The East Carolinian, December 10, 1991






Ir�"kkim On
S
VI opens to enthusiastic crowds
Bearcats snap Pirates 7
f hree-game winning streak ends tor Purple and (lold
Qftiz i�ust (ftamlttrian
ftV, Dl ; MBEH 10 1991
Gbei NVII , ! . N rth Cai
c
.000
H Pages
Board reduces assault penalty
nd Other
A recruits whites
niversitv is trying to
illmcnt, bv using white
h.nu ellor for academic
I art ol .) desegregation
� ersitv is still oper-
. i rsirv is to try to
v �. ition on campus said
nistration of North
lires . recruit
- stl epercentage
its help employees
ires, a group of students, t.u
� it) of North
ieS I 001 buy
� - an
d faculty
mbei
md let pci �
: ' � �
awarded grants
� arded to Dt Ram
- � � istry it 1 jberty
cul rre can h in chemistry
� ised to develop new
�� nk industry Along
iffercd a computer system at
i simulate molecules
. hen a university has been
mis and producing papers
uregrants, -
ity expands recycling
the! niversity
i is cxj ted to expand the recy-
ersJI
rsity has become involved,
� I has Kt-n made in the
his department now
rw w lts.t paper
� Campus 1 anli
d papei � essential in
lepartment
' d paper.
i irinitiativesaid
ill a lot more that can be
per arrested
� was arrested tor
� tball tickets toa police
ri ketsii a luffel bar
ith him when the
rttei aid Pi pe had
if them were
ma i rcom
g equipment to record
xision concerns students
impus an the No. 1 student
tate University, according to an
that the student body has brought
�rns to the forefront said Kk k Ashby,SGA
- Morethananyotherissuestudenb
out ra ism and racial issues
m Brian Freyberger said that a big
v people don't want to talk about the
al hand, and a lot of things are blown into
� are not
'wnplled by B�h Shimmel
Inside Tuesday
2
4
5
lb
n
By ennifer Wardrep
shisun i New! ditor
hearing Wednesday
the E I Rev iew & ard n
duced thepenalticsi �! the four
I ambdahi Mpha fraternity
members found guilty of as
sault.
The Board n t the
1 loner Board's penalty of ex
ion was Uxi har I I
Anv I, Macoi rod
Casev and rrei
nos ' usp
as fini 17
i �
worV � � readmissii n
��
was 1 much
Driskill ha f th
Board, sa I suspen
nesemesterwastoolil
I he Univ ersitv I lonor
Board had found the tu I
ty of i ndangering ii
ingot threah.mii i
personorpr perty of another"
and had senti I them to
ilsion i he students then
nishment to
rd
i � .r I Marty
Baker, cl f tl

that these m
the
Bak r lid tl � � �

� ; �� the f( iur si
� � ine and that a
hv that mar)
aid the Board felt

re found
was "irtd

� �
loi t have
-
� � . it 1
- rave'sfather
i he did not think
II

� hard for
run
ildb
aid
I
� -
� �
An
� ind
� mil
� � �
Ocl
that
-
froi

� � .
ib �
- ravi
indjulei

-
Board
Coble urges
graduates
to persevere
B lulie Rosi
Shirting the issue
�� � �� .
with Govi
Courtroom coverage disputed
By C olleen Kirkpatrick
Sj!( vv rit�
Free press and fair trial aresur
rounded b ontn ��. ersv in four ar
eas: pre trial public ity, p'n trials.
cameras in the courtroom and re
leasing the names of vi ti
the ain ed
New the ourts
puttwoconstitutional rightsaga
each other Hie Bill of Rights pro
hil it . emment from resti
ing - pe a irct- press
while also guaranteeing the integ-
� minal justice sy I
ith An nt guarantees
peoj isedofa rimeatrial by
an impartial j posed
lilt or
innocence based on i
sented in a irtro
In court
v hat jurors see and hear !
outside thei ourtrot m, jun i
come m contact ���
gossip ib ul the trial they are
involved in
lip are pi
mendment, and oft
reads or hears stories that are i
allowed
(ne of the most
mp
:of pre h
Iry
Ideally,
. ceding) . iul : I
Mas
Mai .
ch is ai
i violation of the
mendment. "Howev i
; se sanctions on layvyersto
� m revealing Uxi much
infon because ' pre � i
ludge i n id Reid !r.
.
i Id ition he explained
- . vays I pn I
. .
tthejury not to listen, hear or

� d way is to send . at
where 1cm s aredi -
ee Free .

I - -
near!) I � � . tsand ' � il the
- � : � ill gradual � � 7.
� . isensi thespet
luation day: I 0th a earl
Harbor, theeveof the 500th am irof
inding of Cr ristopher
hemisphere and the abs f thi
rate - � MewYi
: .
ill �
dice,
econoi - orhealtl
geousley ind violence in our society
the wide-scale neglect ai I our
menti ble said
recognitioi
string confetti a
from the studeni
Some nursii - - meed
blow � �'es in the air �
loons
graduates new challenges in to
world axe as important as I - rand-
parents faced after the art � irbor,

I . e the
trials and ady with
. Irous
game of life I you
� ind nev :
yourself and others.
See Grad .
Bergalis dies after fight with AIDS
(AP) Kimberly Bergalis,
whocontracted All Sfromher
dentist and became the focus
of a ruitional crusade tor mm
datory testing of health pn �
fessionals, died Sunday ai
home surrounded by her fam-
ily She was 23.
"The world haslostagreat
deal, but the world will never,
ever forget how brave and
how caring and how deter
mined that lad) was s.nd
Barbara Webb, a retired En-
glish teacher who also was
infected b) dentist! lavidAcer
Bergalis' lawyer, Robert
Montgomery, said her father
phoned shortly alter 3 a m.
and said "Kimberly is not
going to suffer any more
Bergalis shixked the na-
tion in September 1990 when
she came forward to sav she
was "patient A the first
known LS case of a patient
hocntra ted VII S du
i medical procedure.
"I ler courages �us spirit
and her determination to help
others avoid her own tate
touched Honda and the na
tion(iov.I awton( hilessaid
Sunday
1 Xxtors initially rejected
the idea of infei tion hv the
dentist,but inanuarv,theL.S.
( enters tor Disease Control
determined that her particu
lar strain of HIV almost iden
ticaHy matched Acer's.
I heI h. ended doubts
tor many when it found Mrs
Webb and three others were
infected while Acer worked
on their tivth in his dental of
hee in Stuart.
Acer, who was bisexual,
refused to assist federal and
state AIDS investigators bo-
fore he died Sept. 3, 1990.
Though visibly in pain,
� � aliswentbeforc television
imer.is in October to argue
for mandatory testing of health
care workers and patients be-
fore invasive procedures a
position opposed by IDS
at tn ists. the American Medi-
ci 1 Ass oationand the Amen
can 1 Vntal Association
! b I blame myself? I sure
don't 1 never usi IV drugs,
never slept with anyone, and
never had a bkod transtu
sum Bergalis wrote in a let-
ter to a state health official on
Vpril6.
"1 blame lr. Acer and
every single one of vou bas-
tards Anyone who knew Dr.
Acer was infected and had full-
blown All 6and stexni bv not
doing a damn thing about it.
on aw all rust as guilty as he
was You've mined mv life
and my family's
BL sjk

J 1 pm T'� i
We made it!
Pholo court��y ECU N�w� Bur�u
An enthusiastic graduation candidate expresses her
excitement at becoming an ECU alumna





2 Hht Cast (Carolinian December 10, 1991
Board
Continued from page 1
Free
Continued from page 1
Student arrested at Hardee's for
DWI, revoked license, speeding, and
resist, obstruct, delay
Dec 4
1420�Publications Building: Checked out a report of a damage
to personal property. A report was taken.
2012�Tenth Street and Rockspring Road: Vehicle stopped for
driving with no headlights and speeding on College Hill Drive. The
non-student was issued a campus citation.
0004�Third and Reade streets: Checked out a report of possible
breaking and entering and larceny in the parking lot of the Attic.
Same was turned over to Greenville Police Department.
0209�Hardee's: Vehicle stopped for speeding west of
Mendenhall Student Center. Subject was arrested for DWI, driving
with a revoked license, speeding and for resist, obstruct and delay.
Dec 5
1511�General Classroom Building: Checked out a report of a
canine in the building. Same was gone on arrival.
1932�Jenkins Art Building: Responded to a report of a gas leak
in the building. Contact was made with construction company
regarding the leak.
0220�Scott Hall: Checked out a scene east of the building in
reference to an intoxicated subject. The student was given a campus
citation for public intoxication, underage drinking and indecent
exposure.
0312�Hetcher Hall: Responded to a report of three suspicious
subjects north of the building. One subject was arrested for littering
and obstruct and delay. The others were advised to leave the area.
0326�College Hill: Checked out a report of an intoxicated
subject at the bottom of thehill. Student was given a campus citation
for public intoxication, underage drinking and damage to state
property-
Dec 6
1205�Brody Building: Vehicle stopped east of the building for
transporting a child without a child's seat. The subject was given a
state citation.
0O44�Jones Hall: Checked out a report of a large amount of
unidentified smoke on the first floor north. Greenville Fire and
Rescue was called. The smoke was causedj by unknowns on the
second floor discharging a fire extinguisher.
0120�White Hall: Checked out a report of a group of subjects
singing. The subjects were asked to leave the area.
0205�Aycock Hall: Vehicle stopped west of the building in
reference to a bike hangingou t of the trunk coveri ng the license phi te.
I "he subject was given a verbal warning.
0253�Clement Hall: Responded to a report of suspicious activ-
ity south of the building. Two male subjects were escorted to their
residence on Elizabeth Street.
Crime Scene la taken from official public safety logs.
know how the students got in the
apartment, because he had locked
the door before going to bed that
night. VanCoutren said that the
"door was slightly ajar however,
and they simply walked in theapart-
ment.
The students went to Segrave's
bedroom, and when he opened the
door. Smith said the students
"jumped him Segrave said when
he opened his bedroom door, the
students yelled, "We're Lambda
Chis,wecandowhateverwewant"
"They were screaming
throughout the whole thing Tay-
lor said.
Smith said Segrave, who was
holdinga 9mm gun at the time, shot
a warning shot into the closet and
the students "proceeded to kick him,
beat him to a pulp
VanCoutren said he was scared
when he saw the gun in Segrave's
hand. "I acted on a frightened in-
stinct he said.
Arnold also said he was scared
of thegunand thatheacted because
he thought VanCoutren had been
shot.
During their suspension, the
defendants cannot take courses to
be transferred to ECU.
The defendants have the right
to appeal the decision of the Review
Board to the Vice-Chancellor for
Student Life. Smith said the role of
the vice-chancellor is "to make sure
nobodsri ghts ha vebeen violated"
during the hearing.
nected and phone calls are screened.
'If s hard to balance the media
and the judicial process because both
are constitutional rightsand should
be guarded Mark Owens III, a
criminalattomeyinGreenville,said.
Yet in terms of pre-trial publicity,
Owens said, "Often 1 believe the
press does go too far in releasing
information before a trial
Another issue when speaking
of freedom of the press and fair trial
is whether to release the names of
people involved in a news event.
Much of the decisions that are made
about whether to print the names of
crime victims are based solely on
ethics.
RexRoland,court reporter who
is covering "The Little Rascals Day
Care trial deals with this issue ev
ery day. The media have the option
of whether to reveal the names of
the parents on trial. WNCT-9chost;
not to reveal name.
"By identifyi ng the parents, we
are identifying the kids Roland
said. "However, it is a difficult
issue because sometimes it seems
essential to identify not only the
names of the accused, but also the
accused
Cameras in the courtroom.
present another complication be-
tween the media and the courts. ,
'Tve fought this battle in two
states and I'm all for having cam-
eras not only in the courtroom, but
everywhere said Chris McDaniol,
news director at WITN-7.
T.6
OUTLET
Save 50 or more on your favorite
men's & women's catalog and
department store clothing.
PRE CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
20 Discount (with coupon) on
i any purchase of $10.00 or more.
! SALE ITEMS EXCLUDED
Good through Saturday, December 14
T.G.I. F.
210 E 5th St. (across from Bogies)
Open M-F 10-6
Includes
�Round-trip bus transportation
�Room at Atlanta's Castleqate Hotel
Transportation to Atlanta's Underground
Hew Year's Eve
�Transportaion to Stadium
Prices per person:

Quad Otcupanty Room$59.00
Triple 0�upany Room$69.00
Twin 0�upany Room$69.00
Single Otwpanty Room$92.00
Trice Does Not Include Gome Ticket
Bus leaves at 7:00 am, December 31, from Mendenhall
and returns to Greenville after the game on January 1.
For tickets or more information, stop by the Central
Ticket Office or call 757-4788.
Sponsored by the Student Union Travel Committee
The Student Union
FORUM
Committee
would like to send our
SEASONS GREETINGS
and heartfelt
THANKS
to the over 75
AIDS QUILT VOLUNTEERS!
Your time and effort was 1
much appreciated!
HAVE A SAFE
AND HAPPY
HOLIDAY!
Grad
Continued 1r
Coble said the graduates are
prepared to generate newideasand
newleadersand asked them toporv
der their impact on the future.
"In the last nine years, the
United States has seen the top 10
banks in the world shift from this
country to Japan and Germany. In
the same time frame, we have
dropped from a creditor nation to
the largest debtor nation on earth.
"The threatenedAmerican
middle class has also measurably
shrunk. A few!
of the wealthy,
shifted tolowi
"By the i
the world you j
cna alter may i
describedCc
The comme'
included Cobil
senior cias!
D.G Martin ofl
North Carol
Moskop, chairl
FOSDll
I890 SI
3003 S. Evaj
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, SL� ,
Deviled Crab Cakes, U Clam
at Lunch J mSnei
$2.99 � ��
Beverage not included " Good Monc
lJ5SS22,W L Expire,
The
East Carolina Uniti
HONORS PROG
takes pleasure in congratu
the following graduating sei
fall 1991 for completing
requirements to becon
GRADUATES OF THJ
HONORS PROGRAM
�Susan Rose Ambert � Tammy Rei.
�Jeremy Daniel Childress �Rodney Lee
�Jeffery William Qreen �Stephanie
PART-TIME
HJ
WE'LL HELP
PAY OFF YOUI
STUDENT LOAI
TO20f00a
$It you have th
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the Arm) Reservd
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weeksAnnual Training. Ca
Sgt 1st Class Hall-756-961
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
ARMY RESERVE






Continued from page 1
I
leened Care trial desfa with this issue ev-
I dia eryday rhemedtahavetheopttoij
. vth o whether to reveal the names of
nlld t ntson trial. WNCT-9daj
not to reveal name
den rifying the parents, we
iMng the kids Roland
h'u'f it is a difficult
sMU. . i sometimes it seems
denary not only the
� the accused, but also the
�s in the courtroom
present another complication be-
.WlV. edia and the courts. ,
I w fought this Kittle in two
state? and I m all tor having canv
in the courtroom, but
iere sakl Chris McDaBafaJ
sdirector at V' I N-7
v't
send our
REETINGS
rtfelt
KS
er75
IOLUNTEERS
effort was
eciated!
Grad
December 10,1991 fflfag �agt (Karoltman 3
Continued from page 1
Coble said the graduates are
prepared to generate new ideasand
newleadersand asked them to pon-
der their impact on the future.
"In the last nine years, the
United States has seen the top 10
banks in the world shift from this
country to Japan and Germany. In
the same time frame, we have
dropped from a creditor nation to
the largest debtor nation on earth.
"The threatenedAmerican
middle class has also measurably
shrunk A few have joined the ranks
of the weal thy, but many morehave
shifted to lower incomes.
"By the choice of your life and
the world you want to recreate, you
cna alter may of the negatives I just
described'Coble said.
The commencement speakers
included Coble, Jennifer Hedrick,
senior class vice president,
D.G Martin of the University of
North Carolina, and Dr. John
Moskop, chair of the ECU Faculty.
FOSDICK'S
I890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans 756-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, & Clam Strips.
� �������������������
Small Shrimp! Regular Shrimp !
at Lunch Dinner at $6.50 j
�9 OO I e One Free .
W - Beverage not included .
. Beverage not included J Good Monday - Thursday Z
J Expires: 12-21-91 � Expires: 12-21-91 1
The
East Carolina University
HONORS PROGRAM
takes pleasure in congratulating
the following graduating seniors of
fall 1991 for completing the
requirements to become
GRADUATES OF THE
HONORS PROGRAM:
�Susan Rose Ambert � Tommy Renee Hurt
�Jeremy Daniel Children �Rodney Lee McCaslcill
�Jeffery William Qreen �Stephanie lee Singleton
PART-TIME
HS CHAOS
WE'LL HELP
PAY OFF YOUR
STUDENT LOAN
TO20,00a
$ If you have the aptitude
to tram in certain skills.
the Army Reserve
will help repay your
qualified student loan up to
$20,000. Usually, you'll serve only
one weekend a month plus two
weeks' Annual Training. Call:
Sgt. 1st Class Hall-756-9695
KAU TOUCAN K.
ARMY RESERVE
A Store Full Of Hidden TVeasures
�Toys
�Pictures
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Here
tor A Old
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924 Dtckinao Avenue
Greenville, N.C.
Telephone 752-2139
�Musical Instruments
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Open Tut. Thru Pri.
10:00 � 5:00
Saturday 10:00 � 2:00
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NEW YEAR'S DAY at the ATTHC
Join WSFL 106.5 and hopefully ESPN for 1
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� Free Admission -First 106 Fans Receive FREE
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Location: (Old �264 Playhouse) Big blue building behind Earl's
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TUESDAYS:
Silver EJullet's Female "Eixotic" Dancers.
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers). Cash Prize.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
THURSDAYS:
Slver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
FRIDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors open at 4:00 pm.
SATVRQAYS;
Silver Bullet's Female'EExotic" Dancers.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night
Open Tues.et. VALID ID Required at the Door
Interviews Accepted for New Dancers. Call 756-6278

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�be
Letters to the Editor
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 7925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
W. Douglas Morris, Jr Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Matt Jones, News Editor
Jennifer Wardrep, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Entertainment Editor
Lewis Coble, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Brian Kerns, Sports Editor
Michael G. Martin, Asst. Sports Editor
LeClair Harper, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
M. CHANTAL WEEDMAN, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
STEPHEN Schaubach, Systems Engineer
CHRIS NORMAN, Darkroom Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead ed.tonal in each edition
,s the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or leas. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Utters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, December 10, 1991
TEC staff turns over again
The world is improving.
The Soviets have formed a fledgling confederation in
hopes of making their country work. The countries in the
middle east are gathering for more peace talks. Bush's
economic advisor actually said that a middle-income tax
cut will be necessary to bring back the failing economy
(something that the democrats have been asking for for
some time). And Lloyd Bentsen, a democratic senator
from Texas, said that, because the cold war has ended,
defense spending may take a five percent cut in the
coming year.
The country may not be sailing on smooth seas, but
people are waking up and saying that things need to
change, that there is a better way run our government.
In the local arena, things do not look so rosy. ECU is
still trying to bury all information about the wiretapping
scandal with pay-offs and non-existent documents that
are protected by attorney-client confidentiality. The ex-
ecutive branch of the Board of Trustees met last week in
a closed session and, most likely, discussed just that.
Stanley Kittrell, the one bright light in the murk of
scandal surrounding Public Safety, is still waiting for his
day in court concerning the alleged retaliation he re-
ceived after taking information concerning the wiretap-
ping to the FBI.
Charles Hinman, chief of Greenville Police, has
unfinalized plans to make the city into a police-state for
the next Halloween. He wants the students' support.
Registration still sucks. There are not enough profes-
sors for all the classes that should be offered or for all the
students who want to take them. The campus beautifica-
tion project is still throwing piles of dirt and bricks
around campus. The SGA has no money. And the SGA
president, Alex Martin, thinks The East Carolinian is "the
worst source ever
As Tim "Earlvis" Hampton would say, for a muck-
raking, Chaucer-reading, liberal, yellow journalist, it is a
busy time to be working.
And so, I quit.
The controversy surrounding that is another story
not worthy of coverage in The East Carolinian.
When I took over the job of Managing Editor, it was
immediately following a three-day sleepless stint work-
ing on the Welcome Back ed ition. That 56-page behemoth
had most of us believing that we would die before the
next Tuesday's edition. Blair Skinner had just left to take
a break from newspaper work (a break that lasted little
more than two months). Blair returned to work as a copy
editor, something which made my job immeasurably
easier.
Unlike other people who had held the job before me,
I had only one objective: to make sure the newspaper was
at the Daily Reflector to be printed by 2 a.m. We had just
changed printers which, in addition to improving the
quality of the newspaper, moved our deadline ahead by
three hours.
The change was good for The East Carolinian. We are
now basically a morning newspaper. That, in addition to
affordable color and the fact that folks at The Daily Reflec-
tor are just easy to work with has helped improve the
readability of the newspaper this semester.
Matt "scoop" Jones will be taking over as Managing
Editor next semester. He will, no doubt continue his
investigation of Public Safety and their related scandals.
He is perhaps the best investigator to ever work for The
East Carolinian, and certainly blows away anyone else
who has been here during my three years.
Jennifer Wardrep, a recent addition to The East Caro-
linian family will be replacing him as News Editor. She
will have to find a scandal of her own to unearth, (some-
thing that should not prove too difficult).
A few people will be leaving the newspaper, for
various reasons.
"Macho" Matt King has finished Spanish and has
graduated. Production will be different without his argu-
ments for "Floridanian" and a slew of other words that
would make Webster roll over in his grave. In addition,
his booming laugh and general good humor will be sorely
missed.
Lewis Coble will be taking over the Entertainment
department. Lewis is so radically different from Matt that
it is difficult to predict what the Entertainment section
will look like next semester. However, Lewis has some
definite plans. Students can look for some country music
to make its wav onto the pages of The East Carolinian as
well as more comic-book reviews.
Brian Kerns, whose time as Sports Editor was short,
but poachy, will not continue because of a heavy class-
load and his work advising Scott Hall residents. Kerns
may have advanced faster than anyone who has ever
worked here. In a little over a month, he went from Staff
Writer, to Assistant News Editor, to Sports Editor.
Mike Martin, a former Sports Editor, Managing Edi-
tor, Layout Manager, deadline pusher will be replacing
Brian. Mike not only knows the ropes, he has climbed
them once, jumped off and has decided to start again. His
experience as Sports Editor as well as his knowledge and
abilities should make the Sports section better than ever.
There are rumors that next semester will see the
return of "The Clearly Labeled Satire Section If so, Scott
Maxwell will once again be set loose to parody as he sees
fit, sending students into an uncontrollable laughing
frenzy in the process.
Rich Haselrig will continue as Staff Illustrator and
comic guru. He has not had much room to work with this
year on the comics page, but what he has had, has been
filled with the quality comics that have become a tradi-
tion at The East Carolinian
Rich's work will still be supplemented by Jeff Parker's
editorial cartoons. Jeff regularly receives more mail for
his cartoons than most writers that work here. His char-
acterizations of people both local and otherwise regularly
spar' controversy as well as laughter.
And then there is Chantal Weedman, Layout Man-
ager extrodinare. She, alone, of the editorial board, will be
in the same position next semester.
Chantal started with minimal layout experience, a
little knowledge of computers and has, in one semester,
mastered the difficult job of designing two newspapers
per week. Chantal is a layout wonder, she's incredible �
we love her. She should make sure that the newspaper
starts off smoothly next semester.
Greg Jones has made sure that there were enough
advertising inches for The East Carolinian to stay alive. It
has not been an easy job, but he has managed to keep this
newspaper afloat.
Finally, there is Tim Hampton. Tim has been with
77 East Carolinian since its founding in 1925. After a brief
stint working in Eden, he came back for more punish-
ment. Most recently, he has been taking his lashes from
the media board. Tim has played the whipping-boy for
the newspaper all semester and deserves some credit.
He has, in turn, whipped Greg Jones and myself to
make this newspaper better than ever. He can be heard
telling people: "All I want is for this newspaper to be the
best that it ever has been
I have spent a semester, longer in some cases, work-
ing closely with all these people. They all have their own
individual quirks and identifying characteristics. They
have each been part of my family for the past few years.
For every headache they have caused, there have
been twice as many enjoyable moments and I know, I am
the better man for having known them all.
� 30 �
N.C State alumna
dislikes depiction
of former school
To The Editor:
I am writing in response to Tim
Hampton's editorial that appeared in
The East Carolinian on Nov. 21.1 am a
first year graduate student at ECU.
But 1 am also a N.C. State alumna. Mr.
Hampton's slanderous remarks about
N.C. State were obnoxious, offending
and serve only to perpetuate the false-
hood that N.C. State produces noth-
ing but an ignorant bunch of slovenly
farmers. N.C. State does have a School
of Agriculture and Life Sciences, but
this is only one of the nine schools that
comprise the university. Several of
these schools are not only reputable,
but have achieved national recogni-
tion. Need I go on?
Not only is N .C. State recognized
in the academic community, but it is
also recognized by the business com-
munity as an outstanding research
university. Proof of this can be seen in
theamount of money for research that
N.C. State receives from private re-
sources. No other University in the
state receives more. This is money
that is not poured into the athletic
department. N.C. State has made
many important contributions in ar-
eas of current research � from super-
conductors to research done for the
Space Shuttle ProgTam. It is, also, in-
teresting to note that the first nuclear
reactor to be built on a U.S. campus is
at N.C. State. Not bad for Moo-U!
Overall, I am very disappointed
that Mr. Hampton and The East Caro-
linian have encouraged such a nar-
row-minded attitude. 1 am all for sup-
porting your team, but don't do H by
"slamming" academics at "that"
school. Leave all the "slamming" for
the football teams. We should all be
proud that two of our outstanding
universities in North Carolina will be
represented at the Peach Bowl. And,
Mr. Hampton, it is too bad that I did
not have a course in "Barnyard Hy-
giene" while I was at N.C. State. It
would have helped me get through
your editorial.
and hardly merits the adulation you
give to it.
3. What constitutes a "better"
president, "bad" congressmen and
"good" government? Based on your
past editorials, no doubt "good" gov-
ernment impliesanactivegovernment
bent on their redistribution of wealth
and one which will eventually de-
stroy what little freedom we have.
While I am on my soapbox, let me
now address John Carter. In a recent
editorial "U.S. citizens dislike Bill of
Rights you state that Marxism is the
best form of government and the So-
viets messed up a good thing.
Mr. Carter, you are definitely a
pragmatist; if something does not
work, then throw it out and try some-
thing else. As a typical pragmatist,
you see only the end, not the means to
attain that end. Socialism and its fairy
tele results you spoke of so highly
sounds nice, but the means to attain
socialism's ends destroy freedom and
ignore absolute truths of life, liberty
and property. Socialism is doomed
from the start; thus, the Soviets
"messed up" nothing. So, which is
more important lo you? Freedom, or
any type of go vernmentthat "works?"
R. Matthew Poteat
Junior
History
Fish should not
have been paid to
speak at ECU
Well, my friends and I will be in
Atlanta on New Year's day But we
won't be at the Bowl game. We'll find
a cozy little bar somewere in town
and watch our Pirates hunt down the
Wolfpack on a 20-inch television
screen. All I can say is, at least we will
have instant replay!
For us, it is no longer Peach Bowl
bound, it is Atlanta Bound!
Kimberly Helms
Nan Newbern
Kathy Sawyer
Marye Lissey
School has many
faults, students
will pay
Mary Campbell
Graduate Student
Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology
Cartoonist wrong
about portrayal
of N.C. State
To The Editor:
Your Nov. 21 cartoon by Parker
was an embarrassment to our univer-
sity. The idea of portraying ECU as an
institution of "culture" and N.C. State
as an institution of "agriculture" is
not only 50 percent incorrect, but is
also 100 percent anti-intellectual. Some
of our country's top ranked universi-
ties haveexcellent agricultural schools
and there is nothing academically
problematic in taking a degree in any
of the agricultural sciences. As a mat-
ter of fact, it might be helpful to our
entire region and university commu-
nity if our students had a little more
training in the agriculture sciences.
I would also like to point out that
N.C. State has been recently rated as
the very best university in the country
in both forestry and entomology, dis-
ciplines ECU students know very little
about, if anything. To depict N C. State
students as hayseed rednecks who
study only agriculture is sophomoric
and absurd. The cartoon, reflecting a
pitiful mentality of intellectual secu-
rity, makes one fed sorry for its cre-
ator as well as to those who find it
amusing. It's no wonder some people
wince and jerk when the concept of
ECU and academia are spoken in the
same breath.
Hal J.Daniel III
Faculty
Maxwell reminds
student of former
columnist
To The Editor.
It seems Dereck McCullers's spirit
has found a home in Scott Maxwell's
pen. Rather than reading a preachy,
religou vslanted opinion each week, I
now read a preachy, liberal-slanted
opinion. The New and Observer
would be proud to have Maxwell on
their editorial staff, his ostensible and
pontifical attitude would be relished.
I speak specifically, though not en-
tirely, about his Nov. 21 editorial con-
cerning term limitations.
Maxwell, let me begin by asking
you a few questions:
1. Why do you consider America
to be a democracy? America is not a
democracy. It is obvious you have
fallen prey to this socialist fallacy
which runs rampant in today's aca-
demic institutions. America is a Re-
public, with a constitution to protect
individuals from democratic � or
should I My, mobocratic � excess.
1 Why do you place voting in
such an esteemed position? You seam
to think voting to an and into Itself.
Voting to a means to an end, nothing
more than an expression of opinion
To The Editor:
Americans are fortunatetolive in
a country that grants basic human
rights such as freedom of speech to all
of its citizens. In the United States,
even those who would curtail these
freedoms, such as Stanley Fish of Duke
University, are allowed to speak their
mind freely. But it's one thing to allow
people like Fish to attack the funda-
mental freedoms justly exercised by
all American citizens and another
thing entirely to spend tax money on
them, as ECU did in sponsoring Fish's
talk on Nov. 21. Do the taxpayers of
North Carolina really want to spend
money to deny liberty rather than to
advance it?
Fish's method of operation has
been widely reported by newspapers
such as the New York Times, the Wash-
ington Post and the Wall Street Journal,
who noted his attempt to deny free
speech to his colleagues at Duke. Fish
wrote a notorious letter to the provost
of Duke arguing that members of the
National Association of Scholars, an
organization favoring free speech,
should not be allowed to sit on impor-
tant university committees. This let-
ter was circulated to a few chosen
friends, one of whom was so shocked
by its contents that he made it public.
Fish denied his statements until the
Duke student newspaper, which had
obtained a copy of his letter, broke the
story of his deceit. Thereafter, Profes-
sor Fish declared himself unavailable
for comment.
Another example of Fish's deceit
is his misrepresentation of the NAS.
That organization exists to promote
and protect free speech, to guard indi-
vidual rights now under attack in
universities and to oppose efforts to
politicize the curriculum by trendy
ideologists.
Steven Mandelker
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Philosophy
Ticket sales
handled badly by
administration
To The Editor
I would like to express my recent
disappointment over the way ECU
decided to handlethe Peach Bowl tick-
ets. I have been a student here for four
years and have patiently awaited an
event such as this. I have followed the
Pirates loyally even before 1 was a
student here. I have been to every
home game and I have traveled to see
my Pirates play, win or lose. Unfortu-
nately, I will be unable to attend the
Peach Bowl this year. My friends and
I faithfully waited until Dec. 2 to pur-
chase tickets because our university
told us to. However, the tickets sold
out right in front of our very eyes.
Once again, the students were jilted.
After waiting for the Pirate Cub,
Alumni and all of Eastern North Caro-
lina to purchase their tickets, we got
last pick. I pay $6,200 on my own
every year to come to this university
because I honestly love it. Yet, I am
unable to go to the Peach Bowl. Some-
thing just doesn't seem quite fair to
me The students are the heart of this
university. Somehow, I feel that this is
taken for granted.
1 can't ever remember receiving
credit as a student body for honoring
our university. Yes, there to Barefoot
on the Mall along with many restric-
tions.
I don't want to go off on a tan-
gent, 1 just want to make my point.
ECU students deserve some consider-
ation. Eight thousand of us went to
Virginia Tech to support our Pirates,
what would make one think that only
4,000 of us would go to the Peach
Bowl?
To The Editor:
What has happened to ECU? We
have a police force that wire-taps our
phones. we ha ve a stud ent honor court
thatunbelievablypresidedoverarape
case. And now, we have a fellow stu-
dent fired from his job as a resident
adviser for expressing his religious
preference.
Has this university turned into a
police state? Paul M. Shaw should not
have been fired from his job as resi-
dent adviser for doing something we
practiceevery day. Freedom of speech
and religion areour God -given rights
One should not be afraid of reprisals
for practicing these rights at a suppos-
edly liberal and open-minded institu-
tion. Communism is dead in Eastern
Europe, but it sure is alive and well at
ECU.
Who is going to pay for these out-
of-court settlements for wiretapping
Who is going to suffer for allowing a
student honor court (or is that "kan-
garoo Court") to preside over feloni-
ous crimes? Lastly, who is to pay tor
the court settlements of the fired em-
ployees expressing religious beliefs?
We the students, will pay through
higher school fees and continued ad-
ministrative shortcomings.
The administration and students
must start having the foresight to
evaluate their actions and put this
university back on the right track. I
love ECU, but 1 must voice my dissat-
isfaction over witnessing these hap-
penings.These incidents are unaccept-
able.
D.H. Marr
Graduate Student
History
Maxwell irritates
trekkie with lack
of support
To The Editor
I am surprised that the editors of
The East Carolinian would allow Scott
Maxwell to write a column without
first checking (or at least questioning)
his ranhngs and ravings. I refer to his
column of Oct. 31 entitled "Weekly
irritants Specifically, his vague ref-
erences to science fiction "illiterates"
and his damning eulogy of the late
Gene Roddenberry, writer and creator
of Star Trek.
On the first point. Maxwell claims
that Roddenberry is directly respon-
sible for creating a slew of SF-Uhterates
who believe "that science fiction is all
about flying around in outeT space,
shooting phasers at aliens
Maxwell deems it unimportant
that he lay out the criteria as to what he
thinks is good science fiction. There is
no concrete evidence in his article that
Maxwell knows what he's talking
about. Of course, he can justify this by
claiming to be a "columnist" � not a
rational being. He never cites examples,
sources, genres or any other specifics.
As for the passing of Gene
Roddenberry, Maxwell's selflessness
is downright touching: "Overall, I'm
pretty sure V m upset that Roddenberry
has died He checks his emotiors at
the door and rates his feelings as if it
were a new record on American Band-
stand.
No one doubts that Gene
Roddenberry created a pop institution.
But I think it is safe to say that he also
inspired and stimulated more than a
few minds (literate or otherwise) to use
their imagination. Imagination is a
powerfully creative tool. Maxwell
readily admits as much when he says
that some of Roddenberry's stories are
good stories � "they're just not good
SF Of course, he fails to enlighten
us on what he means by good SF.
Finally, Maxwell closes out his
thoughts on Roddenberry by wishing
"Roddenberry had died a lot sooner
if hehearsone more person say: "beam
me up, Scotty If the columnist had
done his homework, he would know
that nowhere in the Star Trek canon is
that line ever said.
But what to more unsettling, other
than Maxwell's obvious ignorance, is
the crudity of his remark. Maxwell,
why wish a man dead because you
hate your first name?
As for the rest of us not as gi fted as
"Scotty" MaxweU, I say to all those
wonderfully imaginative minds out
there, and in remembrance of
Roddenberry: "far Jang and prosper'
Robert Caprio
Lecturer
Communications
Entertainment
Star Trek
By Matt King
Entertainment Editor
The Star Trek think tank has
done it again. Star Trek VI The
Undiscovered Country, opened this
weekend to an eager audience that
was happy to see another page in
the trek saga.
It takes something special to
activley keep two American gen-
erations interested. Star Trek, in
the form of a series had a unique
something that brought viewers
back to the rube week in and week
out.
Even in the re-run phase of
the series, kids and adults would
rally around the TV to see. Kirk
get the girl, Bones say, "Damn it
Jim,I'm a Doctor" and Spock flaunt
the advantages of logic over hu-
man emotion.
The success of the series (evi-
dent by the thousands of card-
carrying "trekkies") will never be
able to be blamed on one attribu tc
or set of attributes.
Regardless of the reasons for
the enthusiasum over everything
Star Trek-like, the enigma just
keeps on snowballing along
thanks to mediocore-to-good Trek
movies.
Even a medn.
film is a masterpiece
so thev go to the moj
Blow Me Down
One of the Souths favorite bands was in town this we j
no prisoners. There is never any pressure on these boy'
Robert Shaw cl
crown of the
EDITOR'S NOTE � He gave a
new meaning to the word chorale.
For half a century Robert Shaw has
been directing glee clubs and choirs
and in his lifetime, he says, he has
seen choral music emerge as a sen-
ous art form. The conductor is be-
ing honored this month by the
Kennedy Center.
NEW YORK (AP) � If any-
body embodies poet Walt
Whitman's thundrous phrase, "I
hear America singing it is Robert
Shaw.
More than anyone else in the
United States, he has been respon-
sible for millions of people joining
in harmony and lifting their voices
in choral groups every week, every
day.
And he has seen the work im-
proveso much that now,Shaw says,
the Texas all-state high school choir
"swgs things which we thought 50
years ago were beyond the capaci-
ties of professional choirs
Shaw's accomplishments:
He formed the Fred Waring
Qee Club, which he considers "the
best voices ever assembled in the
history of marc" first used the word
chorale to mean a group singing
choral musk; led the Robert Shaw
Chorale from 1949 to 1967, and
founded thebigCcdlegiateChorale,
now cetebratmg its 50th anniver-
sary season
Shaw conducted the 1939 pre-
miereof "Ballad for Americansby
the New York Philharmonic and
Paul Robeson, which was broad-
cast
He also conducted a crowd of
people pirened into Carnegie Hall
inMay,ontheir�rningthe famous
concert hal celebrated its 100th
birthday. Violinist Isaac Stem wept
at the gtorious sound.
The American Choral Direc-
tors Association, fouj
ago with 85 memr.
15,600. Carnegie Haj
1 2-hour video of Sr
150 people in BrahJ
Requiem which it
sider esoteric.
This month,
Kennedy Center He
awarded to the 75-
as well as coun try sii
the songwnting tl
Comden and Adoll
Nicholas Brothers dl
actor Gregory Peck.j
Kennedy Cenj
given for "eonrnbul
turallifeof thenatif
performing arts
Shaw is pleas
cause if s public I
emergence of the cri
"The fact thatl
has a much higher d
music than it did 50
I think is reflected
Center Honor.
I'm not vain i
did it If s recognit
art. They needed a J
blanket on
A music-H
goosebumps lis
choir.Socanachoi
"Singers can I
supreme quality
the absolute top oi
ity he says.
"Anextraordi
available to the I
An instrument
to study for years f
that level. Not asr
of the voice,i
"His one oft
do with other
tain your self-
dent enjoyment
Ifssortofthel
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the Editor
ds and I will be in
iu Yeai ! -lav But we
� W� il tmd
ere in town
mt do n the
telev iston
t we will
I II ' Kivsl
School has many
faults students
will pa)
to E U?We
a ire taps our
nor court
iverarape
�W stu-
is a resident
�i igious
. turned into a
hiv should not
b is resi-
ething sv
� ��jxvch
.i not' $iv � rights � reprisals
paid tos it a suppos-led institu-
,n Eastern
md well at
� eseout-
t� ippings?
it m n -
�� er feloni-
pay ror
fired em-
- � � lief s?

d ad-
I thi
ept
Maxwell irritates
rekkie with lack
support
�adlv bv
Intion
I - Barefoot
th many n !
MKC my point
ftofnsconstder-
of us went to
lrt our Pirates,
uhinkthatonlv
to the Peach
.n Scott
without
tioning)
fer to his
Weekly
igue nef-
ites
� the late
: reator
aims
. respon-
� i literates
i � tion is all
r space,
� mportant
is to what he
There is
i It-that
! talking
. itify this by
not a
ever les examples,
� pecifics
� Gene
laxwi s selflessness
�-ail. Im
-I lenberry

is if it
merican Band-
� it Gene
restitution.
iv that he also
more than a
erwise)tOUM
on is a
Maxwell
m hen he says
nberry's stones are
-� jusl not gtxxi
fails to enlighten
ins by �(xxl SF.
well closes out his
?ddenbeny by wishing
rrj - i d died a lot �xner
repersonsay "beam
� �� It the columnist had
rk, he would know
t ' tr Trek canon is
- more unsettling, other
' bvious ignorance, is
' v of his remark. Maxwell,
� i man dead btxause you
I name'
W rtl. iMtusnotasgiftedas
� "� " �' m-il. I sav to all those
wonderfully imaginative minds out
there, and m remembrance of
Roddenberry "mr long and prosper
Entertainment
�1� iEaat (Earnltntan
December 10,1991
StarTrek VI pleases next generation
Bv Matt Kirm JL J
By Matt King
1 ntertainment Editor
1 he Star Trek think tank has
done it again. Star Trek VI The
, ftxrtdi .ounrry, opened this
tveekend to an eager audience that
rt . happy to see another page in
the trek saga.
It takes something special to
ley keep two American gen-
cms interested. Star Trek, in
e form of a series had a unique
thing that bnnight viewers
Kk k ti i the rube week in and week
E en in the re-run phase of
series, kids and adults would
around the TV to see: Kirk
t the girl, Bones say, "Damn it
n I'm a Ivtiir" andSrxxrk flaunt
advantages of logic over hu-
emotkm.
I lie success of the series (cvi-
: by the thousands of card-
lrrving "trekkies") will never be
to be blamed on one attribute
r set oi attributes.
Regardless of the reasons for
� i enthustasum over even-thing
� Irek-like, the enigma just
ps on snowballing along
k sto mod iocore-to-good Trek
movies.
Even a mediocore Star Trek
film is a masterpiece to a trekkie,
so they go to the- movie, so the
moviemakes money, somore Trek
films go into production. If s a
vicious circle.
This latest Star Trek adven-
Dul R��d-ECU Photo L�b
Blow Me Down
One of the Souths favorite bands was in town this weekend. The Sex Police came to the Attic and took
no prisoners There is never any pressure on these boys when they bring their horns to the Emerald City
Robert Shaw claims the
crown of the King of Choral
Robertapno
Lecturer
Communications
EDITOR'S NOTE � He gave a
new meaning to the word chorale.
1i r half a century Robert Shaw has
been directing glee clubsand choirs
and in his lifetime, he says, he has
n choral music emerge as a seri-
art form, fhe conductor is be-
ing honored this month bv the
nedy Center.
NEW YORK (AP; � If any-
, embodies poet Walt
Whitman's thundrous phrase, "1
ear America singing it is Robert
Shaw.
More than anyone else in the
United States, he has been respon-
se for millions of people pining
in harmony and lifting their voices
i n choral groups every week, every
day.
And he has seen the work lm-
provesomuchthatnow,Shawsays,
theTexasall-statc high school choir
ngs things which we thought 50
tars ago were beyond the capaci-
ties of professional choirs
Shaw's accomplishments:
He formed the Fred Waring
Glee Club, which he considers "the
best voices ever assembled in the
history of man'first used the word
chorale to mean a group singing
choral music; led the Robert Shaw
Chorale from 1949 to 1967, and
founded thebigCollegiateChorale,
now celebrating its 50th anniver-
sary season.
Shaw conducted the 1939 pre-
miere of "Ballad for Americans" by
the New York Philharmonic and
Paul Robeson, .vhich was broad-
cast.
He also conducted a crowd of
people jammed into Carnegie Hall
in May, on the morning the famous
concert hall celebrated its 100th
birthday. Violinist Isaac Stem wept
at the glorious sound.
The American Choral Direc-
tors Association, founded 32 years
ago with 83 members, new has
13,600. Carnegie Hall is selling a 2
1 2-hour video of Shaw rehearsing
130 people in Brahms' "German
Requiem which it doesn't con-
sider esoteric.
This month, the 14th annual
Kennedy Center Honors are being
awarded to the 75-year-old Shaw,
as well as country singer Roy Acuff,
the songwnting team of Betty
Comden and Adolph Green, the
Nicholas Brothers dance team, and
actor Gregory Peck.
Kennedy Center Honors are
given for "contribution to the cul-
tural life of the nation through the
performing arts
Shaw is pleased, he says, "be-
cause if s public recognition of the
emergence of the choral art.
'The fact that choral singing
has a much higher place in classical
music than it did 50 or 60 years ago,
I think is reflected in the Kennedy
Center Honor.
I'm not vain enough to think I
did it. It's recognition of an arva of
art. They needed a horse to put the
blanket on
A music-lover can get
goosebumps listening to a good
choir. So can a chorister, Shaw says.
"Singers can approach art of
supreme quality, meeting minds at
the absolute top of human creativ-
ity he says.
"An extraordinary repertory is
available to the amateur singer.
An instrumentalist would have
to study for years to play music on
that level. Not asmuch isdemanded
of the voice, technically.
'It is one of the things ou can
do with other peopleand still main-
tain your self-respect and indepen-
dent enjoyment.
Ifssort of the best of camarade-
ture is one of the best.
To avid, almost maniacle, fol-
lowers of The Enterprise's adven-
tures the new movie ranks at least
second to The Wrath of Kahn in the
six film series.
The Star Trek movies have a
great thing going� each one gets
to build on the story of the ones
that came before.
Logically each one has the po-
tential to be better than its prede-
cessor.
Unlike Rocky movies, where
the ending is a foregone conclu-
sion, Trek movies always have a
special twist for their followers.
(Balboa could never die and then
be brou gh t back to life in the realm
of an earthbound boxer movie).
The best thing about The Un-
dxscovered Country is that, finally,
the seasoned crew has learned to
take itself with a grain of salt.
Howmany times can you save
the universe and not become a
little desensatized?
Many of the nailbiting scenes
in themovies are sal ted with some
legitamatly funny one-liners (to
qu ote would onl y spoil some good
belly laughs).
Once again the special effects
are breathtaking.Sometimes they
were so above-par that the only
noise the talkative young trckkies
behide me could utter was cxxxh
or aaaah.
The plot is timley even to the
non-trekkie. The Federation is
hatching a plan to help save the
dying Klingon empire and em-
bark on time of neverendi ng peace.
Unlike the Klingons in Star
Trek: The Next Generation the
Klingons of Kirk's era are not en-
tirely to be trusted, eventhough
their planet will beoxygendepleti
in 5o years.
The plot smells of the luke-
warm friendship that America has
with its new-found commrads.
As fare would have it, Kirk
and the rest of the trusty crew are
putonliasonassignment. To make
a long scenario short Kirk (a noto-
rious Klingon hater) is set upasan
assassin.
The rest of the movie is spent
with various past and present En-
terprise crew members breaking
rules to rescue, and prove the
inrxxrense, of their trouble-mag-
net of a captain.
The movie is a borderline
must see; Star Trek VI is certainly
worth the price of a Greenville
movie ticket.
Community welcomes brand
new Multicultural Center
By Jimmy Robinson
Special to i h� Tast Camhman
The Eastarohna Multicultural
Center is now a reality. Since its
conception on fuly of l'l much
progress has been made toward
making the dream a reality.
On November 27,1991 the pro-
gram became incorporated as an
independent, non profit organiza-
tion.
The .Multicultural Center lead-
ers haveelecul a 17 member board
of directors and appointed two ad-
ditional committees; a Public Rela-
tions Committee and a Member-
ship Committee.
The location of the center is still
undecided, although several build-
ings in the downtown Greenville
area .m1 being consideration.
Members have visited vacant
buildings and atv working toward
obtaini ng one rent free for two years
with an option to buy at the end of
the two years.
Brochures were distnbuted at
the International Festivaland intrest
in the project abounded. Threehun-
da-d people submitted their names
and addresses. In addition to the
brochures, a leaflet is being sent out
with the Chamber of Commerce
Newsletter.
The Multicultural Center con-
cept was a result of discussion dur-
ing a "Community Round-Table
Forum
The center recieved a grant
from the North Carolina Humani-
ties Council.
Dr. Mohammed Ahad con-
ducted four community meetings
on four different cultures to be rep-
resented in the center Indian, His-
panic, Chinescand Mid-Eastern. All
the evaluations of the center have
been positive and suggest the es-
tablishment of a community based
cultural center.
'This issomething people want
to know and will enjoysaid Ahad
in an earlier interveiw.
The cen tcr pi a ns to ha ve rooms
with artifacts, literature, pictures
and art from different cultures.
The objectives of the center are
to amass resources such as films,
vide is, charts, maps and books for
students, teachers, scholars and in-
terested individuals; to conduct ex-
hibits on particular cultures, to help
with research on health care beliefs
and utilization strategies, to con-
duct seminars and workshops for
target groups such as teachers and
nurses and to maintain a library
and reading room of reference
matenal on immigrant cultures.
According to a press release.
The Multicultural Center will tar-
get grade and high school students,
college students, graduate students
and professors.
"Weare looki ng for willing and
enthusiastic students of ECU to
volunteer to become members of
vanoussubcommitteesand one stu-
dent leader to serve on the board of
directors
"Students and teachers will
learn from this center more than
any other group. " said Ahad.
neand isolation. And because it'sa
group effort it demands a certain
amount of ethical behavior, likecon-
sideration for the person who's next
to you
In his lifetime, Shaw savs, he
has seen the emergence of choral
singingasa senousart form. "When
I was growing up. then1 were junior
high and high school choruses and
fraternity sings.
When 1 got to New Y rk in 1938
the major large choruses were
alumni clubsof men who'd left uni-
versities and got together to drink
beer and sing on Wednesday
nights he says.
'There was the Oratorio Soci-
ety for whom Andrew Carnegie
built a hall, for his wife to sing The
Hallelujah Chorus
Chomses began to flourish af-
ter World War 11, Shaw says, when
musicologists discovcaxi the rich
choral literature of the 16th, 17th
and 18th centuries and technology
developed to publish and transmit
the scores.
"With the growth in literature
came a corresponding growth in
schwls of music and the education
of conductors he says.
While Shaw finds the general
choral scene encouraging, there are
some things that disturb him. "One
is the removal of the arts from early
curriculum he says.
"American education would be
an awful lot better off if we began
with arts rather that memorization.
'Singing, instruments, art, po-
etry, open up creative aptitudes in
children, making them capable of
faster learning of the memorization
subjects which they need, spelling,
arithmetic, history.
That has been proved. Ameri-
can education has the thing com-
pletely upside down.
Larroquette predicts court is
in session for last roundup
NEW YORK (AP) � John
Larroquette, the slightly smarmy
prosecutor of NBC's "Night
Court thinks this may be the
show's final season. But then, he
notes, "1 said that last year. And
the year before
That, he said, was because for
the last two years the acting con-
tracts were on a vear-to-vear ba-
J j
sis. But the show, now in its ninth
season, keeps getting renewed,
and one never knows: "It still pro-
duces enough (Nielsen) numbers
to make it viable
Still, Larroquette, the first ac-
tor ever to win four consecutive
Emmys for a series, isn't putting
all his eggs in one sitcom. He does
occasional film roles, and on Sun-
day will star in one on NBC �
"One Special Victory
He plays a self-absorbed real
estate hawker who finds a new
meaning in life as the accidental
coach of a basketball team of
handicapped adults.
If NBC does lop "Night
Court" off its roster for 1992-93,
"I'll do plays or movies if any-
body wants me to do some he
said. "I'm sure I'll do another tele-
vision series. It's a great way to
make a living
Standing 6 foot 4 and pos-
sessed of a rich baritone voice,
Larroquette did various things
before acting to earn a living.
Born and raised in New Or-
leans, he studied music for 11
years, and did time on tenor sax in
a rocknroll band there. He also
was an announcer at a classical
music station. But without the
soothing yawl drawl of his home-
town.
He worked hard to lose the
accent: "I thought it'd be better to
sound like Walter Cronkite than
'Where y'at
I wanted to sound as though
I was 40 and had gray on the side
of my hair
After that, he worked in San
Diego as a record promotion man.
And then, on to Los Angeles and
acting, starting in local stage pro-
ductions of "The Crucible" and
"Enter Laughing He was at the
relativelyadvancedageof24then.
He hadn't studied emoting
much. But "it was in the back of
my mind all my life, even when I
was a kid he said. "In New Or-
leans, the streets are theater. You
can just walk outside and watch
great pageantry and drama and
comedy
It's a good drinking town.
Indeed, as Larroquette notes, "the
nice thing about New Orleans is
that you don't have to go thirsty
too long Problem is, he picked
up a taste for the sauce there as a
teen-ager.
Later, when he was starting
to roll in Hollywood, his drinking
came close to doing him in.
It almost cost him his career
and hismarriagetohiswife,Eliza-
beth, who he had met in "Enter
Laughing Finally, he quit, cold
turkey, on Feb. 6,1982. He hasn't
touched it since.
"I think the bottom line is
that you've got to quit by yourself
and for yourself he said.
"Les Enf ants du Paradis7 makes cable
television debut this week on Cinemax
NEW YORK (AP) � Cable
TV's Cinemax long has billed it-
self as the premium channel for
movie lovers, but with lastnighfs
premiere of "Les Enfants du
Paradis it lives up to the billing.
"Children of Paradise as
Cinemax will insist on promoting
it out of fear of scaring you off,
was fi 1 med between 1943 a nd 1945
during the Nazi occupation of
firance.

Director Marcel Came's mas-
terwork is a "backstage" movie,
set in the theater world of 1840s
Paris.
Jacques Preverfs screenplay
is a beguiling romantic drama, cre-
ating a fully realized world filled
with interesting characters and
interesting ideas.
"Les Enfants du Paradis" is a
seminal work in just about every
cinephile's canon. Once you've
seen it, you have a skeleton key to
the last 40 years of French cinema.
This is the text all those ob-
lique New Wave French directors
were schooled on and worked
from.
Don't let this deter you. It's
engrossing drama, with moments
of high comedy.
Considered solely as a ro-
mance, "Enfants du Paradis" is
worth your time.





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Entertainment
(BItc ?Eii�t (Earultnian
December 10,1991
Star Trek
By Matt King
I nterlainmenl I ditoi
�l at ! rek think bank has
igain Stm Trek VI ihe
� red( auntry, opened this
ltoaneageraudiencethal
py to sec another page in
taga
kes something special to
e keep two American gen-
interested Star Ink, in
! I scries had .1 unique
thai brought viewers
he tube week in and week
ven 111 the re-run phase of
kids and adults would
ind the rV to see: kirk
Bones sn "Damn it
�� tor' and Spock flaunt
mtages ol logic over hu
iuccess ol the series (evi
the thousands ol card
trekkies 1 will neverbe
blamed on one attribute
�� ibutes
irdlcss of the reasons for
usiasum over everything
� like the enigma inst
snowballing along film is a masten
� ' - good I'n-k so they eo to tl
next generation
movies
Even a mec
u re Star I rrk
icce to .i trvkkie,
u' movie, so thi'
movie makes mone) .somore I tvk
tilms j;o into production Ifs .1
le
I lu latt 1 � ' en-
Oail R��a ECU Photo Lab
Blow Me Down
e ol the Souths favorite bands was in town this weekend '��� ex Police came to 11 Itook
noprfsoi � any pressure on these boys when�. � their horns to thi iidOty
Robert Shaw claims the
crown of the King of Choral
OF N Mi- Hegavea
to the word horale
1 r hall .i century Robert Shaw has
lirechnggleei tubs and choirs
i in his lifetime, he says, he has
horal musi emerge as a sen-
he o inductor is K-
honored this month by the
cdyi enter
w YORK (AP) - H any-
embodies poet Wall
tman's thundrous phrase, I
11 America singing it is Robert
More than anyone else in the
ites, he has been respon
for millions ol people joining
1 . I fting their voices
m! groupsevcry week, every
1 V
ik) he has seen the work inv
- mux h that now,Shaw says,
the fexasall state high school choir
angs things which we thought i
its ago were beyond the capaci
esol professional choirs"
i-tvn s accomplishments:
He formed the lred Waring
,irt-( fob, which he considers "the
U"st voices ever assembled in the
history ol man first us�J the word
chorale to mean a group singing
. horal music; Uvi the Roberl Shaw
Chorale from 1949 to 1967, and
fi unded thebig ollegiateC horale,
now celebrating Its 50th anniver-
sary season
Shaw conducted the 1999 pre-
miere of "Ballad for Americans"by
the New York Philharmonic and
Paul Robeson, which was broad
cast
I le also conducted a crowd of
people nmnxxl into Carnegie 1 lall
in May, on the morning the famous
concert hall celebrated its 100th
birthday Violinist Isaac Stem wept
at the gloriOUS sound
Ihe American Choral Direc-
tors ssociation, founded V
awo with 85 members, now has
15,600 c amegie Hall is selling a -1
1 2-hour video l Shaw rehearsing
150 people in Brahms German
Requiem which it doesn't ion
sider esoteric.
I"his month, the 14th annual
Kennedy Center I ionors are being
awarded to the 75 y ir-old Shaw,
as well ascountry singer Roy Acuff,
the songwriting team ol Betty
Comden and Adolph Green, the
Nicholas Brothersdance team, and
at tor (iregory Peck
Kennedy . enter 1 lonot arc
given tor "contribution to the ul
tural lite ol the nation through the
performing aits
shaw is pleased, he says, be
cause it's public n ognirion oi the
emergence of the t horal art.
"The tact that choral singing
has a much higher pU e in classical
music than it did 50 or 60 years ago,
I think is reflected in the Kennedy
Center I lonor.
I'm not vain enough to think I
did it. It's recognition ol an ana rji
art. They needed � horse to put the
blanket on
A music-lover can get
goosebumps listening to a good
choir So can .1 chorister, shaw says
"Singers can approach art of
supreme quality, meeting munis at
the absolute top of human creativ-
ity he sivs
"An extraordinary repertory is
available to the amateur singer
An instrumentalist would have
to study for years to play music on
that level Not asmnchisdenvindcd
of the voice, technically.
"It isoneof the things you can
do with other peopleand still main-
tain your Ntf-fcsped and indepen-
dent enjoyment.
11' s sort of t he best of c ma rade-
rie and isolation Andbei luseit'sa
group effort il demands a certain
amount of ethii albehavior likecon
siderabonforthepersonwrw snexl
to you
In his lifetime, 'haw says, he
has seen the emergence ol choral
singingasaseriousartform VS hen
1 wasgrowingup there were junior
high no high school i orusesand
fraternity sings
When 1 got to New orkin 1938
the major large choruses were
alumni (lubsol men who d left uni-
versities and got together to drink
beer and sing on Wednesday
nights he say s
"There was the (ratorioSki
ety tor whom Andrew Carnegie
built a hall, tor lus wife to sing the
1 lallelujah Chorus
( horuses began to flourish af-
ter World War 11, Shaw savs, when
musicologists discovered the rich
choral literature of the 16th, 17th
and 18th centuries and technology
developed to publish and transmit
the scores
"With the growth in literatim'
came a corresponding growth in
schools of music and the education
of conductors he s.ns
While shaw finds the general
choral sceneerx ouraging, then an
some things that disturb him. "Cno
is the removal of the arts from early
curriculum he says
"Americaneducation would he
an awful lot better off if we began
with arts rather that mem natton.
"Singing, instruments, art, po
etrv, open up creative aptitudes in
children, making them capable of
faster learningot the memorization
subjects which they need, spelling,
arithmetic, historv
Thai has been proved Ameri-
can education has the thing com
pletely upside down.
hire is one of the best
foavid,almost maniac le,fol-
lowersol The Enterprise's adven-
tures the new movie ranks at least
second to The Wrath of Kahn in the
six film series.
I he Star Trek movies have a
great thing going each one gets
to build on the story of the ones
that came be-fore.
logically each one has the po-
tential to be better than its prede-
cessor.
Unlike Rocky movies, where
thi ending is a foregone conclu-
sion, Trek movies alwavs have a
special twist for their followers
(Halboa could never die and then
be bn night back to life in then a 1 m
oi an earthbound txer movie)
The best thing about The Un
discovered Country is that, finallv,
the seasoned crew has learned to
take itselt with a grain of salt
I low m an v times can you save
the universe and not become a
little desensatized?
Many of the nailbiting scenes
in the moviesaresalted with some
legitamatly tunnv one-liners (to
quote would only spoil some good
belly laughs).
( mce again the Special effects
art' breath taking Sometimes thev
wen- so above-par that the only
noise the talkative young trekkies
behideme could utter was ooooh
or aaaah.
The plot is tnnlov even to the
non-trekkie The Federation is
hatching a plan to help save the
dying Klingon empire and em-
Kirkontimeot neverending peace.
Unlike the Klingons in Star
Trek: The Next Generation the
Klingons of Kirk's era are not en-
tirely to be trusted, eventhough
their planet will beeixygendepleti
niTO yvjrs
Ihe plot smells of the luke-
warm friendship that America has
with its new-found commrads.
As fate would have it, Kirk
and the rest of the trusty crew are
put on hason assignment I o make
a kmg scenario short Kirk (a noto-
rious Klingon hater) is set upas an
assassin
"Ihe rest of the movie is spent
with various past and present En-
terprise crew memtXTS breaking
rules to rescue, and prove the
innocense, of their trouble-mag-
net of a captain.
The movie is a borderline
must see; Star Trek VI is certainly
worth the price of a Greenville
movie ticket
Community welcomes brand
new Multicultural Center
By immy Robinson
; � 11 iMultN u I rural
in ilit) ince its
nnou � ' I � � 1 much
en made toward
making the dream a reality
I nNovembcr27 1991 thepro-
gram became incorporated as an
independent 'on pntit organiza-
tion
I tural Center lead-
ers haveclet ted a l7memberboard
of direi tors and appointed two ad-
ditional i ommittees; a Public Rela-
tions v ommittee and a Member-
ship 1. ommittee,
fhe location ol thecenter isstill
undecided although severalbuild-
ings in the downtown Greenville
area an' beingonsidrration.
Members have visited vacant
buildings and an' working toward
obtaining one rent free for two years
uith an option to buy .it the end of
the two years.
Hnvlum-s were distributed at
the International i estivaland mtrtNt
in thepnm. 1 abi �unded 'Ihnvhun-
drcd people submitted their names
ii � addresses In addition to the
� I is being sent out
i � �hambcr olbmmerce
a lettei
Fhe Mulhcultural Center con-
cepl was a result of discussion dur
ing a " ommunity Round-Table
l orum "
The enter recicved a grant
from the North Carolina Humani-
ties Council.
Pr Mohammed Ahad con-
ducted tour community meetings
on four different cultures to be rep-
resented in the center Indian, I lis-
panicChineseandMid Eastern All
the evaluations of the center have
been positive and suggest the es-
tablishment of a community based
cultural center,
"This is something people want
to know and will enjoy,Msaid Ahad
in an earlier interveiw
l"ho center plans to have r(Xms
with artifacts, literature, pictures
and art from different cultures.
rhe objectives of the center arc
to amass resources such as films,
videos, charts, maps and book I 1
students, ti 1 hers, scholars and in-
�� � � : � . iduals; too induct ex-
hibitsonp ��� ilar cultures, to help
with resean h on health care beliefs
and utilization strategies, to con-
duel seminars and workshops tor
target groups such as teachers and
nurses and to maintain a library
and reading room of reference
material on immigrant cultures
According to a press release,
I"he Multicultural Center will tar-
gel grade and high school students,
college students, graduate students
and professors
Weare looking for willing and
enthusiastic students of ECU to
volunteer to become members of
various subcornmitteesand one stu-
dent leader to serve on the board of
directors
"Students and teachers will
learn from this center men than
anv other gnuip said Ahad.
Larroquette predicts court is
in session for last roundup
1 W YORK (AP) lohn
Larroquette, the slightly smarmy
prosecutor ol NBC's "Night
i ourt thinks this may be the
show's final season. But then, he
notes, 1 said that last year. And
the year before
That, he said, wasbecausefor
the last two years the acting con-
tracts were on a year-to-year ba-
sis but the show, now m its ninth
season, keeps getting renewed,
and one never knows: It still pro-
duces enough (Nielsen) numbers
to make it viable
Still, Larroquette, the tirst ac-
tor ever to win tour consecutive
Emmys tor a series, isn't putting
all his eggs in one sitcom. 1 le does
occasional film roles, and on Sun-
day will star in one on IKZ �
"One Special Victory
1 le plays a self-absorbed real
estate hawker who finds a new
meaning in life as the accidental
coach of a basketball team ot
handicapped adults.
If NBC does lop "Night
Court" off its roster for 1992-93,
"I'll do plays or movies if any-
body wants me to do some he
said. Tm sure I'll do another tele-
vision series. It's a great way to
make a living
Standing d foot 4 and pos-
sessed of a rich baritone voice,
Larroquette did various things
before acting to earn a living.
born and raised in New Or-
leans, he studied music tor 11
vears, and did time on tenor sax in
a rocknroll band there. He also
was an announcer at a classical
music station. But without the
soothing y awl drawl of his home-
town.
He worked hard to lose the
accent: "I thought it'd be better to
sound like Walter Cronkite than
Where y'at
I wanted to sound as though
I was 41) and had gray on the side
of mv hair
After that, he worked in San
Diego as a record promotion man.
And then, on to Los Angeles and
acting, starting in local stage pro-
ductions of The Crucible" and
"Enter Laughing He was at the
relatJvelyadvancedageof24then
He hadn't Studied emoting
much. But "it was in the back of
mv mind all my life, even when I
was a kid he said. "In New Or-
leans, the streets are theater. You
can iust walk outside and watch
great pageantry and drama and
comedy
It's a good drinking town.
Indeed, as l .arroquette notes the
nice thing about New Orleans is
that vou don't have to go thirsty
too long Problem is. he picked
up a taste tor the sauce there as a
teen-ager.
Later, when he was starting
to roll in Hollywood, hisdnnking
came close to doing him in.
It almost cost him his career
and his marriage to his wife, Eliza-
beth, who he had met in "Enter
Laughing Finally, he quit, cold
turkey, on Feb. b, 1982. He hasn't
touched it since.
"1 think the bottom line is
that vou've got to quit by yourself
and for yourself he said.
'Les Enfants du Paradis' makes cable
television debut this week on Cinemax
NEW YORK (AP) Cable
TV's Cinemax long has billed it-
self as the premium channel for
movie lovers, but with lastnight's
premiere of "Les Enfants du
Paradis it lives up to the billing.
"Children of Paradise as
Cinemax will insist on promoting
it out of fear of scaring you off,
wasfilmod between I943and lM5
dunng the Nazi occupation of
ranee.
f
Director Marcel Came'smas-
terwork is a "backstage" movie,
set in the theater world of 1840s
Pans.
Jacques Prevert's screenplay
isa beguiling romantic drama, cre-
ating a fully realized world filled
with interesting characters and
interesting ideas.
"Les Enfants du Paradis" is a
seminal work in just about every
cinephile's canon. Once you've
seen it, you have a skeleton kev to
the last 40 vears of French cinema
This is the text all those ob-
lique New Wave French directors
were schooled on and worked
from.
Don't let this deter you. It's
engrossing drama, with moments
of high corned v.
Considered solely as a ro-
mance, "Enfants du Paradis" is
worth vour time.





Classifieds
uJK fcazt (Hitrultnian
December10,1991
NOTICE- I will pay $75 for a
Peach Bowl ticket. I need at least
20 tickets. Call Billy at 756-1566.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SER-
VICES: We offer typing and
photocopying services. Wealso
sell software and computer d is-
kettes. 24 hours in and out Guar-
anteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Pro-
fessional Computer Services,
106 East 5th St. (beside
Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
TYPESETTING: Resumes and
reports. Brochures and news-
letters. Call 752-0833 or 830-
9090. Ask for Lisa.
A Beautiful Place to LK c
�All New
�Anil Ready To Kent-
IMVKRSITVAPARTMKM
2899 E 5th Street
�Located Near P.Cl
�Ne ir Majoi Shopping Centen
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limitedtffei S3 JO a month
Cocitaci J.T or romm) WUIiami
756-7815 or 830-1937
OfTiceopen y 8,12-5 0pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
(lean and quirt wir hrJriKtn fanttlsd sjmUIIN tl
mrg) effk m, Urr � and vrr. - �vrrv t-ven.
cjMc TV, Couples a tanajam only SM0 a n�ith. 6
m rhlf�� MOB0 IIHOrVfl Kl v; ! S � I
i.rjtln Awtrnrrttar�drn�tbjrhwnet� AaJcali�fdr�
nc�i Huk vr Couwn CM
Contad J r vv; romim Williams
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Privatebalcony bed-
room, Wilson Aaes. 1 2 utili-
ties and rent. Free cable. Dish-
washer. Need for second se-
mester or sooner. 758-5262.
FORRENT:2bedroom duplex.
758-5615.
DisriV. ciASSifim
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share a 2 bed-
room apartment with 2 girls.
Fully furnished. Across the
street from campus at Regency
House. $130 a month plus utili-
ties. 758-8272.
WANTED: Female roommate
to share apartment at Wilson
Acres. 1 4 of rent and utilities.
Will have own bedroom. Please
call for more information. 757-
0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: FREE rent, utilities,
cable in house, near campus in
exchange for care attendant ser-
vices. Will provide own nxm.
NO experience necessary. Avg.
worktime 10 hr. week. Call 752-
1932 for details Available Jan.
8. Ask for Courtney.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3
bedroom,2 l2baths, fireplace.
Small pets allowed with pet fee.
Security deposit required.
Available Jan. 1, 1991. $590.00
per month. 355-5079.
TWO ROOMMATES: wanted
to share three bedroom
townhouse. $190 a month plus
13 utilities. Non-smoker pre-
ferred. Call 3554)986.
FEMALE SEEKING, room-
mate to share 2 bedroom apt. it
Stratford Arms beginning Jan.
1. $175 a month 1 2 utilities.
Call 355-7640.
SUBLET: 1 bedroom apart-
ment. Unfurnished. Dec. 1-July
31 or portion thereof. $265
monthly, plus utilities and de-
posit. Call 321-0288 or 758-2320.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: for
spring semester to share 4 bed-
room apartment. $138month,
1 4 utilities, wd, dishwasher.
Non-smoker. Wild wood Villas.
Call 830-5125
PRIVATE ROOM: with shared
bath, kitchen, living room. Lo-
cated next to campus. 504 E.
12th St behind Dominos Pizza
on Charles. $180 per month in-
cludes utilities. Call Marsha
Blair to see at 757-2110 days,
355-2228 nights.
)ISI'I V (I ASSIIII I)
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED ASAP:Non-smoker,
on ECU bus route. $170 rent, 1
2 utilities. Share 2 bedroom. Call
757-0503.
RESPONSIBLE ROOM-
MATE NEEDED: Ringgold
Towers, fully furnished. $187.50
a month plus 12 utilities. For
spring semester or sooner. Call
Patrick at 7524428.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Half
block from campus. Call any-
time 758-8225.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT:
to sublease Jan. 1. $275month.
On 5th Street across from cam-
pus. Call 752-0348 after 5 p.m.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, has
loft, washer and dryer, 10
minute walk to campus. Call
7584287.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Share 3 bedroom
apartment with 3 girls. 2 12
baths, non-smoker, furnished.
$138.75 plus 14 utilities. Tar
River Estates. Call 752-0895.
MARIN MOUNTAIN BIKE:
for sale. '91 model, 2 months
old. Bought as a gift, ridden
once. White wsalamanders.
Suntour XCU components.
Water bottle, seat bag, lock and
computer included. Previewed
in the December issue of Moun-
tain Bike Action. $400 firm. Call
758-5354. Ask for Lew.
GREAT BUY! 6 days and 5
nights. Bahama vacation. Fun
in the sun. $149.00 or best offer.
919-776-8511.
FOR SALE- Couch and love
seat. 6 months old.
Williamsburg blue. Asking
$250.00. Call 757-3537and leave
message.
FOR SALE: Queen size
waterbed. Simple wooden
frame, semi-wave, asking $125
or best offer. Call 321-1179.
Leave message.
FOR SALE- Peach Bowl tickets.
Also drafting table, sleep sofa,
love seat. Must sell. Call 830-
9046.
I
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Ixascs for
1 Bedroom. 2 BodfOORI,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
GILBERT'S MUSIC: offers
20 discount to ECU students
and faculty - 40 off non-
stocked items. Musical instru-
ment repairs of all types. 2711E.
10th St. 757-2667.
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM: Ex-
cellent running condition.
Looks sharp, too! A steal at $700.
Call Greg at 830-9131.
SEIZED CARS: trucks,boats,4
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 805-682-7555 ext. C-
5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES:
availableat below market value.
Fantastic savings! You repair.
Also S&L bailout properties.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. H-6314.
1983 FORD ESCORT: $1400 or
best offer. New timingbelt, new
water pump, good condition.
Relocating. Call: 551-2745. 8
a.m5 p.m.
FOR SALE Stuff your Pirate
fans section with an ECU car
flag! $7 each. Don't delay. Call
830-3691.
WESLEY COMMON APARTMENTS
I
BRAND NEW!
1 and 2 Bedroom Apt.
AVAILABLE JAN. 5-10
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS
CALL FOR MORE INFO.
355-3647
laraestllbrary of Information In uT
Largest Library
19.273 TOPICS - ALL SUBJtCTS
Order CaUisg Today with VISA. MC or COD
HE 800-351-0222
Or Rutn K 0010 RewtrcH littorrralnn
11372 Idirto Av� WPM lot Anytw CA KXOi
FUNDRAISER: We're looking
for a top fraternity, sorority, or
student organization that
would like to earn $500-$1500
for a one week on-campus mar-
keting project. Must be orga-
nized and hard working. Call Jo
Ann or Pam at 1-800-592-2121.
MAKE $500-$1000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home.
Start now! Rush S.AS.E plus
$1.00 to Home Employers, 2301
Kent 8 Las Cruces, NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY! No experi-
ence necessary. Process FHA
mortgage refunds. Work at
home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers
and cruiseships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
employment. Call80S682-7555
ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext P-3712.
EASY WORK1 EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble products at
home. Call toll free. 1-800-467-
8585 ext 5920.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the holidays? Need a fun part-
time job? The Honey Baked
Ham Co. is in search of seasonal
help to fill our sales, counter
and production positions. We
have stores located in the fol-
lowing markets: Greenville, SC,
Columbia, Charleston, Knox-
ville, Raleigh, Durham, Greens-
boro, Winston Salem,
Wilmington, Charlotte, Atlanta
and other major cities through-
out the southeast. Please stop
by during your Thanksgiving
break to inquire about Christ-
mas help. Check the white pages
for information on the store
nearest you.
SPRING BREAK: Bahamas
PartyCruise$279! Panama City
$99!S.Padre$199!Cancun$469!
Jamaica $399. Jasa 758-5165,
Georgia931-9363,Jeff 830-5367,
Wayne and John 757-1369.
TRAVEL SALES REPRESEN-
TATIVE: STS, the leader in col-
legiate travel, needs motivated
individuals and groups to pro-
mote winter spring break trips.
For information call Student
Travel Services at 1-800-648-
4849.
PAINTERS NEEDED: Need
energetic people to help paint
Atlanta purple by displaying
ECU car flags on Jaa 1, 1992.
Buy your car flags today. Call
830-3691.
HELP WANTED: Wait staff
and bartenders. Apply in per-
son at Professor O'Cools (lo-
cated behind Quincy's on
Greenville Blvd.) from 8 a.m. to
10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Must be able to work Christmas
break.
FREE SPRING BREAK VA-
CATION: Organize a group,
earn commissions and free trip6!
Call: 1-800-826-9100.
MUSICIANS NEEDED: Key-
board or percussion to accom-
pany ECU dance classes. Good
pay. Call 757-6390.
FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS: Promote and organize
our spring break tours. All ma-
terials furnished. Good pay and
fun. Call Campus Marketing. 1-
800-423-5264.
portation. Call between 5-10
p.m 757-1040.
INVENTORY SERVICE seek-
ing part-time help. Starting pay
$6.00hour. Paid training. No
experience necessary. Call 752-
1204 Monday,Dec. 16,9a.m. to
3 p.m. only. Equal Opportunity
Employer.
RIDETOTHE PEACH BOWL
with Pirate pridei Buy your ECU
car flags today. Reduced price:
one for $7. Call now: 830-3691
and leave message.
CONCERNED: about your fu-
ture? Will some uncertain fu-
ture income pay all of your cer-
tain future bills? Maybe we can
give you advise on what to do.
Free, confidential consultation
from people who want to help
people. 355-3789.
LOST: Red Naurica Ski jacket.
Reversible to blue and green.
Call 355-5393. Big reward.
SLURPY: As finals draw to an
end and the real partying be-
gins. Make sure to ha ve a Merry
Christmas and Happy New
Year! We don't agree some of
the time (PSYCHO) but I wish
you the best in '92! Your new
roomey!
"WOODSTOCK Youare one
beautiful individual found only
once in one million. What we
have is as much a rarity. Thanks
fora mesmerizingsemesterand
for brightening my life with
your light. I love you now as I
will always. Happy 24th Birth-
day! Love, 'Snoopy
PIKA EXEC: Doing a great job.
Keep up the good work. We
appreciate it. Hang in there
pledges, if s almost over! The
Brotherhood.
AZL. Last Thursday night was
awesome. Lef s do it up again
sometime you hear! PIKA.
LOST: Blackwhite wind-
breaker . Taken from Rawl class-
room Wednesday. Has a set of
car keys in pocket. Reward. Call
830-9046.
Peach Bowl Special
SINGLE 1 or 2 persons $39.88
"parsons
Include: Overnight lodging, arrival h'ort duurvres,
super-deluxe complimentary continental breakfast
Super 8 � Atlanta South
1-75 Exit 73
(404)389-4108
20 minutes
from stadium
WATTERSONWHEEL&Now SPRING BREAK '91- Guaran-
hiring delivery driver for both teed lowestprices! Book by Dec.
lunch and dinner. Must be reli- 15 and save $100. Call Scot or
able, neat and have own trans- Paul at 752-6681 for more info.
We mourn the deaths of
Macho & Eahh
"Macho"
Man King. 24,
J of an unspeci-
fied street in
Ripple City.
j left us Mon-
day. His rude,
boisterous
behavormade
him an enig-
mabc icon, but
few really be-
i lieved his wild
J tales of con-
guest Gone is his earth-shaking laugh.
Gone is his sanctimonious trreverance.
Gone is his pungent, acrid malodorous
scent
Doug "Eahh"
Mortis. zZ met his
fate while taking
his dog for a leak.
Eahh's last words
were "Eahh. weD.
actually His
casket consists of
200 conogated
Dino's Pizza
boxes. To be en-
graved on his
tombstone: �'Wire-
tappers should mmmmmmmmmmmmm
have dwdThe funeral will be held at 3 oro,
Eahh will promptly appear at 8 pjn. Earn is
remembered for being confused with timely
matters of 5 hours. �
Announcements
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTOR AND PHYSICAL
FITNESS COMPETENCY
TEST SCHEDULE
Minges Coliseum, 10a.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 13. A passing score
cm this test is required of all
students prior to declaring
physical education as a ma-
jor. 1. Maintain an average T-
score of 45 on the six-item test
battery. 2. Having a T-score
of 45 on the aerobics run.
Any student with a medical
condition that would
contraindicate participation
in the testing should contact
Mike McCammon or Dr. Gay
Israel at 757-4688. To be ex-
empted from any portion of
the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed
summary of the test compo-
nents is available in the Hu-
man Performance Laboratory
(Room 371, Sports Medicine
Bldg.). Your physician's ex-
cuse must specifically state
from which items you are
exempt.
HONORS SEMINARS
Faculty members are re-
I
minded that proposals to
teach honors seminars fall
semester 1992 are due during
the third week of spring se-
mester. If you have questions
about the procedure or the
format, contact David Sand-
ers, 757-6373, at the Honors
Office, 124 Fleming Hall. The
Honors Committee makes the
final selection.
PUBUCATIQN OF AJWQUNCEMENTS
ANY ORGANIZATION MAY USE THE ANNOUNCEMENTS
SECTION OF THE EAST CAROLINIAN TO LIST ACTIVITIES
AND EVENTS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TWO TIMES FREE OF
CHARGE. ALL ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE TO BE TYPED OR
NEATLY PRINTED. DUETOTHE LIMITED AMOUNTOF SPACE
AVAILABLE, THE EAST CAROLINIAN CANNOT GUARANTEE
THE PUBLICATION OF ANNOUNCEMENTS. IT IS NOT ADVIS-
ABLE TO RELY ON THESE ANNOUNCEMENTS ASASOLE
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION. DEADLINES ARE: FRIDAY AT
4PM FOR TUESDAY'S PUBLICATION AND MONDAY AT 4PM
FOR THURSDAY'S PUBLICATION.
Bearcats d
Pirates, 10
By Lisa Spiridopolus
Staff Writer
ECU snapped a three game wanning
streak Friday night by bein routed by the
undefeated Bearcats of Cincinnati at the
Shoemaker Center, 105-69
The statistics said it all for ECU. the
team was outmatched and dominated in
every facet of the game.
"We had a tot of fundamental prob-
lems Eddie Payne, ECU's head basketball
coach said.
The Bearcats took advantage of this
problem by forcing 27 turnovers which
Cincinnati turned into 31 points.
ECU had threeplayers in double figures
while the Bearcats had five. UC also shot 55
percent from the floor compared to the
Pirates 43 percent
The bright spots for the Pirates came
from Ike Copeland, Steve Richardson and
Ronnell Peterson who combined for 50
points on the night.
Copeland, averaging 14 points a game
had 19 points and seven rebounds.
Copeland's play on the season has made
Copeland a leader for the Pirates this sea-
son.
"Ike has had some aggressive play for
us Payne
hard and hi
Richard
for the Pira
and finishir
Peterson, wl
a game, scoi
Lester J
sconng an$
points and I
minutes of
ltwasl
nan head co
strength is i
Cinar
off the beet
Herb
hasbeenavl
Bearcats sec
Payne
haveenoug
partly duel
days
Thetis
exams and I
Tennessee)
18.
ThePil
two-game j
Newman i
American Unr
BvChristie Wilson
Staff Writer
Both of ECU's swimming and diving
teams su f f ered losses Sa turd a y to the Ea gles
of Amcncan University.
The men's team wasdefeated 130-110,
to move their record to 3-1 on the season.
The women's team lost 139-86, which
moved their overall mark to 2-2.
Head swnmmingcoach Rick Kobe said
even though both teams lost, they swam a
great meet.
"Each swimmer put forth their best
effort he said. "I just think Amencan was
a little stronger than we (were)
Leading scorers for the men's team
were senior Derek Nelson and sophomore
Lance Tate.
Nelson took first in the 1,000-yd.
freestyle with a time of 957.65, and second
in the 500-vd. freestyle in 453.36. He also
took first place in the 200-yd. freestyle in
15659.
Tate
breastroM
participate
in which
rime of 3
Sopr
both thej
(15954),
Fresh
in the 40
first in vl
yd. freest
the 400-vi
Fresf
ond in bol
andthe20
also cont
relay.
Fresr
ond in the
at 2:04.91
4XVvd.
Detmer, Jones
Freshman
From Staff and Wire Reports
ECU'S Robert Jones, BYU's Ty
Detmer and San Diego State's
Marshall Faulk lead the pack of the
1991 Associated Press All-Ameri-
can college football team.
Faulk led the country in rush-
ing and scoring, the first freshman
to finish on top in either category.
On Thursday, the San Diego State
running back also become the third
freshman to make the AP first team
since they became eligible for var-
sity competi tion in 1972. The others
were Georgia's Herschel Walker in
1980 and Pittsburgh's Tony Dorsett
in 1973.
Detmer, last year's
Heisman Trophy winner from
Brigham Young and the NCAA's
all-time passing leader, is the only
repeater from the 1990 team. He is
the first quarts
first unit in consej
Notre Dame's j
19467.
Joining Faul
offense is Heisr
Desmond How
triple-threat wic
159 yards per
nation's second -lj
23 touchdowns,
his trademark dr)
his TDs came or
return and a 93-
Despite rnisj
with an injury,
1,429 yards and
He gained 386 ya
setting an NO
that was later
Tony Sands-
Detmer waJ
passer this seas
of 403 throws for
Washington's
HOUSTON (AP) � Washing-
ton tackle Steve Emtman had been
hoping all year to win the Lombardi
Award as the nation's top college
Bnermrvbuthecould hardly believe
it when the moment arrived.
Tm reaDy in awe right now.
Thisisthegreatestawardofmylife
Emtman and Thursday night "If�
the greatest moment of my Hfe
Emtman, leader of second-
ranked Washington's dominating
defense, was selected from a field of
four finalists mat also included de-
fensive tackle Santana Dotson of
Baytor, linebacker Marvin Jones of
Hortda State and offensive tackle
Greg!
Thei
minee of sports
ers and coaches, j
banquet hosted I
taryCrub.Thei
not announced.
The award i
Vinos Lorn
BayandWa
who died of i
created toraiser
can Cancer!
Last year's i
Dune'sChrisr
mounted)
symbol for!





BOP-
Ivme for
un pan-
icked
seasonal
ji uinter
ins. We
the iol-
ille.H
Knox-
C .reeas-
alem,
Atlanta
vrough-
tse stop
�sgiving
I hrist-
t pages
store
nas
maCitv
n$4r'
(B-5165,
-5367
tESEN-
fer m acA-
t Vated
to pro-
trips
!t ident
-MS-
paint

all
ii- stall
I er-
is Go-
's on
m to
i p.m.
istmas
VA-
roup,
trips'
EAK
fganize
ma-
iavand
mg. 1-
H KS( )NAI S
portation. Call between 5-10
p.m 757-1040.
INVENTORY SERVICE: seek-
ing part-time help. Starting pay
So.iXVhour. Paul training. No
experience necessary. Call 752-
1204 Monday, Dec. 16,a.m. to
3 p.m. onlv. Equal Opportunity
Employer.
PFKSONAIS
RIDE TO THE PEACH BOWL
vvnthnratepnde'BuyvourECU
oar Sags today. Reduced price:
one for $7. Call now: 830-3691
and leave message.
Sports
(HJe 3Eaat Olnrolinian
December 10,1991
C3
CONCERNED; about your fu-
ture7 Will some uncertam fu-
ture income pav all of your cer-
tain future bills1 Maybe we can
give you advise on what to do.
Free, confidential consultation
trom people who want to help
people. 355-3789
LOST: Red Nautka Ski jacket.
Reversible to blue and green
Call 355-5393. Big reward.
SLURPY: As finals draw to an
end and the real partying be-
gins Make sure to have a Merry
Christmas and Happy New
Year! We don't agree some of
the time (PSYCHO) but I wish
you the best in '92! Your new
roomey!
WOODSTOCK You are one
beautiful individual found only
once in one million. What we
have is as much a raritv Thanks
fora mesmerizingsemesterand
for brightening my life with
vour light. I love you now as I
will always. Happy 240a Birth-
day' Ixwe, 'Snoopy
PI KA EXEC: Doing a great job.
Keep up the good work. We
appreciate it. Elang in there
pledges, it's almost over! The
Brotherhood.
Key- AZD: Last Thursday night was
ti- awesome. Let's do it up again
Good sometime vou hear! PIKA
LOST: Blackwhite wind-
breaker. Ta ken from Rawl class-
room Wednesday Has a set of
car kevs in pocket. Reward. Call
830-9046.
:Now SPRING BREAK '92: Guaran-
r both teed lowest prices! Book by Dec.
e reh- 15 and save $100. Call Scot or
trans- Paul at 752-6681 for more info.
n the deaths of
&
Eahh
(King. 24,
i unspv
street in
p)le City.
is Mm
His rude,
s t e t o u i
vntrmade
an enig
:icon. but
really he-
I his wild
of con
ig laugh
xwice
tl((irnis
IR "Eahh
Moms 22. met his
tee while taking
his iog for a leak.
Eahh's last vwrds
were: "Eahh, well,
actually ' His
casket consists of
2CH) corroeated
Dino's Pia
hones To he en
graved on his
tombstone: "Wire
tappers should .
have died The funeral will he held at 1 p m
Fahh will prorrtptlv appear at 8 pm. Fjfth is
rrmemhered for being confuse! with nmelv
matters of 5 hours
N OF ANNOUNCEMENTS
MAY USE THE ANNOUNCEMENTS
ST CAROLINIAN TO LIST ACTIVITIES
0 THE PUBLIC TWO TIMES FREE OF
JNCEMENTS ARE TO BE TYPED OR
�TOTHE UMITED AMOUNT OF SPACE
CAROLINIAN CANNOT GUARANTEE
ANNOUNCEMENTS. IT IS NOT ADVIS-
1ESE ANNOUNCEMENTS AS A SOLE
CATION. DEADLINES ARE: FRIDAY AT
PUBLICATION AND MONDAY AT 4PM
IBUCATION.
Bearcats down
Pirates, 105-69
By Lisa Spiridopolus
Staff Writer
ECU snapped a three game winning
streak Friday night by being routed by the
undefeated Bearcats of Cincinnati at the
Shoemaker Center, 105-69.
The statistics said it all for ECU. the
te�l) was outmatched and dominated in
every facet of the game.
"We had a lot of fundamental prob-
lems EddiePayne, ECU's head basketball
coach said.
The Bearcats took advantage of this
problem by forcing 27 turnovers which
v incinnaH turned into 31 points.
ECU had threeplayers in double figures
while the Bearcats had five UC also shot 55
jxTce from the floor compared to the
PI rates 43 percent.
The bright spots for the Pirates came
trom Ike Copeland, Steve Richardson and
Ronnell Peterson who combined for 50
points on the night.
Copeland, averaging 14 points a game
had 19 points and seven rebounds.
( opeland's play on the season has made
v ppeknd a leader for the Pirates this sea-
son.
"Ike has had some aggressive play for
us Payne said. " He pratices and plays
hard and his work ethic is producing
Richardson came off the bench again
for the Pirates to nail four three-pointers
and finishing with 18 points on the night.
Peterson, who had been averaging 12 points
a game, scored 13 for the team.
Lester Lyons, who leads the Pirates in
scoring and assists, was held to just two
points and was 0-5 from the field in 27
minutes of play.
It was the sixth straight win for Cincin-
nati head roach Bob Huggjns. "I believeour
strength is our depth Huggins said.
Cinci nna ti had several players to come
off the bech and contribute for the team.
Herb Jones, a 6'4" senior forward who
hasbeen averaging 21 points a game for the
Bearcats scored 26and grabbed lOrebounds.
Payne said that he felt the team didn't
have enough preparation for the match-up
partly due to playing four games in seven
days.
The team will get an eight-day rest for
exams and also use the rest to take on the
Tennessee Volunteers in Knoxvilleon Dec.
18.
The Pirates will return to Minges for a
two-game home stand against Carson-
Newman and against Campbell.
Fit photo by DaM R�od��CU Photo Lab
The ECU men's basketball team suffered a 105-69 loss to the Cincinnati Bearcats over
the weekend. The team will take an eight-day break before playing Tennessee
American University sweeps ECU swimmers
ByChristie Wilson
Staff Writer
Both of ECU's swimming and diving
teams su ffered lossesSartirday to the Eagles
of American University.
The men's team was defeated 130-110,
to move their record to 3-1 on the season.
The women's team lost 139-86, which
moved their overall mark to 2-2.
Head swimmingcoach Rick Kobe said
even though both teams lost, they swam a
great meet.
"Each swimmer put forth their best
effort he said. "1 just think American was
a little stronger than we (were)
Leading scorers for the men's team
were senior Derek Nelson and sophomore
Lance Tate.
Nelson took first in the 1,000-yd.
freestyle with a time of 957.65, and second
in the 500-yd. freestyle in 4:53.36. He also
took first place in the 200-vd. freestyle in
1:46.59.
Tate placed first in the 200-yd.
breastroke, clocking in at 2:13.90. He also
participated in the 400-yd. medley relay,
in which the team placed second with a
time of 3:38.72.
Sophomore Brian Sol tz took second in
both the 200-yd. individual medley
(1:5954) and 100-yd freestyle (49.63).
Freshman Patrick Cassidy participated
in the 400-yd. freestyle relay and placed
first in 3:19.81. He took second in the 50-
yd. freestyle (2259) and also took part in
the 400-yd. medley relay.
Freshman Jason Callaher placed sec-
ond in both the 200-yd. butterfly (2.02.79)
and the 200-yd. freestyle (1:46.86). Callaher
also contributed in the 400-yd. medley
relay.
Freshman Robert Goral placed sec-
ond in the 200-yd. backstroke, clocking in
at 2:04.91. Goral also participated in the
400-yd. medley relay.
The men's team defeated the Rich-
mond SpidersonSat. Nov. 23 before meet-
ing with American University.
"The women's team had a harder time
this meet because once again we were
beaten by a teams depth Kobesaid. "(We)
were faced with 10 great women swim-
mers, but I can't have them swim every
event
The Lady Pirates lost their first meet
last week to Richmond University, but
won 7 of the 13 events. Kobe said the
reason the team lost was because of
Richmond's depth.
"It is hard to swim teams that have
anywhere from 15 to 20 women swim-
mers Kobe said. "I think that when we
win it shows that our team has real talent.
We don't have to depend on quantity, just
quality
Against American, the leading scor-
ers for the women were junior Tia Pardue
and sophomore Jacqueline Silber.
Pardue placed first in each event she
swam. She won the 50-yd. freestyle in
2534, and the 100-yd. freestyle in 55.46.
Pardue also contributed to the 400-yd.
freestyle relav. The team clocked in at
352.85.
Silber took second in each event she
swam. Silber participated in the 1,000-yd.
freestyle, coming in at 1041 01, and the
200-yd. freestyle in 159.82. Silber's final
event was the 500-yd. freestyle, in which
she clocked in at 5:16.26.
Junior Julie Wilhelm placed second in
the 200-yd. backstroke in 2:18.94. Wilhelm
also participated in the 400-yd. medley
relay which the team placed second in
4:15.30.
Freshman Michelle Walck took first in
the 200 yd. breastroke coming in at 2:39.97.
Walck also contributed to the second place
win in the 400-yd. medley relay.
The Pirate swimmers next meet will
be on Jan. 2 against Ashland University.
Lacrosse team
prepares to
defend crown
By Kent Lewark
Special to The Eaat Carolinian
The EC U lacrosse team has begun early
preparation todefend their crown ascharn-
pions of the Southern division in the Na-
tional Collegiate Lacrosse League.
The team has held several informal
practices in order to sharpen their skills
before next season's March start.
A fall season had originally been
planned, but was later cancelled in part
because the team's budget cuts. The de-
partment of intramural recreational services
slashed the teams budget by more than half
from what they recieved in 1990.
The teams' budget covers the costs of
equipment, travel and membership fees to
the NCLL.
The NCAA has extended a bid to ECU
to become a Division I team. The Pirates
had to decline the in vi tation due to financial
problems.
'The University could not financially
support lacrosse as a varsity sport at this
time Wes Davis, team captain, said.
The ECU lacrosse team is a club sport,
which differs from a varsity team because
they receive considerably less financial
support than varisty sports.
The NCLL consists of 35 club teams
from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Mary-
land, Virginia and North Carolina. The
teams are split in to seven divisions.
ECU competes in the Southern divi-
sion against such teams as Old Dominion
University, William and Mary College,
James Madison University, Virginia Com-
monwealth University, the University of
North Ca rolina, N.CState University, Elon
College, the University of Richmond, Lib-
erty College and Howard University.
The Pirates are returning eight starters
from last year's squad that posted a 9 and 2
record and came up one game short of a trip
to the Final Four in Baltimore, Md.
The Pirates appear to be strong favor-
ites to repeat as Southern division champs.
Leading scorer Scott "Smitty" Smith returns,
as well as other offensive stars. Kirk
Katzburg and Drew Borque.
On defense, all starters are back, in-
cluding Wes Davis, Larry Fortier and
standout goalie Phil Truitt.
"With 90 percent of our top goal scor-
ing back and no one lost on defense, the
team should be just as good as last year
Katzburg said.
See Lacrosse, page 8
Detmer, Jones lead All-American team
Freshman also makes list of the elite
From Staff and Wire Reports
ECU'S Robert Jones, BYU's Ty
Hetmer and San Diego State's
Marshall Faulk lead the pack of the
1991 Associated Press All-Ameri-
can college football team.
Faulk led the country in rush-
ing and scoring, the first freshman
to finish on top in either category.
On Thursday, the San Diego State
running back also become the third
freshman to make the AP first team
since they became eligible for var-
sity competition in 1972. The others
were Georgia's Herschel Walker in
1980 and Pi ttsburgh's Tony Dorsett
in 1973.
Detmer, last year's
Heisman Trophy winner from
Brigham Young and the NCAA's
all-time passing leader, is the only
repeater from the 1990 team. He is
the first quarterback to make the
first unit in consecutive years since
Notre Dame's Johnny Lujack in
19447.
Joining Faulk and Detmer on
offense is Heisman Trophy favorite
Desmond Howard of Michigan. The
triple-threat widereceiveraveraged
159 yards per game and was the
nation'ssecond-leading scorer with
23 touchdowns, many coming on
his trademark diving catch. Two of
his TDs came on a 93-yard kickoff
return and a 93-yard punt return.
Despite missing three games
with an injury, Faulk rushed for
1,429 yards and scored 140 points.
He gained 386 yardsagainst Pacific,
setting an NCAA single-game mark
that was later broken by Kansas'
Tony Sands.
Detmer was the nation's No. 2
passer this season, completing 249
of403 throws for 4,031 yardsand35
touchdowns. He finished hiscareer
with more passing yards (15,031)
and TD passes (121) than anyone in
NCAA history, two of his 68 pass-
ing and total offense records.
Completing the backfield is
Indiana's Vaughn Dunbar, the
nation's No. 2 rusher with a 154-
yard average. Although he only
played two years for the Hoosiers,
Dunbar finished his career as the
school's third-leading rusher and
TD scorer.
Mario Bailey of Washington is
the other wide receiver and Kelly
Blackwell of Texas Christian is the
tight end.
Rounding out the offense are
center Jay Leeuwenburg of Colo-
rado; guards Jerry Ostroski of Tulsa
and Jeb Flesch of Qemson; tackles
Greg Skrepenak of Michigan and
Bob Whitfield of Stanford; and
placekickcr Carlos Huerta of Mi-
ami.
The defense is led by ECU's
Robert Jones and Washington's
Steve Emtman, who won the
Lombardi Award as the nation's
top lineman.
They are joined by linemen
Santana Dotson of Baylor, Brad
Culpepper of Florida and Leroy
Smith of Iowa; linebackers Marvin
Jones of Florida State and Joe
Bowden of Oklahoma; and backs
Kevin Smith of Texas A&M,Terrell
Buckley of Florida State, Darryl
Williamsof Miami and Dale Carter
of Tennessee.
Top-ranked Miami and No. 2
Washington, the only undefeated
teams in Division I-A, each have
two players on the first team. No. 4
Michigan and No. 5 Florida State
also placed two players on the
squad.
See American, page 8
Washington's Emtman takes Lombardi Award
HOUSTON (AH � Washing-
ton tackle Steve Emtman had been
hoping all year to win the Lombardi
Award as the nation's top college
lineman, but heoould hardly believe
it when the moment arrived.
"I'm reaDy in awe right now.
Trteistregreatestawardofmylife
Emtman said Thursday right "If s
the greatest morrsnt Of my Me
Emtman, leader of second-
ranked Washington's dominating
defense, was selected from a field of
four finalists that also included de-
fensive tackle Santana Dotson of
Baylor, Hnebacker Marvin Jones of
Florid State and offensive tackle
Greg Skrepenak of Michigan.
The winner, selected by a com-
mittee of sports writers, broadcast-
ers and coaches, was announced ata
banquet hosted by the Houston Ro-
tary Club. The final vote totals were
not announced.
The award is named in honor of
Vince Lombardi, the former Green
Bay and Washington Redskinscoadh
who died of cancer in 197a It was
created to raise money for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
Last year's recipient was Notre
Dame'sChrbZorich. The award is a
mounted chunk of pink granite�a
symbol for Lombardi, who, as a col-
legiate lineman, was known as one
of Fordham's Seven Blocks of Gran-
ite.
Emtman, a 6-foot-4,280-pound
Junior from Cheney, Wash an-
chored a Washington defense that
allowed onh237yardsand 92 points
per game. He made 60 tackles and 6
11I sacks, broke up three passesand
had an interception for the Huskies
(11-0), who will play Michigan in the
Rose Bowl on Jan. 1.
Emtman, who is also a finalist
for theOutiand Trophy, was named
a first-team AD-American by The
Associated Press on Thursday. Ear-
lier, he was named the Pac-lfsde-
fensive player of the year for the
second straight season.
Jones, a 6-2,220-pound sopho-
more, led Florida State with 125 tack-
les, including a season-high 15
against Miami. He was the first
sophomore to benamed a Lombardi
finalist
Dotson, a 6-5,264-pound senior,
finished with 60 tackles, one fumble
recovery, four sacksandtwoblocked
kicks. Skrepenak, a 68,322-pound
senior, helped power Michigan's
offense to an average of 439 yards
and 37 points per game.
a Dotson, Jones and Skrepenak
Jbo were named AP AH-Americans.
toy Mil
On the run
ECU'S Hunter Galimore makes another outstanding reception
against South Carolina earlier this season. Galimore and the
Pirates will take on N.C State in the Peach Bowl New Year's Day.
Look for the
Peach Bowl wrap-up
in the first edition of
TheEast Cardinitm,
January 14,1991.
(ecu)





8 6Ic CnotCEnniltnian
December 10, 1991
Angels aquire Von Hayes from Phillies in winter meeting
MIAMI BEACH, Hi (AP)
She l alifornia ngf Is made the big
noise al the winter meetings Sun
day, getting Von Hayes in .� trade
from I'hil.ktt Iphia a few hoursafter
general manager Whitey Herzog
launched ,1 face to face tirade .it
Danny lartabull agent
fne ngeb, whe traded Devon
White to! orontointheopeningdeal
of List vv,i! s meetings, again made
th first move fney sent two lop
minor leaguers, pitcher Kyle Abbott
and outfielder Ruben maro Jr to
Philadelphia (or Hayes
l laves, M, has been on tlie trad-
ing Mock tor several seasons He
played only 77 jimcs last war K
cause ol a broken right arm mn
tained when ho was hit a pitch from
rom Browning,and batted ust !
with 21 KHIs '
I laves has not hit a home run
since September I'M) Despite that
the Angels hope he can till sonx' of
the power void left by 1 taveWmncld,
who was let go after hitting .11 am
leading 28 homers.
"We were 1 Mb in the
runs scored and 1 Jthinon baseper
centage Herzog said. "We know
he's (oming off a bad year B
can help ns in those area
I lerzog snd I (ayes will take
Winfield'sspotinright field, for now
rhe Angels are struggling to re sign
tt �� agent tirst baseman Wally
foyner.andl lerzog said 1 I.ivm ould
plav then' if ncvessirv.
"We're not finished We expo '�
� 1 a lot dt things this week
I lerzog snd.
But signing rartabuD, tin- pre-
mier free agent remaining, may not
!� i uifot diem.
I lerzog is still smarting over his
dealings with IVnnis Gilbert, the
agent who represents Bobby lknilla
and lartabull rhe Angels wanted
� ilia,but 1 lerzog feltalbert used
turn in order to raise the $29 million
i iffer that Bonilla ai cepted last week
from the New York Mets.
So 1 lerzog, .is brunt a baseball
man as there is. told Calbvrt m. He
cursed fl�agentmtheFontaineWeau
I lotel lobby in a brief, but loud, out-
burst.
It should be pointed out that
HefZOg and i albert go wav back.
albert plaved for the Mets' minor
league team in Visalia in 1969, when
1 ler ig w.is the Mets' farm d irt tt r
"We know each other well
(albert said
Literleraog'svilitewa .
but his message was the s
lartabull, who had been hij
Angels' wish list, wasn't prime any-
more.
"If he changed agents, I i
be interested Heraog said "I'm
never going to make an (rffer tt
of Dennis C albert S players.
"I didn't like what hap;�
the Ik milla situation, ' he said
a little upset at th.it
Peach Bowl
draws
attention to
university
By Doug Morris
tnnic�rm t ifitm
Phe Bowl thi
drawing more attention to all ;
athletii programs than ever b I
The bowl has increased intcn
!H�t jusl the football team, but other
sports as well

ill
��lion
lion

rtvitioi
Slid
all wee!
i their Wl kl

� � ting the
lively of
rate sup �
ommentators

win
'
m A fipai k
,i rivalry but
ii i tati ' � � .


ght about ' Ihe
� sitiveisbeinginabowl I
� the biggest negative is that
� vs. ill t(x uson the rivalry and
not tb i "ii. and this is some
what controled by the media We
- people will talk about how
� 1 ,iUi. not that this is
their first � !h their rival
� i
This bowl is ,i reward more
than anythingelse Ifsa reward tor
theathlet
Lacrosse
Continued from page 7
re going to have an awe
some blend of returners and .1 few
nismg newcomers Smithsaid.
� '� renot going to lose a step '
I he up oming 1992 season
I imises to be an exerting one tor
the Pirates. "I'm definitely looking
forward to this season I avis said.
it wet in spread this attitude to the
new guys, we can take this team to
another level "
American
Continued from page 7
Emtman was the leader of the
nation's best defense, vhnh lim-
ited opponents to 217 ytardsand 9 -1
points per game
I iehad ig 1 f2tm klesforlonea,
unhiding 6 12 suks, aixl Inter-
cepted one pass
Robert lonesmadeanaznazing
151 tackles for East (arotina, which
won its last lOgamestogainaberth
in the Peach Bowl.
Jones was also a tuvilist tor the
Butkusaward, an award given an
nu.illy to the nation's top hneKu ker
The All Amoru a team was so
locted bv AP sports editor IXirrell
Christian, college football writer
Rick Warner and regional AP sports
writers.





8 vllic �ast (Harulinian
n,
W I 1
Angels aquire Von Hayes from Phillies in winter meeting

� �
i
Kvn or t!
hroki
; v hen he was hit .1: �
1
is in

1 lera
Winl
nol hit .1 li. �me run rho
� �-
can till son




with
Later
: I
mi �re
li'ttin 1 irV :�
from the New 1 rk Mel
So I lerzog, as Muni 11 is I 1
man .is there is, told Gilbert so. Hr
i ursedtheagi ntinthe! 1 mtaini I
. ! (nit
burst.
It should be p nted ut that
1 lerzog and iilberl
( iilbt �' Mets' minor - �
11 tcaminVisalia in - � hen of Q
� � � I lerzogwastl eMets'I
"We � .a h other well
1st v � - Gilbert said pset
.
Peach Bowl
draws
attention to
university

Lacrosse
d from page 7
- �
-
1 li
1
American
Continued from page 7
He id 1
r losses,
-
ben
� .11 Kit
won its

� ilsoa
Butkus award ti iward j u an
nuallvti 1 the nation stoplim
Ilic Ml An it-p. .1 team v 1 -
Iti ted I � � trrell
Christian, college football �
Kiek Wamerarwi n v.ii �nal Al' sp irts
writers





Title
The East Carolinian, December 10, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 10, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2802
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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