts as
in the past.
"We're supported during
the school year by SG A, but dur-
ing the summer we're self sup-
porting he explained.
However Faircloth did
stress that "if a student comes
with an activity card between 8
and 815 on the night they want
to see the show, thev hct in for
$730"
Thediscounted rated 2the
normal price), he reiterated,
would adhere only to the time
guidelines
Regardless of a discounted
price or not, the production of
Fantstickscertainly proves to be
interesting as well as an enter-
taining one. One and all should
trv to attend.
-Pho�o Court��y of ECU Th��l�r D�par!m�nt
Charles Ronald Campbell is featured in "Fantasticks this ��� � � -
presentation by the ECU Summer Theater Program.
Lenny Kravitz returns strong with Mama Said
By Kendal Vance
Staff Wnter
Over the course ot time, sue
cesstul artists have found the nerve
to abandon their religion.
Whether it he from the lure of
successor the greed of wealth art-
ists have sacrificed their faith for
the tinsd glimmer of generic top 40
hits, often times creating dime-a-
doen cliches void of any creative
elements
Lenny Kr.mt however, has
tound a wuv to incorporate his
faith and knoweledge of the Bible
into his music in such a way that it
conveys a unique sound
His own special signature ot
stvle is marked with yz, rock
opera, gospel, blues, folk rock and
soul
Mama Said91 Virgin) is
Kravitz's second IP. It follows Let
UnvRulci 89 Virgin), they are both
mainly focused on the enlighten-
ment at the mindset of our society
and the brotherhood at man
women
With subjects ranging fnm the
environmental hazardsofnon bio-
degradable products, to racism, to
love, and politics Kravitz uses pas-
sages from the bible to take on the
evils that men do.
With such quotes as "1 build
this temple ot love" he speaks of
the sanctity ot marriage.
" I hme Kingdom Come,Thine
Will bV done combines quotes
with praversto drive his message
home.
He also makes several refer-
ences to Moses and Jesus.
Unlike R.E.V1. ("Losing My
Religion") who come acnss at
timesasdoubttul and despondent,
kravitz's tone is for the most part
hopeful and optimistic
One can feel his faith, fed the
chills trickle down the back of the
neck.
When emotions bellow forth
from mites so deep and SO long
you can feel his strength, the cha-
nsma of this person reaches out.
Lennv Kravitz Believes.
1 lis unique use of violins and
horns, creates an orchestrated chior
devoted soulv to the evolution of
sound.
Fields of Joy I & II dispite
the name, arv of a more melan-
cholv flavor. The flutes merge with
electric guitars that march the
drums along in an almost forbid-
ding tone.
"Alwavson the Run a popu-
larly known as Mama Said- isdown
right funk rock, it is a humorous
view on "Mamas" lamentations
on life.
There is a great focus on horns
which adds a unique stvle and
contributes to the ultimate success
ot this song.
"Stand By My Woman is an
idealistic expression of a woman
who is apparently the essence of
his life
"It Ain't Over Till it's Over
the beach music style and smooth-
ness avails the Style Councils no
tonous flare for groove This song
had a continuous allure without
the use of blatant referals and ex
plicitness so frequently used in
todavs rap music.
"Flowers For Zoe is obvi-
ouslv a lullabv where Kravitz
mxns softy of angels in heaven
and the sweetness of a childs inno-
cence and niavite.
In what "does Around Comes
Around Aravitz could be the
Moses he has sung about standing
on the mountain pointing his fin-
ger fore warning that we must
mend our evil ways.
That a world united to a con-
stant climb up the materialistic
tower of babel is bound to come
crashing down upon us.
"Stop Druggin Anuind an-
other popular song, isa short verse
which mates interesting use of the
word sex-o-lette.
"When the Morning Turns to
Nightis a eulogy to those who
re-lent to the temptation ot sub-
stance abuse. Fhe son t: is a descrip-
tion ot the ultimate death that re-
sults in henin addiction.
"Butterfly is the last song on
Mama Said "Butterfly is not only
the title but also an ageless symbol
Of femininity
It is a romantk love song tell-
ing of a girl who is not only beau-
tiful to kxik at but also attractive to
love and respect.
It you like co�xl music Lenny
Kravitz is not lust another top 40,
make-a-quick-miTlion thendjsap-
pear,t"lah-in-the-pan-artist Iennv
Aravitz is here to Stay.
Willis explodes as summer's classic stealing cat burglar
-SUltra-rich.
mega-trendy
Darwin(2nd
from 1.) and
Minerva
Mayflower
��(Richard E.
Grant .Sandra
ik jte.Bernhard).
assisted by
their capable
butler Alfred
try to force
Hudson Hawk
(Bruce Willis)
IBto help them
�achieve world
�domination.
-Photo CourtMy of
"V HBHTrf Star Pictures
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
Bruce Willis is the famed cat
burglar "Hudson Hawk His an-
tics in thisaction-packed movie Like
him to New York, Rome. Budapest,
London and Lis Angeles so the
scenery equals the predictable vio-
lence.
The mo vie begins with Hudson
Ha wk finalizing his ten-vear prison
term and meeting his old partner.
Tommy Five-Tone, Dannv Aiello.
The world's greatest cat bur
glar is blackmailed into stealing
three pieces of Leonards Da Vinos
Work, in exchange for his partner's
life.
The pieces include the Da
Vinci's model of a house, the vortex,
the coolex, a sketchbook of Da
Vinci's work and a lhth century
heli-copter.
What Hudson Hawk is un-
aware of is the true intentions of the
blackmailers Thev do not treasure
these prized pi isseSM ns themsel es,
hut for what thev contain.
Each object has pieces of crys-
tal , when assembled and placed into
a machine can make the most
worthless objects into the most
priceless.
The intention of the blackmail-
ers is to Like over the world.
Bruce Willis must keep his
partner alive, himself and save the
world.
This movie has a senous motif
combined with some theatrical hu-
mor, including witty Three-Stooges
slapstick, sly comments and some-
what unrealistic happenings.
This Week's Entertainment
lv.
21st
Mary on the Dash
Saturday 22nd
Mind Over Matter
'Thursday 27th
The Return of
OPEN MIKE NITE
Hours
Mon.&Tue11 anvtym
Wed11am-3pmA9pm1 am
Thurs Kfr 1 lam-lam
Sat.9pm-1am
513Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
The Arts Council of Wilson presents
LIVINGSTON
The
COMedY
ZONE
Every Wednesday
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St.
Every Thursday
99 Draft
991 Histtballs
99C Memberships
SATURDAY, JUNE ��
Thursday, June 27, 8.00 pm
Fike High School Auditorium
Tickets: $10.00 in advance, $12.50 at the door
For information call the Wilson Arts Center, 291-4329
MOULD AMERICA
Atlantic Recordins Artist
L
19 WEDWltQft COMEDY ZONE (Dmn Storti Jim Holder)
toTHuii.Tancpoaa�ap�Md�ar�KRMKm(99 32oz Draft)
t1 FW THEE MUGGERS and t Special Guest (99 32oi Draft)
Science Fiction
By Michael Harrison
Staff Wnter
Aliens haven t always popped
out of the bellies of unsuspecting
rstMin the Sci-Rbtgscreen b. I
theonset of gt ry sex- lai erf ects then-
were OCRbnl me tk �r, picture fanta
sies. Although gra ph iv ha vt-al.�
beenaSFpicruri-makt-rsbesJ rnend,
the now hard-to-hnd content v ts
once the focal r mt t rv.ir yfi '��
fantasy
'The Day th
stani95i)
A flying anh
bringing a humanoid be
embarks on a i � a am the
people f Earth that the.
destroyed if die) continue fa tamper
with nuclear power H. -hounded
by authorrnesbut finds i ,vith
an unaware Arnerican fan
Hisindenhtyand
are revealed, h
his death and then his resurrei
byGortthes. i I - . nch-
tall robot on the spaces) :
The warning
eredattheend;ti.
the spaceship frying away
Directed bv Robert Wise, the
him star- M
Neal.Hugh Mark -vj
I
This
htf n tarth in I
ve under
masttTs on top
rhesetsarespe
icret pia i mesn
A
Verv:
music soudr
f-nt
I
-



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June 19,1991
glfre gggt (Earolfnian June 19.1991 7
tasticks

"��t 0�p�r1m�n!
-
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t tht
H'ot tne
inis to
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hat rv
on.
last s�
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� i most
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�rld.
. must keep his
- � ind save the
his rm vie has a serious motif
r some theatrical hu-
� g witty rhree Stooges
y comments and some-
tk happenings
ATTIC
b-7303209E 5th St.
Eery Thursday
W Draft
99c Highballs
99 Memberships
IRDAY, JUNE 22
i
a
:UILD AMERICA
ic Recording Artist
tCMt COMEDY ZONE (Danny Stortz Jim Holder)
cpexrifer c tanone (99 32Z Draft)
and � Special Guest (99 32Z Draft)
Science Fiction of today relies on healthy roots from the past
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Aliens haven't always popped
out of the bellies of unsuspecting
Vsts on the Sd-Fi big screen. Before
I heoaset of gory special effects thea-
were cerebral morion picture fanta
aes. Although graph icshavealways
tx vn a SF picture makers best fnend,
the now hard-to-find content was
ixe the focal point of nvanv filmsof
mtasy.
"I"he Day the Earth SuxkI
ill"(ll):
A tlvnng saucer visits Earth,
ringing a humanoid being who
niharks on a mission to warn the
.�ople oi Earth that they will be
lestroyediftheycontinuetotamper
ith nudeaf power. He is hounded
I authontiesbut finds refuge with
in unaware American fa mil v.
I lisnxientitvarkl whereabouts
ire revealed, however, leading to
s death and then his resurrec turn
v Gort,oSesever�-foot, seven-inch
ill robot on the spaceship.
The warning is finally deliv-
ered at theend. the film closing with
u- spaceship flving awav
Directed by Robert Wise, the
m stars Michael Rennie, Patricia
Neal. Hugh Mario we and Sam Jaffe.
"Metropolis'(1926):
ThisGeiman silent film predicts
life on Earth in the year 2000.
Workersliveunderground withthe
masters on top.
Thesetsarespectacularand the
screenplay is mesmerizing.
A color-tinted (not colorized)
version with a newly-recorded rock
music soudtrack was released in
recent years. It is, by far, the best
way to see this film.
Fnt1 angdirected and Bngitte
1 lelm and Alfred Abel were among
the film's talented cast KarlFreund,
one of the movie's tow photogra-
phers, vears later became the cin-
ematographer of "1 Love 1 ucy
"War of the Worlds "(1953):
1 lostile alien beings from Mars
land on Earth and threaten to take
over the planet Much of the film is
centered on Gene Barry, a nuclear
physicist, and his love interest, Ann
Robinson
As they seek escape and sur-
vival, the aliens continue to wage
war with their disintegrating heat
rays.
Defeat seems imminent until
the Martians die from infection of
an ordinary bacteria to which
earthlings are immune.
Plotting, charcterizarion and
acting are somewhat labored.
However, the special effects, which
won an Academy Award, manage
to carry the film very well and look
especially terrific since the film is
color.
To create the Martian shriek,
the sound of rubbing ice across a
contact microphone was combined
with a tape of a woman's high-
pitched scream ran backward at
fluctuating speeds.Byron Haskin, a
former special effects supervisor,
directed this fim.
"Star Wars"(l 977)
One of the top grossing films of
all time, "Star Wars" earned $400
million in ticket sales worldwide
(some sources say $800 million). It
earned about the same in movie-
related merchandise, and earned
seven Oscars for its 3h3 special ef-
fects and for John Williams' bril-
liant music score.
The Imperial Galactic Empire
is ruled by the evil Grand Motf
Tarkin (played by Peter Crushing)
and the villainous lordDarth Vader
(played bv David Prowse with the
voice of lames Earl Jones).
The now familiar team of

ft
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fighters, Princess L.eia Organa
(Carrie Fisher), farmer Luke
Skvwalker (Mark Hamill), and the
fast living starship pilot Han Solo
(Harrison Ford) join with the an-
droids �31X3 and R2-D2 and the
entire' rebel force to tight the evil
empin and destroy the mtergalac-
tic threat of Death Star, an im-
mensely powerful space station.
Alec Guinness pla vs Obi-Wan-
Kenobe instructing Skywalker
about "The Force a mysterious
supernatural power that can he used
for evil deeds perhaps more easily
than for grxxi. George Lucas cre-
ated and directed this enormously
entertaining film.
Meanwhile, "Star Wars" pnn
ripal stare ravecontinued to be very
successful. Fisher has recently es-
tablished another earner as a best-
selling, en ticallv-acclaimod author
Mark Hamill continues to act,
appearing most recently on CBS's
"The Flesh and Harrison Ford
achieved even greater stature with
his "Indiana Jones" movie tnlogy
and other film projects, such as
"Witness" and Presumed Inno-
cent
"The Fmnire Strikes
Back(K,v�.
The team from "Star Wars" re-
unites to battle Darth Vader again
Luke Skvwalker leams how to
use The Force more effectively with
the help of edi Master Yoda a
puppet handled by Frank Oz of the
Muppefe"). An unliktly mmantic
match blooms between Princess
1 via and Han Solo, Billy Dee Wil-
liams avstars as Landoalnssian,
who reluctantly sends Solo to a
bounty hunter, helping to bring
Skywalker into Vader's clutches
Later, Vader eventually reveals
he is Skywalker's father, hoping to
lure Luke to the dark side of The
Force.The characters, as before, are
certainly distinct, but the acting and
George Lucas' scripts are somew hat
too melodrarruc for the movie's
good.
Irving Kershner directs per-
fectly, creating a usual masterpiece,
and John Williams' music score is
as tern he as ever.
Camera movements are fast
and sweeping, and special effects
are accommodated gracefully and
expertly, enhancing the story im-
measurably.
The next sequel, "Return of the
ledi was unleashed in 1983 and is
practically an abomination next to
its predecessors. The film has its
moments, but they're few and far
between.
NoiNn iN"3anis
NOiNn iN3anis
NAKED GUN
from the files of POLICE SQUAD!
(As
Th � AY, Jl INE 20
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Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dr. l





9.1991
iHtje East Carolinian June 19,1991 7
tasticks


ma Said
at burglar

I �me-
ATTIC
03 4 209 E 5th St
i
RDAY, JUNE 22
MILD AMERICA
�Q� COMtDV ZOHC fDanny Storti I Jim Holder)
nartfw�jmor�,(99c 32oz Draft)
�nd i sp�ci�i Gu�� (99 32oz Draft)
Science Fiction of today relies on healthy roots from the past
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
�Miens haven't always popped
il ot the bellies of unsuspecting
MsonthoSo h bigsereen before
te onset of gory special effects there
erebral motion picture fanta
es Although graphics haveahvas
ecnaSFpicture makers best friend,
� now rvird to find content was
n e the focal point of manyfilmsot
mtas
rhe Day the Earth Missi
flying saucer visits Earth
a humanoid being whi
irks on a mission to wam the
of Earth that they will be
stro cd if they continueto tamper
� ith nuclear power He is hounded
authoritiesbut finds refuge with
n unaware American family
1 hsindenriryand whereabout?
� revealed however teadii
- death And then his resurrec Hon
rt theseven fool seven inch
i robot on the spaceship
�� w aming is finally delh
� theend the film closing with
iceship flying away
Erected b) Robert Wise, the
stars Michael Rennie, Patricia
Neal high Marlowe ami Sam lafte
wMetR3fx4is"(1926)
ThisGerman silent film predicts
life on Farth in the vear 2000
Workers live underground with the
masters on top
rhe sets are spectacular and die
screenplay is mesmerizing.
A color tinted (not colorized)
version with a newly recorded rodk
music soudtrack was released m
recent years It is, bv tar, the host
� ,w to mv this film
I ritz 1 angdirected and Brigitte
lelmand Alfred Abel were among
the film's talented cast karli reund,
one of the nio le s tow photogra-
phers years later became the cin-
ematographer of "1 1 ove I uc
� irof the Worids"0953)
Hostile alien beings from Mars
land on Earth and threaten to take
over the planet Muchol thetilmis
centered on (lene Barry, a nuclear
physicist,and his love interest, Ann
Robinson.
As they svi� escape and Mir
vival the aliens continue to wage
war with their disintegrating heat
rays.
Defeat seems imminent until
the Martians die from infection of
,tn ordinary bacteria to which
earthlings are immune.
Plotting, charcterization and
acting are somewhat labored.
1 lowever, the special effects, whk h
won an Academv Award, manage
to carry the film very well and look
especially terrific since the film is
color
To create the Martian shriek,
the sound of rubbing ice across a
contact microphone was combined
with a tape erf a woman s high
pitched scream ran backward at
fluctuating speeds Bvron Haskin a
former special effects supervisor,
directed this tim
"Star Wars't 177)
(. W of the top grossing films ot
all time, star Wars" earned $400
million in ticket sales worldwide
(some sources say SHOO million), t
earned about the same in movie-
related men handise, and earned
seven ()scars tor its 363 special ef-
fects and for lohn Williams bril
liant music score
The Imperial ialactic Empire
is niled by the evil (.rand Mctt
Tarkin (played bv Peterrushing)
and the villainous I ordDarthVader
(played bv David Prowse with the
voice ot lames Earl lonos)
1 he now familiar team of

Se &&te at
ff
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PLAY A
GAME
fighters. Princess Leia Organa
( arne t isher), farmer Luke
sWv walkerM.trW r iamill), and 'tie
tast living starship pilot I Ian Solo
(Harrison lord) join with the an
droids i 'ID and R2 1 2 and the
entire rebel force to tn;ht the evil
empire and destnn the intergala
th threat ot l'�th Mar, .in im-
mensely powerful space station
A lei (.umness plays(bi Wan
Kt-nciK' instructing Skywalker
about 'The Force a mysterious
supernatural powerthati anb
tor evil deeds perhaps more easilv
than tor good leorge i u. a;
attl ,nd directed thisenormouslv
entertaining him
Meanwhile, star Wars pnn
c ipal stars havecontinued to be very
successful. Fisher has recently es-
tablished another areer as a best-
selline crihcallv aa laimeil author
M.irk Hamill continues to act,
appearing most nsvntlv on&'s
'The Mesh and Harrison lord
a hieved even greater shitum with
his "Indiana ones" movie trilogy
and other film prefects, such as
"Witness" aivi 'Presumed Inno-
etlt
"T he Emnire Strikes
Ha. kt !
rhe team from "Star Wars re
unites to Kittle I �arth ader again
1 uke Skvwalker learns how to
use rheFon emoreeffo lively with
the help ot ledi Master Yoda i
puppet handled by Frai k zotthe
Muppets"). An unlikelv romantk
h blooms between Princess
: u Han Solo Billy I lee A
ii.inis i ik M.irs as 1 andi i alrissian,
who reluctantly sends Solo to a
bounty hunter, helping to bring
Skvwalker into Vader s i tut. hes
Later, Vadereventually reveals
he is skvwalker s father, hoping " i
lure Luke to the dark side of I"Vh-
1 �( ir e I"he i haraclers, as rx-ti ire aan
i ertainlydistinctbuttheactmgand
( H-ore Lucas' scripts are somevv hat
too melodramu tor the movie's
good.
Iring Kershner directs -r
recfjy,creatingavisual masterpio e,
and (ohn Williams' music scon is
as terrific as ever.
( amera movements are t.ist
and sweeping, and special effei ts
are a� emmodated gracefully and
expertly, enhancing the storv im-
measurabty.
rhe next sequel Return ot the
ledi was unleashed in 13 and is
practically an abomination next to
its predecessors. The film ha- its
moments, but they're few ai
between
NAKED GUN
from the files of POLICE SQUAD!
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Memorial Or.





ahc �aat (Tarultntan June 19,1991 7
Science Fiction of today relies on healthy roots from the past
d. n- iii. � - i 11i. u i�.)c�i,n� nMtMinMnomwrnina twht.Ts imss i.i.i Orpana Mark H. mullontinues to .� t Later, Vader event
tasticks
AA
By Michael Harrison
M-lft Writer
Miens haven t always p�ppi
I tin bellies 't unsuspecting
ntheSci Rbigscreen IV �
�etofgor) special effects there
i rebral motion pk rurefanta
Mthough graphics havealwavs
iSl ;� turemakersbestfriend
. �� hard to find content was
" � � cal pointol nvim hlmsol
as
isits Earth
�eini: w h
mission to wam thi-
rth that th will be
r conbnuc to tamper
. - -m't 1 If ishoui
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screenplay is mesmerizing
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fluctuating speeds Bvron 1 laskin,a
former special effects supervisor,
lim ted this fim
"Star Wars 1977)
Oneol the top grossing HI msoi
all tune. Star Wars earned $400
million in ticket sales worldwide
(some sources say $800million) It
earned about the same in movie-
related men handise, and earned
. i n Oscars tor its 3h3 special e!
!e ts and tor lohn Williams bnl
liant musk s i re
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is ruled by the c il ' Irand Moff
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IB
glhg gaat (Carolinian
June 19,1991
SPORTS
Kinston clinches first-half championship
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The Kinston Indians clinched
the first half Southern Division
Championship Monday night with
a spasmodic 13-11 win over the
Durham Bulls.
The game was laced with fe-
verish scoring bv both teams
The bottom half of the second
inning saw the Indians amass seven
runs on five hits to take an early 7-1
lead
The Pulls, in turn, went ahead
with and eight-run fifth that put the
score at 10-8. Kinston then put the
game away with five runs in the
seventh that put the score at 13-
10.
Durham got off to a 1 -0 Start in
the top of the first as lead off man
Mike Mordecai doubled off the right
field fence. Their lead did not last
the second mning.
The second inning started in-
nocently enough as Brad Dejardin
and Paulino Tena both struck out to
begin the inning but Miguel Flores
doubled and Meade walked.
With runnersat the comersand
a hit-and-run in action, Nick Sued
singled and cleared the bases. Brian
Giles then looped to leftfield that
brough t i n Sued from second. Tracy
Sanders then stepped up to the plate
and hit a twcvrun homer that put
Kinston ahead 5-1.
The Indians scored two more
runs on errors bv a usually error
free Bulls team The Bulls left the
inning behind bv six nins.
In the third Mike Young came
in to replace David Nied. The Indi-
ans pounded DurhamsacefoT seven
runs on five hits in two innings
Before Monday's outing, Nied had
the second best ERA (1.03) in the
long though as Kinston exploded in Carolina League.
The Bulls scored once in the
fourth on a homer by Eddie Perez
but it was a small prelude to the
devastation they would cause in
the next inning. Ramon Caraballo
singled to start the inning and
Mardecai doubled. Pat Kelly
grounded and reached on an error
by Marc Tepper that scored
Caraballo.
Nievcs singled and brought in
Mordecai from third and set upTim
Gillis' double that brought in two
more runs. Shawn Bryant was then
replaced bvCarl Johnson in the fifth
since Brvant had yet to get an out m
the fifth inning.
Johnson gave up one more hit
and two mn? runs in the inning
and Kinston managed to escape
with onlv a two-run deficit, 10-$.
Durham could only manufac-
ture one more run in the game and
that was on a homorun by Tony
Tarascoin the ninth asGarland Kiser
came in for Johnson and recorded
the save.
The big story in the seventh for
the Indians was Tom Eiterman's
pinch-hit grand slam that put the
Indians ahead to stay. Paulino Tena
singled in Dejardin that started the
scoringin the seventh. Miguel Flores
walked and Meade was hit by a
pitch that loaded the bases for
Eiterman.
The rest of the game is history
as well as the first half of the season
for the Indians who clenched the
Southern Division Championship
with the win.
Winston-Salem will finish
sccondin the division.
The Indians finish up the first
half of the season against Durham
at Grainger stadium but they begin
the second half with a tough road
trip. They face Winston-Salem and
Durham before coming home to
face Peninsula
Seahawks sign two prospects
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
The University of North Caro-
lina at Wilmington acquired some
impressive candidates for their la
dies golf team yesterday when
Michele Immekus and Stephanie
Pouhn signed letters of intent to
plav for the Seahawks.
Head Coach 1 ea Dudley made
the announcement une 17 adding
even more depth to a team that is
returning four of six starters from
last year's squad.
"We lost two hey players to
graduation in Nina van Drumpt
and Laura Covington Dudlev said
"We'll be a very voung team, so I
was looking for someone to mesh
and complement our current play-
ers
"1 think Michele and Stephanie
certainly fit that bill
Immekus, of Hoffman, Illinois
currently ranks among the Top 10
golfers in her state and consistently
plays with an eight handicap. She
also finished second in the sectionals
and was a conference medalist
Also impressive in Coach
Dudley's eves is the fact that
Immekus has worked tor the past
year on a daily basis with I. hm
Suttie, head coach at Northwestern
University and teaching pro.
"I'm extremely excited about
getting another one of jim SutrJe's
students Dudley said. "He pro-
vides his students with a good solid
foundation
"Mkheleisa very strongplayer
and could have a major impact as
early as her freshman year. She has
shown rapid improvement over the
past two years
Pouhn, of Acton, Massachu-
setts, meanwhile, has competed on
the boys' team tor the past three
consecutive seasons and is consid-
ered one of the top four players in
Massachusetts.
the National JuniorTourand placed
sixth in the Massachusetts Junior
State Amateur. She is also the three-
time defending junior champion at
Nashawruc Country dub.
'1 think Stephanie is a late de-
veloper Dudley said. "She's the
tvpe of person who keeps the other
players motivated and works hard.
She will provide us with good depth
initially"
Coach Dudley certainly has
gtxxl reason to feel excited about
next season with the additions of
Immekus and Pouhn. Along with
the returning players to the squad,
the Seahawks' have potential for
South Africa allowed
to host Olympic games
Poulin was selected to play on great success.
Loughery hired as
new coach for Heat
MIAMI (AP) � Miami Heat
management plans to consult with
their new head coach, Kevin
Lougherv. about the upcomingdraft
� even though Loughery is still
working for the Atlanta Hawks.
Loughery took his sixth NBA
coaching job Monday, but will not
be released fmm his contract as an
assistant with the Hawks until after
the June 26 NBA draft.
The Heat's owners aren't
pleased with the arrangement.
'To say that we're very happy
abou t it, we're not co-owner Lewis
Schaffel said at a Monday press
conference. "We have no choice but
to comply
The Hawks said they did not
want to release Loughery until after
the draft because he had been "part
of the decision-making process
Schaffel said.
Schaffel also said he didn't
know of any rules against consult-
ing with Loughery during the draft,
though it raisesan apparent conflict
of interest.
Co-owner Billy Cunningham,
a teammate of Loughery's on the
1971-72 76ers, said he was angry
and disappointed at the rum of
events.
Cunrugham said they were told
Sunday night, on the eve of their
announcement that Loughery was
their man, that he wouldn't be able
to come to Miami right away.
"We were blindsided, we
thought, last night Cunningham
said.
The Heat has turned to one of
the most experienced coaches in the
league in an effort to improve the
club that had a 42-122 record under
Ron Rothstein, who coached
Miami's first two seasons and re-
signed this year.
Loughery, the head coach of
the Hawks from 1981-83, also
coached the Philadelphia 76ers,
New Jersey Nets, Chicago Bulls and
Washington Bullets. His record is
341-503. He also coached the New
York Nets to an American Basket-
ball Association championship.
Last summer, before he ac-
cepted the job with the Hawks,
Loughery served as a part-time
scout for the Heat and previously
had a "small say" in Heat personnel
matters, according to reports.
LONDON (AP) � The repeal
of the last major apartheid la w da1 w
praise from international sports of-
ficials and led some South Africans
to dream about holding the Olym-
pics early next century.
But anti-apartheid groups
warned that, despite abolition of
the law that classified citizens on
the basis of race, the end of South
Africa's two-decade sports ban
might not be immediate.
South Africa moved closer to
rejoining the world sports commu-
nity when its Parliament voted
overwhelmingly Monday to repeal
the Population Registranon Act of
19?0, which served as the founda-
tion for virtually all apartheid
measures.
It was the last of the three major
apartheid laws whose repeal had
been demanded by the International
Olympic Committee and other
world sports bodies.
The IOC has said read mission
is dependent on those laws being
abolished and South Africa forming
non-racial sports federations. Such
federations have already been
formed,orarebeingcreated,in most
major sports.
Ravmond Gafner, a senior IOC
J
administrator, said repeal of the
registration act showed recent
guarantees of change by South Af-
rican leaders "were not vain
promises
'This is a very good thing. It's
what we expected Gafner said
"We are satisfied that the program
is progressing.
"Now we'll wait for the reaction
of our friends in South Africa. The
abolition of the la w isone thing, but
of course the situation on the ground
is another
Olympic president Juan Anto-
nio Samaranch had said Sunday
that repeal of the act would be wel-
comed.
"We think if the third law is
abolished this month, maybe we
can see verv soon South African
athletes taking part in very impor-
tant sports events around the
world he said. " think maybe in a
few weeks something can happen -
with South Africa participating in
major sports events
The IOC last Thursday gave
Samaranch and the body's execu-
tive board the power to reinstate
South Africa once the three major
apartheid laws had been abolished.
South Africa's formal return
could come on July 9, when the
nation's sports leaders are sched-
uled to meet with IOC official in i
Switzerland.
Invitations for the 1992
Barcelona Olvmpics wffl been our
July IS and IOC officials said a late
entrv is still possible for e 1992
W i n ter Games i n Albertville, France.
The International Amateur
Athletic Federation hopes to have
South African athletes at its work;
games this summer, and said
Monday's vote was a good signv �
"It s another step toward pW
sible readmission said, lAiYf - '
spokeswoman Jayne Peame. 'XM
course it's good news
Pearce said an IAAF delega-
tion will travel to South Africa, in
earl v July to reappraise the situ aim
and possibly recommend lifnngthe
nation's suspension from miens
tional track and field.
rhe formal lifting of that sus-
pension would take place Ang. 20-
21 in Tokyo, a few days MMJPK
world championshipabegjlt
South African polmciansaiesoi-
confident of readmission to world?
sports that mayors of thecounSfy's
th ree biggest a ties�Johannesburg
Cape Town and Durban �already
have announced they want to host
the Summer Olympics in 2000 or
2004.
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 19, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 19, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.814
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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