The East Carolinian, March 23, 1989






Editorial4
Classified6
Clearly Labeled Satire11
Cartoons12
Art show opens Gray Art Gallery.
Flip to page 9.
ECU baseball defeats Davis &
Elkin, 9-3, Rugby wins tourney.
Catch the action on page 14.
She i:ast (ftaroliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b3 No. 59
Thursday March 23,1989
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Minority
BvGAin SANDERSON
Stafl Vriter
In order to inaugurate the
Minority Presence Initiative, Dr.
Reginald Wilson. Minority Affairs
Director for the American Coun-
cil on Education, paid ECU a visit.
Since 1981, Wilson, who
holds a Th.D. in clinical and edu-
cational psychology, has toured
campuses nationwide making
recommendations as to how col-
leges can improve minontv rela-
tions. In touring campuses, he
consults with black and white
faculty, administrators and stu-
dents in an effort to discover where
problems exist, then makes sug-
gestions as to how the problems
may be rectified.
"ECU has a golden op-
portunity to improve its minority
reputation Wilson said. 1 le said
that minority students "may feel
intimidated" by happenings Mich
as "theTeddy White incident, the
art exhibit a couple of months ago
and th brown jelly bean occur-
rence in the SGA
"People act on their per-
ceptions and things like that have
a tendency to make black students
shakev he said. Wilson said he
had spoken to the Chancellor,
black faculty and students. "ECl
needs to impress beyond a shadow
of a doubt that there is no racism
on campus he said. "I've re-
cieved nothing but cooperation on
the part of this
administrationeveryone seems
to want the question ot racism
cleared up
'I'malso concerned aboi11
retention of nuneritv studentsthe
large number that have dropped
out 1 le said that ECU needed to
examine "ways of retaining stu-
dents and to focus on getting those
who have dropped out back
"There is room tor con-
siderable improvement in the way
of black administrators and fac-
ulty Wilson said. "ECUneedsto
do more in terms ot black recruit-
ment ot faculty According to
Wilson, there are currently 28
blacks on faculty and 10 black
administrators.
"ECU has a golden oppor-
tunity to improve its
minority reputation'
Reginald Wilson
"Schools tend to do better
in administration because no Ph.D.
is required Wilson said. "Per-
haps thisuniversity needs to work
with othersin surrounding states
he slid.
The ongoing Minority
Presence Initiative encourages the
hiring of minority faculty mem-
bers, especially black faculty. Dr.
Mary Ann Rose, Director of Equal
Opportunity programs said the
initiative centers on "bringing
black scholars on campus as guests
in order for them to interact with
students, administration and fac-
ulty
Rose said that the univer-
sity is striving to "highlight schol-
arly work by blacks, give blacks
and whites a chance to interact
and to boost recruitment oi black
scholars
"Main' people like tosav
we would hire a black but there
aren't any qualified and we don't
want that anymore Rose said
Applications for visitation were
to include the credentials of the
scholars likely benefits to the
department concerned, plans for
the visit, and the likely degree of
interest among students and fac-
ulty
posed guests include
Talmadge Fauntlcroy, an ECU
alumnus who is pursuing a suc-
cessful opera career in Italy, De-
lano Berry, an Alumnus working
toward h I " 'rate at the Uni-
versity of Kentucky, Dr. Kenneth
Hard) I �� . utive Director of the
I ommission on Accreditation for
Marriage ind Family Therapy
Education and Dr. Charles V
Hamilton, a prominent black po-
litical scientist.
Physicist studies particle collisions,
pioneers in the field of ion impacts
A 2 MeV Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator used by the ECU Department of Physics to study
and obtain data on ion collisions at 5 to 7 percent of the speed of light (Photo by .D. Whitmire)
Women's involvement in government
policies, national security discussed
Bv ADAM CORNELIUS
i" VS-rrr
The short documentary,
"Women for America- For the
World" was shown at a luncheon
in Mendenhall Tuesday. The acad-
emy award winning film empha-
sized the importance of women's
involvement in thinking and talk-
ing about government policies.
The 22 women in the film
included such speakers as Repre-
sentative Patricia Schroder, for-
mer vice-presidential candidate
Geraldine Ferraro and actress
Joanne Wood ward. The documen-
tary voiced concerns over the
subjects of nuclear war and an
escalatingarmsbudget.lt its place
was an appeal for more money to
be alloted for humanitarian pro-
grams, including education, hun-
ger relief, and medical care.
"We conceive the nation in
our bodies said Addie Watt,
Chairman on the president's
Committee on Food. "We carry
the nation in our bodies. We nurse
it. We nurture it. It is certainly our
responsibility to decide which way
the nation goes
Several of the women talked
about the effect of war on their
children and the children of the
world, urging education about
war.
"We have to be strong and
teach (the children) to be diligent
said therapist and author Joanne
Macey. "It's all about what you do
for the children
Psychiatrist Jean Bolen com-
mented on tht� effects of the bomb-
ing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
and how its impact is felt today.
"When you start to feel that
what happened in Hiroshima and
at Nagasaki happened to us too,
that then starts a chain of people
who begin to realize that things
have to change. In a nuclear age a
nuclear family is all the children
in the world
A discussion group was held
immediately following the film,
led by Drs. Maria O'Neil-McMa-
hon and Leslie Mega. Together
with Mr. John Moskob, the group
discussed how funds are spent in
the U.S. government and the
implication that a broad view of
national security includes every-
thing that makes up a healthy
society.
See WOMEN, page 7
� A
By DAVID HERRING
A��i�tant Ntwi Fditor
In 1969, the ECU Department
oi Physics purchased a $500,000,2
million electron-volt Tandem Van
de Graaff Accelerator which can
accelerate ions (atoms with some
or all electrons missing) to a speed
of 5 to 7 percent of the speed of
light.
According to Dr. Alexander
E. Skutlartz, professor of physics,
these high-speed ions collide with
target atoms (gaseous or thin sol-
ids) in an interaction region be-
hind the accelerator. Then, reac-
tion products such as electrons,
scattered projectiles and recoiling
targets are observed.
"The results obtained so far
have direct implications on infor-
mation about the mechanisms
involved in such collisions, and
health-related physics research
said Skutlartz. "lonbeamsare used
to treat cancer in humans, but a
detailed experimental data base is
still needed and will be partly
furnished by our experiments to
work out models of radiation
damage in living tissue
In addition to the health-re-
lated physics research, he plans to
answer the fundamental question
in ion-atom collisions, where did
all the electrons from the target
and the projectile go in a single
collision event? "Getting a snap-
shot of the whole collision system
would simultaneously show what
is happening to the electrons and
what forces are acting on them
Skutlartz explained.
According to the Uncertainty
Principle, one cannot simultane-
ously measure, except within a
certain limit, the velocity and
position oi any particle - one can
only give probabilities. The ex-
perimental results Skutlartz will
provide could be compared to
already existing theoretical pre-
dictions about the behavior of
particles to determine their valid-
ity.
A relatively new addition to
the physics department faculty,
Skutlartz is still in the planning
stageof two upcoming experimen-
tal projects involving high speed
particle collisions. 1 le hopes to
answer questions concerning the
effects of ion impacts on organic
matter, which would provide a
data base for health physics and
for humans living in outer space.
"The orientation of DNA de-
termines how radiation will affect
it Skutlartz noted. "Under what
conditions is DNA altered or de-
stroyed? What mechanisms are
mainly involved in radiation kill-
ing' cells?"
In another project, co-con-
ducted with a colleague, he hopes
to determine the effects of ion
impacts on materials which have
bonded interfaces between met-
als and carbon compounds. le
asks, how do ion impacts alter or
destroy such interfaces and break
down the bonding oi the two
materials.
"This is important to know,
since satellites and space probes
are constructed ny sucn materi-
als Skutlartz stated, "and in
space, objects are subject to con-
tinuous ion bombardment from
the sun
In an accelerator collision, the
reaction products have three main
reaction channels which might be
open singly or simultaneously: the
emission of electrons from either
the target or the projectile, the
excitation of electrons in either the
target or tne projectile twrucn
means simple electrons moving
from an inner to an outer orbit
around the nucleus of the atom),
or the capture of electrons from
the target to the projectile.
After the collision the excited
electron clouds surrounding the
target and projectile rearrange
themselves, which sometimes
leads to the emission oi further
electrons or x-rays. The energy of
these "secondary" collision prod-
ucts gives a "fingerprint" of how
excited the system was before the
rearrangement.
"I'm interested in doing what,
up to now, no one else in the world
has succeeded in doing Skut-
lartz said, "which is, looking at all
the reaction products in a collision
event simultaneously. There are
onlv three groups in the world - in
Sweden, Germany, and Kansas
State University - conducting
similar experiments, and up to
now, no one has studied ion im-
pacts. This is exciting because it is
a new field and there is soon going
to be competition from other agen-
cies
Forum to break new ground for
ECU School of Education
By JAMES CLARK
Special to The Ea�t Carolinian
The ECU School of Education
is "breaking new ground stated used by teachers. Tims, the pur
Dr. Kathy Carter in reference to P�se of the forum was to address
in 1987. gested by Thompson. To moti-
One of the recommendations vale students to learn, Thompson
made by the board was to im- asserted that students have to
prove the motivational techniques consistently experience academic
success. Accordingly, studentsarc
Forensics win competition
By MINDY McINMS
Staf Writer
The ECU Forensics Society
competed at UNC-Wilmington
and ended up winning it all. They
finally proved that "we are not
dead bodies said Mary Harri-
son, president of the ECU Foren-
sics Society.
"Having theentire week to do
nothing but practice paid oft be-
cause now we're going to the
Nationals said Harrison.
The ECU Forensics Society is
on their way to Upscula, N.J. on
April 27th to compete in the Na-
tional Forensics Society Competi-
tion. Their competitors wilj con-
sist of 2CKX) students from every
college in the country.
The group achieved eligibil-
ity to compete in the Nationals by
winning first place overall in the
Carolina Forensics Society Com-
petition held the weekend of
March 11th at UNC-Wilmington.
In the Wilmington competi-
tion, the Society scored a total of
four first place awards, seven
second place awards, and four
third place awards.
Informative, persuasive, and
after dinner speeches were the
only categories of the competition
that was prepared. Exemparanuis
and impromptu are the only cate-
gories that are unprepared.
Harrison said that the unpre-
pared categories are the hardest
because when the judges hand the
contestant the information the
contestant has a limited time to
study the material.
"It's kind of like ramming
for exams she said, but "it's a
great feeling that you get when
youradrenalincstartsflowingand
it's you and everyone against the
judges
See FORENSIC, page 7
the forum which the School of
Education recently sponsored.
The forum, which was held
at ECU on February 13th, met to
discuss and begin development of
a case literature for educators.
According to Carter, ECU is
one of the first universities in the
country to combine the experience
and expertise of both teachers and
teacher educators, from various
schools and disciplines, to accom-
plish this.
This project was initiated as a
result of grant funded by the Board
of Governors of the University of
North Carolina. The grant resulted
from a task force report on teacher
preparation, which was submit-
ted to the N.C. General Assembly
by the UNC Board of Governors
the problem of how to motivate
students to learn, and to incorpo-
rate suggested techniques into a
case literature for educators and
student teachers.
Carter was one of two guest
speakers invited to attend the
forum. She is a professor at Ari-
zona State University and is noted
more likely to succeed if they have
confidence in their abilities and
are rewarded for their efforts.
Some motivational techniques
proposed by Thompson were:
more individualized instruction,
heterogeneous classrooms which
integrate low and high perform-
ers, and differential assignments
(assignments based on a student's
for her research in using case stud- ability). Thompson stressed, how-
ics to educate student teachers, ever, that each student is an mdi-
joining her was Max Thompson vidual, with particular needs and
from Appalachian State Univer- a particular background. There-
sity who is noted for his research fore, motivational techniques that
on motivational techniques work with one student or one
Amone Thompson's credits is his specific socio-e. onomic group of
experierc: working for the Wash- students, may not work with
ington Redskins as team motive- another.
Jz Then too, there are some situ-
Student motivation is by no ations which pose dilemmas that
means an exact science, as sug- See FORUM, page 7






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23,1989
How to reduce exam
1 get very nervous each year
around exam time. What can 1 do
to reduce this anxiety?
It's near the end of the semes-
ter, finals are being given, projects
assigned and it's spring time! All
of these factors will have an im-
pact on you. You can handle all of
these situations if you adopt a
wellness viewpoint. Wellncss is a
positive state of health and in-
cludes learning ho w to stay physi-
cal! v and emotionally heal thy. The
by eating a variety of foods every because you have too much work (focus your attention on your
day. Exercise can help you main- todo, problems with relationships, work)
tain or lose your present body
weight and will promote a healthy
heart, lungs, and muscles. It also
releases stress. A good nights sleep
may be helpful before taking ex-
ams, going to class, etc Avoid
bad habits such as smoking and
abusing drugs and alcohol. Drink-
ing in moderation is more benefi-
cial than over-doing -it. Take care
of your body and don't put it
following areas are related to the through a great deal of abuse.
physical aspects of Wellness. A major factor related to the
Eat balanced meals and avoid emotional aspect of wellness is
unk iood. Fast food restaurants stress. Stress is a part of every-
may be more convenient for your one's life in some form. The way
schedule but not for your body, you learn to handle stress is im-
Practice good nutritional habits portant. You may be under stress
too many bills, and etc Don't let
Health Column
by
Sharon
McDonald
these things upset you! There are
a variety of behaviors you can
3) take breaks to release
tension, loosen muscles, and relax
your mind
4) recognize your limita-
tions and realize that everyone
has strengths and weaknesses.
5) be prepared for your
exams by not procrastinating
There are many other tips on
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Scott Makey
Phillip V. Cope
adopt to handle these situations. Wellness available to you. Con-
You can learn to manage your time tact Mary Elesha- Adams at the
by: Student Health Service at 757-6794
1) following a daily sched- or visit the resource room at the
ule Student Health Service for more
2) studv in a quiet room information.
Students, civic leaders plan Project Graduation
to have drug-free activities for substance abusers
By BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
Students, civic leaders, and
substance abuse counselors met
in the new classroom building activities are planned throughout
yesterday to discuss Project the evening including games, a
Graduation. Pitt County is fol- band, and breakfast for those who
lowing the lead of most other choose to pull the all nighter.
North Carolina counties in pro- "Students provided the idea
viding incentives for students to for the project said Gregg Allin-
remain drug-free. son, project coordinator. "They
Project Graduation will take provide the effort and success and
place in Minges Coliseum on they do all the work. We have
Friday-June 9, from 10 p.m. until 5 faith in the students,
a.m. This event is open to all jun- "It's their desire to be
iors and seniors in Pitt County straightAllinson said. ITiest;
Schools. dents want that
After students sign a contract "The volunteers decided that
saying that they will arrive drug the drug problem was not hope-
free they will be sent formal invi- iCSS" said Dr. Bill Smith of Pitt
tations to the function. Drug-free County Council on Substance
Abuse. Allinson noted that more
young people between the ages of
16 and 20 die as a result of drug-
related accidents between 10 p.m.
and 4 a.m. during May and June.
One of the purposes of Project
Graduation is drug-abuse educa-
tion, intervention, and prevention,
Allinson said.
"We want to show students
that they can have fun without
Air Force discovers 5 missiles
accidentally rendered impotent
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Air Force quietly modified its
procedures for loading launch
codes in Minuteman nuclear mis-
siles after discovering three years
Maj. Pat Mullaney, an Air Force
spokesman at the Pentagon.
According to the Air Force
statement, the launch codes in-
side Minuteman 3 missiles are
been loaded. "As a result of the
incident, a number of procedural
changes - nine - have been incor-
porated into the coding process
the service said. "During subse-
ago that some of the weapons had changed on an annual basis for qucnt code changes, all missiles
been accidentally rendered impo- security reasons. The problem at were correctly coded,
tent. Malmstrom was discovered
The service, responding to a "during ihc 19S6 annual code
published report Monday, ac
knowledged that some Minute-
man 3 missiles at Malmstrom Air
Force Base in Montana could not
have been fired in 1986 if the
United States had gone to war
because they didn't have the right
launch codes inside their internal
computers. The Air Force said the
precise cause of the mistake was
never determined, but "inadver-
tent personnel error was the most
likely the cause
The procedures for loading
new codes into the missiles have
been overhauled and no repeat of
the incident has occurred since
1986, the Air Force added. While
refusing to detail all the changes
made in the code-loading proce-
dures, the Air Force said one in-
volves a complete double-check
in which a second team of techni-
cians enters a silo to verify codes
after a first team has completed
the programming.
The Air Force agreed to dis-
cuss the matter Monday in re-
sponse to a report in the Washing-
ton Times. The newspaper quoted
unidentified sources as saying the
code problem affected five of the
Air Force's Minuteman 3 missiles
for roughly a year.
The Air Force refused to con-
firm the number five, instead
saying only that "a few of the
missiles in one squadron" were
affected. "Throughout the period
when these few missiles had the
incorrect (code) information, they
were entirely safe and secure the
Air Force said.
"Although these few missiles
were not on full alert and not
capable of immediately participat-
ing in our nation's war plan, more
than 98 percent of the Strategic
Air Command's missiles were on
full and active alert during that
same period The United States
has 1,000 land-based missiles,
including 500of the Minuteman 3.
Each of those missiles carries
three warheads. The Washington
Times quoted Bruce Blair, an
expert on nuclear weapons at the
Brookings Institution, as saying
the miscoded weapons could have
thrown the operation of the entire
squadron of 50 missiles into disar-
ray if the United States had gone
to war.
The Air Force disputed that
assertion, however, saying the
failure of a few missiles to respond
to "enable" and launch commands
would never prevent missile crews
from attempting to fire their other
rockets. "You do not hold up an
ordered response because a few
missiles don't show green said
change in that squadron the
service said.
The Air Force technicians at-
tempting to load new codes into
the missiles were unable to do so
because the 1985 codes had never
Vote
in the SGA election
next Wednesday
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drugs said Allinson. "We're at-
tacking the problem at a county-
wide, grass roots level
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BUSINESS HOURS:
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PHONE:
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1989 SUMMER SCHOOL
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT
CHAPEL HILL
Academic Calender
Session I: May 22 - June 27
Session II: June 29 - August 4
Tuition and Fees: (NC Resident) Undergraduate 1-5 hrs $157; 6-8 hrs $220
UNC-CH offers, during two 5-12 week terms, one of the largest summer programs in the United States. Over 800 courses are
scheduled in 40 disciplines. A typical coarae load per term is two classes of three semester hours each.
Students from any college or university, teachers, rising high scdool seniors, and others who are not enrolled
at UNC-CH may apply aa Visiting Summer Students.
For details, please request a catalog
Name
Street
City
Stsle
Zip.
Matt to: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Summer School CB I 3340. 200 Pettigrei
Chapel HU1, NC 27599-3340. Phone: (919) 962-1009.
(AAEBO Institution)
Hall.
07
now Accepting
applications for the
1989-90
ATTORNEY GENERAL
AND PUBLIC DEFENDER
These salaried positions offer
an excellent opportunity to
gain experience and leader-
ship abilities that will benefit
you throughout your life. At
the same time, these positions
will enable you to make valu-
able contributions to East
Carolina University. For addi-
tional information and appli-
cations, contact the Associate
Dean of Student's Office in 209
Whichard.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE TURNED IN BY
Thursday, March 30th
L





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23,1989 3
WorldWatch Institute surveys Earth's environment
Earth faces global4Pearl Harbor'
NEW YORK (AP) Un- new political consensus is arising -World grain production per
checked pollution, land misman- that may defeat them. As Ameri- capita hasdcclined each year since
agement and population growth cans faced heat waves, drought 1934 "a litt e in 1985 and 1986,
havepushed the world to the brink and beach pollution last summer, qUite a tit in 1987, a lot more in
of its environmental Pearl Har- "What people began to sense was 1988
bor: a global food shortage that that the planet might be chang- .S year's North American
could starve millions, the mg Brown said. "And that they drought cut U.S. harvests by 30
might be responsible
Worldwatch Institute says.
The environmental research
group, which has surveyed the
Earth's condition annually since
1984, lias issued perhaps its grim-
mest report. "The State of the
World 1989 "We are losing at
this point, clearly losing the battle
to save the planet said the re-
port's chief author, Lester R.
brown.
The impending result, he
warned, "will shake the world to
its foundation Yet a glimmer ot
optimism lightened Brown's
message at a briefing on the
Worldwatch findings last week.
With growing awareness of
the hazards at hand, he said, a
But with the atmosphere get-
ting hotter, arable land disappear-
ing and overpopulation continu-
ing, time is short. "By the end of
the next decade, thedie will pretty
well be cast the report said.
Brown identified two critical
concerns: Environmental degra-
dation - from the lossot topsoil to
a growing scarcity water to
percent, and other major produc-
ers could not make up the loss:
China's harvest fell by 3 percent,
the Soviet Union's by 9 percent.
- Croplands have shrunk by 7
percent in China since 1978, mostly
because of industrial develop-
ment, and by 13 percent in the
Soviet Union, mostly through land
mismanagement. The Earth is
losing 24 billion tons of topsoil a
apparent global warming caused yCar . as much as covers Austra
bvair pollution - that has cut farm
output; and continuingoverpopu-
lation. Already, he noted, the
world Is undergoing "a loss of
momentum in the growth of food
output
He cited this evidence:
lia's wheat belt - chiefly from
overtilling.
"If we don't have a severe
drought in North America this
year, we will one of these years,
and when that comes, with de-
pleted stocks, the economic shock
waves of that will shake the world
to its foundation Brown said.
There are countermeasures,
Worldwatch said.
The group called for world-
wide land-conservation measures,
such asrequiringrecipientsof U.S.
grain to better protect their crop-
lands; a broad array of energy-
saving steps, from solar-powered
water heaters to more-efficient
electric appliances; and an aggres-
sive effort to cut population
growth. Such actions, Brown said,
would require an effort on the level
of that mounted by the United
Statesafter the 1941 attackonPearl
Harbor pushed it into World War
II.
"The question is, what will it
take to turn things around?" he
said. "My guess is that the Pearl
Harbor in the battle to save the
planet will probably be the next
major drought in North America
MEDIA BOARD
Is now accepting applications
for General Manager for the
1989-1990
academic year for the
BUCCANEER
(yearbook)
Please apply at the Media Board Office,
2nd Floor, Publications Building
Phone 757-6009
Applications accepted through
March 31, 1989
Whoopi Goldberg speaks
in NC on spouse abuse
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Teople
don't want to believe that domes-
tic violence is so pervasi ve, but the
armed takeover of a battered
women's center in Lenoir should
prove that the subject can't bo
ignored, comic Whoopi Goldberg
said.
"It's something people don't
want to talk about Goldberg said
Mondav. "The attitude is, it" a man
hits his wife, it's his wife. Well,
we're here to say we're not any-
one's property any more
Goldberg, in Charlotte to do
her one-woman show "Living on
the Edgeot Chaos appeared with
seven former battered women at a
newsconference sponsored by the
.C. Coalition Against Domestic
Violence. She looked at the women
lined up in front of the cameras.
"These women didn't always
look like this she said. "We don't
have any 'before' pictures
She told reporters she was
surprised that the March 10 hos-
tage incident, in which a dis-
traught husband held women and
children for about 13 hours, ap-
peared to be all but forgotten. "For
this not to be a real hot boiling
issue is scary she said. "I don't
understand why people aren't up
in arms
Troy Lingle, 35, has been
charged with holding up to seven
people hostage before quietly
surrendering to police. He isbeing
held on $150,000 bond in the
Caldwell County Jail.
No one was hurt during the
ordeal,but w omen'sgroupsacross
the state have seized on it, saying
the problem of domestic violence
needs to be addressed instead of
ignored. 'This is happening in
households across the country
every day said Goldberg. "This
can visit you any time. It could be
vour sister, your mother, your
daughter or son
INC.
Iff
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ANN OUN CIN G
Election of Executive Officers
for the
Student Residence Association
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
March 28, 1989
Filing Dates are March 20 - March 23
Campaigns will be March 24 to March 29
Candidates Meeting - March 23, 1989
7:00 pm
Greene Lobby
For More Information and Applications
See Your Residence Hall Directors
CAN YOU SING?
JOIN A CHORUS?
Make Your Reservations
With The
Easter Bunny
m
2
It's true, the Easter Bunny is awaiting your
reservation for an Easter feast you won't
soon forget.
V bring the uhole family Have your picture taken
with the Easier Bunny Then, feast your eyes on a
buffet extravagana that s guaranteed to satisfy everj
one's tastes � And it s all to the pleasant sounds of
bve contemporarj jazz music hum Spiral
I he selection is endless SpecialK seasoned entrees
Beef. seafood chicken and pasta Broiled lkked. tried
and sauteed A variety of freshly prepared vegetables
krfh inade-to-order omelettes or crepes as light as ait
Roast Baron of beef carved at your command And
that s only the beginning
Finish with your choice of mouth-watering desserts An
uitazing selection that u ill tempt you to come back for
more That is. if you still have room
Ifte School ofMusic is having Auditions
for choralgroups
Concert Cfioir, "Brett Watson, (Director
meets (Monday - Thursday, 1:00 p.m.
University Chorale, Rhonda Fleming, Director
meets Monday - Thursday, 12:00 noon
Sign up for an audition time (see below) in the office of the Fletcher
Music Building
If you don't want to audition but still would like to sing, just register
for University Chorale, Section 2 (honda Fleming, 'Director), or
Women's Chorus, Section 1. These choirs are open to all students,
faculty and staff who want to sing in a chorus.
It meets Monday and "Wednesday from 4:30-6:00 p.m.
So make your reservations toda Remember the
Easter Bunny is waiting
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Audition Times:
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ttttfi iEaat (Earoltnian
Tim Hampton, n Mtor
Chris Siegal, s. &
Chip Carter, F-tm, &�
Susan Howell, ;�.��� MMpr
Dean Waters, o�hm-u
Stephanie Singleton, c ea
vt�j i�� fM 0��i�� f�iii ��limy 3trt IMS
PETE FERNALD, CmtniMmta
Stephanie Folsom, m��h un
James F.J. McKee, a
Brad Bannister, c &,r
Jeff Parker, si�r mm
TOM FURR, OrcKkfton Mwwijer
Debbie Stevens, s-fy
Stephanie Emory,u t�j.
Mac Clark, b��� m?
March 23,1989
OPINION
Page
Elections
"Ten" is an unlucky number for the SGA
Some students will be tempted
not to vote in the SGA elections next
Wednesday, even with the many
opportunities for learning about
each candidate and making an in-
formed choice.
Approximately 90 percent of the
students on this campus chose to
"just not get involved" in the elec-
tions last year. Such a figure of apa-
thy is terrible for the SGA, but great
for those groups who very much
want a particular person in office.
The poor show at the ballots merely
encourages block voting and en-
sures its success. The uninvolved 90
percent may not show any interest at
election time, but the entire campus
suffers when there is a dispropor-
tionate representation in the Stu-
dent Government Association.
There are still many ways to
become more familiar with each
candidate before casting a ballot
Wednesday. Those running for of-
fice have been and will continue to
approach various groups in an effort
to meet more students before the
election and explain what they
would like to do in office.
A debate forum will be held on
the Mall Monday. Members of the
five campus media will ask the can-
didates questions, the candidates
will ask each other questions, and
this also provides an opportunity
for students to ask questions.
Profiles of each candidate were
printed in the newspaper this week
and each platform will be printed
Tuesday. Candidates will also be
printing platform flyers to be dis-
tributed all over campus.
Actually, there is no way to get
around knowing the candidates
unless a real effort is made not to.
The SGA will never be representa-
tive of all the students without first a
large representation of students
coming out to vote for its leaders. A
group which comprises only ten
percent of the student population
holds a majority in the student gov-
ernment. Ten percent of our campus
voted last year. The numbers and
the representation will never get
better unless more and more people
on this campus are willing to take
the time to get involved in this elec-
tion and care about the effects it will
have on them.
Drug war revisited
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Editorial Columni.t
Inexplicably, the Supreme Court failed
to pay attention to the excellent reasoning in
my last column. Instead, the highest court
in the land decided that civil rights are sub-
ordinate to the war on drugs.
Testing government officials involved
in the war on drugs and railroad workers
whose train was involved in an accident for
drugs, without apparent reason, isn't a
breach of the right to protection from unrea-
sonable search and seizure. Or so the court
says.
Either the majority did stop to think that
the term "government officials involved in
the war on drugs" will soon be expanded to
include all government officials, or they
didn't stop to think that. Either way, it's a
mighty sobering thought.
On the same subject, George Bush pro-
vided the most direct statement of the true
reason for the war on drugs yesterday.
There are no shades of gray involved,
according to the fledgling president. It is, he
said, a matter of "good guys versus bad
guys, of white hats and black hats
In other words, more direct ones, you
don't have to mink. Anyone against drugs
is good, everyone else is bad. I just reread
1984, and this sounds like "duckspeak" to
me. One of the terrifying aspects of Orwell's
nightmare world was that people were
encouraged not to think deeply on any is-
sue. There was political orthodoxy: if you're
told that ifs right, it's right; if you're told it's
wrong, it's wrong. If you decide differently,
you're wrong.
The transformation from a free society
to a decidedly unfree one doesn't happen
overnight, folks. It happens in little steps
like this one.
I don't like to talk about campus-re-
lated matters much, but I do have one thing
to say about the upcoming elections.
Don't listen to anyone who just says,
"Vote Listen to me: learn the issues in-
volved and the candidates' positions first,
then vote. I know it sounds obvious, but
most people don't bother with the first step,
even among those who bother with the
second.
I do encourage everyone to vote, but nol
unless they have first gathered (and
thought about) more information about tht
candidates than what appeared in the can
didates' own posters and in letters to Tht
East Carolinian.
If the worst happens, though, and you
find yourself on election day unprepared to
make an informed decision, then don't vote.
And be proud of it.
9EAF LINIP oh v)vm
WHAT 5 YWR KEA50N fOK HOT VOTING- THIS YFAR ?
History of art makes a difference
To the editor:
This is a response to an article
written by Nara Bost about the place-
ment and content of Artwork (March
21).
Nara, the first time I read your
letter, my immediate reaction was to
sit you down and pound the history
of art into your thick head. But after
several readings I realized that you
were a very intelligent person who
simply refused to look at a situation
from any point of view except vour
own.
Have you been attending your
art history classes? Most students
don't, which is probably one of the
most detrimental things any young
artist can do. I will give you a for
instance: Have you ever seen the
painting "Les Demoiselles d' Avi-
gnon" by Pablo Picasso? This paint-
ing is considered, by most, to be the
turning point of modern art. It was
painted in 1907, and so offended it's
viewers and Picasso's artist friends
that the painting was not shown in
public until thirty years later. I have
had the privilege to see this painting
in person, and I would be lying if I
said I liked it, but I was moved. L
couldn't take my eyes off of it. I stood
there offended yet unable to do any-
thing about it. This one painting
(though I hated it) made me re-evalu-
ate the way I looked at my own paint-
ing and even the way I looked at the
world around me.
1 am not comparing events in
terms of artistic qualities; it is the
principle of both situations I am dis-
cussing. To say that an artist should
handle a subject so it is less offensive
to someone else is ludicrous. You are
proposing that we do away with ev-
ery type of art, because there isn't any
painting, sculpture, etc. that doesn't
offend someone.
The artists of this piece are white
and looked at a particular situation as
only they could � as white arris ts.
The most ironic thing about your
response is that you took 13 of the
time to deny the right of their work to
exist, and in the 23 of the article, you
reacted in just the way the artists
expected, thus making their work a
total success.
If you are the proud African
American female artist you are, then
why give them the satisfaction of
knowing their piece was so success-
ful and so offended you. Why not re-
spond to this same subject in a way
that only you can � as an African
American female artist.
As you have seen, their place-
ment of the sculpture has gotten far
more response than if they had
placed it in the art building. So, if you
feel your past and future are being
violated, don't whine about it; do
something. Art can speak much
'ouder than the written word.
Scott Eagle
Painting
Graduate Student
Vote Vanderburg
To the editor
I am endorsing Jennifer Vander-
burg for vice president of the Student
Government Association because of
a word that sums up her life here at
ECU: active. Jennifer has been very
active with SGA, where not only does
she serve as a legislative member, but
is also very active in the SGA commit-
tees. In addition to her work wtth
SGA, she is active with the Student
Union, where she serves on several of
its committees. Jennifer is also a
leader in other organizations. Cur-
rently she serves as vice president of
her sorority, Alpha Xi Delta, as well
as being its past scholarship chair-
man.
So why do I want to see Jennifer
Vanderburg become the vice presi-
dent of SGA? Well one reason is
obvious, she is extremely qualified.
But another reason is her compe-
tency in whatever she involves her-
self with. Whether it be SGA, Student
Union, or Greek organizations, she
always becomes a respected and
valuable member. Jennifer does net
believe in apathy and therefore re-
fuses to be silent when important is-
sues come up. She is organized, level-
headed, and above all else, genuinely
concerned about ECU's students.
Now that I have stated a few of
the reasons why 1 feel Jennifer Van-
derburg would make the best vice
president of SGA, I hope that you will
support her also.
Fred Steck
English
Junior Clas President
Experience
To the editor:
On Wednesday, March 29 the
students of East Carolina will ha vean
outstanding opportunity to make
sure that their voice is heard. This
opportunity will be the election of
Student Government Association
executive officers for the 1989-90
school year.
The Student Government Asso-
ciation is your voice at East Carolina.
To ensure that the student voice is
heard we must have a strong student
government. Our student govern-
ment can only be as strong as the
leaders we elect. The person we elect
to the office of president will have the
responsibility of leading our SGA.
We need the most qualified person
there is for the job. 1 would like to
suggest to you that the most qualified
candidate for the office of president is
Kelly Jones. Kelly has been active in
Student Government for several
years. She has held several positions
in Student Government including
Chairperson of the Student Welfare
committee. Most recentlv she has
served the students of East Carolina
as Vice-President of Student Govern-
ment. She has served students of East
Carolina well. Many times when
there are issues of student concern on
campus Kelly is constantly trying to
get students to attend meetings on
these issues. More often than not she
will be one of the few students who
actually attends these meetings. She
works hard to make sure the student
voice is not ignored.
On March 29, to ensure that East
Carolina students have a strong voice
on issues of student concern, I urge
you to vote for Kelly Jones for presi-
dent of the East Carolina SGA Thank
you.
Lee Toler
Student Welfare Chairperson
Cooperman
To the Editor:
I am writing in support of Susan
Cooperman, candidate for vice-
president of the SGA.
As drum major of the East Caro-
lina Marching Pirates and a member
of the East Carolina Pep Band, 1 have
had the opportunity to get to know
Susan and see her work. As a co-
section leader for the Marching Pi-
rates the past two years, Susan has
had one of the top sections in the
band. Her ability to work with
people and get the job done ha
gained her respect not only by her
peers, but by the faculty is well
Also, for the past two year she has
been the manager for the Eat Care
Una Pep Band. Without her total or-
ganization and constant updating
for day to day changes, the pep band
would not have operated as
smoothly as it did.
In addition to musical activities,
Susan is also involved in other on-
campus, student activities. Since its
inception, she has been a member of
the Fine Arts Board where she ha
gained a vast knowledge of the dif-
ferent ongoing activities taking
place at East Carolina. She is verv
well informed and is constantly
looking for knew ways to help the
student body and improve the uni-
versity.
In closing, I would like to say
Susan Cooperman would make an
outstanding vice-president of the
SGA. Her knowledge, fairness, and
ability to work with her peers, make
her an excellent representative for
the position of vice-president of
SGA, not only for the student bodv,
Dut for the university as well.
On March 29th, make the right
:hoice. Vote for Susan Cooperman,
ice-president for the SGA.
Scott D. Lane, III
Drum Major
Music Education
Personal Pres
To the editor:
1 am writing in support of Tnpp
Koakes for student body president.
In many elections, candidates come
and go while most voters are left with
no real insight into what these people
really represent. Underneath all the
'campaign hoopla what kind of
character does this person really
have, who will represent the voice of
the ECU'S 18,000 to the world
My friends, this is one candidate
that 1 do know personally anu can
proudly say that our representation
would be held safe in the "firm
hands" of Tripp Roakes as president
I could sit here and write about all the
accomplishments and experience
that Tripp holds that I have wit-
nessed in my two years in the legisla-
ture but I'll leave that to others. My
concern is that vou understand the
person, that individual who will
have to mesh together the thoughts
and fears of students with the opin-
ions of faculty which, believe me, is a
lot more complicated and diverse
than it appears on the surface.
Tnpp is the kind of guy you
could call up at 3:00 a.m tell him that
your car has broken down and in five
minutes he would be there helping
you anyway he could. You see, serv-
ing us as student body president
involves more than just legislative
procedures, it requires a person who
can sit down on a one to one basis
vith any student or faculty member
and not only listen to their concerns
but take immediate action to bring
about positive results. Tripp is that
kind of person. He has proven his
ability and if you are a student who
wants a leader you can truly believe
will listen and take action on your
concerns, then Tripp Roakes is your
kind of candidate for student body
president. I'm sure he would appre-
ciate your support and your friends'
on election day. Thank you.
Allen Thomas
Business
Sophomore Class President
fr
v
V,





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23, 1989 5
SGA treasury candidate profiles
Layton discusses funding
By BEN SEIBY
Stiff Writrr
SG A treasurer candidate Inn
Layton would like to see nn
provements made in the student
tunding appropriations process
"We need to educate differ
ent student groups about the ap-
propriations process and meth
ods of funding Lavton said. "I
would like to make sure that the
budget is done accurately. This
would insure that there is no
cause for debate or any group
getting screwed' over. It should
have been done right the first
time
"I would like to see the
budget printed in the East Caro
liniart Layton said.
Lavton would like to see
more money tor student art proj-
ects. "We have one of the best a 11
schools in the Southeast Laj
ton said. "The ultimate compli-
ment tor an artist is to have his or
her work displayed "
Lavton would like to see the
$50 refrigerator fee reduced. "I
think that they should be pro-
vided as a service said Layton.
Layton would like to give
more money to minority student
organizations equaling the
money that fraternal organiza-
tions receive.
They're important groups
on campus Laytonsaid. "I don't
think that they get enough money
for what they do. They need more
money for honorariums.
"I want to bring groups into
closer touch with the SGA
Lavton said. "They aren't as in-
volved as they could be.
"I want to give the voters a
choice' Lavton said, "instead of
one unopposed Greek candi-
date'
For the last two years, Lay-
ton has served on the Screenings
and Appointments Committee,
the Appropriations Committee,
and is a member of the North
Carolina Student legislature. He
serves on the faculty senate, the
General College Committee, and
the Student Union's Public Rela
JIM LAYTON
tions Committee. He is also a
member of the Wesley an Foun-
dation. For two years, Layton has
been a cross country varsity ath-
lete. He serves as an intramural
athletic representative.
Madden stresses essentials
By BEN SEIBY
St jtl ft'nli r
"The essentials of the Student
Government Association aren't
being met in regard to serving the
student body in .in efficient man
ner said Ray Madden,candidate
tor S i A treasurer
"To manv people are throw
ing the blame aound Madden
said. "We need people that will
act responsibly
" The enforcement ft the rules
are so stringent th.it many people
are apprehensive about voicing
their opinions during the weekly
meetings Maddensaid. " ("here's
a need lor common courtesy and
an explanation ot the rules ol
order
Madden said that the duties
,it treasurer are concrete and that
the best way to make improve-
merits is to work mo re closely with
the president.
"We need to go to the differ-
ent organizations on campus and
recruit day representatives for the
SGA Madden said. "This will
make a more well-rounded SGA
because the students will be able
to speak when it counts.
"Improvements can be made
with people getting in volved other
than Greeks Madden said.
"Getting people involved will not
solve the problems, but it will open
the door for solutions
"I've always wanted to get
involved and this isa great oppor-
tunity for me to help Madden
said, "(decided it was time for me
to get off my tail
Madden served as president
of the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity
where he worked closely with the
treasurer. (le is a past member of
the SGA Executive Cabinet and
served on the Homecomi ng Steer-
RAY MADDEN
ing Committee.
Currently, Madden is the
president of the Media Board, the
Student L'nion Board ot Directors,
and the Inter-Fraternitv Council.
Erosion threatens to isolate Hatteras Island
W1NSTON-SALEM (AP)
The only route onto Hatteras Is-
land hi North Carolina will be
washed away unless the federal
government lets North Gn-olina
� eht the accelerating erosion,
jim Martin said.
Martin made a personal ap-
peal Monday to Manuel I man r
the new secretary ot the intern r,
,for permission to build a stone
wall from the northern end oi the
island intothe Atlantic Ocean. The
state needsa permit from the Inte-
rior Department because the wall,
also known a a groin, would be
built on land w ithin the Pea Islan i
.National Wildlife Refuge
� department quickly ap-
proved part of Martin's request.
But the proposed wall still faces
numerous obstacles.
Recent storms swept away XX)
acres of the island's tip, which
Martin, valued at S43 million. The
ocean is advancing steadily on
N.C 12, the only road that allows
the island's '� 000 permanent resi-
dents access to the mainland, he
said.
It that road is not protected,
the 1 lerbert C Bonner Bridge over
�n Inlet will be nothing more
than a long fishing pier, Martin
warned The island would also
I se its onh source of electricity,
he said
Steven Goldstein, the chiet
spokesman for the Interior Depart-
ment, said the department plans
to issue a special permit to North
Carolina today that would allow
emergency dredging and tilling
in the storm-battered area. The
department and the Army Corps
of Engineers must still study the
proposed groin, however, to see
whether it is "environmentally
prudent he told the Winston-
Salem journal.
The federal government has
consistently denied the state's
efforts to stabilize the inlet and
protect the bonner bridge with
mile-long stone jetties. But Gold-
stem noted that the department
has a new leader, who has told his
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
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Staff to keep an open mind toward
the 1,000-foot groin.
Unlike the jetties, which
would cost the federal governme nt
$110 million, the groin would be
financed out of the state highway
fund. The state would have to
postpone a highway project to
raise the $15 million to $20 mill ion
needed for the gToin, Martin said.
Another hurdle is the N.C.
Coastal Resources Commission's
regulations, which prohibit groins,
jetties and other significant ad-
verse impact on the value and
enjoyment of adjacent properties;
or public access to and use of the
ocean beach Richard E. Shaw, a
coastal program analyst for the
N.C Division of Coastal Re-
sources, said the state would have
to applv for a variance from the
regulations.
And to his knowledge, he said,
no variance has ever been granted
for a hardened erosion-control
structure. George E. Wells, the
state highway administrator and
a member of the team that met
with Lujan, said he was not aware
of the regulation against groins.
"We will work under the
emergency procedures for a vari-
ance he said, "since that is the
only solution (to the erosion prob-
lem) that has come forth The
project would qualify for a vari-
ance, he said, because the groin
would protect the adjacent prop-
erty, not damage it.
The federal government's
inaction hasalready claimed more
than 200 acres of public property
at South Point, the area on the
south side of the inlet, he said.
Orrin J. Hlkey Jr a coastal geolo-
gist at Duke University, disagreed
with Wells.
"There's no question, no ques-
tion, that that (groin) will increase
erosion downstream he said. By
focusing on the section of N.C. 12
at the northern end of the island,
Pilkeysaid,thestateismissingthe
big picture.
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IMHM . n�h 1 �J �" -l.m-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23,1969
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
Screened-in porch. Utilities included.
Near ECU campus. $250.00 per month.
Call 758-1274 after 6:00 p.m.
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (May � August). Want
to m ike arrangements as soon as possible.
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3030.
LARGE 2 BR HOUSE: Walking distance
from campusdowntown. Available May
8 � Aug 12. Suitable for 3 people.
S350.00month. Furnished. Call 752-6812.
FOR SALE
CAN YOU BUY:Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4 s seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 1 slightly-
used Al Merrick Design 6'4" Channel Is-
lands Thruster, includes board bag. Must
sell, $175.00. Call 355-3364.
BIKE FOR SALE: Perfect condition
$125.00. Price neg. 758-0076.
FOR SALE: 5 ft. width cabinet, fits Clem-
ent, White, & Greene dorms. Very spa-
cious. Has a shelf to fit large refrigerator.
Call Kathleen or Amy 758-4507.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chews. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S�1166.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
earlv and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Job-Hunting
Guide (Rev. 1989). Send $19.95 fox the
step-bv-step guide. IvySoft International,
PO Box 241090, Memphis, TN 38124-1090.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
MAKE MONEY WORKING AT HOME:
Selling information by mail. Rush self-
addressed stamped envelope. S & W Inc.
Box 2414, Greenville, NC 27858.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT
LOOKING FOR PART-TIME EMPLOY-
MENT: Need a good solid respectable job
to begin now and continue through the
summer? Through Fall semester? And
even through graduation? Brody's and
Brody's for Men are accepting applica-
tions for dedicated, conscientious people
who show enthusiasm to be a part of a
quality retail environment. Apply with
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glenwood
Dr. MooresviUe, NC 28115. (704) 664-
4063.
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STU-
DENTS: Who enjoy cooking. . . we have
openings for cook's helpers and kitchen
aids at children's summer camp in the
cool mountains of North Carolina. Experi-
ence not necessary, we will train. You
receive room, meals, laundry, plus
$900.00-$ 1000.00 salary and travel ex-
penses. Non-smoking students write for
App.brochure: Camp Pinewood 20205-1
N.E. 3 Court, Miami, FL 33179.
HELP WANTED. Part-time Children's
Youth Director, salaried position. 15
hours per week. Please apply in writing to
Rev. Bill Leary, Winterville Baptist
Church, P.O. Box 434, Winterville, NC
28590.
ADDITIONAL STAFF NEEDED: For
small country inn and restaurant in the
delightfully different coastal town of
Beaufort, NC�knowledgeable wait
people interested in learning more about
wines and gourmet cuisine�chamber
maids for our elegantly appointed
suites�positions available in our profes-
sional kitchen. Please call "The Cedars" at
(919) 728-7036 after 2 p.m.
ATTENTION�HIRING Government
jobs - your area Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840 -
$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885, Ext. R5285.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS:
For Life Guard positions. Greenville
Country Club�756-1237. WSI preferred.
CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
summer camp. Over 30 activities includ-
ing Water Ski, Tennis, Heated swimming
pool, Go-Karts, Hiking, ArtRoom,
meals, salary and travel. Experience not
necessary. Non-smoking students write
for applicationbrochure: Camp Pine-
wood. 20205-1 N.E. 3 Ct. Miaou. Florida
33179.
LOOKING FOR A FHATERNITY, SO-
RORITY OR STUDENT ORGANIZA-
TION: That would like to make $500 �
51000 for a one week on campus market-
ing project. Must be organized and hard-
working. Call Patti or Cina at 1-800-592-
2121.
POLL TENDERS NEEDED: To work
SGA elections on March 29 Organiza-
tions please contact SGA office or Paul
Puckett at 757-1840
WANTED: Part-time childrenyouth di-
rector Twelve month employment with
additional hours During summer Please
write for application Winterville baptist
Church. P.O Box 434, Winterville, N.C
28590.
PERSONALS
GET READY TO PARTY: Sammy and
the USUALS along with THE TREBLE
MAN1AX are coming to the KA house,
Thurs. April 6th. Everyone is welcome
Keep watching for details.
AOPI'S: Get ready to jam to the FUNKY
Cold Medina and roast some Oscar Mayer
Weiners! Luau is around the corner!
BANK ON IT!
IN-HOUSE KA'S: Thanks for the refresh
ment, the games were quite a job; And
next time you play�Don't forget to say
"Hey, Bob �Love, the real women next
door!
TO A CERTAIN LAMBDA CHI WHO
HAS NO CLASS: 1 don't know why I
bothered with you. You're just a pain in
the a.
DELTA ZETA: Have a great Easter! �
Love, your Secret Sorority�Zeta Tau
Alpha.
CRUISE: On over to the AOPi House to
get a raffle ticket. Yes! For $5 (what a
bargain 0 you might win a cruise for 2 to
the Bahamas or take the cash value�it's
your option Just pick some tickets up
from an AOPi today!
PIKES ONCE, PIKES TWICE: Holy
jumpin G S ,
We're all Pikes! (Fill in the blank).
HEY ECU Don't you know the SGA elec-
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
tions are on Thursday?! Be cool�don't
forget to vote�a friendly reminder from
Alpha Xi Delta.
TONIGHT: Pi Kappa Alpha Happy
Hour. 9 p.m. until. Drink specials and
more�at the Fizz. Go Fizzin' w the
Pikes.
SAE: The time is at hand. It's now or
never. Over the top, boys. Our charter
awaits. Word.
SIGMA NU: We just wanted to thank you
for the great St. Patrick's Day party Friday
night. Hope we can do it again. �Love,
Delta Zeta.
GREEKS: Have a great and Happy
Easter. Straight up! �Love the sisters and
pledges of AOPi.
ECU: Easter Weekend is here, We know
you're ready for fun, Whether you're
going to Myrtle, Or just spending a day in
the sun! We hope it's the best. And defi-
nitely not BLAH! But please don't drink
and drive, It's against the law! Have a
good one. � The AZD's.
DON'T MISS IT! The infamous Delta
Zeta "All U Can Eat Spaghetti Dinner"
Tuesday, March 28 at the Delta Zeta
1 louse. Buy yc; j ticket 'rom any sister or
pledge for only $3. Be there!
A NEW PIKA PARTY HOUR AT
GROGS Wednesdays starting at 9:00.
Come on out and Rock the House with the
Brothers and Pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha.
CHI OMEGA: 1 lope you all have a safe
and enjoyable Easter! �Love, Your Secret
Sorority.
JENNIFER VANDERBURG: We're be
hind you, 100 percent. We know you're
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
bound to be SGA vice-president! You're SAE PLEDGES: Ya'U are doing well Pull
the best! �Love, AZD. it together soon 'Nuff said �The Broth-
ers
TO TWO PHI TAU STRANGERS: Okay,
so stranger isn't the proper word. Keep
these three thoughts in mind: shots, hot
tub, and four in a waterbed. Wouldn't it be
great if we could be like cats and be there
just like that. Get'cha Get'cha! We had a
great time Thursday night. Thanks.
SAE AFTERNOON DELIGHT: Every
Friday at 5:30. Beverage specials as usual
and incredibly innnnnteresting videos. Be
there or be a right angle parallelogram
Word.
EMI (NOT AMY): You didn't think I
would, did you? Ha. Have a great day-
Pike one.
IF YOU WANT A REAL WINNER:
Who's bound for success, vote Jennifer
Vanderburg for SGA vice-prez!
DELTA ZETA: Get psyched tor
Dreamgirl
AOPI: Lisa Grosshandler, 1 bet you
thought I had forgotten you! Have a great
Easter Break! �Your Secret Sister
ZTA: Have a Happy Easter and great long
weekend. We're looking forward to Greek
Week! �Love, Your Secret Sorority
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Thursday night
was awesome! Thanks. �Love, tho
AZD's.
AOPI: To Jodi Gear who's a great sister,
have an awesome time in Myrtle Beach' �
Your Secret Sis
PANHELLENIC SORORITY SWAP
Delta Sigma Thcta and Sigma Gamma
Rho�we can't wait to get together w7
voui �Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
(jforona
Extra IrvHf
Boxing
Tournament
March 28, 29, &30
Minges Coliseum
East Carolina
University
Call 757-3042 or
830-1094
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru SaL Low
Ooat Termination to ?0 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . .
I. the act
� � ibooki
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU :
fS' COPitS roaitsr nufi
758-2400
�?� � - p -��i
GALLERY
LIGHT, BRIGHT, FUN,
JEWELRY
By Dave Jenssen
355-2426 An Gallery & R� Crafts
690 Arlington Village
Mon-Fri
10-5pm
Sat
11-4pm
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
FALL RUSH WILL BE HELD:
AUGUST 19th -
AUGUST 23rd
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Warn
Subscription Form
I
Address:
Date to Begin:
Complimentary.
Amount Paid:
Individual:
Date to End:
Business
DatL Paid:
Rate: Individual S2S per year Business $35 per year
Kriiim lo: The East Carolinian. Publications Uldg - KX Creenvilir. NC :Tiv5o-4353
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p jn. in Ra wl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Posrion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics�757-6282 or 757-1677.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 730-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
HFLP FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th fc 15th at the
ECU track. Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods.
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc Bryan Haskins (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or David Overton (830-
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega.
ECU SKI CLUB
ECU Ski Club will be holding its weekly
meetings on Tuesday's at 930 p.m. in
room 212 MSC. For info, call Tommy
Lewis at 830-0137.
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes ITZHAK
PERLMAN, THE N.C. DANCE THE-
ATRE, SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more. Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
today. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC 757-6611, Ext. 266.
VTSITTNG LECTURES
The Honors Program, the Science and
Math Ed. Center and International Stud-
ies will sponsor "A Day in the Life of a
Park Ranger" March 28 (co-sponsored by
the ECU Geology Dept.). K. Rod Cran-
son�Science Dept Lansing Community
College, Lansing, Mi Science Educator,
Summer Interpreter for the National Park
Service, and author of "Crater Lake-
Gem of the Cascades: The Geologic Story
of Crater Lake National Park 730 p.m
room 1026 CCB. "The National Parks of
New Zealand and Costa Rica" will be
presented on April 4th (co-sponsored
with the ECU English Dept). Robert and
Patrida Cahn�Environmental Journal-
ists and Consultants, Leesburg, VA. Pulit-
zer Prize 1969 and 1988 recipient of the
Majory Stoneman Douglas Award. 7:30
p.m room 1031 GCB.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board Secretary's Office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. Deadline for submissions is ex-
tended to March 23.
PRE-PT STUDENTS
There will be 2 advising sessions for
summerfall registration for PT students.
Dates are March 22 & 23 at 7 p.m. in the PT
classroom (Belk Bldg.). ALL Pre-PT
students MUST attend one of these meet-
ings
BACKPACKING TRIP
Register now through March 28 for a BP
trip to the Uuharrie National Forest.
Equip transportation and trail food, as
well as instruction will be provided for a
nominal fee. All faculty, staff and students
are encouraged to register in 204 Memo-
rial Gym. For additional info call 757-
6387.
PUBLIC INFO.
The League of Women Voters of Green-
ville-Pitt County is sponsoring a public in-
formational meeting about present and
future solid waste mgmt. in Pitt County.
The meeting will take place on March 21 at
7:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church
in Greenville.
SPORT DAY
The annual Budweiscr Sport Day will
hold its registration March 28 at 5:00 p.m
in BIO 103. Participants receive FREE t-
shirts with trophies awarded to first
through 4th place finishers. Don't miss the
action. This co-rec event is designed for
teams of 2 men and 2 women.
TENNIS MIX DOUBLES
A registration meeting for intramural
sport tennis mixed doubles will be held
March 28 at 5:30 p.m. in BC 103.
SRA
Filing dates for offices in Student Resi-
dence Assoc Area Residence Council,
and House Council will be from March
20th through 23rd. There will be a manda-
tory candidates meeting in Creene Lobby
on March 23rd at 7.00 p.m. Elections will
be held March 28th. Don't forget to come
and vote!
YEARBOOKS
1987 & 1988 Buccaneers along with the
1988 New Student Reviews can be picked
up in the hallway of the Publications Bldg.
anytime during the day.
CCF
Campus Christian Fellowship would like
to invite you to our Bible study every
Tues. at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130. Bring your
Bible and a friend as we study the book of
Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199 if you need
a ride or further info.
BIG KIDS
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present.
Here's Something You Should Know.
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
COURSE OFFERED
A Humanities course for 1st Summer
Session will be offered in Russian Lit. of
the 19th Century taught in English (Russ
2220), M-F, 1150-12:50. This is a 3 credit
course dealing with Dostoevsky, Tolstoy
and other great Russian writers. The
course satisfies the General College
Humanities requirement.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is April 3 at 7:00 in GCB
1019. We will discuss plans for our trip to
Campbell Law School on April 7. Please
attend.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1989 Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
April 14 at E.B. Aycock Jr. High School in
Greenville (rain date: April 21). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympians.
Volunteers must be able to work all day�
from 9 a.m2 p.m. An orientation meeting
will be held on April 11 in Old Joyner
Library, rm. 221 from 5-5:45 p.m. Free
lunches and volunteer t-shirts will be
provided the dag of the games to all vol-
unteers who have attended the orienta-
tion session. For more info contact Spe-
cial Olympics office: 830-4551.
BALLOON RIDES
Come join the Down East Balloon Sorety
on April 15 from 4-7 p.m. at Vernon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern N.C (weather permit-
ting�rain date: April 29,4-7 p.m.). Watch
the Children's Mirade Network Telethon
on W1TN-7, June 3-4.
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale April 6-7. The sale will take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 a.m. to 1 pjn.
OREGON
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
Oregon will conclude the 1988-89 Cham-
ber Music Series. This performance will be
held in Hendrix Theatre on April 5 at 8
p m. Tickets are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC. Hours are 11 a.m6
p.m. M-F. Telephone: 757-6611, ext. 266.
Don't miss this exciting evening of im-
provisational jazz. This event is co-spon-
sored by the School of Music and the Dept
of University Unions.
LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST
The Acting Co. will present
Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost on
April 10th at 8 p.m. in Wright Aud.
Founded by the late John Houseman, The
Acting Co. is one of the leading regional
theatrical companies in America. This
delightful evening of comic fun is part of
the 1988-89 Performing Arts Series. Tick-
ets are now on sale at the Central Ticket
Office in MSC (757-6611, ext. 266).
HABAKKUK
Inter-varsity 2100 Multi-Media Produc
tion HABAKKUK is coming to ECU
HABAKKUK is a presentation centering
around the question "Where is the God ot
Heaven and why is He taking so long1
This modern day look at the book of
1 labakkuk deals with the issues of AIDS,
abortion, world hunger and other similar
issues. If you are wondering where Cod is
amidst these problems, come join us! It
will be shown in Wright Aud March 27th
at 8 p.m. and March 2Sth at 3 p.m. and B
p.m. Admission is FREE
CONTEST
Guess the of M&M's in the jar�win a
pizza! Proceeds will go toward costs of the
Multi-Media Production event
Habakkuk! Look for Intervarsity's table in
front of the Student Store.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Like to Sing? Join a chorus next semester
Auditions for School of Music Choirs will
be held on Thurs. March 23 and Mon
March 27 Sign up for a time in the School
of Music Office. If lyou want to participate
but don't want to audition, just register for
University Chorale, section 2 or Women's
Chorus, section 1.
HEALTH FAIR
It's not too late to set up a booth or display
for the Health Fair (April 4 from 11 to 5:30
pm at Memorial Gym). Call Mary Desha-
Adams at 757-6794 for more details.
SUMMER SCHOOL ,99
ROOM RESERVATION SIGN-
UP INFORMATION
Residence hall room payments for Sum-
mer School 1989 will be accepted in the
Cashier's office, room 105, Spilman Build-
ing, beginning April 5,1989. Room assign-
ments will be made in teh respective resi-
dence hall offices on April 5 201 Wichard
Building. The rent for a term of sumer
school is $225 (Cotten, Fleming and Jarvis
Halls�$280) for a semi-private room adn
$335 (Cotten. Fleming and Jarvis HaUs �
S

t
�iti icr'M





1 HE EAST CAROLINIANMA '
Announcements
S370) for a private room
Residence hall to be used tor summer
school are Retcher and Jarvis (co-ed),
Cotton (women) and Fleming (men)
Fleming Hall will house men during the
summer, but it will revert back to a
women s residence hall Fall Semester
1989.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The last mencan Marketing Association
mod ivill be held or Tues March 28 at
e meeting will be held ;n room
I 28 I the General Classroom Building
Oui guest speaker will be mce Watkms
: pi ducts xr.d development
at 1 I Lioi V. persons interested are
welcome and mcml rsar crt ouragedto
3t:e
COLLEGE HILL ARFA RFS1-
PENCE COUNCIL
am wi : be Sal April 1 from 2 r pm
r oca cat ng livi ntcrtatn
m�: : m Victn the acationing Fire
men and Nouveaux Campaign Don l
miss great music, food and lots ol fun in
the sun' Sport red h College 1 lill Area
Resident e Council
PUTT PUTT GOLF
The resurrected putt putt golf league wii
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5 00
pm in BIO N102 All ECU faculty, staff,
and students are welcome
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find them-
selves with tit in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity softball field
The annual Home Run Derby provides
great awards for winners Bringyourl cl;
ID. as the registration begins
CA MP L' SX BI IS APE FOR
CHRIST
Looking foi fur : I i vsl ip and hi aring
Cod's vv; d? Your are welcome t - Prime
Time' at Raw! Rn I ever) irs it
7:30 pm Looking forward to sceii ;
there' Rcfreshrrx nts - i ved
SOCIETY FOR THE AP-
VANCEMI T OF MGMT.
The last SAM meeting will be held Wed
March 29 at 3 pm in CCB 1028. Elections
tor ru vt year will be held and ail members
a:e required to attend!
PRE-REGISTRATION BLITES2
You could be registering tor courses in
NEW MEXICO, OREGON, NEW YORK,
MARYLAND, MAINE, COLORADO to
name a few instead of ECU Find out
about . urses in your field m'A special
programs available thru The National
Student Exchange. Contact Stephanie
Evancho in 1002 CCB or call 757-6769 for
details
INT ER VIEWING WORK SHOP
RESJME WORKSHOV
Ihe Career Planning and Placement Serv
ice in the Bloxton 1 louse otters thse one
hour programs on beginning a resume tor
your job search. 1 landouts and samples
will be- given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session No signup is re
quired. The next session will beheld in the
Career Planning Room on March 28, at 3
pm.
HILL EL
! iillel, a Jewish Student Organization, will
be having a Bagel and Lox Fhnner on
March 24th from 7-9 pm It will be in Room
248 Mendenhall Rabbi Rose will be lead-
ing a discussion on "Being a Jew in the
WsO's " Donations will ho accepted to
c �ver the food costs.
Why Trust
Your Pictures
With An Out
Of Town Lab?
INSTANT REPLAY WILL DEVELOP YOUR
SPRING BREAK PICTURES WHILE YOU WAIT
INSTANT REPLAY
ONE ! JOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
"Quality, Convenience and Persona! Ser.
THE PLAZA 355 5050
TTu
Career Plannning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton 1 louse offers thse
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
bettei interviewing skills. A film anc dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
am pus will shared The next session will
be held in the Career Planning room on
Mar.ii 2() at 3 pm.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Clergy says higher booze tax would pay for drug war
RALEIGH (AP) � Higher
taxes on alcoholic beverages
would be the most likely way to
pay tor the war on illegal drugs
under proposals made bv more
in 30 representatives of North
Carolina clergy.
Phil Murphy, commanding
officer of the Salvation Army in
Raleigh, told the Governor's Drug
Cabinet on Monday there should
be stiffer financial penalties tor
druc dealers. He called tor a ban
on television ads for alcoholic
beveragesand proposed warning
labels on bet r � inc and liquor.
He also suggt sted a 'signifi-
cant taxation in rea � on alco-
holic beverages and political and
economic sanction tgainstcoun
tries that expert drugs to the I S.
"Wealso need to romeatti
schools addedl t.Gov.JimGard-
ner, chairman ot the panel.
�n
tude that (drug) use is not t ool i
sophisticated, he said "We need
to get a straight, clear concise
message being taught in cur
Forum
ithc r important weapon m
the i hi against drugs is building
sellteem among young people
; r their intrinsic value, instead ot
constant!) emphasizing their
achievements Murphv said.
Robert Edmunds, U.S. attorney for
middle district, opened the
i tir g with a luncheon address
in which he said, "We must be-
come intolerant of dru ;s
Continued from page 1
eve
go beyond mere motivation. For
instance, one panel member asked
"What do you do with a student
who is highly motivated but is not
performing up to standards. Al-
though the student is earning A's
for effort, they are still making F's
on content
According to Carter, that is
when it would be helpful to refer
to the case literature to see how
other teachers responded to simi-
lar situations.
Unfortunately though, teach
ers and teacher educators cur-
rently lack such a referral source,
which is why researchers such as
Carter and Thompson, and insti-
tutions such as ECU, are now
trying to develop one. Using the
success which law and other pro-
fessions have had with case stud-
ies, Dr. Carter asserted that case
literatures in education would
provide teachers and teacher
educators with the best practical
arguments on which to base their
Women
Continued from page I
Comparing the United Stales
and the Soviet Unions' reactions
to war, Mega explained that So-
viet students and a greater degree
of optimism which was most likely
due to their degree of isolation
from world news, their education
in school about nuclear war, and
the government's assurance of a
brighter future. Mega further
noted that US. students "worried
about their parents dying first and
about nuclear war second. Stu-
dents in the Soviet Union worried
first about nuclear war, and about
their parents death second
Forensic
Continued from page 1
Harrison has been competing
since her sophomore year in high
school. Dunng her freshman year
at ECU Harrison judged Foren-
sics competitions on the high
school level.
It wasn't until last year that
Harrison joined the ECU Foren-
sics Society and was appointed
president. Her finely tuned speech
structure aided in the victory at
UN'C-Wilmington.
The other ECU contestant was
freshman Michael Harvey. Al-
though this is Harvey's first year
on the ECU r jrensics Society, he
has been coi. peting for five years
in high school.
The members of the Society
believe that this is going to be a
great year and they are looking
forward to attending the Nation-
als. Harrison credits lanice
Schreibcr , advisor and coac of
the ECU Forensics Society, with
most of the victories.
Harrison concluded by
sayingIf we didn't have Janice
Schreiber, we wouldn't have a
Forensics team
! arter empha-
ed that Case studies should not
decisions. Not onl would cast
literature help teachers m tivate
students and plan pedagogical prescribe formulas tor solving
strategies, but would also help teaching dilemmas, but instead,
teacher educators better prepare . .�;� alternatives and guide-
student teachers to teach lines for find inc such solutions.
r bityone" speciality sandwich and J
I RECEIVE THE OTHER SPECIALITY SAND
WICH OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR
12 PRICE!
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I
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Not good with other special offers.
Good Between 5pm and 9pm Mon-Sat
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Saturday
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Wed
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Fri
1 1 1
Sat
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Join the Fantastic Parade with Spring Dress
from
(pyTyMAS�
919 A. Redbanks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
lie said the same strategies
that have made it less socially
acceptable to drink and drive or
smoke cigarettes could work on
harder drugs. Use of cocaine and
its highly concentrated derivative
- crack - is on the rise, and with it
t. mes . i il ?ncc, Edmunds said.
"It's the problem of the future
and it's going to be a big one he-
said. "You may not know it. but
you know addicts. Your lawyei
may be on drugs
Edmunds said one out of
every 10 people in the United
;t ites have used illicit drugs in
the past 30 da) s.
FREE
I 2nd SET
; OF PRINTS
B AT tTME Or
PROCESSING
UMIT2
m one coupon it:r visn
a EXPIRES APRJI. 6.1 H
FREE
RERINTS
ONE FREE
REPRPfl WITH I
TWO PI . � �
ON! - .
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FREE
ENLARGEMI
PERSONAL PORTRAITS
Ivti i
: INSTANT!
ARE GREAT,
TRADITIONAL AND LONGLAST t!(
r
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with each paid sitting
(Comparable value $55.70)
SAVE $15.75
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Y
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
c
Open
Monday-Sat unlay 10-9
Sundav 1-b"
CUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
MonSat. 10-6
Thurs. 10-8
SHARKYS
of Greenville
Presents.
Import Nile
All Imports & Coolers
SJ 00
every Thursday
Import Selection:
Chihuahua
Corona
Amstel Light
Beck's
Heineken
Bass Ale
Killians Red Ale
Molsen
'Dress To Impress!
Sharky's is a Private Club for
Members and Their Guests Only.
(must be 21)
LOCATED BESIDE SPORTS PAD ON 5th STREET
(Please Use Alley Entrance)
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL $3.00 UNTIL MARCH 31st
Sharkys is available for Parties, FraternitySorority Mixers, etc
Open
8pm - lam Sun-Thurs
4:30pm - lam Fri-Sat
For Details Call 757-3881





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23,1969 7
Announcements
$370) for � private room.
Residence hall to be used for summer
tchool are Fletcher and Jarvis (co-ed),
Cotton (women) and Fleming (men).
Fleming Hall will house men during the
summer, hut it will revert back to a
miss great music, food, and lots of fun in
the sun! Sponsored by College Hill Area
Residence Council.
PUTT PUTT GOLF
VANCEMENT OF MGMT.
The last SAM meeting will be held Wed.
March 29 at 3 pm in GCB 1028. Elections
for next year will be held and all members
are required to attend!
women's
128L
residence hall Fall Semester
The resurrected putt-putt golf league will
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5:00
pm in BIO N102. All ECU faculty, staff, PRE-REGISTRATION BLUES?
and students are welcome.
AMERICAN MARKETTNC.
ASSOCIATION
The last American Marketing Association
meeting will be held or Tucs. March 28 at
3:30. The meeting will be held in room
1028 of the General Classroom Building.
Our guest speaker will be Vince Watkins
from special products and development
at Food Lion. All persons interested are
welcome and members are encouraged to
attend.
COLLEGE HILL AREA REST-
PENCE COUNCIL
;
Hill Jam will be Sat. April 1, from 2-6 pm
on Tyler Beach. Featuring live entertain-
ment from Victim, the Vacationing Fire-
men, and Nouveaux Campaign. Don't
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find them-
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity softball field.
The annual Home Run Derby provides
great awards for winners. Bring your ECU
I.D. as the registration begins.
CAMP" CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Looking for fun, fellowship, and hearing
God's word? Your are welcome to "Prime
Time" at Rawl, Rm. 130 � every Thurs. at
7:30 pm. Looking forward to seeing you
there! Refreshments served.
SOCIETY FOR THE AD-
You could be registering for courses in
NEW MEXICO, OREGON, NEW YORK,
MARYLAND, MAINE, COLORADO to
name a few, instead of ECU. Find out
about courses in your field and special
programs available thru The National
Student Exchange. Contact Stephanie
Evancho in 1002 GCB or call 757-6769 for
details.
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
The Career Plannning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House offers thse
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film ana dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will shared. The next session will
be held in the Career Planning room on
March 29 at 3 pm.
BFSITMK WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton House offers these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No signup is re-
quired. The next session will be held in the
Career Planning Room on March 28, at 3
pm.
HILLEL
Hillel, a Jewish Student Organization, will
be having a Bagel and Lox Dinner on
March 29th from 7-9pm. It will be in Room
248 Mendenhall. Rabbi Rose will be lead-
ing a discussion on "Being a Jew in the
198Cs Donations will be accepted to
cover the food costs.
Why Trust
Your Pictures
With An Out
Of Town Lab?
INSTANT REPLAY WILL DEVELOP YOUR
SPRING BREAK PICTURES WHILE YOU WAIT
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
INSTANT REPLAY
ONE HOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
Quality, Convenience and Personal Service"
THE PLAZA 355-5050
Clergy says higher booze tax would pay for drug war
RALEIGH (AP) � Higher
taxes on alcoholic beverages
would be the most likely way to
pay for the war on illegal drugs
under proposals made by more
than 30 representatives of North holic beverages and political and
Carolina clergy. economic sanctions against coun-
Phil Murphy, commanding tries that export drugs to the U.S.
officer of the Salvation Army in "We also need to promote the atti
on television ads for alcoholic schoolsaddedLt.Cov.JimGard- L He said the same strategies
beverages and proposed warning ner, chairman of the panel. that haf "e g lesf j131
labels on beer, wine and liquor. Another important weapon in acceptable to dnnk and drive or
He also suggested a "signifi- the fight against drugs is building jmoke cigarettes could work on
cant taxation increase" on alco- self-esteem among young people iSJSl
for their intrinsic value, instead of
constantly emphasizing their
achievements, Murphy said.
Robert Edmunds, U.S. attorney for
its highly concentrated derivative
- crack - is on the rise, and with it
comes violence, Edmunds said.
It's the problem of the future
Raleigh, told the Governor's Drug tude that (drug) use is not cool or the middle district, opened the and it sgoing to a bigone, he
Cabinet on Monday there should sophisticated he said. "We need meeting with a luncheon address I0U "J V�?l " �. lit�
be stiffer financial penalties for to get a straight, clear concise in which he said, "We must be-
drug dealers. He called for a ban message being taught in our come intolerant of drugs
Forum
Continued from page 1
decisions. Not only would case
go beyond mere motivation. For literature help teachers motivate
you
may be on drugs
Edmunds said one out of
every 10 people in the United
States have used illicit drugs in
the past 30 days.
FREE
2nd SET
OF PRINTS
AT TIME OF
PROCESSING.
UM1T2
ONE COUPON PER VISIT.
EXPIRES APRIL 6.1989
FREE
RERINTS
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TWO PURCHASED
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FREE
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WTTH PRUCliASE OF ANY
COLOR EMARGEMENT
UP TO ir x 14"
RECEIVE 2nd
ENLARGEMENT
FREE
UMIT2
EXPIRES APRIL 6.1989
PERSONAL PORTRAITS
by
.INSTANT REPLAY
ARE GREAT,
TRADITIONAL AND LONGLASTING GIFTS
r
i
39.95
-i
1-11X14, 1-8X10,
2-5X7-S. 12 Wallets
with each paid sitting
(Comparable value $55.70)
SAVE $15.75
1mm EXPIRES APRIL 6.1989
EASTER SPECIAL
$10 OFF OR
FREE 11x14
($19.95 Value)
WITH THE PRUCHASE OF ANY .
PORTRAIT PACKAGE
With Coupon
EXPIRES APRIL 6.19H9
However, Dr. Carter empha-
sized that case studies should not
Sttto��,onepaiiil�emberad: students and plan pedagogical prescribe formulas for solving
"What do you do with a student strategies, but would also help teaching dilemmas, but instead,
who is highly motivated but is not teacher educators better prepare provide alternatives and guide-
I
performing up to standards. Al-
though the student is earning A's
for effort, they are still making F's
on content
According to Carter, that is
when it would be helpful to refer
to the case literature to see how
other teachers responded to simi-
lar situations.
Unfortunately though, teach-
ers and teacher educators cur-
rently lack such a referral source,
which is why researchers such as
Carter and Thompson, and insti-
tutions such as ECU, are now
trying to develop one. Using the
success which law and other pro-
fessions have had with case stud-
ies, Dr. Carter asserted that case
literatures in education would
provide teachers and teacher
educators with the best practical
arguments on which to base their
Women
Continued from page 1
Comparing the United States'
and the Soviet Unions' reactions
to war, Mega explained that So-
viet students and a greater degree
of optimism which was most likely
due to their degree of isolation
from world news, their education
in school about nuclear war, and
the government's assurance of a
brighter future. Mega further
noted that U.S. students "worried
about their parents dying first and
about nuclear war second. Stu-
dents in the Soviet Union worried
first about nuclear war, and about
their parents death second
Forensic
Continued from page 1
Harrison has been competing
since her sophomore year in high
school. During her freshman year
at ECU Harrison judged Foren-
sics competitions on the high
school level.
It wasn't until last year that
Harrison joined the ECU Foren-
sics Society and was appointed
president. Her finely tuned speech
structure aided in the victory at
UNC-Wilmington.
The other ECU contestant was
freshman Michael Harvey. Al-
though this is Harvey's first year
on the ECU Forensics Society, he
has been competing for five years
in high school.
Tne members of the Society
believe that this is going to be a
great year and they are looking
forward to attending the Nation-
als. Harrison credits Janice
Schreiber , advisor and coach of
the ECU Forensics Society, with
most of the victories.
Harrison concluded by
saying,f we didn't have Janice
Schreiber, we wouldn't have a
Forensics team
student teachers to
f" BUYONESPECIALITY SANDWICH AND J
� RECEIVE THE OTHER SPECIALITY SAND- J
! WICH OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR .
J 12 PRICE!
I Not good with other special offers.
! Good Between 5pm and 9pm Mon-Sat �
J Expires April 11, 1989 ,
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
$1.25 Imports
Lightnin' Wells
Closed-Easter
Weekend
3HARKYS
Mon-Tues
11-10
Wed.
11-1
Thur
11-11
Fri
11-1
Sat
12-1
Join the Fantastic Parade with Spring Dress
from
PUTUMASIO
919 A. Redbanks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
MonSat. 10-6
Thurs. 10-8

of Greenville
Presents:
Import Nite
All Imports & Coolers
$1oo
every Thursday
Import Selection:
Chihuahua
Corona
Amstel Light
Beck's
Heineken
Bass Ale
Killians Red Ale
Molsen
(Dress T0 Impress!
i
Sharky's is a Private Club for
Members and Their Guests Only.
(must be 21)
LOCATED BESIDE SPORTS PAD ON 5th STREET
(Please Use Alley Entrance)
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL $3.00 UNTIL MARCH 31st
Sharky's is available for Parties, FraternitySorority Mixers, etc.
Open
8pm - lam Sun-Thurs
4:30pm - lam Fri-Sat
For Details CaU 757-3881





HEAR THE
CANDIDATES SPEAK!
The Media Board and
The East Carolinian
are sponsoring a candidate
forum Monday, from
2:30pm until 4:30pm on
the mall.

Rain Site: Hendrix Theatre
� Members of the campus media will as
the candidates questions.
�The candidates will be allowed to ask
questions of each other.
�There will be a questioning period for the
audience, also.
This may be your only chance to meet the candi-
dates before Wednesday's elections, so don 7 miss
the opportunity! Take a part in the future of your
university. Attend the forum Monday and vote
Wednesday.
V
HP��!��wi �






THE EASTCAROt INIAN
Features
MARCH 23,1989 PAGE 9
New art show opens
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
I
I
Pictured here is one of the many models created by artist VitoAcconci. The models represent large
scale archecrural and landscape projects. (Photo by Angela Pridgen, ECU Photolab).
Monday night, ECU's Gray
Art Gallery premiered two pow-
erful, yet very different shows.
"Models Plus" by New York
artist Vito Acconci and "The Art
of Tibet a collection of predomi-
nantly Buddhist works, will both
be on display until April 7.
Acconci's "Models which
are displayed in the front of large-
scale architectural and landscape
projects. At a lecture Monday
night in Jenkins Auditorium,
Acconci presented a slide history
of his works and explained some
of the concepts behind his art.
"I asked myselfDoes a piece
havetobeafinalizedspace? Can't
the viewer have something to do
with the making of a project?
Acconci eventually became
interested in places that could
contain and enclose people and
manifested this interest in public
art. The Models on display ade-
quately reflect Acconci's inten-
tions, knowledge of which is
almost essential to appreciating
these works.
A plan for a playground struc-
ture at a Ronald McDonald house
features recessed niches that
people can sit down in. Three
projects in his "Land and Lake"
series propose tiny natural piers
in the shape of schematic humans.
It is Acconci's intentions and
ideas which are themselves the
work of art. The physical models
aren't nearly as exciting as the
artist's underlying vision. In fact,
they're rather disappointing when
compared to some of the works
Acconci discussed during his
presentation.
As a result, viewers who
didn'tattend the lecture might not
be as receptive to these models.
To cou nteract this confusion, Gray
Gallery should have prepared a
catalog with some background
information about Vito Acconci
and his art.
Because a detailed catalog
prepared for "The Art of Tibet
no prior knowledge of Tibetian
Art is needed to enjoy this show.
John Brzostoski, original curator
of the collection when it was at
New York's Riverside Museum,
gives a thorough overview of
Tibetian Art and specific informa-
tion about each peice. Also a glos-
sary of Tibetian terms is presented
near the front of the exhibition.
See TIBETAN, page 10
Joker's life history recapped
By CHIP CARTER
Features Fditor
Sporting a mixed media cover
by "Shadow" artist Kyle Baker,
DC Comics newest hardcover
comic book collection claims to be
"The Greatest Joker Stories Ever
Told Baker's version of the loker
is part cartoon line drawing, part
serious acrylic painting and chalk.
The cover is symbolic of The
Batman'sarch-enemy'scheckered
career, and the stories represented
within. Spanning the 50 year his-
tory of the Harlequin of Hate, the
stories within are culled from each
decade and spectrum of the Clown
Prince of Crime's criminal career
The Joker is unique among
the Batman's rogue's gallery. 1 is
true name hasnever been revealed,
his origins are shrouded in mys-
tery, and those hints revealed over
the years have to be taken with a
rain of salt. As the loker himself
�flaid, "If I'm going to have a past,
I prefer it to be multiple choice
But arc these really the great-
est Joker stories ever told? With 50
years of "Batman" and "Detec-
tive" comics to choose from,
numerous guest appearances in
other hero's magazines and nine
issues of his own title to select
from, it is an awesome task to
even consider narrowing down
the best ones.
Editor Mike Waid admits in
the text pages, "Stacking the Deck:
The Other Joker Stories "For each
tale reprinted in this volume, the
editors evaluated ten stories that
didn't make the final cut Two
recent treatments are among the
most highly praised; Frank
Miller's use of the character in the
acclaimed "Dark Knight" min-
iseries and Alan Moore's "The
Killing Joke
Miller's tale is set in the future
when Batman comes out of retire-
ment to halt the Joker's killing
spree, which include the mass
murder of David Letterman, Dr.
Ruth and the "Late Night with
1 a vid I et terman' audience when
the (rim tester appears as a guest
on the show.
Moore ended Batgirl's career
with a bullet in the spine and tried
to drive her father, Commissioner
Gordon, insane in "The Killing
loke" to prove that the Joker's
cheory that all it takes is one bad
day to drive the most stable per-
son over the abyss. Since both
stories were recently printed in
graphic novel form, it follows that
this collection should be reserved
for those stories that have only
seen light in regular newsprint
form.
The 20 stories reprinted in
"Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told"
do include some gems, but sadly
leave out many notable issues.
They include the Joker's first
appearence (from Batman 1,
Spring 1940), his origin ("The Man
Behind the Red I food from De-
tective Comics 168, Fcbru-
aryl951) and his team-ups with
Clayface (another Batman toe) and
Superman's arch-villain, Lex Lu-
thor.
Missing are someof the Mirth-
ful Murderer's memorable collu-
sions in crime with other Batman
foes : the Catwoman, the Riddler
and the Penguin. However, one
of his collaborations with the Foul
Feathered Fiend was collected in
the companion volume, "The
Greatest Batman Stories Ever
Told" last Christmas.
Only one issue of the Joker's
own scries is present. For nearly a
year during the late 70s, he was
awarded the unique honor ot
having his own magazine � the
first and only established super-
villain ever to do so. The scries
failed for a variety of reasons; bad
art, repetitive stories, and a re-
strictive censorship policy.
The Comics Code Authority,
which policed comics throughout
the 50s, 60s, and 70s, ruled that
good must always triumph over
evil, and the bad guy punished.
Thus, even in his own magazine,
the Joker had to end up in a cell at
thcendofeach issue. Writers tried
to get around this by establishing
a hideout for the Joker underneatl.
Arkham Asylum for the Crimi-
nally Insane. His Ha-Hacienda
was an answer to Batman's fa-
mous Batcave, but this and other
Batman-inspired gadgets were
omitied in "The Greatest Joker
Stories
One of the earliest imitations
was the Joker's utility belt, and
this is presented in a story titled
(aptly enough), 'The Joker's Util-
ity Belt From the OctNov. 195?
issue of "Batman the story is
drawn by one of the classic Bat-
man artists of the period, Dick
Sprang.
By the time Sprang inherited
the character, the Comics Code
was in full force, and the Deadly
Dealer was no longer the gleeful
murderer he had been in the
darker 1940s tales. This Joker re-
lied on gimmicksandoutrageous-
ness to outwit the Batman, and no
erne ever died during this period
in comics. The utility belt story is
typical of those creatively-stifled
years, but Sprang's art lifts the
outrageousness into the realm of
the surreal and it worked in al-
most every story.
It was not until the 70s that the
See COLLECTION, page 10
Tibetan tapestries are among the many Buddhist works on dis-
play in Gray Art Gallery through April 7. (photo by Angela
Pridgen, ECU Photolab).
Coming
This
Weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Tipper Gor
Attic:
Stairway to Heaven
Friday
New Deli:
Lightnin' Wells
Attic:
The Assassins
fiafrirctey
Attic:
Jesse Bolt
Fletch goes southern
By JEFF PARKER
Staff Writer
Chevy Chase goes Southern in the new film, "Fletch.
32389
1) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
2) XTC � "Oranges and Lem-
ons"
3) Robyn Hitchcock �
"Queen Elvis"
4) Connels � "Fun and
Games"
5) Guadalcanal Diary � "Flip
Flop"
b)The Dickies �"Great
Dicktations"
7) Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
8) Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
9) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
10) Nevil Brothers � "Yellow
Moon"
11) Thrashing Doves �
"Trouble in the Home"
12) Pilgrim Souls � "Is This
All of Us"
13) Slammin' Watusis �
"Kings of Noise"
Back by popular demand is
Irvvin Fletcher, master of disguise
and smart remarks, in his long
awaited sequel, "Fletch Lives
Fletch (played once again by
Chevy Chase) leaves sunny Los
Angeles and the unusually hectic,
life-endangering job of newspa-
per journalist to go stay in a Mis-
sissippi plantation left him by a
late aunt.
Once in the South, Fletch finds
his mansion to be somewhat less
majestic than he imagined. Tend-
ing the run-down house is Calcu-
lus, played by Cleavon Little, a
hired hand who seems not to real-
ize there was ever slave emanci-
pation.
During his stay in the land of
Dixie, Fletch gets mixed up with
the murder of a lawyer and an
evangelical empire that expands
on everything built by Jim Bakker
and the PTL ministries.
Also thrown in are several
rednecks with three-part names,
bumbling klansmen, and a sod-
omistic biker played by Randall
'Tex" Cobb. In essence, everything
good about the South. (Inciden-
tally, the script writer is from
Raleigh, for whatever that's
worth.)
Though all this sounds like a
big departure from the first
"Fletch" movie, it's nothing of the
sort. The writer unfortunately
followed the form of the first movie
to the letter, assuming that the
same pattern would be a formula
to make another success like the
first.
It borrows so much, however,
that the audience can point to
almost every scene and name the
one it corresponds to in the origi-
nal movie.
There are also less memorable
jokes than in the first movie, and
some are milked for more than
they're worth, like Fletch's roman-
tic encounter with the short-lived
lawyer, Amanda Ray Ross.
The funny scenes that do stand
out, on the other hand, are hilari-
ous and well-timed. One of the
highlights is Fletch's fantasy, an
elabora tely done take-off of "Song
of the South complete with
white-clad singers and animated
animals. Some other memorable
scenes come when Fletch goes
undercover as a guest faith-healer
on the Reverend jimmy Lee Fams-
worth's television show.
The moyie, despite its short-
See NEW, page 11
Pickin' the Bones
Bonehead "just says 'Vote
5 9
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUM Write-in
Okay,fdks.Thisiswhatwe've
all dreaded a serious Bonehead
vice-president and other impor-
tant persons from among your
peers. Youcan do this by a process
somewhat more painful than
aU;d8CiUUlUra waitinS to the aifirmary, and
NextWednesdaytheSGAwia mJb0tlSatSfy less painful than
h�ld,nforthei!u0fcaS �r geng run over bya speeding
the 1989-1990 year The SGA, as Kyoto Qwakh.
many people don t know, stands itdoesn'trrtterwhoyouvote
for Student Government Associa- for ft doesn't miter who I vote
ti�n- . for (though for a six-pack, TO be
Trusmearemeareabodyof giad to hold a discourse wim you
elected student officials who act, n metits oi candidate of
accordmgtotheirSGADocuments choice). All that matters is that
booklet, "with resolute determi- of y me students, vote.
nation to perserve the best in our p, q, mpte rules:
tradition of responsible student t p y vaj� student ID
self-government" caid and cuirent iK&viry sticker.
Thafs from their preamble. Trufi itmayhe spindled or mwti-
It's nowhere near as catchy as the Uled fr tryi to foiree y
United States which had a great dooropenonthosedrunkennigjits
beat and you could dance to it folget y j Doean'i
whenitwassettomusicbyABCs "
"Schoolhouse Rock" back in the
'70s.
Next Wednesday, you, the
students win eleetvour president
matter. lust procure it and take it
toclasa.
2. On your way to or from
class, keep your eyes peeled for
handy voting booths manned by
helpful ana friendly elections
com mi tte members. Walk over to
them and express your desire to
involve yourself in the election
process.
Take heart! You've now
passed the biggest hurdle�apa-
thy . If you get this far, the friendly
and helpful committe members
will not let you leave until you
have performed. Several members
may be armed with broken Coke
bottles, to help insure your par-
ticipation.
3. Choose the student you feel
best qualified to represent you in
the SGA. True, your friends, fam-
ily and casual sex partners may
pressure you to vote for the candi-
date of their choke but the cool
part of this anonymous type of
voting is they'll never know
who you voted for.
You could vote for Hubie the
Dead Co w, and still go back home,
smile cheerfully and
course,Ivcedforyour
best friend, who I've been
to date for two semesters.
4. If none of the eat
the ballot pleases you
spair! There will be ample i
for youto write in thai
person you, the student,
most qualified for the job.
A personal note hem
writemynarneintn�r
it, I'm not taking this job, i
don't do it
-Chippy Bonehead &
person, and ifl got electt
feel obligated to take
job, at least until we got 1
General Classroom "
named.
5. Now the easy parti
ballot in the box and
with a glow of pride. .
and amtle at the paapfc
you.
See;
:��ki2&jj& g





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH P. 1989
Collection chronicles Joker's past
ATiTIC
CT-
Continued from page 9
character again began to act like
the Joker that Batman creator Bob
Kane envisioned. The entire line
of DC Comics w ere being renno-
vated after the campy plague of
inane stones that infected all their
comics atter the prime-time "Bat-
man" television show Comics had
surged in popularity for a while,
but after the show cancelled, comic
sales dropped drastically.
The joker, as played by Cae-
sar Romero on the television pro-
gram, was no longer in demand
His Joker had been typical of the
Sprang period, but that did not
sell well to an America recovering
trom the aftermath of Vietnam.
Comic readers demanded rele-
vance in comics and young talents
like writer Denny O Neill and
artist Neal Adams looked back-
wards for inspiration.
Presented in this volume is
oneor their many loker tales The
Joker s Five-Way Revenge from
� The Brave and the Bold 111,
FebMar. 1974. Their Joker killed
wantonly, he looked bizarre but
realistically so, and he was hinted
to be homosexual.
This cast a new light on the
maniac and his relationship with
the Batman. O'Neill and other
writers began to portray him as a
sexually perverse madman, in
love-hate relationship with his
arch-foe.
In Steve Englehart and
Marshall Rogers' "The Laughing
Fish from Detective Comics
475, Feb. 1978, The Joker teases
the copyright commissioner of
Gotham'City in this humourous
exchange:
The Joker bursts into the copy-
right office. The official shouts,
"Good Lord
The Joker starts, and whirls
around. Finding nothing, he turns
to the dazed official and says, "Oh,
Hahahahahaaa, I seel It was just
an expressionof endearment,
eh, Mr. Francis? Come on, you can
tell me! You've always secretly
admired me, haven't you?"
Though the collection only
offers one story from the 80s, it
was in this decade that the Joker's
personality fleshed out. His mad-
ness was explored in depth and
his relationship with Selina Kyle,
the Feline Fury known as the
Catwoman, came to light.
Kyle began her career as a
prostitute, and her love for Bat-
man led her to reform and eventu-
ally began to fight crime along-
side him. He even went so far as to
reveal his secret identity to her.
In one of the most logical reac-
tions the Joker ever expressed, he
used a brainwashing technique to
return her to a life of crime.
Throughout the two-part story in
Detective Comics (which was
sadly omitted from thiscollection'
it was hinted that the Joker's jeal-
ousy of Batman's affection for
Catwoman drove him to kidnap
her and brainwash her.
Obviously, he could not stand
to see a potential rival for Bat-
man's attention go straight (no pun
intended) and win his respect and
love. While male members of the
Caped Crusader's rogue's gallery
have reformed, the Joker never
felt the need to return them to
their rightful place.
Also, the 80s were a time when
a shot of much needed humor was
injected into comics. Not camp
humor, but truly funny situations
and dialogue. And in the Joker's
case, a macabre, dark humor that
suited his continual battle of wits
with the grim Batman.
An especially good example
overlooked by the editors was the
Joker's rematch with the Justice
League International in their
Annual last year. His schizo-
phrenic contradictions and sick
humor subtly interwove them-
selves amid his contract to kill
each super hero in the League.
The lack of these recent sto-
ries that reveal so much of the
Joker's character is the fatal flaw
of "Greatest Joher Stories True,
most avid fans can purchase back
issues of these comics cheaply
enough, an interested reader
(especially an uninitiated one, who
might start reading comics after
the advent of this summer's much-
hyped "Batman" movie) will miss
the chance to get a feeling for the
character by picking up this one
volume.
Instead, they will purchase a
book that shows the Joker in many
different lights, but never the mad
darkness that characterizes him
and the turbulent 80s so well.
Plaza Cinema
I'l.i.i Shouiilni! Ctr. 756 OOHH
NOW SHOWING
DANGEROUS LIAISONS
WALT DI8NET8
THE RESCUERS
Tibetan art strengthens show
Continued from page 9
Brzostoki will give a lecture on
Tibetan Art on March 30 at 7:30 in
lenkins Auditoriam.
In describing Tibetian Art
Brzostoski states that, "The every-
day reasons for this art are the
peoples' everyday beliefs, every-
day Buddhism, and everyday
hopes. Take away the Buddhist
connection and the world would
be a great void
Indeed, entering the show is
like stepping back in time to a
Buddhist monastery. Serene
Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, (pre-
Buddhas), smile on viewers trom
paintings and woodcuts, some of
which date to the 17th century.
The accompanying music,
consisting of Buddhist chanting,
takes a few minutes to get used to.
However, since these are the
chants that have inspired the art-
ists' visions, the music gradually
becomes clearer and harmonizes
with the art itself.
Brightly colored thangkas,
religious paintings, bronze sculp-
tures, and even everyday objects
demonstrate this religiousbalance
in their intricate symbolic designs.
Finally, a section of photography
by Virginia Henes captures reli-
gious practices in Modern Tibet as
well as some oi Buddhism's holi-
est shrines.
Overall "The Art of Tibet" is
an exceptionally strong show
which could have been displayed
on its own without "Models Plus
Certainly it's one of the rarest
collections ever displayed in Gray
Gallery and anyone with an inter-
est in'Tibetan'art or Buddhism
should see it.
"The Art of Tibet" is on loan
from the Rose Art Museum at
Brander's University and is sup-
ported by a grant from the North
Carolina Arts Council and the
National Endowment for the Arts;
The ECU Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs; The School of
Art and the Art Enthusiasts; and
Tibet House, New York.
LEAN ON ME
Tark 'Theatre
NOW SHOWING
TWINS
IRTCTIRVED
CLASS RINGS
Become a part of
THE
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fc a "Pirate Crew Member
�You will assist in recruiting and hosting future Pirate athletes and
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�You will influence the future of your university and its athletic
department.
�You will meet university and community leaders.
�You will be apart of an outstanding student organization.
Table Set lip At Student Store March 28th thru March 31st
March 20th - 24th
Monday - Friday
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Student Store
Wright Building
East Carolina University
Date
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Tmt H
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Y





The Clearly Labeled
"c
's
sH
Weather
(Dff@flsifi�na

P?
o
iliil
1 r, �J
D
Quote o' the week:
"Phylogeny recapitu-
lates ontogeny
� Stuart MaxweU
rain
Big E
Pear Pig E
Why does it always rain in
Greenville' And win is it that one
day it's s0 degrees and the next
day it's 30 degrees"
Signed Weather Watcher
DearSkipMuddWaters
AcCOrdingto ourstaff mete
0� ReBob 1n Tom bol
Mackey, Greenville is cursed by
recurringrainpattemsbecausethe
gods have great sorrow for our
wicked city. Rev. Bob says the
amountof pre-marital copulation,
combined with an increase in
apathy forSC A elections in recent
weeks, has caused the Emerald
City to become drenched in celes-
tial tears.
New 'Batman1 film
undergoes changes
HOLLYWOOD CA (BP)
Filming of the new "Batman'
movie was halted today when
producers introduced a radical
change in cast and plot to the film
Michael Keaton v ill still pla)
the Batman, but Rae Dawn ChOng
fresh from an appearance on the
Sweethearts" game show will
ry the voluptuous Batgirl. lack
Nicholson, whose partas the okei
had already been filmed, has quit
the movie, forcing the director to
find a new actor for the revised
sex scenes
The new scenes, in which
ttgirl uses her womanly ways to
seduce the Gown Princeof Crime
and thus capture him, will use an
animated loker, created by the
same studios that produced' V.
Framed Roger Rabbit?
Chong said that interacting
without a co-star m the steamy
love scene was the hardest acting
job she - had to date. ' 1 just
couldn't build up to a realistic cli-
max. The) had to keep pinching
my toes, she said.
Nicholson refused to provide
the voice for the foker cartoon, so
director Tim Burton asked Kath-
leen Turnt r tosubstitute. "I beard
he rin 'RogerRabbit and realized
she had the perfect voice and the
experience in animation to do the
Joker
Chong added that this made
her role even more difficult, "it
�.a- reall) disc ncerting to hear
her, and trv and react to her voice
passionately. They had to start
putting out their cigarettes on my
ankles
The film, daneerouslv over
budget, also had to cut back on
The temperature swings, ac-
cording to Bob, are made so that
Greenville residents will come
down with colds It they have
colds, they buy more NyQuil, the
sniffly-sneezy-snotty-nost -so-
you-can-get-drunk-on-two-
capfuls-and-sleep-through all
your-classes-the-next day medi-
cine.
Weather Watchers, it von
want beautiful weather to come to
Greenville, E suggests that you
clean up your life. Throw away
those filthy, slimy books from
under your bed. Stop your drug-
using habits. And for the sak 'of E,
McKay quote o' the
week:
"It's not the same
thing unless 'making a
camel' is some phrase
for
� McKay Sundwall
some of the special effects. The
Batmobile got totalled, and the
studio wouldn't pay tor a n�� �.
one. So we bought a '66 Ponti n
LeMans and painted it black he
said. 'The special effects depart-
ment outdid themselves, and 1
don't think the change will be
noticeable to the audien e '
Other changes include .
graphic scene in which Batman
saws the Joker's animated arm off
with a broken Coke bottle.ar-
toon tendons and veins gush blood
onto the ground. Burton feels that
the scene will pass through the
Warner Brothers' censors, since
"it's onlv cart on violence.
The producers are still del
ingwhether i tncludeCatwoman
tentatively pLyed b ami
Curtis, who will seduo iti
by masquerading as a sad
chistic stripper.
People like these are eating happily, at peace with the world. However, some poor souls are
haunted by the evil spirits of dead children. No lie. It's spooky.
wash your nasty, foul, blasphe- uming the small hallway outside
mous body with an abrasive my room at 8:30 every Saturday
cleanser. nly then will the sun morning in an i ffort to wake me
shine in tli i tainted Emerald of a up.
cit) It wouldn't be so bad, but 11 �
vacuums the same square fo it I
carpet for an hour and a half, i told
her whal she van Ao with hei
va mini, but .he didn't like thai
DearBic I i too much
Evei time I go home to ncd B,H ' u
Raleigh mj frionds and ! goto Dear Bad Suction,
Barry and C(. Tavern and So, we like to go out and do all
plat iki that md we usual!) kinds of psychoactived �vith
stay out all i ight long M) prob our little dei tented friend md
lem is thatm tl rsl irl acu- worn oui little middl i I
BushFest� comes
to N.C. beaches
HOLDEN'S ISLAND, N.C.
1BP) The much-ballyhooed
Cancellation of Myrtle Beach's
innual BudFest has brought tears
t the residents of Holden's Island
JNX tears of jov.
This year, they hope to host a
c ach beer blast vacation that will
Butshineall previous such college-
it udent oriented alcohol-ingesting
arties the First Annual Bush�
test
Hosted by Schnauzer-Bush
jnc , makers of such quality bever-
iges as Bush Lite� and Quayle
iite S I "The non-alcoholic beer"),
he thrce-dav festival will include
jrformances by some of the hot
lest stars on the rock musi s ene,
prtdless contests based solely on
h sical appearance and a sp ial
dition of 'The People's Court
broadcast from the Holden's Is-
md Motel Six swimming pool
Stars scheduled to perform
iclude Debbie Gibson, Gene
-oves Jezebel and Oli via Newton-
)hn Superstar Tiffany was con-
icted to appear, but "since we
lon'thaveashoppin'center down
'icre yet, she didn't have no place
play Bush�Fest promoter
Ronald Merchandise said
I esl promoters will be giving
away tons of tree stutt. We got
the popular 'Get Sand in your
Bush � cigarette rolling ma-
chines, 'Quayle Lite�' spittoons
and Bush Lite� aglets (shoelace
tips) Merchandise said, 'lust
come iin down
Partygoers will go through a
m reening process in the Motel Six
lobby to determine contestants for
the 'The People's Court broad-
cast. Entrants will be rated on
abilitv to s. ream at ex-husbands,
number ot past felonies and will-
ingness to make a omplete tool of
themselves on nationally syndi-
cated television.
In addition, there will be cash
prizes given for the winnersof the
Best AnkleContest, Best Wet Sock
Contest, Most Innovative Mastur-
bation Contest and the "Hot
Gums" competition. Pageants will
be held each day, and the celebrity
judges include Charles Nelson
Rilev, Burt Convy and Pink
Floyd's back-up singers.
Grand Prize winners in each
category will receive an all-ex-
penses paid trip to Smithfield,
N.C, where they will stay at the
luxurious Smithfield-Selma Mo-
Song quote o the
week:
"I'm gonna hit cha if
ya say that to me one
more time
� Sinead O'Connor
tel Six for a three-week vacation.
Merchandise savs that this
Easter Weekend party will be
better by far than any of Myrtle
Beach's previous festivals. "You
take the weather. It's supposed to
rain and and be real cold down
there all this week. Hell, that's
normal weather up here in North
Carolina! We're used to goin'
down the waterslides in skin div-
ing suits
He points out that Holden's
Island is much closer than Myrtle
Beach. "Unless of course you live
down to Wilmington. Yeah, that is
a little bit closer. But, hell, who
lives in Wilmington?"
Pop star Gibson is excited
about the weekend. Recently
J
graduated from high school and
coming off her first world tour,
sheravesabouttheCarolina beach.
'They have, like, thebest malls
ever. Thev have one on every road,
just about. I can't believe Tiff isn't
going. She needs to get more of
that purple eyeshadow
"What? You mean this place
isn't near Raleigh? It's not down
the street from Crabtree Valley
Mall? Dammit Herb, I told you to
check this out! Daddy! Fire him
Sucking Up
ii" ther to thi ; int of taking psy
u tive drugs md calling other
��� irrii I mothers at in th morn
: ' �� - Shame oi . u
'h I : ��. you
respect i
i iuldn'l -1 ep in ail morn-
tnd ncgl � it household
I :��'� I I! . � fat 1
from Mommy every month, but
nil helping the poor
with vacuuming the
or our -ars with a
and think about how bad
: head hurl �
It is time to wake up and listen
t the va uurn leaner.
Pictured here are Rae Dawn Chong, Michael Keaton and the joker
movie. Behind them is the new, improved Batmobile. I ookin' pret
stars of the new "Batman'
tv low-budget, eh folks?
Local man's lunch a living hell
GREENVIl � N.C. (HP) �
A Greenville man's lunch hour
has become a living hell due to
constant harassment by a station
v agi n full of alleged "ghost"
( h Idr n.
( e Graham, 29, first noticed
the ghost children while eating at
theBojangle i n Memorial Drive.
I was sitting be the plate glass
window on the drive-thru side,
and just sinking my teeth into a
Bo's biscuit That's when 1 saw
'em: a ear load oi kids none oi
'em older than five parked bv
the sidewalk, watching me.
"At the time I just thought it
was irresp nsible lor the parents
to leave them kids in the car with
the motor running and such. They
were still sitting there when 1 left
(iraham said.
Graham says he would've
forgotten all about it if the carload
of kid s hadn't appeared again, this
time while he was finishing a
happy meal at McDonald's.
"Like the first time, 1 was sit-
ting by the plate glass window on
the drive-thru side. They were
staring at me again. I thought this
was sorta strange but, man, let
me tell you, I didn't know what
strange was then " Graham's
voice gets caught in his throat and
it's a moment before he can con-
tinue:
"I decided to take a look-see.
When I stepped out the door, the
car and the kids had disappeared.
1 mean gone! but when i went
back to my table and sat down, the
kids were there on the other side
of the glass
Duke University's sole Par-
apsychologist, Aim Praeger ex-
plains why the ghost children, are
only visible through the plate
glass: "V e know that, under cer-
tain conditions, glass can develop
a property akin to polarization that
allows you to see into the spirit
world. A psychic Amber Vision ot
sorts. This is a phenomenon not
uncommon in the plate glass ol
certain fast food establishments
(Praeger is researching Graham's
story for inclusion in updated
editions of Time-1 lfe Books'
"Mysteries oi the Unexplained").
A distraught Graham con-
curred.
"When 1 learned they was
undead and all, I figured 'Just
ignore 'em, maybe they 11 go
away They didn't take to that.
Thev started doing things to .
my attention Obscene
things
"Like the time I'd just g �ttt na
mouthful oi Shone) s hot fu
cake. One o them ghost kids
suddenly shot his tongue out like
a big frog and caught a fly outI
the air. 1 liked to threw up.
Graham has tried shunning
fast food. But there are conse-
quences: One day ! thought I'd
trv eating at home. N
ts I thought 1 heard it hail .
halfway through. lunch. It was
raining Big Macs and I lo-l lo's on
my house and don't tell me it won't
them ghost kids
i raeger's resc irch has �
some light on the identities of the
'ghost children. While eating
dinner with Graham onee ening
he jotted down details of the sta-
tion wagon, which was, he re-
ported, nondescript except for an
I break for Chthonic Spirits
bumper sticker.
Praeger did get the license
plate number however, and
learned the car had belonged to a
Wisconsin woman who acciden-
tally caused the death oi her chil-
dren when she left the idling car
unattended in thedrive-thru lane.
One child, while play-driving
threw the car out of gear. It ca-
reened into the path of a semi
Graham's connection with the
children remains unclear and
Praeger has arranged a m� I
between Graham and their
mother.
"1 m just glad to have some-
one on my side Graham said
"Folks that ain't haunted by 'em
just thinks they're a car of cute
kids. Cute as poltergeists go, 1
reckon, but I've seen enough to do
me tor this life and the next
Mother gives birth to 12oz.steak Dukes quote c the
week:
GREENVILLE, NC (PP)
Medical history was made Tues-
day in St. I leifer Memorial Hospi-
tal in upstate New York when
expectant mother Marv Francis
Mehegahogan gave birth to a
twelve ounce sirloin steak.
"Yeah, you could say 1 was
i aught off guard commented
chief surgeon WesSizlen. "1 swear,
the amniocentesis showed that it
was going to be a girl. A big one,
too. We were all gearing up for a
caesarian, and then wham.
Crazy
Though the steak was smaller
than a baby would have been, the
delivery took longer than normal.
"Well, we were using the
wrong instruments said sur-
geon's assistant Ann Dromecha.
"So Dr. Sizlcn ran out to the com-
missary and brought back a pair
of steak tongs � sterilized, of
course. He even had fun with the
whole ordeal, wearing a 'Kiss the
Cook' smock and all. He's a real
nut under pressure
The mother-to-be was put
under anesthetic immediately, to
save her from the shock of seeing
the birth Her husband agreed to
this, reasoning, "It would have
shattered her in her weak state
She really hates red meat
Other odd circumstances sur-
rounded the delivery, according
to Dr. Sizlen.
"Well, we didn't have to cut
the umbilical chord, 'cause it was
connected to a piece of gristle, and
that came off easy enough. What I
immediately noticed was that
there were criss-cross char-grilled
marks, and a small red steak flag
stuck in the side. The strange part
is, the flag read rare but it wasn't
If was medium well. "
When news leaked out, sev-
eral medical experts and mterna-
tionallv known chefs were called
in to try to explain the event. Sur-
geon General C. Everett Coop had
this to suggest:
"Well, ah, I'd treat the situ-
ation with a little Worcestershire.
"Well, well, well and
well
� Boss Hogg
Curse o' the week:
"Freckles darn it
straight to heck
� Scott Maxwell
Gel it? Worcestershire! Hah
After waking in the recovery
room, Mrs. Mehegahogan was
informed of the entire situation,
and to the doctor's surprise took
the whole event in stride.
"Well, you know, I'm the third
daughter of a third daughter of an
idiot. So this kind oi thing was
bound to happen
The proud couple was ready
to leave St. Fleifer's the following
day, and had to name the steak
before checking out.
"We'll call it Junior for now
said Mr. Mehegahogan. "What the
hell, it'll probably just go bad
anyway





I
The Clearly Labeled
m,
&�& (Oaiffolflmfi&im
Quote o the week:
"Phylogeny recapitu-
lates ontogeny.
� Stuart Maxwell
Weather fan asks Big E why it's gotta rain
'Tsasi Ask
BigE
Dear Big E,
Why does it always rain in
Greenville? And why is it that one
day it's 80 degrees and the next
day it's 30 degrees
Signed, Weather Watcher
Dear Skip Muddy Waters,
According to our staff mete-
orologist, Rev. Bob Dan Tom Bob
Mackey, Greenville is cursed by
recurring rain patterns because the
gods have great sorrow for our
wicked city. Rev. Bob says the
amount of pre-marital copulation,
combined with an increase in
apathy for SG A elections in recent
weeks, has caused the Emerald
City to become drenched in celes-
tial tears.
New 'Batman' film
undergoes changes
HOLLYWOOD, CA (BP) �
Filming of the new "Batman"
movie was halted today when
producers introduced a radical
change in cast and plot to the film.
Michael Keaton will still play
the Batman, but Rae Dawn Chong,
fresh from an appearance on the
"Sweethearts" game show, will
play the voluptuous Batgirl. jack
Nicholson, whose part as the Joker
had already been filmed, has quit
the movie, forcing the director to
find a new actor for the revised
sex scenes.
The new scenes, in which
Batgirl uses her womanly ways to
seduce the Clown Prince of Crime
and thus capture him, will use an
animated Joker, created by the
same studios that produced "Who
Framed Roger Rabbit?"
Chong said that interacting
without a co-star in the steamy
love scene was the hardest acting
job she's had to date. "1 just
couldn't build up to a realistic cli-
max. They had to keep pinching
my toes she said.
Nicholson refused to provide
the voice for the Joker cartoon, so
director Tim Burton asked Kath-
leen Turner to substitute. "I heard
her in 'Roger Rabbit and realized
she had the perfect voice and the
experience in animation to do the
Joker
Chong added that this made
her role even more difficult. "It
was really disconcerting to hear
her, and try and react to her voice
passionately. They had to start
putting out their cigarettes on mv
ankles
The film, dangerously over
budget, also had to cut back on
The temperature swings, ac-
cording to Bob, are made so that
Greenville residents will come
down with colds. If they have
colds, they buy more NyQuil, the
sniffly-sneezy-snotty-nose-so-
you-can-get-drunk-on-two-
capfuls-and-sleep-through-all-
your-classcs-the-next-day medi-
cine.
Weather Watchers, if you
want beautiful weather to come:to
Greenville, E suggests that you
clean up your life. Throw away
those filthy, slimy books from
under your bed. Stop your drug-
using habits. And for the sake of E,
McKay quote o the
week:
"It's not the same
thing unless 'making a
camel' is some phrase
for
� McKay Sundwall
some of the special effects. "The
Batmobile got totalled, and the
studio wouldn't pay for a new-
one. So we bought a '66 Pontiac
LeMans and painted it black he
said. 'The special effects depart-
ment outdid themselves, and 1
don't think the change will be
noticeable to the audience
Other changes include a
graphic scene in which Batman
saws the Joker's animated arm off
with a broken Coke bottle. Car-
toon tendons and veins gush blood
onto the ground. Burton feels that
the scene will pass through the
Warner Brothers' censors since
"it's only cartoon violence
The producers are still debat-
ing whether to include Cat woman,
tentatively played by Jamie Lee
Curtis, who will seduce Batman
by masquerading as a sadomaso-
chistic stripper.
wash your nasty, foul, blasphe-
mous body with an abrasive
cleanser. Only then will the sun
shine in the tainted Emerald of a
citv.
Sucking Up
Dear Big Earl,
Every time I go home to
Raleigh, my friends and I go to
Barry's and ACC Tavern and
places like that, and we usually
stay out all night long. My prob-
lem is that m mother starts vacu-
I People like these are eating happily, at peace with the world. However, some poor souls are
� haunted by the evil spirits of dead children. No lie. It's spooky
ushFest� comes
to N.C. beaches
HOLDEN'S ISLAND, N.C.
P) � The much-ballyhooed
ancellation of Myrtle Beach's
nnual BudFest has brought tears
the residentsofHolden's Island
C tears of joy.
This year, they hope to host a
ach beer blast vacation that will
Imtshineall previous such college-
student oriented alcohol-ingesting
parties the First Annual Bush�
est.
Hosted by Schnauzer-Bush
nc, makersof such quality bever-
iges as Bush Lite� and Quayle
ite� ("The non-alcoholic beer"),
he three-day festival will include
erformances by some of the hot-
est stars on the rock music scene,
ndlcss contests based solely on
hysical appearance and a special
dition of "The People's Court
?roadcast from the Holden's Is-
and Motel Six swimming pool.
Stars scheduled to perform
nclude Debbie Gibson, Gene
.oves Jezebel and Olivia Newton-
ohn. Superstar Tiffany was con-
ic ted to appear, but "since we
on't havea shoppin' center down
lere yet, she didn't have no place
lo play Bush�Fest promoter
Ronald Merchandise said.
Fest promoters will be giving
away "tons of free stuff. We got
the popular 'Get Sand in your
Bush� cigarette rolling ma-
chines, 'Quayle Lite�' spittoons
�and Bush Lite� aglets (shoelace
tips) Merchandise said. "Just
come on down
Partygoers will go through a
screening process in the Motel Six
lobby todeterminc contestants for
the 'The People's Court" broad-
cast. Entrants will be rated on
ability to scream at ex-husbands,
number of past felonies and will-
ingness to make a complete fool of
themselves on nationally syndi-
cated television.
In addition, there will be cash
prizesgivenforthe winners of the
Best Ankle Contest, Best Wet Sock
Contest, Most Innovative Mastur-
bation Contest and the "Hot
Gums" competition. Pageants will
be held each day, and the celebrity
judges include Charles Nelson
Riley, Burt Convy and Pink
Hoyd's back-up singers.
Grand Prize winners in each
category will receive an all-ex-
penses paid trip to Smithfield,
N.C, where they will stay at the
luxurious Smithfield-Selma Mo-
Song quote o' the
week:
"I'm gonna hit cha if
ya say that to me one
more time.
� Sinead O'Connor
tel Six for a three-week vacation.
Merchandise says that this
Easter Weekend party will be
better by far than any of Myrtle
Beach's previous festivals. "You
take the weather. It's supposed to
rain and and be real cold down
there all this week. Hell, that's
normal weather up here in North
Carolina! We're used to goin'
down the waterslides in skin div-
ing suits
He points out that Holden's
Island is much closer than Myrtle
Beach. "Unless of course you live
down to Wilmington. Yeah, that is
a little bit closer. But, hell, who
lives in Wilmington?"
Pop star Gibson is excited
about the weekend. Recently
graduated from high school and
coming off her first world tour,
she ra vesabout the Carolina beach.
"They have, like, the best malls
ever. They have one on every road,
just about. I can't believe Tiff isn't
going. She needs to get more of
that purple eyeshadow
"What? You mean this place
isn't near Raleigh? It's not down
the street from Crabtree Valley
Mall? Dammit Herb, I told you to
check this out! Daddy! Fire him
uming the small hallway outside
my room at 8:30 every Saturday
morning in an effort to wake me
up.
It wouldn't be so bad, but she
vacuums the same square foot of
carpet for an hour and a half. I told
her what she can do with her
vacuum, but she didn't like that
too much.
Signed, Bill Hoover
Dear Bad Suction,
So, we like to go out and do all
kinds of psychoactive drugs with
our little demented friends and
worry our little middle-aged
mother to the point of taking psy-
choactive drugs and calling other
worried mothers at 3 in the morn-
ing, do we? Shame on you.
Obviously, Mr. Hoover, you
have no respect tor your mother
or you wouldn't sleep in all morn-
ing and neglect your household
chores. We get our nice tat check
from Mommy every month, but
when it comes to helping the poor
woman with vacuuming the
house, we cover our ears with a
pillow and think about how bad
our head hurts.
It is time to wake up and listen
to the vacuum cleaner.
Pictured here are Rae Dawn Chong, Michael Keaton and the Joker, stars of the new "Batman"
movie. Behind them is the new, improved Batmobile. Lookin' pretty low-budget, eh folks?
Local man's lunch a living hell
GREENVILLE, N.C. (HP) �
A Greenville man's lunch hour
has become a living hell due to
constant harassment by a station
wagon full of alleged "ghost"
children.
Joe Graham, 29, first noticed
the ghost children while eating at
the Bojangles on Memorial Drive.
"I was sitting by the plate glass
window on the drive-thru side,
and just sinking my teeth into a
Bo's biscuit. That's when I saw
'em: a car load of kids none of
'em older than five parked by
the sidewalk, watching me.
"At the time I just thought it
was irresponsible for the parents
to leave them kids in the car with
. the motor running and such. They
were still sitting there when I left
Graham said.
Graham says he would've
forgotten all about it if the carload
of kidshadn'tappeared again, this
time while he was finishing a
happy meal at McDonald's.
"Like the first time, I was sit-
ting by the plate glass window on
the drive-thru side. They were
staring at me again. I thought this
was sorta strange, but, man, let
me tell you, 1 didn't know what
strange was then Graham's
voice gets caught in his throat and
it's a moment before he can con-
tinue:
"I decided to take a look-see.
When I stepped out the door, the
car and the kids had disappeared.
I mean gone! But when I went
back to mv table and sat down, the
kids were there on the other side
of the glass
Duke University's sole Par-
apsychologist, Alan Praeger, ex-
plains why the ghost children are
only visible through the plate
glass: "We know that, under cer-
tain conditions, glass can develop
a property akin to polarization that
allows you to see into the spirit
world. A psychic Amber Vision of
sorts. This is a phenomenon not
uncommon in the plate glass of
certain fast food establishments
(Praeger is researching Graham's
story for inclusion in updated
editions of Time-Life Books'
"Mysteries of the Unexplained").
A distraught Graham con-
curred.
"When I learned they was
undead and all, 1 figured 'Just
ignore 'em, maybe they'll go
away They didn't take to that.
They started doing things to get
my attention Obscene
things
"Like the time I'd just gotten a
mouthful of Shoney's hot fudge
cake. One o' them ghost kids
suddenly shot his tongue out like
a" big frog and caught a fly out of
the air. I liked to threw up
Graham has tried shunning
fast food. But there are conse-
quences: "One day I thought I'd
try eating at home. No glass; no
ghosts. I thought I heard it hailing
halfway through lunch. It was
raining Big Macs and Ho-Ho's on
my house and don't tell me it won't
them ghost kids
Praeger's research has shed
some light on the identities of the
"ghost" children. While eating
dinner with Graham one evening,
he jotted down details of the sta-
tion wagon, which was, he re-
ported, nondescript except for an
"I break for Chthonic Spirits"
bumper sticker.
Praeger did get the license
plate number, however, and
learned the car had belonged to a
Wisconsin woman who acciden-
tally caused the death of her chil-
dren when she left the idling car
unattended in the drive-thru lane.
One child, while play-driving,
threw the car out of gear. It ca-
reened into the path of a semi.
Graham's connection with the
children remains unclear and
Praeger has arranged a meeting
between Graham and their
mother.
"I'm just glad to have some-
one on my side Graham said.
"Folks that ain't haunted by 'em
just thinks they're a car of cute
kids. Cute as poltergeists go, I
reckon, but I've seen enough to do
me for this life and the next
Mother gives birth to 12oz.steak Dukes quote � the
week:
GREENVILLE, NC (PP) �
Medical history was made Tues-
day in St. Heifer Memorial Hospi-
tal in upstate New York when
expectant mother Mary Francis
Mchegahogan gave birth to a
twelve-ounce sirloin steak.
"Ypah, you could say I was
caught off guard commented
chief surgeon WesSizlen. "I swear,
the amniocentesis showed that it
was going to be a girl. A big one,
too. We were all gearing up for a
caesarian, and then wham.
Crazy
Though the steak was smaller
than a baby would have been, the
delivery took longer than normal.
"Well, we were using the
wrong instruments said sur-
geon's assistant Ann Dromecha.
"So Dr. Sizlen ran out to the com-
missary and brought back a pair
of steak tongs � sterilized, of
course. He even had fun with the
whole ordeal, wearing a 'Kiss the
Cook' smock and all. He's a real
nut under pressure
The mother-to-be was put
under anesthetic immediately, to
save her from the shock of seeing
the birth. Her husband agreed to
this, reasoning, "It would have
shattered her in her weak state.
She really hates red meat
Other odd circumstances sur-
rounded the delivery, according
to Dr. Sizlen.
"Well, we didn't have to cut
the umbilical chord, 'cause it was
connected to a piece of gristle, and
that came off easy enough. What I
immediately noticed was that
there were criss-cross char-grilled
marks, and a small red steak flag
stuck in the side. The strange part
is, the flagread 'rarebut it wasn't.
If was medium well. "
When news leaked out, sev-
eral medical experts and interna-
tionally known chefs were called
in to try to explain the event. Sur-
geon General C. Everett Coop had
this to suggest:
"Well, ah, I'd treat the situ-
ation with a little Worcestershire.
"Well, well, well and
well
�Boss Hogg
Curse o the week:
"FrecMes darn it
straight to heck
� Scott Maxwell
Get it? Worcestershire! Hah
After waking in the recovery
room, Mrs. Mehegahogan was
informed of the entire situation,
and to the doctor's surprise took
the whole event in stride.
"Well, you know, I'm the third
daughter of a third daughter of an
idiot. So this kind of thing was
bound to happen
The proud couple was ready
to leave St. Heifer's the following
day, and had to name the steak
before checking out.
"We'll call it Junior for now
said Mr. Mehegahogan. "What the
hell, it'll probably just go bad
anyway





12
Tl IE LAST CAROLINIAN
MAROi 23, 1W
Overkill
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By Elliott MIXPIX
The Law
Bv Reid

r
t
"
,
This week Fun and Games examines the life of a man who is still largely a mystery to us all,
Steve Reid. Steve began doing The Law for Pirate Comics in the Spring of 1988, and since then
his character has undergone many changes in personality (The Law, not Steve). When teaching
class here at ECU, Steve often gives extra credit to his students who can answer comics page
trivia. He's quite a guy. And here it is, .


V

,�


e

"
s
THE INTERVIEW THAT HAD TO BE DONE
Who or what influenced you in your comics work?
The fine arts, the pop movement, Jasper Jarvis, The
Law and various editorial cartoonists, real life
What is your greatest achievement? Winning the First
National NAPIM Essay Contest and it's thousand
dollar prize
Greatest failure? never fail
Career ambitions: To finish masters degree in Fine
Arts, find a university teaching position and continue
making images
Favorite books or works: My extensive comic
collection (2000 )
Favorite movies: Evil Dead II, Shogun Assassin,
Tough Guys
Mission in Life: To get the dent banged out of my car
Favorite wrestlers: Abdullah the Butcher Since Steve is constantly in
Interests, pasttimes: Stockpiling video, Japanese demand, we deemed it best
animation to not reveal his true visage.
Turn-ons: My wife Angela and creating images The average human being's
Turn-offs: Not enough time to do everything I'd like to mind would burn itself out
do trvmg � comprehend such
Favorite music: They Might Be Giants, Red Hot Chili beauty anyway. Mr. Reid
Peppers, Dead Milkmen gladly opted to turn his pic-
Everyone should be my friend because: I'm Steve Reid ture into a game, for those of
Biographer. Parker, simply Parker. US who enjoy such things.
�NWA
&
�4
rtff
f d
X
CARTOONISTS WANTED, FOLKS!
I
DfWW THt ARtlST,
Cartoonists are needed for the
Summer semesters and for the
Fall. If you have any neat
concepts, contact the East
Carolinian via our free number,
757-6366. We are readv to believe
you. If you have funny ideas and
talent, that would help. No SGA
members, please.
i

fc-





Till EAST'
H89 13
Band blends American and
Eastern jazz for unique mix





THE EAST CAROL1N IAN
MARCH 23fl989l3
Band blends American and
Eastern jazz for unique mix
and 12-string guitars, piano
�cu Ne. Bur�u Prophet 5 synthesizel, comet and
percussion Glen Moore plays bass
"Oregon a New Age jazz piano and flute Paul MVCan-
improvisationalmusicquartetwill dless pktys oboe, bass, clarinet,
perform at ECU April 5, as part ot English horn and soprano saxo-
the ECU School of Music-Univer- phone.
sitv Unions Chamber Music Se- The group's most exotk and
ries. newest member is Indian-bom
The concert is scheduled for 8 percussionist Trilok Gurtu who
p.m. in Hendnx Theater. Tickets replaced original percussionist
for the general public, priced at $8 Collin Wakott who was killed in a
for adults and S4 tor youth, are
available at the ECU Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Oregon's music fuses Ameri
two solo albums and signed with
Windham Hill Records last year.
The original members per-
formed under a variety of names
before settling on "Oregon which
was selected in honor of the state
whose scenery they all admire and
where two of the quartet mem-
bers grew up.
Among Oregon perform-
ance tours have been a six-week
can, European and Indian-Afri- are ECM releases "Ectopia and
can sounds. The group was
formed in New ork City in 1970
bv musicians ho were part of a
larger ensemble, the Paul Winter
Consort.
The tour members among
thempla) a total ol some 50 musi-
cal instruments and are continu-
ally exploring new combinations
of instruments and new forms o
improvization.
Ralph Towner plays classica'
European tour bus accident five
years ago Gurtu performs on the tour of southeast Asia, sponsored
"Indian ' tablas as well as congas by the U.S. Information Agency.
and various other tvpes of drums. They received popular and cnti-
Among Oregon's recordings cal acclaim in Sri Lanka, Bombay,
Calcutta, Pakistan, Algeria and
other locations.
"Crossing Elektra releases
"Roots in the Sky" and ' Out of the
Woods' and more than halt a
dozen Vanguard recordings, in-
cluding "Winter Light" and
"Moon and Mind
The Oregon members also
perform and record on their own
with other musicians. Towner is
the most prolific, having recorded
a number ot solo and ensemble
albums for ECM. McCandlesshas
A spokesman for the Ameri-
can Embassy in Islamabad com-
mented that Oregon's blend of
American jazz with themes, tones
and rhythms from Eastern cultures
was of particular interest to the
Asian audiences, who were "fas-
cinated to hear the familiar tabla
integrated so effectively into con-
temporary Western music
New Fletch doesn't measure up
Continued from page 9
comings, is still an entertaining
movie, though not nearly up to
par with the original. The produc-
ers tried so hard to make another
movie like "Fletch that the se-
quel wasn't allowed to have it's
own individuality.
Also, the fantasy elements of
Farnsworth s Biblel and end the
exaggerated South took away a
lot of realism that the first movie
had, and which served to accent
the humor and boldness ot Retch's
character.
Chevy Chase, Hal Holbrook,
and the rest of the cast do a line job
in their roles, and Chase constantly
tries to improve on what has been
written for him, keeping his char-
acter intact. Hopefully another
sequel will be done to let Retch
live up to his potential, and per-
haps another writer will look back
to the Gregory McDonald "Fletch"
books for inspiration. On the cat-
head scale, two and a half heads.
MlM�
Bonehead urges students to vote
Continued from page 9
Let them know that you have
just taken part in the Great Ameri-
can System of Democracy, and you
feel so good about it, you're ready-
to go drink some Crystal Lite�.
IrTaTl seriousness, folks these Remember, it you don t vote
peoplevoueleethaveasaymhow Wednesday, I don t want to hear
tour student fees get allocated for your complaints for the next year,
the next year Fees, as in money, It's on your head. Til next time,
the green stuff we all yearn for. havefunatMyrtleBeacn,andmav
Don't let them waste it by being the hangovers be gentle, but the
too lazy to oh buzzes intense
Read Scott Maxwell's editorial column
on the editorial page, every Thursday.
ATTENTI
Oregon, a New-Ageimprovisational jazz troupe will blend their unique Eastern and American
jazz performance for audiences in Hendrix Theater on April 5.
Troupe does comedy
F.CL Ne�� Bureau
Shakespeare's comedy,
"Love's Labour's Lost will be
performed at ECU April 10, by
The Acting Company, a touring
drama company which has pre-
sented some half a dozen classic
plays on previous visits to the
campus.
The performance will begin at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
Acting Company's Shakespeare
production is part of ECU's 1988-
89 Performing Arts Series.
Tickets for the general public
are $14 each, $7 for youth, and are
on sale at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Studen Center.
"I ove's Labour's Lost" is an
earlv Shakespeare play considered
by modern scholars to be the first
mark of the dramatist's great
genius. It concerns the effects of a
vow to swear off women and
worldly pleasures taken by King
Ferdinand of Navarre and three of
his nobles.
Their plan is upset and high-
spirited frolics ensue when the
Princess of France and her ladies
appear on the scene. The result is
humorous deceit, surreptitious
delivery of love sonnets, music
and dance. As the drama con-
cludes, the young men and women
are faced with the death of the
Princess' father and the need to
enter the adult world of reality.
A comic subplot in "Love's
Labour's Lost" offers satiric por-
traits of a schoolmaster, a clergy-
man, a constable and a Spaniard.
The Acting Company, the only
permanent, professional repertory
theater company touring nation-
wide, was founded in 1972by John
Houseman and Margot Harley.
Since then, the company has trav-
eled over 412,206 miles, perform-
ing 62 plays in 45 states, to audi-
ences totaling nearly two million
people.
Veterans of Acting Company
tours havo enne on to become
sought-after professionals. Two
noted performers who have ap-
peared at ECU with previous
ActingCompanyengagementsare
Kevin Kline, featured in the films
"The Big Chi 11" and "A Fish Called
Wanda and Patti LuPone,starof
the Broadwav musical "Evita
The current Acting Company
membership consists of 15 actors
from loiding American profes-
sional schools conservatoriesand
resident theaters In addition to
"Love s i a hour's lost the com-
pany's 1988 'ur consists of
"Bov Meets rl a satirical look
at the goldon age of Hollywood
and "The Phantom Tollbooth a
children's play inaugurating the
company's ne Young Audiences
Project
, STAFF
MARK
ARCH
IS CONDUCTING
A SURVEY FOR
THE EAST
Tables will be located across campus
t





THE EAST CARCM INI AN
Sports
MARCH 23,1989 PAGE 14
Pirates increase record to 13-2
ECU baseball fights elements to beat Davis & Elkins
Bv KRISTEN HALBERG
Staff Wntti
The East Carolina Pirates
fought the elements and on a cold
. rainy day they overcame the
Senators oi Davis & Elkins in a 9-
3 victory Tuesdav.
The Pirates were due to plav
the Hartford Hawks on Wednes-
day but were rained out. The time
will not be rescheduled.
Greenville freshman Tom
Move started on the mound and
pitched seven innings while giv-
ing up just five hits and no runs.
Dallas McPherson, a Rose High
School graduate, came in to re-
lieve Move and pitched the final
two innings
All three runs scored by the
Senators were scored in the final
inning while McPherson was on
the mound but they were all
unearned.
The rain drizzled throughout
the entire game but that didn't
hinder the performances of the
Pirates. ECU jumped out on the
scoreboard right from the start
when, in the first inning, they put
two runs on the board to give the
Pirates the quick 2-0 lead. The Bucs
then added one more in the third.
The highlight came in the fifth
inning when junior first baseman
Calvin Brown hit his fifth home
run of the season. The Battleboro,
C. native now leads the ECU
baseball program in batting with
a .440.
Brown, a solid power-hitter,
hit seven home runs as a freshman
and six as a sophomore.
But an ECU scoring drive
mounted in the fifth inning when
the Pirates exploded to get five
runs against Davis & Elkins. The
Pirates had four base hits includ-
ing key hits by Chris Cauble and a
two-run single from Mike An-
drews. The Pirates had increased
their leading margin to 9-0 and
would not score the rest of the
game.
The Senators mounted a scor-
ing drive in the ninth inning with
three runs. But the spark for Davis
& Elkins came too late in the game
as they would leave Greenville in
defeat.
Brown had two hits tor the
game including his fifth home run
ofthe season. Tommy Bos well also
had two hits and Cauble had two
hits which included two doubles.
Coach Gary Overton is now
144-57 (.716) in his four plus years
coaching for Hast Carolina Uni-
versity. He is currently among the
top 15 coaches in the NCAA Divi-
sion 1 in terms of winning per-
centage.
The victory increased ECU'S
record to 13-2 on the season.
The Pirates will see confer-
ence action again this weekend
when they travel to Williamsburg,
Va. to face the Tribe of William &
Mary. The two teams will play
one game Saturday and a double-
header on Sunday.
William & Mary finished
fourth in the conference in the
season.
Pirate golfers swing into second
BvLORI MARTIN
Stii isnter
The Pirate golfers placed sec-
ond with two golfers finishing in
the top three in the Hyatt
Richmond Intercollegiate March
18-19.
Virginia Commonwealth
University, a co-host oi the Inter-
collegiate . won the tournament
over ECU by two strokes. In third
place out of 17 teams was UNCC
four strokes behind ECU.
ECU's Francis Vaughn won
the tournament with a two-round
total oi 144. Vaughn shot 68 in the
first round and To in the second
Takingsecondintheindividu-
als was VCL s Mickey Moore who
shot 143, one stroke behind
Vaughn. John Maginnes of ECU
took third with a two-day total ol
146.
Finishing 12th was ECU'S Tee
Da vies, a co-captain of the Pirates.
Seventy golfers participated in the
tournament.
The tournament was played
in cold and windy conditions, "he
site of the match, the Confederate
Hills Golf Club, was extremely
wet as a result of rain the previous
week.
With the win over Duke and
UNCC, two teams ranked high in
the district. ECU improved its
ranking to quality for the NCAA
tournament in June.
The team will travel to Duke
Universi ty to participate in the Iron
Duke Intercollegiate the weekend
of March 24-26. According to Mor-
rison, Duke's tournament will be
oneof the toughest fields the team
will face this season.
win with speed
BvGREG ROACHE
Stiff Wntct
The ECU Rugby Team trav-
eled to Charlotte last weekend to
plav in the Round Robin Rugby
tournament. They leit Sunday
with three very impressive victo-
ries and first place.
The ruggers started the week-
end earlv Saturday by crushing
the Charlotte Men's Team B side
40-8. ECU dominated play on both
sides oi the ball, with ECU'S speed
proving too much for the slower
Charlotte team. A tournament
high seven tries (equivalent to a
touchdown in football) were
scored by the Pirate Ruggers.
Scorers were Steve Kinan, D
Shrade, Fob Eason, Mike Shunk,
Frank Cutler arid Philip Ritchey.
In the second game of the day,
the Pirates faced UNCC, a team
they beat earlier in the season 20-
3. ECU started slowly after only
an hour and a half lest trom the
previous game. The score at half
was 9-6 ECU. The second half
opened with the ECU scrum tak-
ing control of the game. UNCC in-
experienced scrum was no match
for the fired up Pirate ruggers.
Philip Ritchey and BobTobin,long
time ECU scrummers scored three
tries between them, Mike Shunk
also scored with one EAson Eason
and Cutler adding two point con-
versions. UNCC would not score
in the second half, as the game
ended 27-6.
ECU would face its toughest
challenge, TheCharlotteOld Boy's
Sunday in the finals. This Char-
lotte team was the biggest ECU
has faced in years. Most oi Char-
lotte's MTiim were 230 pounds ox-
better. The superior speed of
ECU's backs however simply
pro ed to be too much.
Charlotte opened the scoring
early in the first half, but ECU
would quickly respond with two
tries oi their own. Philip Ritchey
scored His fourth try oi the week-
end off a blocked kick by Blair
Byrd. Mike Shuck scored his third
See RUGGERS, page 15
An Ohio University player is easy prey for this ECU fielder. The Lady Pirates lost the first game of
their doubleheader Monday but came back to beat Ohio University in their second game.
Fall short in game one
Lady Pirates rally to split with Ohio
ifcwarawwR1
Shdi Writer
After winning the Lady Pirate
Classic this past weekend, the soft -
ballers were back in action Mon-
day splittinga double-header with
Ohio-University.
The Lady Pirates fell 0-1 in the
first game with Jen Sagl pitching a
three-hitter and picking up her
first loss of the season bringing
her record to 4-1.
The Pirates had a total of six
Wendy Tonkcr poth having two
hits a piece.
In the second game of the da v,
the lady Pirates fought back to
beat Ohio 7-5. The Pirates blasted
a total of seven hits. Chris Byrne
was the leading hitter with two
hits of her own.
The softballcrs had a rally in
the third inning, scoring five runs.
Laura Cro wder and Donna Weller
both sineled to start the inning.
Mickey Ford then doubled and
drove in a run. Leslie Cramer
walked while Wendy Tonker,
Chris Byrne, Kathy Schrage and
Mechelle Jones all had singles and
picked up RBIs.
Renee Meyers was the win-
ning pitcher boosting her record
to 4-2.
The 10-6 Lady Pirates will
travel to Fairfax Va. this weekend
to play in the George Mason tour-
nament.
Top pick wins Softball tournament
Mike Small pitches to an awaiting batter in the Corona Beer Preseason Softball Touranament
Renegades walked away with first place honors as they beat Sumphin Special 13-2.
(IRS) �The 1989 Corona Beer
Pre Season Softball Tournament
wasaction packed from the begin-
ning as 13 men's squads and three
ladies team took part in the an-
nual intramural softball season
opener. In the men's bracket, The
Renegades and Sumphin Special,
two well recognized teams from
the past were picked to take the
top honors. In the women's divi-
sion, three relatively unknown
squads took to the fields.
The Renegades struck hard at
their opponents defeating Fried
City, PIKA A and the Belk DPI to
find themselves facing bracket B
champion. Sumpthin Special de-
feated the Masterballers and Hit-
men but had quite a bottle in the
semi finals against Substation 11.
Sub II started the contest out strong
with singles from Scott Johnson
and R. Watts, however thev were
unable to get any points on the
scoreboard prior to the fourth
inningand found themselves play-
ing catch up. A runaway first
inning for Sumpthin Special put
them ahead 8-0. K Kennv, B. Whit-
more and M Wells lead the way
for S & S. SubStation II added
three more runs to their total in
the fifth and seventh innings to
give Sumpthin Special a special
scare but were unable to capital-
ize offensively at the plate in the
final inning. With a single run
batted in during the fourth inning,
Sumpthin Special headed to the
championship game against the
Renegades with a 9-8.
A balanced Renegade attack
at the plate proved to be too much
for Sumpthin Special who soon
found their final contest of tour-
nament 'Sumpthin from a night-
mare The Renegades scored two
in the fourth, four in the third, two
in the fifth, one in the sixth and
four in the seventh inning to de-
molish Sumpthin Special 13-2.
Thornton, Clark, Lowry and Gar-
rison topped the Renegade order
ai td provided the power surge past
Sumpthin Special who were able
to score single runs in the fourth
and sixth innings.
The women's bracket was not
contest for the Pump Mammas
who breezed past their double
elimination tournament defeating
the Martineers and Dream Team
The Pump Mammas held their
opponents to only two runs in
each contest while they managed
to power together into double
See SOFTBALL, page 15
Pirate9s Booty
The Blue Edwards All-American selection: Talent or politics?
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sporti Editor
The regular season is finished
for most college basketball teams,
so it's time to hand out the post-
season honors and awards. And
last week the Associated Press
presented its All-American team.
One deserving player was left off
the list of players honored.
East Carolina's Blue Edwards
was not named Ail-American. I
find this absolutely mind-bog-
gling. Here is a player who was
voted most valuable player in his
conference, who finished the sea-
son sixth in the nation in scoring
and who has turned some pro
scouts' heads and he is not voted
All-American.
Since I didn't know what the
requirements were to achieve All-
American status, I contacted AP
and questioned them. I found out
that a player only needed to be
voted for by two or three basket-
ball writers across the country.
Two or three votes! It's unbeliev-
able that a player of Edwards'
caliber could not get at least two
votes.
I also contacted Skip Foreman,
the North Carolina Sports Editor
for AP. He said North Carolina
had three votes for All-Americans.
The votes were distributed be-
tween three people. One of which
wrote for a daily newspaper, one
wrote for an evening newspaper
and one voter was a member of a
television or radio outlet.
The writers were to nominate
10 players and send their nomina-
tions to New York where the votes
were tabulated. This is the same
procedure used to compile the Top
Twenty basketball and football
polls.
Foreman said that his office
knew of Edwards and his accom-
plishments, but due to being in
the CAA and the location of the
conference it was hard for Ed-
wards to gain exposure. "Until
you get name recognition and do
something spectacular on a regu-
lar basis, it is very hard to get the
recognition needed to be nomi-
nated Foreman said.
This is all well and good, but
the CAA did have enough recog-
nition to get one of their players
placed on the AP All-American
team and that player was George
Mason senior Kenny Sanders.
Sanders was voted Honorable
Mention All-American. This was
a shock to me, because I saw each
player play numerous times and
on each ocassion Edwards' per-
formance was better than that of
Sanders. I'm not detracting from
Sanders' performance throughout
the season, but Edwards's statis-
tics and play this year were supe-
rior to that of Sanders.
According to those involved,
ECU'sSports Information Depart-
ment made a major push to get
Edwards the selection in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association and that
it was tight until the last minute.
From the games I saw this season,
there should have been no ques-
tion in anyone's mind who was
Player of the Year. The same goes
for Edwards' receiving a spot on
the All-American team.
It appears to me that the All-
American voting is done on a
political basis and is not truly
based on a player's performance.
To those of us who have written
about this year's Pirate basketball
team, it has become very evident
that the Virginia press has looked
down their noses at ECU from the
beginning. These people saw that
Edwards completely dominated
the league, but when it came time
to vote for All-American no one
even recognized his accomplish-
ments.
Being made All-American is
supposed to be reserved for the
best players in the country. Look-
ing at some of the selections this
season and examiningsome of the
players who weren't selected, it's
apparent that's no longer the case.
� I'm sure there are other athletes
and schools who feel they have
also been overlooked and I am
sure this is not the first year things
like this have happened. This time
it hit close to home and opened
my eyes to how unfair the process
is.
It is a shame that athletes who
deserve post-season honors don't
receive them because of what
school they attend or public opin
ion of that school. These honors
were created to award a player's
performance, not to show off tho
institutions they attend. When the
organizations which present these
awards realize that, these awards
will carry more significance with
the athletes and the fans.
ItistoolatetogetAPtochange
their minds about Blue Edwards,
but ECU and CAA fans alike know
that Ed wards deserved the award.
See EDWARDS, page 15
V





T
i
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 23, 1989 15
ECU loses hard hitter to State
sMl
By KENNETH MCKENNA
Staff Writer
The lacrosse team opened
their seasonSarurdayagainstN.C.
State and lost the hard hitting game
8-6. The beautiful weather brought
out lots of fans who were fortu-
nate to see a very competitive
game. In the fall the Pirates beat
the Wolf pack 12-5, but with poor
defense and an offense that
couldn't click, ECU lost this one
themselves.
A hot trick by freshman at-
t irlmon. lav Black and two goals
bv Captain Ken McKenna led the
Pirate scoring. Strong face-offs by
Kelly Hoyt and Drew Bourgue
gave East Carolina the ball but the
offense had trouble putting it in
the goal. A fourth quarter face-off,
turned into a fast break and a goal
for Bourque cutting the lead to
'two.Althc jh ECU controlled the
ball for the final three minutes and
shelled the goalie with shots, that
is as close as it would get.
Defensively the Pirates didn't
play as a team due to poor cover-
age and lack of sliding when a
man was beat, the Wolfpack was
able to outscore the Pirates. Vet-
eran defensemen John Mcaulev
played well and another veteran
Mark Henderson intimidated
State by putting them on their
back. Even though being injured
on a clear, goalkeeper James
Young had clutch saves to keep
the game close.
Although losing, ECU played
well for their first game, after
having two previous games
snowed out. The Pirates host UNC
Greensboro April 1, at 2 p.m. and
Davidson April 2, at 2 p.m. So if
you want to see the fastest game
on foot, come out and support
Pirate Lacrosse.
Rose's gambling under investigation
PLANT CITY, Fla. (AP) �
Pete Rose is being investigated by
major league baseball over "seri-
ous allegations" that, according to
a source, could result in a suspen-
sion for the Cincinnati Reds man-
ager.
Rose's gambling reportedly is
the subject of the investigation,
revealed Monday in a statement
bv Commissioner Peter Ueberroth
and Commissioner-elect A.
Partlett Giamatti.
"The office of the commis-
sioner, which was founded to
preserve the integrity of the game,
has for several months been con-
ducting a full inquiry into serious
allegations involving Mr. Pete
Rose the statement said.
The statement made no men-
tion of any possible action against
Rose, noting major league base-
ball's investigation isn't complete.
But a baseball source, who asked
not to be identified, said a suspen-
sion is a possibility.
John M. Dowd, a trial lawyer
with the Washington firm of
Heron, Burchette, Ruckert & Roth-
well, is leading the investigation
as special counsel to the commis-
sioner. Dowd, 47, headed a Justice
Department organized crime task
force from 1972 to 1978 and led
investigations of the FBI and of
former Pennsylvania Rep. Dan
Flood.
Dowd said Monday he has
been investigating Rose for about
a month. He said he didn't know
how much longer the inquiry will
last.
"It's dictated by the facts and
circumstances. I have no idea
Dowd said. He would not discuss
the nature of the investigation.
The statement from the com-
missioner's office said that when
the investigation is finished, "the
Ruggers first
Continued from page 14
minutes later. Charlotte scored
again shortly before the half. ECU
led bv four at the half
The second half opened with
Charlotte tying the game at 16-16.
Bob Eason answered with an im-
pressive 30 meter score Easonad-
ded the conversion, pushing
the score to 22-16.
John "Rockin Rubble"
Gr -enburg wasawarded the tour-
nament MVP. The victory moved
the Rugger's record to 5-0 on the
season. Next home match is Sat-
urday April 8th vs. Old Domin-
ion, the eighth ranked team on the
east coast.
IRS softball
Continued from page 14
figures. In the final contest, they
faced the Martineers. Cindy Tay-
lor and Lori Cowan scored for the
Martineers in the second and third
innings while several other team
members added base hits. But they
were the only bright spot on the
diamond. The Pump Mammas
first five batters scored in the tip
off inning lead by J. Williams who
crossed the plate three times in the
game. Wheeler, Turnbaugh, and
Porter stepped home twice each.
Final outcome: Martineers 2,
Pump Mammas 17.
No Edwards
Continued from page 14
His performance on the court and
his sportsmanship were exem-
plary and that's what college ath-
letics is all about.
Maybe years from now AP
and others will present their hon-
ors to those who truly deserve it,
but until then some athletes will
be overlooked. Unfortunately for
ECU and Blue Edwards, that
doesn't help this time.
commissioner will consider the
information presented and take
whatever action is warranted by
the facts
Rose and Reds general man-
ager Murray Cook declined com-
ment on the investigation.
Rose, normally outspoken,
answered all questions about the
investigation with "no comment
then apologized for being tight-
lipped.
"Sorry. I know you're just
trying to do your job Rose told
reporters in his office. "I appreci-
ate that.
"If something happens, when
it happens, I'll talk about it then
Asked whether he expects
something to happen, Rose said,
"No comment
Rose served a one-month
suspension last May for shoving
former umpire Dave Pallone over
a disputed call at first base. Gia-
matti, the National League presi-
dent, handed down the suspen-
sion and declined to rescind it
following a hearing with Rose in
New York. Rose contended the
one-month suspension was too
severe a penalty.
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I
16
TH2 EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH?-
!
ECU rowers take to the water
WASHINGTON, N.C.�The
first East Carolina University
rowing team in almost two dec-
ades ha- training on the
Pamlico River -� Washington for
three spring races.
This weekend on March 25 a
four-oared shell with coxswain
will be matched against novice
crews from Duke, UNCand Clem-
sen on Lake Michie north of Dur-
ham.
On April 1st the crew will
travel to Georgia for the Augusta
Invitational Regatta which is host
to college and university crews
throughout the southeast. At least
two dozen schools will bo repre-
sented.
The season will conclude in
Occoquan, Virginia at the George
Mason (University) Invitational
Regatte.
Rowing is a brand new sport
to all but two of the ECU partici-
pants. The crew uses the facilities
and equipment of the Pamlico
Rowing Club in Washington and
various club members are serving
as coaches.
it is hoped that the program
will be renewed again in the fall of
1989 and that the addition of a
second four-man boat will enable
both men and women from ECU
to compete in future races.
The missing link
New whistle may save instant replay
PALM DESERT. Calif. (AP)
�Tex Schramm, who has lobbied
for four years to keep his instant
replay dream alive, thinks he's
finally discovered what he calls
"the missing link" to retaining it
permanently.
An electronic whistle.
An electronic whistle that
reproduces an asterisk on vide-
otape when a whistle is blown.
An electronic whistle that
demonstrated to NFL owners
Monday that a disputed call that
may have decided the Houston-
Cleveland AFC wilr card game
was wrong on two counts.
The owners are expected to
vote either today or Wednesday
on keeping instant replay - per-
haps making it permanent. And,
as it has been for the past four
years, the 21 votes it needs from
the 28 teams is only a maybe.
Enter the whistle, which
places on the monitor of the re-
play official an asterisk at the exact
time it is blown. That allows the
replay official to know when the
play has ended and, in Scrhamm's
opinion, will eliminate long de-
lays that have plagued the sys-
tem.
"It takes away one of his op-
tions said Schramm, president
of the Dallas Cowboys and chair-
man of the league's competition
committee.
"Now he knows when the
whistle blew. It's very unsatisfy-
ing to have to sit and wait to know
when he blew the whistle
To demonstrate the system,
Schramm and Miami Coach Don
Shula showed a tape of the key
play in the Houston-Cleveland
game, which came with the Oilers
leading 14-9 in the third quarter.
Warren Moon dropped back to
pass, threw the ball backward to
running back Allen Pinkett, who
dropped it at his own five whore
Qeveland'sClayMatthewsrecov-
cred.
The replay showed the pass
was dearly a lateral, but after five
minutes of review at the game, it
was ruled that the whistle had
blown when theba" vasdropped
- by an official who believed the
pass was forward. The ex per i men-
tal whistle, in use at the game.
showed, however, that the whistle
didn't blow until after Matthews
had recovered.
So instead of Cleveland get
ting possession, Houston retained
it and went on to win 24-23.
"This was the missing link in
the whole system Schramm said.
"Now wecan unuequivocally say
what happened
Opponents, however, were-
n't satisfied.
"Change? Hah said George
Young, general manager of the
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 23, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 23, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.665
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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