Fountainhead, April 20, 1978






derving the campus com-
munity fa ever 50 years.
With a circulation of o.bfu.
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
Vol. No. 53, No. �K East Carolina University Greeny He, North Carolina
ON THE INSIDE
Jenkins honoredp. 3
Asian Symposiump. 5
Greek forum p. 6
Apartment modifyingp. 7
Dinner Theatrep. 9
Bucs bomb Topsp. 13
lot of hard work'
By A NNE THA RRING TON
Staff Writer
The REBEL, ECU'S literary
art magazine will be available to
studentsand faculty begining late
Friday afternoon, according to
editor Luke Whisnant.
"Interested persons can pick
up a copy at the REBEL office in
the publication building or in the
Mendenhall Student Center.
"By Saturday morning, stu-
dents should find copies on top of
the FOUNTAINHEAD boxes at
the library and in some of the
dorms Whisnant said.
The staff and contributors are
staging the First Annual REBEL
Heading Monday at 7 p.m. in the
Coffeehouse, room 201 in Men-
denhall.
The public is invited and
refreshments will be served.
"This is a chance for the
publictohear selected poetry and
short stories, read as the original
writer intended said Whisnant.
Participating writers indude
Allison Thompson, Jeff Rollins.
David Gerrard, Karen Brock,
Terry Davis, Dr. Peter Makuck,
Ray Harrell, Colleen Flynn, Kim
Murph, Whisnant, and others.
"We have not yet been billed,
but the printing cost should total
around $7,800, almost $200 less
than last year's total Whisnant t
said.
The printer, Theo. Davis &
Sons of Zebulon was recommen-
ded to the REBEL last year by the
art department, according to
Whisnant.
"We were happy with last
year's results so we decided to
contract them again this year
added Whisnant.
Whisnant said there was a
tremendous response from the
university community this year.
"Approximately 400 poems
and 25 to 30 short stories were
submitted fa consideration.
" That's a good response when
you can only use about seven
staies and 30 poems Whisnant
said.
He added that this year he
tried to make selections on the
basis of quality and readability.
jEmiNONOREDR. Leo Jenkins, who will
soon be retiring from his position as chancellor here,
received an appreciation award last Wednesday
"We tried to stay away from teaches poetry writing
pieces that were too obscure in
order to make the magazine mae
appealing to a larger number of
readers Whisnant added.
He feelsthe quality of writing
here has definitely improved over
the past year.
"I think that I can attribute
this (improvement) to the writing
program in the English depart-
ment, and especially to Terry
Davis and Dr. Peter Makuck
Davis teaches fiction and
non-fiction writing and Makuck
from the campus social fraternities and sororities in
recognition of his 31 years of service to ECU.
Last year's REBEL was selec-
ted fa the Associated Collegiate
Press All-American Award which
means it was one of the ten best
literary art magazines in the
United Sates, accading to
Whisnant.
"We have a lot to live up to.
We'll find out how this year's
REBEL stacks up in October. I'm
a little nervous about thfe
Whisnant admitted.
"But I'm not too waried. We
are the only campus literary art
magazine that has 20 pages of full
cola art-wak in the state
Whisnant said.
Only two and a half weeks
ago, the final set of carected
proofs was sent to the printer, the
culmination of nine months pre-
paration.
"It's been a la of hard wak,
but I think it's been wath it. Of
course I couldn't have made it
without Kay Parks, art director,
and Allison Thompson, associate
edita Whisnant said.
First Lady of the ECU community for nearly 20 years
Thurs
ECU News Bureau
A reception was given Thurs-
day evening to hona Mrs. Lillian
J. Jenkins who herself has been a
gracious and charming hostess
fa literally thousands of recep-
tions, dinners, luncheons and
aher social events in the ECU
Chancel la'shone.
Mrs. Jenkins is the wife of
retiring East CArolina University
Chancel la Leo W. Jenkins and
has been "First Lady" of the
ECU community fa nearly 20
years.
Thursday evening's reception
was staged in ha hena by
sevaal hundred wonen of the
tion, faculty and tfaff
It was a joint venture of all
women of the unviasity commun-
ity including present and retired
membas of the ECU administra-
tion.
UMBRELLAS OPEN UP all over campus to greet April showers.
A highlight was a presentation
to Mrs.Jenkins of a certificate of
naification of combined contribu-
tions of mae than $1,500 fa the
previously established Lillian J.
Jenkins Scholarhship Fund at
ECU, and introduction of two
students who will share in the
scholarship proceeds in 1978-79.
HONORED
The Lillian J. Jenkins Scholar-
ship Fund was named in ha
hona in 1975 and the presenta-
tioi was made with hope that this
expression of esteem would pro-
vide impetus fa furtha contribu-
tiais toward popetuation of the
Lillian J. Jenkins Scholarships.
Also, a plaque citing ha
"many years of friendship" was
included in the famal presenta-
tioi.
Mrs. Joikins, the former
Lillian Jacobsen of Lavalette,
N.J holds the B.S. degree from
Trenton State (N.J.) Teachas
College.
She came to Greenville with
ha husband when he became
Dean of the Univasity 31 years
ago. Dr. Jenkins has served as
president and chancella of ECU
since 1960.
In addition to ha duties as
wife of the chancella and motha
of six, Mrs. Joikins has been
active in numaous community
and civic affairs, in garden dubs
and litaary drdes, in ha church,
as a past Cub and Brownie Scout
leada, a chart member and first
president of the Aires Book Club
which lata became two dubs.
She assisted in famatioi of
Seira Book Club, Chi Omega, and
a helpa in all dvic adivities.
She is a frequent visita and
helpa at Greenville Villa Nursing
Hone.
I have neva been a jdno
says Mrs. Joikins, modestly.
But those honaing ha spoke
of "faithful and faceful" po-
famance and ha invdvement
"with loving and saving people
"My hobbies are gardening
and grandchildren she said.
One grandchild, in particular,
Yanna Person, occupies a great
deal of Mrs. Jenkins' time. Also
she makes use of a green house in
the rear of the chancella's
mansiai fa the growing and
arranging the flowos and plants.
The Thursday evening recep-
tion was held at the Van
Landingham Roan of the ECU
School of Home Economics on E.
Fifth STreet. Reception guests,
friends and admiros of the
honaee wre received by Mrs.
Jenkins.





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 ApriM978
Gamma Beta Economics
Cflday
Poetry reading Inter-Varsity
The First Annual Rebel Read-
ing will be this coming Monday
night at 7.00 in the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse.
Some of ECU's top writers,
including Terry Davis, Peter
Makuck, Jeff Rollins, and Allison
Thompson will be reading from
their poetry and fiction. Copies of
the 1978 issue of The Rebel will
also be available.
The reading is free and the
public is invited. That's Monday,
April 24 at 7O0 in room 15
Mendenhall.
Fellowship
Looking for Christian fellow-
ship? The Forever Generation
meets every Monday night in
Brewster C-304 at 9 p.m.
There will be good singing, a
relevant Bible study, and delic-
ious refreshment.
Speaking this week will be J.
Michael Bragg of the Peoples
Baptist Temple. Why not join us?
Writing jobs
Students who signed up for
English 4890, Writing Practicum,
for Fall Semester 1978 are
reminded to submit their applica-
tions to Dr. Brett by April 25.
Those who do not have
applications (with summer ad-
dresses) in by that date will not be
allowed to take the course for
credit. Applications may be hand
delivered to the English Office,
Austin 122.
Seminar
Frank Arey, a Chemistry
grad. student, will present a
seminar on April 28, at 2 p.m. in
room 201 Flanagan Building on
Analytical Methods for Measur-
ing F and Ca Ions in the Blue
Crab, Callinectes sapidus
Bowling
Lane rentals are available at
the Mendenhall Bowling Center
every Saturday from Noon until 6
p.m. It only costs $2.50 to rent a
lane for one hour.
Stop by and try it out; you
can't afford to miss it.
"Red Pin Bowling" is every
Sunday evening from 7 p.m. until
10 p.m. at the Bowling Center at
Mendenhall.
If you can make a strike when
the red pin is the head pin, you
win one free game
It's that simple.
Come over and try it out this
Sunday. It could be your lucky
day!
Inter-Varsity Christian Fel-
lowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m at the Afro-
American Cultural Center.
Robert Morgan
Senator Bob Morgan will
deliver a Law Day address on
Fri April 21 at 8 p.m. in the
Willis Building on First and
Reade Streets.
There will be a reception
immediately afterwards.
This is a joint presentation by
the ECU Law Society and the Pitt
County Bar Association.
The public is invited and
urged to attend.
Handball
ECU Team Handball Exhibit-
ion, Thurs April 20 at 8:30 p.m.
in Memorial Gym. A 25 cent
donation is requested to help fund
the team trip to national champ-
ionships in Long Island, New
York.
Jesse Helms
There will be an organization-
al meeting of the ECU Student
Leaders for Jesse Helms Thurs
April 20 at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Two films (one on Senator
Helms' general political beliefs
and one on national defense) will
be shown.
Refreshments will be served,
and all people interested in
working in the Helms campaign
are invited.
The SGA needs your help in
working on a new visitation
policy. If you have some good
ideas, goto your hall advisor and
give them a list of what you think
will be a better plan.
Be sure and do it betas April
21. We appreciate your help!
Comics dub
The ECU Comic Book Club,
the Nostalgia Newstand, and the
Roxy will sponsor a mini comic
book convention at the Roxy, 629
Albemarle Ave. on Sat April 22.
The convention will be free to
all and last from 10 a.m. to 5 D.m.
Anyone with comic books,
records, science fiction and fant-
asy items to sell or trade are
invited to set up booths free of
charge.
There will be an art show and
a costume contest. ,
For more information call the
Nostalgia Newstand at 758-6909.
The Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet on April 20 in the
Biology Bldg rm. 103.
The meeting will begin prom-
ptly at 7 p.m.
All members should plan to
attend this last meeting of the
year.
New members will be induct-
ed and new officers will be
installed at this meeting.
Family fun
'Family Fun Night' is Thurs-
day, April 20, at Mendenhall
from 6 p.m. til 10 p.m all
children accompanied by a parent
may bowl, play billiards or play
table tennis for Vi price.
Only one adult per group must
have an ECU ID or Mendenhall
Membership Card.
Each game of bowling will be
12 price for the children and
billiards and table tennis will be
Vz price for the entire family.
You can't beat the prices and
the kids will love it, so bring the
whole family and have some fun.
Crusade
Leadership Training Class,
sponsored by the Campus Cru-
sade for Christ, meets on Thurs-
days at 7 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
After a time of fellowship,
there is an opportunity to learn
more about how to love God and
love others.
The four classes offered are
Christian life, dynamics of dis-
cipleship, dynamics of ministry,
and life of Christ which is open to
those interested in investigating
ther person of Jesus Christ.
Fashion show
In memory of Ledonia Wright,
a fashion show entitled, "A
Weekend Affair of Fashions
will be held on Fri. April 21, at 8
p.m. at the West Greenville
Recreation Center.
This program will be held to
raise money for the Ledonia
Wright Memorial Scholarship
Fund.
The evening will be full of
delightful fashions with various
styles of attire ranging from
casual to formal wear.
Also, entertainment will be
provided by sororities and frat-
ernities-they all perform by
doing a short step, and music will
be supplied.
The scholarship will be given
to an incoming freshman student.
Tickets can be obtained from:
Shelia Bowe, Dr. Ensley, James
Green and Carolina Moss.
Tickets are $1.50 in advance
for students, and $2 for adults; at
the door: $2 for students and
$2.50 adults.
Make checks or money orders
payable to: the Ledonia Wright
Memorial Scholarship Fund.
Send to: ECU, Business
Office, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Attn: Mrs. Anne May.
Omiuom Delta Epsilon, Eco-
nomics Honor Society, will hold a
meeting ai Home Savings down-
town on Tuesday, April 25 at 7
p.m. New officers will be elected
and refreshments will be served.
All members are urgod to attend
our last meeting of the semester.
Gospel choir
The Student Union Minority
Arts Committee will present
Mary Streeter and the Interdom-
inational Gospel Choir,of Farm-
ville, on Sun April 23, at 6 p.m.
The program will be held in
Mendenhall Student Theatre and
there is no admission fee.
NCSL
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will meet to held
elections of new officers Thurs
April 20 at 4 p.m. in 248
Mendenhall.
All members are urged to
attend this important meeting.
Keg party
For those of you who did not
make it to the Phi Kappa Tau
"Spring Fling" last Friday, you
really missed a wild party.
And for those who did attend,
you sure won't want to miss it
next year at the Phi Tau house.
A total of 18 free kegs were
provided.
Congratulations go out to
Sammy Hicks, the winner of the
all expense paid beach weekend
for two.
A special thanks goes out for
those sponsors who made it all
possible.
Full Gospel
Are you tired of living a life of
temporary happiness, shallow
relationships, and phoney peace?
Then come and here testimon-
ies of fellow students who have
found real peace and joy through
a personal relationship with Jesus
Christ.
The Full Gospel Student Fel-
lowship irvites you to tonight's
meeting Apr. 20 in Mendenhall
221 from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
At this meeting we will be
sharing testimonies about what
Jesus Christ is doing in our lives,
sing songs of praise to Him, and
pray fa everyone's needs.
Gamma Theta
There will be a Gamma Theta
Upsilon meeting Wed April 26
at 11 a.m. in rm. C-205 of
Brewster.
The purpose of this meeting is
to elect newoffioersfor next year.
All members who will be return-
ing next year please attend.
Communication arts classes
will meet with visiting commer-
cial art alumni this Friday in
Jenkins Art building.
Visiting alumni are Debbie
Harlee, art director ol Integon
Corp Winston-Salem, N.C Tim
Gilland, graphic designer for
Sonderman Design, Charlotte,
N.C . Rich Gnendling, artist-m-
residence in Elizabethtown, Ky. ;
Harry Hartofelis, graphic design-
er for McKinney, Slver, &
Rockett, Raleigh, N.C; and
Michael Winslow, art director of
McKinney, Slver & Rockett,
Raleigh, N.C.
Alumni will talk to photo-
graphy, illustration, and graphic
design classes on the current job
market and possibilities in com-
munication arts.
A roundtable discussion will
be held at 11 a.m. in Room 1325,
Jenkins Art Building. The discus-
sion is open to the public.
A slide presentation will be
held in Jenkins Auditorium on
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. The public
is invited to attend the presenta-
tion which will include current
works by the alumni of their
companies and their own personal
art work.
Sponsored by the Visual Arts
Forum in conjunaton with the
SGA.
Luther Hodges
Volunteers needed to help
work with the Luther Hodges
campaign. Hodges, a democrat,
is running for the U.S. Senate. If
interested, call 758-4666.
Hypertension
The Theta Alpha Chapter of
Aplha Kappa Alpha Sorority will
conduct their annual Hypertens-
ion Clinic Sat April 22 at Harris'
Grocery Store from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m.
Blood pressure will be taken
and pamphlets will be distribut-
ed. Take advantage of this free,
healthy and helpful opportunity.
Homecoming
Would the Homecoming Court
or any one who could identify the
homecoming court please come
by the Buc office Mon April 25
after 6 p.m.
Free flight
The Greenville Flight Club
will sponsor a control line model
airplane contest on Sun. April 23.
The contest will beheld on the
field adjacent to the Allied Health
Building, located at he intersect-
ion of Hwy 264 ByPass and NC
43.
The event will include combat
flying (dogfighting) and racing.
Flyers from North Caijlina,
South Carolina and Virgina will
be competing fa trophies.
The contest will begin at noon
and last most of the afternoon.
The public is invited to attend.





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Jenkins honored, receives
$900 check and
By KAY WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
Dr. Leo W. Jenkins was
honored with an appreciation gift
by the Faculty Senate a their
meeting Tues April 18.
The meeting was held in
Mendenhall at 2:10 p.m.
Jenkins was presented with a
cashier's check for $900 to be
used on a trip of his and Mrs.
Jenkins' choice.
The Faculty Senate also pre-
sented Jenkins with luggage to be
used on the trip.
Dr. John Ellen, a former
chairperson of the Senate and a
professor in the history depart-
ment, lauded Dr. Jenkins' efforts
in promoting all phases of ECU,
the city of Greenville, an 1 eastern
North Carolina.
According to Ellen, the most
well-known cliche associated with
Dr. Jenkins is "What is Leo going
to undertake now?
Ellen also prasied Jenkins'
efforts in increasing the enrol-
lment, expanding the degree
programs, and promoting indust-
rial expansion.
Ellen expressed the feelings
of many of the Faculty Senate
members when he thanked Dr.
Jenkins for the 31 years he spent
sinoerely striving to make ECU a
major university.
Dr. Jenkins responded to Dr.
Ellen's remarks by thanking the
Faculty Senate fa their coopera-
tion with him during his 31 years
at ECU.
Jenkins also
ate that he will
Atlantic Beach.
told the Sen-
be moving to
Jenkins plans to wak with
Gov. James B. Hunt and also
plans to host a television prog-
ram.
Jenkins further states that he
does not plan to retire completely
fa a few years even though his
wife is strongly urging him too.
RAIN DIDN'T STOP this student from going to dass although it was tempting.
management
By KAREN BREAM
Staff Writer
The community arts manage-
ment students, under the direct-
ion of Amanda Loessin of the
drama faculty, are conducting a
fund drive on campus fa the
educational wing of the new N.C.
Museum of Art, Mon April 24.
The N.C. General Assembly
has appropriated $10 million fa
the museum, but an additiaial $6
millioi is needed fa the educa-
tional wing.
The proposed wing will house
galleries, wakshops, lecture
halls, a restaurant-cafeteria and
the Mary Duke Biddle Gallery fa
the Blind.
TheZ. Smith Reynolds Found-
ation of Winston-Salem has
pledged a $1.5 million challenge
grant.
The museum is counting on
Nath Carolinians to raise the
remaining $3.5 million and a
grass-roots appeal is being made
to all students in Nath Carolina
from kindergarden through col-
lege fa a ten-cent contribution.
Since thae are approximately
13,000 students here, the arts
management students hope to
raise $1,000 on Monday.
ECU students will have the
opportunity to contribute fron 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. at four campus
locations.
The arts management stud-
ents will have booths set up in
Mendenhall, on the Mall, at the
Croatan and in front of the
Student Suppiy Stae.
Each year nearly 25,001)
students visit the present mus-
eum, but there are more than one
millioi students in N.C. schools.
The ECU Law Society
And
The Pitt County Bar Association
Presents
Law Day Address
By
U.S. Senator Robert Morgan
Senator Morgan , A graduate of ECU, formerly chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees, and former N.C. Attorney General, will speak at
the Willis buildingon Reade St. down by the river) at 8:00 p.m.
on Friday, April21.
All students are invited j attend and meet Senator Morgan.
A reception will follow the lecture.





- H l m s
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 April 1978
Yes, Johnny needs
a foreign language
The study of foreign languages in the United
States has declined tremendously during the last
decade, but Americans have been forced recently to
realize how important the knowledge of foreign
languages is in today's society.
President Carter's trip to Europe several months
ago brought to light just how inferior American
citizens are when it comes to speaking a foreign
language fluently. Carter's interpreter, Steven
Seymour, had Carter saying that he had "abandoned
the United States" and had come to understand the
Polish people's "lusts" for the future.
A group of U.S. Congressmen, led by Illinois Rep.
Paul Simon, have protested that the U.S. is failing to
meet the obligations under the 1975 Helsinkin
agreement by not encouraging foreign studies.
The agreement called upon 35 nations to
"encourage the study of foreign languages and
civilizations as an important means of expanding
communication among peoples (Newsweek)
Carter has asked the U.S. Office of Education to
set up a national commission to examine the reasons
which have caused the decline of foreign studies.
An effort to improve curriculums by reinstating the
study of foreign languages and customs in U.S.
schools is long overdue. To assume that the
knowledge of a foreign language in today s world is
useless is not only absurd, but it's also egotistical.
Many students contend that they don't need to
study a foreign language in order to get a job. While
this may be true fa some, many jobs require people
who are able to speak other languages fluently. In
many cases, it is essential that businessmen,
lawyers, airline pilots, policemen, nurses and others
know how to speak other languages fluently.
Incredible though it may seem, the U.S. foreign
service no longer requires any foreign background
before one enters the service. State Department
officials have said that they were forced to drop the
requirement because so few Americans have studied
a foreign language. (The Honolulu Advertiser, Jan.
1978).
Americans have haughtily assumed that people
from other nations should learn to speak English
instead of Americans having to learn French,
German, Arabic, etc. What accounts for this
arrogance of so many American people? Is it the fact
that the U.S. is a superpower and is known by many
as the most powerful nation in the world? Possibly.
But Americans cannot be compared to a Frenchman,
for example, in the area of foreign languages.
The peoples of European nations are forced to
learn other languages because of their geographical
locations. It isn't unusual to meet an Italian who can
speak four or five European languages fluently.
Many Americans claim that they won't need to
learn a language, that they won't ever go to Europe.
Perhaps they haven't realized that Canada and
Mexico are not so far away. They may someday have
an opportunity to visit or even work in one of these
countries, in which case it would be essential to know
French and Spanish fluently.
Many people still believe that the U.S. is isolated
from Europe; they don't realize how wrong they are.
With the mass communications and international
transportation that we have today, the world is no
longer as large as once believed.
If the U.S. wants to continue to be considered a
great nation, then it must strive to improve
Americans' knowledge of foreign languages and
cultures. It has a long way to go to catch up with
Europe.
Forum
Reader responds to letter on WRQR
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
It seems fairly evident
from Clyde Thomas's letter to
FOUNTAINHEAD that he did not
research his topic adequately. He
oondemns the large anti-WRQR
faction that exists and advises
them to support an FM station at
ECU instead.
He obviously does not under-
stand what is involved when
you're contemplating a complete-
ly new station. A frequency
search must be done; there is
long and complicated legal man-
euvering with the FCC, and if
FCC approval is given, equip-
ment, transmitting, tests, etc
must be brought together.
Putting a new station on the
air these days can take years if
and when FCC approval is
gained.
Issue is taken with WRQR
because t is already on the air
and, up until May of 1977, was
famous for its sane, alternative
adult programming.
Due to the ownermanage-
ment unending desire to earn
more and more of the almighty
dollar, a switch in formats was
made.
They have tricked many hon-
est and unsuspecting area mer-
chants into believing WRQR is
now programming more accept-
able music and have many, many
more listeners than before.
The truth of the matter is they
have alienated so many former
and potential listeners because of
their cold, tastless and talentless
automated daytime program-
ming, and also because of Steve
Hardy's attempt to force his own
questionable personal tastes in
music upon the listeners.
Survey seem to indicate
WRQR is getting killed in the
ratings during the day but are at
near the top at night when
tasteful, live programming re-
turns to WRQR. I personally
don't know a single person that'
listens to daytime WRQR.
I support totally the idea of
an FM station at ECU. However,
trying to educate the general
public about WRQR and hoping
they in turn can pressure WRQR
to program in the public interest -
in a tasteful and adult manner - is
much more feasible at this point
than an effort to create a totally
new station.
Jim Blumenthal
Dept. wants accreditation
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
After researching the pos-
sibility of membership into
American Society of Interior
Design (ASID), we feel that much
action remains to be taken
towards curriculum change to
receive accreditation from this
society.
Things that have to be done to
qualify the Housing and Manage-
ment Department for member-
ship in ASID are curriculum
changes. This would include
bringing in more art oourses -
specifically rendering - including
accounting, merchandising, con-
sumer behavior, and economics.
The change would also delete
such courses as the basic home
economics core oourses. Only two
or three oourses outside one's
area of concentration would be
required in home eoonomics.
There is no way that this can
go any further without the
backing of you students in the
Department of Housing and Man-
agement concentrating in interior
deooration.
Debora Brewer
April 1 'review' upsets coed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Of all the NERVE No
wonder there was no one listed as
the author of that disgusting,
repulsive sacreligious piece of
junk in the April 1 edtion of
FOUNTAINHEAD. I'd be asham-
ed to admit it too!
I, along with many others, we
in disbelief that anyone would
dare to write something of that
oontext. Making jokes about
individualsand groups on campus
is one thing, but a critical review
about the Second Coming of
Jesus Christcome in now. Isn't
that going a bit oo far?!
I'm no so-caJlod "Jesus
Freak" and I don't attend church
every Sunday, but I know when
I've gone too far and I think I
know when to stop. I think the
suthor of that "Second Coining"
article needs a few lessons! It was
definitely done in POOR taste.
Pissed Off
LuLane Coates






�i
MOHHH
U.S. plays important
role in Asian issues
20 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 5
BvRICHYSMITJ-i
and GEORGE OLSEN
Staff Writers
The eleventh annual Asian
Symposium was presented Tues-
day in Brewster.
The theme for the symposium
was "Emerging Trends in Asia:
Implications fa U.S. Relations
Dr. Avatar Singh, coordinator
tor the Asian Studies Program
and a professor of sociology and
anthropology at ECU, opened the
all day affair with welcoming
remarks.
As Dr. Singh spoke on com-
munication, he introduced the
first speaker.
Sh. Ramesh Upadhayay,
senior program officer of the
Regional Bureau for Asia and
Pacific, United Nations, spoke on
"Soci-economic Trends in Asia
and the U.S
"Asia is a picture of wide
diversity he began.
It occupies a vast part of the
world Upadhayay continued.
Upadhayay expressed the sen-
timents of Asia in relation to the
United States.
Despair is expressed at things
that are not happening, he added.
There is much improvement
along the lines of public health
and the prevention of disease.
"The life span of Asians has
expanded from 44.6 years to 48.5
years Upadhayay stated.
"Emerging are highly trained
people he continued.
These Asian countries are
continuing this descent rate of
growth.
"But this is only one sid' of
the story Upadhayay stated.
The rate of unemployment is
also great in Asian countries.
There are present economic
demands and challenges in the
social economic development
realm, he continued.
The role of the United States
plays an important part in issues
that confront Asian oountries.
It takes western democracy
and values, to whip the problem
of the mass, Upadhahay said
Ui. Ralph Braioanti, dJan.es
B. Duke Professor of Political
Science, Duke University, follow-
ed with his topic on "Develop-
mental Issues in Pakistan and
India
Dr. Young-Dan I Song,
department of political science,
ECU, presided.
The afternoon session held
two distinguished speakers again
speaking on the trends in Asian
oountries.
Dr. W. Rasaputram, Embassy
of Sri Lanka, director to the
International Monetary Fund,
spoke on "Third World Econo-
mies: Implications for U.S. Rela-
tions
Widening influence and great-
er decision making power is
crucial if the Third World coun-
tries are to develolp, according to
Dr. W. Rasaputram.
Rasaputram said that the
underdeveloped Third World
nations are looking for co-opera-
tion with the developed nations,
not a confrontation.
Points in favor for the devel-
opment of the Third World are
several minerals, including baux-
ite and copper, according to
Rasaputram.
Development is hampered by
the youth of the majority of the
Third World's population, Rasa-
putram said.
Another problem, is the pop-
ulation growth of the underdevel-
oped nations, which isthreetimes
that of the developed nations.
However, the youth of the
Third World take a great interest
in developing their nation and
want a bigger share of the
decision making process, accord-
ing to Rasaputram.
Dr. Anthony J. Papalas,
department of history, ECU,
presided.
Dr. Wen-hui Tsai, Indiana
University, followed and conclu-
ded the afternoon with the topic
"Power Transformation in Tai-
wan Today
Professor Luis Acevz, depart-
ment of foreign languages and
literature, ECU presided.
The evening session of the
symposium was held at the
Woman's Club Building, Park-
view Drive, Greenville.
Dr. W. Rasaputram, Embassy
of Sri Lanka, again opened the
evening with the topic "Women
in Sri Lanka: Their Role in
Society
Elizabeth E. Savage, chair-
person of the International Affairs
Department, Greenville Woman's
CLub, presided.
Later in the evening an
International Talent Show was
presented including films on
Asia.
Dr. Ralph Birohard, depart-
ment of geography, ended the
evening with concluding remarks.
The Asian Studies Symposium
was sponsored by the office of
International Studies at ECU and
the Student Government Associa-
tion.
The Institute For Self Study presents lectures
from
"The Psycology of Man's Possible Evolution
First lecture is Mon. Apr. 24 in
room 136 of the Willis building at 7:30 p.m.
The public is invited, no admission.
SOME RAIN, A comfortable window ledge, and a book
I
OwUMJxpML
mOJAM RESTAURJUfT
$1.00 OFF
ANY PIZZA WITH COUPON
2713 E. 10111 STREET
Offers expires Apr! 27, 1978.
STOCK REDUCTION SALE
We are overstocked in our Ladies' sportswear and we are reducing prices to lower
our inventory. 30 off on our best selling styles of tops, blouses , and sportswear.
Misses collections in white, blue , and pink:
Blazer was $25.88 now $17.46
Slacks were $17.88 now $11.00
Shorts were $9.88 now $6.86
Vest was $10.88 now $746
Skirt was $14.88 now $9.86
Men's short sleeve dress shirts reg. $12.00 HOW $7.88 to $9.88
Good selection of tennis shorts $7.88 tennis shirt8 $6iJ8
Men's short sleeve western shirts $6.84 slightly irregular )
Blouses $&86to $10.86 were up to $14.88
Tops $�86to $5.86 were up to $10.88 �
Sundresses $7.46 were $12.88
Men's short sleeve golf shirts $7JJ8
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ENDS MON. APRD. 24TH
monfri. 10-9pm sat. 10-6pm





BH
Page6 FOUNTAINHEAD 20April 1978
Greek forum
ByRICKIGUARMIS
Co-Greek Public Relations
Christmas yes Christmas.
Let's think about Christmas for a
while.
Nowadays Christmas decora-
tions pop up Thanksgiving if not
before.
Preparations begin for din-
ners, get together, and parties.
All the planning that goes into
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
this holiday seems in vain though.
After weeks of planning the big
day comes only to slip away as
quickly as it got here.
And just like Christmas comes
and goes, so does Greek Week.
Fraternities and sororities
worked hard last week and fa the
past few weeks to make Greek
Week, 1978 a suocess.
And a success it was!
Greeks came together and
shared in competitions and good
times in a week that they will not
soon forget.
Participation is the key word
during Greek Week.
It's a week to take pride in
your group and your achieve-
ments.
Looking from a broader point
of view, Greek Week serves as a
week for taking pride not only in
your fraternity and sorority but
more important in the entire
Greek system and what being a
Greek at ECU stands for.
Sure, being a Greek stands fa
fun and partying, but there's a
deeper sense of impatance and
commitment in being a Greek.
Making lasting friendships,
serving the school and commun-
ity, and striving fa scholastic
achievement are also components
of being a Greek.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Sigma Sigma Sigma soror-
ity celebrated its Founder's Day
Tues April 18, fa all the sisters
and alumni.
The eightieth birthday of the
soraity was toasted with a dinner
and singing.
The Tri-Sigs will hold their
Spring Famal at the Ramada Inn,
Fri April 21, fran 8 a.m. to 1
p.m.
The Sigma Phi Epsilon frater-
nity is finishing up final plans fa
their Beach Weekend April 21,
22, and 23 at Atlantic Beach.
Sig Ep senia Taiy Burden is
presenting his senia art show
this week at NCNB downtown.
The Phi Tau fraternity is
happy to announce that the
Spring Fling was a suocess and
plan to make this an annual
event.
Sammy Hicks of Greenville
was the winner of the Beach
Weekend fa two given by the Phi
Taus.
Suzanne Lamm was recently
selected as the new Phi Kappa
Tau sweetheart.
The Phi Taus will be traveling
to Virginia Beach. A; .121-23 fa
their annual Beach V :�kend.
Art alum ni to discuss
commercial art field
ByJEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant NewsEdita
Alumni of the ECU School of
Art communications arts program
will meet with communication
arts classes here Friday to discuss
various aspects of the graphic
design field and the job market.
Visiting alumni are Debbie
Harlee, art directa of Integon
Cap Winstai-Salem; Tim
Gilland, graphic designer fa
Saiderman Design, Charlotte;
Rich Gnendling, artist-in-
residence in Elizabethtown, Ky
Harry Hartofelis, garphic design-
er fa McKinney, Stiver &
Rockett, Raleigh; and Michael
Winslow, art directa of
McKinney, Sliver & Rockett.
All of the visiting alumni
graduated from ECU with a BFA
in commercial art (CA) and have
been in their job fields fa a
period of two to six years.
Melody Harrison, s senia CA
maja and vice-president of bus-
iness affairs fa Design Associat-
es, a VAF-funded aganizatioi,
helped coadinate the event.
Harrison said that the alumni
will meet with different levels of
Dhotoaranhv illustration and
AAAKE PLANS TO ATTEND
" HONOR LEO JENKINS NIGHT
99
ON TUESDAY APRIL 25TH
LIVE DINNER MUSIC. 4:30-6:30 at JONES CAFETERIA
PRIME RIB of ROAST TOSSED SALAD
MENU: GREEN BEANS ALMONDINE ASSORTED ROLLS
BAKED POTATOE STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE
Free for Board Students
$3.65 for all other guests
graphic design classes Friday
morning and talk with them on a
level that they can understand
about the field of commercial art.
The alumni will each take a
different level of the classes and
talk to them about the current job
market and possibilities to give
them an idea of what it's really
like out there, said Harrison. ,
It also gives the students a
chance toget professional evalua-
tions of their wak she added.
A roundtable (question and
answer) session will be held in
Jenkins Art Building in Room
1325 at 11 a.m.
The public is invited to attend
and to participate in the session.
A slide presentation will be
held Saturday maning in Jenkins
auditaium at 930. The public is
invited to attend.
The slide show will feature a
six-projecta presentation by Tim
Gilland of an agency to get an
aocount.
Slides by Rich Gnendling will
show his wak with editaial
design and educatiaial TV as well
as sane of his own wak in fine
arts.
Griendling waked with educ-
atiaial TV with WAVE-TV in
Louisville, Kentucky, an NBC
affiliate.
Slides will also be shown by
Michael Winslow and Harry
Hartofelis of their agency's wak.
On Friday afternoon the alum-
ni will meet with CA serial and
aitique senia patfolois
Scott Brandt, a seniu t A
maja and president of Des�tr.
Associates, said that the perse lai
interviews and aitiqueswoulc be
very helpful.
"It gives us a chance to .et a
professional evaluation of a job
patfolois and an expenenoe vith
interviews Brandt said.
"The current update provided
by the aitique and the class
discussions with the alumni vtll
let us know where the jobs ae,
i. id how to get started, he
added





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Interior design students offer solution
2D April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
How to modify a standard five-room apartment
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The Problem: How to modify a
standard five-room apartment
into an attractive and comfortable
interior, without major alterations
and expenditure.
The Solution: Come and see
it, at 504 East Ninth Street,
Greenville.
Twelve interior design seniors
in the ECU School of Art are in
the process of revitalizing that
typical living spacethe two-bed-
room apartmentin an old uni-
versity owned house just off the
main campus.
Working from their own
designs, and on a limited budget,
the students have spent many
weeks on the project, wtvch is a
kind of "laboratory" requirement
for graduation in interior design.
"When people move into
apartments, they are not allowed
to make a lot of changes in their
walls or in the actual structure
explained student designer Sandy
Schlosser of Arendtsville, Pa.
"One of our goals in this
project is to help the public
realize that a good-looking space
can be established within these
restrictions without costing a
great deal
The completed project will be
open for viewing Sun April 23
from 2to6 p.m and during April
24-28, from 2 to 9 p.m.
Students will be on hand to
answer visitors' questions and
give advice on redecoration and
construction of inexpensive fur-
nishings and accessories.
Support for the project was
provided by several High Point
furniture merchants, the Student
Government Association and the
students themselves.
Materials and supplies, as
well as funds were donated by
Greenville area businesses.
The students' work on their
"apartment" did not begin until
they had sectioned off part of the
Job hunting book
proves valuable guide
ECU News Bureau
A unique magazine, The
Graduate, will be given free to all
ECU graduating seniors this
spring, compliments of the Alum-
ni Association and Wachovia.
The 120-page Handbook for
Leaving School includes informa-
tion on careers, job hunting and
life styles, as well as numerous
other articles designed to prepare
seniors for life after college.
"The Whole Job-Hunting
Handbook" provides a guide to
tools, advioe and inspiration for
launching a complete job-hunting
campaign. "Job Opportunities for
the Class of'78" report son hiring
trends and long-range job oppor-
tunities in a variety of career
areas.
A Woman's Guide to Getting
Started in the Business and
Professional World" will be of
interest to both men and women,
and "Graduate and Professional
SchoolAn Overview" explores
post-graduate education oppor-
tunities.
For future entrepreneurs, The
Graduate has three articles ' Be
Your Own Boss-The Dream vs.
the Reality of Being Self-Employ-
ed "Success by 30Profiles of
People Who Have Made It'
and "Why Would Anyone Go Into
(Gasp) Sales?"
Post-College life styles are
also examined with special fea-
tures such as "Values of the
Seventies a discussion of some
of the important commitments of
the under-30 generaton.
Other articles in The Graduate
are. "The Graduate's Guide to
Choosing a Place to Live and
Work After College "Ten Great
Graduation Trips "What Hap-
pens to Friendships after Col-
lege?" and "Your First Year Out:
What Will It Cost?"
Extra copies of The Graduate
are available at theAlumni Asod-
ation Office in the Mamie Jenkins
Alumni Building.
Located on
E. 10th Street,
2 doors down
from Kings
Sandwich .
phone
752-6680
Bill McDonald
"See me for car, home, life, health
and business insurance!9
Like a Rood neighbor.
State Farm is there
"r 0" el H'oc ng'or 'io s
original house to use as their
prototype five-room space. Any-
one who has seen the house after
previous annual interior design
projects will probably be bewil-
dered by the changes!
Past classes of interior design
students have turned the house
into several types of dwellings, a
suite of offices and even a
restaurant.
Work on the spring project
enables them to put into actual
practice the principles and con-
cepts learned in classroom study.
And sinoe they do all the
physical work involved, exoept
changes in plumbing and electri-
cal wiring, long hours of labor are
spent in buliding walls, installing
windows and doors, laying tile
and carpets, and painting before
the "fun" parts�choosing and
arranging furnishings and acces-
sories.
Having created a space which,
unfinished, closely resembles the
series of nondescript "cubes"
typical of the standard-two-bed-
room apartment, the students
have demonstrated how a good
measure of hard work and
ingenuity can make an apartment
exciting and original.
Most of the furnishings were
constructed by hand-seating and
made of scrap bits of wood.
Their imaginative color
choices in window and wall
coverings, carpets and upholstery
fabrics do much to relieve the
monotony of the space, which
consists of a living-dining com-
bination, kitchen wi;h pass-
through, bath and bedrooms.
ARMYNAVY STORE
Seeping bags, camping equip
ment, rainwear, Vietnam & corn
bat boots, dishes. Military sur
plus
1501 S. Evans Street
Save$18 on
this 10 speed
racer
Sale 71.99
Reg. 89.99. Men's or women's 26" 10-speed
racer Side pull caliper brakes, racing brakes
with extension lever brake system, Skylark
derailleur Ice blue finish with dark blue
saddle and tape
4,99
Men's athletic shorts in
easyare polycotton
with back pocket, v-leg
and three contrasting
stripes. Sizes S, M, L, XL.
This
eJCPenney
Pitt Plaza, Open 10AAA to 9:30 PAA







PageS F0UNTA1NHEAD 20 April 1978
.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available tor sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY, APRIL 22 AT AP IN
A
D
LOOK FOR THE ACTION PRICE SIGN - THROUGHOUT YOUR
A4P STORE When A&P buyers make a special purchase at a
lower price, we pass the savings on to you. That lower price is
an action price And these Action Prices are in addition to our
money-saving weekly specials.
? WISHBONE ITALIAN
DRESSING
te( LUCKS NAVY GREAT NORTMERI
? PINTO BEANS
1�OZ
STL
79
17 OZ $1 00
CANS
LIBBYS AwAl
VIENNA SAUSAGE 3 tf& $T
3 0Z $100
CANS
Vi 39c
$ POTTED MEAT 5
, HUNT S PLAIN WITH MEAT OR MUSHROOMS
? PRIMA SALSA "fig" "?? 59c
tejtt LONG GRAIN
$ COMET RICE
tej DULANY FROZEN TINY GREEN LIMAS OR
9 TINY GREEN PEAS
- SALUTO FROZEN
PARTY PIZZA
GENERAL MILLS CEREAL
CHEERIOS
16 07
PKG
89'
13oz $029
RKQ. O
15 OZ.
PKG
FAST ACTING
BUFFERIN TABLETS
3�CT
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$ NABISCO FIG NEWTONS 79
� DOG CHOW 25 & $477
CAT FOOO - ALL VARIETIES
WHISKER LICKINS 3 pVo. $100
Ta&pisadeu shop)
freshly made v�
POTATO SALAD lb.
sliced
BEEF BOLOGNA lb.
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BUCKET OF DELICIOUS
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TALMADGE FARM BRAND
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PORK CHOPS FRANKS
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LB.
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ITEM OFFCMO fOR SALE MOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS ANO WHOLESALERS
SULTANA
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JANE PARKER WHOLE WHEAT OR
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ANN RAOE OWNER
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GOOD THRU SAT. APRIL 17 AT AAP IN Glil�1lvllll!M0





BMBHMnBBBMH
��H
20 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
'Champagne Complex' is MSC Dinner Theatre
Ecdysisism: an uncontrollable
urge to cast off the outer
garments.
What would you do if you not
only knew, but were engaged to,
an ecdysisist? The very rich, very
proper Helms Fell Harper is in
exactly that position.
Whenever his fiancee Allyn
Macy drinks champagne, she is
ing for the role, Charlotte was the
only one who was sure she oould
remove her clothes on stage.
She won't undress complete-
ly, but even getting down to
"polkadot next-to-nothings" can
be quite difficult. Charlotte
makes quite an acting accomp-
lishment - changing from magaz-
ine researcher with an I.Q. of 143
Trends
seized with the unrestrainable
desire to take off her clothes.
Since Helms is the youngest
corporate vioe-president in the
United States, he feels he must
either find a cure for Allyn or
break the engagement. So begins
the next MSC Dinner Theatre.
Allyn, intelligent and attract-
ive, is quite willing to be cured,
but finds herself falling fa the
doctor. At forty, Dr. Bowen is
wordly and mature, always cool
and at ease - until he find's he's
beginning to return Allyn's
affection.
The doctor-patient-fiancee
triangle iscomplicated by the fact
that Helms is the doctor's nephew
and by the possibility that this
isn't love at all, but just transfer-
ence - projecting emotions onto
one's doctor.
DYING TO TAKE OFF HE Ft
CLOTHES
Allyn Macy is played by
Charlotte Cheatam, an. ECU
drama major. Of those audit ion-
toa silly drunk who can't keep her
clothes on.
Bob McCutcheon is a member
of the English faculty at ECU. He
hasappeared in other dinner
theatre productions, but this is
his first romantic role.
�BUMBLING BOOBY"
TO MACHO MALE
Bob obviously enjoys his
Helms Fell Harper role and plays
with great style the youngest
corporate vice-president in the
United States. Bob, like Charlot-
te, has to make some quick
changes in character.
He must be able to switch
from "bumbling booby as he
calls it, to the macho male.
While the other characters are
having continual emotional out-
bursts, Dr. Bowen, played by
Gene Hollar, remains absolutely
calm. Gene never raises his voice
above a conversational level.
He makes Dr. Bowen seem
above all the confusion and
turmoil the others experience.
CO-DIRECTOR WANDA Edwards supervises a scene from
Champagne Complex
The
His Dr. Bowen is the sophisticat-
ed, unruffled psychiatrist who
always remains objective - nearly
always.
Gene has never appeared in a
dinner theatre production, but
does have quite a bit ot
performance experience. He per-
forms three times a week as a
freshman composition instructor
TWO FORMER ECU
STUDENTS DIRECT THE
SHOW
Two former ECU students,
now ECU staff members, are
directing the show. They are
Dana Mills and Wanda Edwards.
Though both have extensive
theatre experienoe, including dir-
ecting, this is their first effort fa
the Mendenhall Student Center
Dinna Theatre productions.
CHICKEN MARENGO,
SCALLOPED POT A TOES
AND GREEN BEANS
Dinner patrons will be offered
sliced top round with haseradish
sauoe, Chicken Marengo, scal-
loped potatoes, green beans
panache, glazed carrrts, salad,
individual loaves of French bread,
and cherry cheesecake.
Coffee, ioed tea, and hot tea
are available during the meal and
at intermission. Serving will
begin at 630 p.m. and the play at
8 p.m except on Sunday, when
serving time is 430 p.m. and
curtain time is 6 p.m.
Public tickets are $8.50 each
and tickets fa ECU students are
$6.00 each. Tickets may be
reserved by phcne, but they must
be paid fa within 24 hours befae
the perfamance.
Refunds will not be given less
than 36 hours befae the perfam-
ance. All tickets must be pur-
chased at least 24 hours in
advance.
Only 100 places are available
fa each perfamance, so early
�W vat ton is advised.
Refreshingly contemporary approach to Shakespeare
Midsummer Night's Dream 'mystical, timeless9
By ANITA LANCASTER
Staff Writer
McGinnis Auditaium under-
went a magical transfamatioi
the night of April 18. The reason
fa this transfamatioi was A
Midsummer Night's Dream.
Innovative directing and sta-
ging techniques used by directa
Del Lewis, combined with
memaable pafamances by most
of the players, made this Shakes-
pearean oomedy well wath see-
ing.
The production of A Midsum-
mer Night's Dream was contem-
porary, to say the least. The
directa's goal was to emphasize
that the real wald (society) and
the fantasy wald (dreamland)
ojrrelate.
In the real wald, people must
succumb to the rules laid down by
society.
Fa example, in the play,
Hermia wants to marry Lysander,
but her father will not let her
because he wants her to marry
Demetrius.
When this case is brought to
King Thesus, he tells Hermia that
she must obey her father a die.
Those are the laws society has
made, so she must obey.
However, in the fantasy wald
situatiais change. When we
dream, we enter into a realm
where we can reloase our inner-
most inhibitionsand oontrol situa-
tions so that the outcome will be
favaable.
This emphasis oi the corela-
tioi between the fantasy wald
and the real wald is shown in
several ways.
First, there is the double-
casting of ThesusOberon and
HippdytaTitania-the king and
queen of the real wald and the
fantasy wald, respectively;
PhilostratePuck; and, the atten-
dantsfairies.
In ader to show the charctei s'
transition from the real wald to
the fantasy wald thae was just a
mere shedding of what looked to
be an outer costume and a change
in the charactas' movement.
In the real wald, these
attendants were very stiff in their
movement and wore an outa
ell of dothing. But as they
made the transition to the fantasy
wald, they shed their outer
clothing and thus shed the
inhibitions of their waking state
and allowed their true psyche to
emerge.
Another production-plus was
the seemingly inherent characta
movement. Nrt a moment passed
when there was no physical
movement on the stage.
One memaable scene gave us
a sleeping Titania in the fae-
ground; in the background, the
fairies are frenetic. When the four
lovers were sleeping, Puck, a
fairy, was swinging from a rope,
and so on. The physical move-
ment on the stage added greatly
to the rhythm of the play. Without
this oonstant gesticulation, the
audience would have lost much of
its intaest after the first five
minutes.
The stage and technicals also
added greatly to the overall
effectiveness of A Midsummer
Night's Dream. The set, designed
by Edward Hanes, was a non-
localized unit set. It did not
designate any particular time a
place. Instead, it aeated a
mystical, magical effect fa the
viewer to admire.
The unique combination of
music, lighting, and costumes
aided the viewer in seeing the
transfamatioi fron the wold of
reality to the wold of fantasy.
A trans! uscent backdrop
("back projection") was used to
change the "cola" of the soene
when the fantasy wold was to
appear.
At the same time, music,
which had a mystical tone, was
played.
The oostumes won by the
fairies were extraodinary. The
wearables were made of a silver
material and covered only the
gentilia.
With respect to almost all the
perfamances I have nothing but
supalatives. The "oaftsmen"
were superb. The group, consist-
ing of Christopher Kara-Eneff,
Steve Willifad, Paul Maltsby,
Join Denny Jeta, Kim Shipley,
and Butch White.provided a most
entertaining and maniacal comic
melange. Kara-Eneff s perfam-
ance was especially refined. He
managed to capture the essence
of the characta in voioe and
figure.
A memaable example of his
tour de faoe was the metamo-
phosis of his characta into an
ass; a nasty turn caused by one
of Puck's pranks.
The pafamanoe by Holly
Jaeme was also on the mark.
Her charactaization of the love-
sick, loveian Helena was beauti-
fully developed. The oombination
of ha vocal and physical ex-
pression aeated a haunting u-
niqueness about ha characta.
Sally Qodfelta' s pafamanos
as Hamia was equally well done
save fa ha ova-animated facial
expressions. She's hopelessly
melodramatic.
Denny Wright gives us a
middle-of-the-road rendition of
Puck. Denny looked like the
Cupid fugure he was to represent,
but he did no come off as being
the mischievous pranksta he was
to become. The enthusiasm of
Puck was somewhat lost in the
translation.
Sara Jo Baman, who played
HipploJytaTitania, was graceful
and poised. Ha stature was
commendable. Ha evay move
was replete with subtle physical
nuances. She possesses the
agility of a Baryshnikov.
Tony E. Medlin's highly "re-
presentative" intapretatioi of
Theseus was well-oonosived
he seldom gave the irnprc.
that he knew whae he was going
with the role. His argument with
Titania was as obscure in inten-
tion as it was complex.
But fo the big picture, A
Midsummer Nighfs Dream com-
bined the timeless quality inha-
ait in all of Shakespeare's woks,
with a refreshingly coitempoary
approach.
The play runs until this
Saturday, with curtain time being
815 p.m. nightly.
Admission to the production is
$2.50, with ECU students admit-
ted free oi the Student Activity
Card.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Playhouse Box Office,
757-6390, between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. through tomorow.





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 April 1978
Conflict of choices key to The Turning Point
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
At some time in our lives, all
of us are faced with making a
decision which will drastically
alter the course of the remainder
of our lives.
"The Turning Point" deals
with the importance of making
such choices, and accepting the
responsibility for the choices
which are made.
The dramatic conflict of the
film grows out of the frustration
felt by Shirley MacLaine, as
Deedee, who forsook her promis-
ing career as a prima ballerina in
order to marry and raise a family.
Returning to New York with
her daughter, who is now devel-
oping into a promising dancer,
Deedee is confronted by her old
friend Emma, played by Anne
ANNE BANCROFT
SHIRLEY MacLAINE
The First Annual Rebel Reading
PUBLIC INVITED
Karen Brock
Terry Davis
Colleen Flynn
David Gerrard
Ray Harrell
Robert Jones
featuring
Peter Makuck
Jeff Rollins
Allison Thompson
Luke WTiisnant
Doug White
Tim Wright
reading from their work
7:00 Monday, April 24
in the Coffeehouse, room 15 Mendenhall
Bancroft, who refused to give up
her dancing fa the security of
marriage.
Deedee, haunted by the ques-
tion of whether she oould have
equalled Emma as a dancer, had
she continued dancing, scon finds
that she is overoome by jealous
rage. The screen is electrically
charged as Deedee lets out the
accumulated "skeletons" of two
decades of self-doubt, as she
lambasts Emma for ruining her
dancing career.
Produoer-director Herbert
Ross doesn't let the plot's con-
flicts end there, however.
Deedee's daughter, played by
Leslie Browne in her film debut,
must face the same choice that
her mother was foroed to make a
generation ear I iera choice which
will have far-reaching effects on
her life.
For the sensitive artist, the
choice to pursue his art as a
career often means a lifetime of
segregation from society.
In order to truly develop to the
peak of artistic expression, the
artist must assume a lifestyle of
self-obsolescense.
Emma, as a prima ballerina,
performs for the pleasure of
TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX s "The Turning Point introduces
Mikhail Baryshnikov and Leslie Browne
thousands of art-starved patrons.
Yet her career will end soon,
leaving her too old to bear
children, too old to pursue any
career other than a dance instruc-
tor.
Deedee, on the other hand,
has raised a family, and has
known the satisfaction of a warm
family life.
Her life has only affected a
handful of people, compared to
Emma's, yet it has influenced
them deeply.
In the utopic societies
envisioned by Marx Engels,
Thorean, or Skinner, the indivi-
dual has no choioe of developing
into an artist (to the exclusion of
other responsibilities); in our
society, on the other hand, the
choioe fundamentally alters the
life of thousands.
The conflict of choices can
only be resolved through the
acceptance of responsibility. The
individual must know his own
goals, and act to achieve self-
realization.
As Emma remarks, "You
can't look backyou can't be
sorry
Animation hits its maturity in
Ralph BakshVs Fritz the Cat
"Wickedly funny, brilliantly
pointed and superbly executed
The animation is uni'ormly excel-
lent.
-Judith Crist,
NEW YORK MAGAZINE
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 11 KM to 10:00
Fri. Cr Sat. 11:00 to 11.00
Thursday Lunch and Dinner Special
No. 12 Chopped Sirloin Steak
with or without Mushroom Gravy
Texas Toast with Baked Potato and melted
butter or French Friesr
Ralph Bakshi's X-rated car-
toon Fritz the Cat will be shown
this Friday and Saturday night at
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre as this week's Student
Union Free Film.
HILARIOUS CHARACTERS
Fritz is joined in the hilarious
satirical action by cartoon animals
playing teenyboppers, hard hats,
hippies, Black Panthers and
revolutionaries.
It's that long-hair, poetry-
loving, white-haired, oollege
dropout cat and his action-packed
misadventures.
With sexy situations, salty
language and a realistic Manhat-
tan backdrop, Fritz the Cat proves
that animation has truly matured.
MAJOR CARTOON
BREAKTHROUGH
Of Fritz the Cat, THE
INDEPENDENT FILM JOURNAL
writes, "some of the most
beautiful, creative animation to
be seen in a long whilepointed-
ly and brilliantly funny and it
always remains beautiful to look
ata major breakthrough car-
toon
Admission to the film is by
ECU ID and Activity Cards for
students. Faculty and staff may
use their Mendenhall Student
Center Membership Cards.
MIDNIGHT
Tm
All for
$1.69

&

fy
ti
H

4fc
w
AN ADVENTURE IN EATING
TutsSat. 11:30 p.m1:30 a.m.
AII Subs for $1.00 with purchase off soft drink
(not valid on dolivorios) 752-1828
708 Evans St.
opon MonSat. at 11:00, Sun. 12:00





PPJ
20 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
11
'Donald DuckVPopoVSwar and Spike'
Comics-an entertaining way to learn history
By ROBERT L. JONES
Staff Writer
There is a mild-mannered
man in Greenville who is super-
enthusiastic about Comics,
Science Fiction. Fantasy, Fan-
zines, and Fandom.
He is Charles Lawrence,
president of the ECU Comic Book
Club, and owner of the Nostalgia
Newstand.
"I was interested in comics
sinoe I was little, even before I
could read Lawrenoe explains.
"I grew out of them for a while.
Then in 1970 I began serious
collecting
His personal favorites are the
Marvel and D.C. Super Heroes,
Donald Duck "Pogo
"Sugar and Spike Philip Jose
Farmer, and Richard Corben.
When asked if comics should
betaken seriously, Lawrence said
yes. "Although it's considered
throw away culture, you can study
how it reflects the past. You can
study the treatment of blacks, war
propaganda, and fashion styles.
Its a fun way to learn history
Other than providing learning
and pleasure benefits, comics
have social and artistic value.
Lawrenoe said, "It is a way of
doing something through read-
ing, something mentally, that you
cant do physically. Comic strip
panels were used as the basis for
the Pop Art of Roy Lichtenstein.
Painters such as Frazeta and
Kaluta are now being highly
acclaimed. In Europe comics and
fantasy art have even found a
place in the Louvre
"We're in a boom right now
said Lawrenoe. "TV shows and
Movies such as "Wonder Woman
and "Star Wars" have expanded
a popular audience. That is one
reason for the Mini-oonvention,
the dub, and the store
Larenoe opened the Nostalgia
Newstand three months ago with
the prodding of his business
-poetry
The poem which appeared in the April 11 edition of FOUNT AINHEAD
appears below in its ENTIRETY.
SELF-SATISFACTION
By Jim Bellows
A love affair is:
A relationship a man wi'l work on
For months to gain
A I a s t i n g unity
And in whi a woman can end in one ��t hour .
If the heart could have
Just one small assurance
That he excelled in one small act,
thought,
moment,
a touch;
That in her mind
Could not be surpassed
By any other person-THAT
Would be enough self-satisfaction
To ease some of the heart-ache
of losing.
Self-satisfaction is not a lot
But to someone who has lost
Their first-love; it is their only smile
In what seems a world of frowns.
Jim Bellows is a junior from Greensboro majoring in Education.
umvnicv�
The
i STUDENT UNION
5
presents
SYMBOL 8
Tues April 25
8 PM � On the Mall �
� In case of rain the
concert will be in WrightucL
�'r JBF mmt
ThARLES LAWRENCE, PRESIDENT of the ECU Comic BooH Club
partner, Mary Atkinson, owner of
The Book Trader.
"Charles is providing a ser-
vice you can't get anywhere east
of Charlotte said Atkinson.
In Greenville there is a sizable
student response to comics and
fantasy, according to Lawrence.
"Tolkein, Larry Niven,
Micahel Mooroock, Philip Jose
Farmer are popular authors
�Howard De Duck Spider
Man the Super Heroes, and
'Star Log' are popular maga-
zines Lawrenoe said.
When asked to explain fan-
dom, Lawrenoe said it's like an
addiction. "Once you're involved
you can't keep away from it.
"It's also a unique means of
communication. Whether you
buy, sell, o. trade, it's always
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
great to get to know people who
share similar interests
On Sat April 22, at theRoxy
the mini-convention will begin at
10 a.m.
Lawrenoe, and others who
share his enthusiasm, will be
there.
Charles Lawrenoe maiored in
history at ECU, and graduated in
1977. He is from Falkland N.C





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 April 1978
ECU Symphony presents annual spring concert
ECU News Bureau
Works by Bach, Beethoven,
Schubert, Barber and Stanvinsky
will appear on the program when
the ECU Symphony Orchestra
presents its spring concert,
Tues April 25, at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Under the baton of conductor
Robert Hause, the orchestra will
perform the Beethoven "Egmont
Overture Opus 84, Schubert s
ATTIC
3:30-7:00
FRI.
FREE FRIDAY
FROLIC FESTIVAL
BRICE STREET
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D.
759; Hause's orchestration of the
J.S. Bach Toccata in G Major,
BWV 916; and Igor Stanvinsky's
"Suite from 'the Firebird
The orchestra will accompany
soprano soloist Belinda Bryant in
her rendition of two arias from
Samuel Barber's "Vanessa
the Winter Come So
and "Do Not Utter a
"Must
Soon"
Word
Ms.
student
recent
Braynt, a graduate voioe
, is the winner of the
"oonoerto auditions" of
the ECU School of Music.
The "Egmont Overture" is
part of the incidental music
composed by Beethoven for
Goethe's drama about the life of
the Count of Egmont, which
celeb, ates the count as a symbol
of oourage in the struggle for
Netherlands freedom.
The overture's three parts
represent the essential character
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of the hero, the emotional cur-
rents of the drama and its final
triumph.
The Schubert Symphony No.
8, with its two movements,
"Allergo moderato" and "And-
ante oon moto is popularly
known as his "Unfinished and
is one of the most frequently
performed orchestral works.
In his orchestra of the Bach
Toccata, originally written for the
harpsichord, Robert Huse has
omitted the third part, a conclud-
ing fugue, but repeats the
opening "Allegro so that the
work remains tripartitie.
Hause began his adaptation
during the summer of 1977 and
oompleted it last December.
The oonoert concludes with
the "Firebird Suite which
features dance music from Strav-
insky's lengthy ballet.
In a 1974 performance, the
ECU Orchestra presented excer-
pts from "Petrouchka another
well-known Stanvinsky composit-
ion fa the dance theatre.
THE ECU SYMPHONY Orchestra will present its annual spring concert this Tuesday at 8.W. Robert
Hause will conduct the orchestra.
Stamp directs ECU Concert Band
JACK STAMP
By RENEE DIXON
Staff Writer
The ECU Concert Band will
perform in Wright Auditorium on
Sunday April 23 at 8:15 p.m.
The band is directed by Mr.
Jack Stamp, a graudaie assistant
in the ECU School of Music.
The program includes "Spec-
trum" for pre-recorded tape and
band, and two classics of band
literature, "Suite in F" by Gustav
Hoist, and "Incantation and
Dance" by John Barnes Chance.
A highlight of the oonoert will
be "Celebrations" fa Chaus
and Wind Ensemble by Vinoent
Persichetti.
The University Chaale and
Men's Glee Club will assist the
band oi this selection.
The program also features the
premiere ECU perfamanoe of
"Rondo Pequeno" written in
1956 by Dr. Otto Henry, a
professa in the ECU School of
Music.
The concert is free and cjen to
the public.
hJ
TONITE
s, THE EMBERS
BEST IN BEACH AND TOP 40
AT THE
?
FRI. � 3-7 END OF WEEK PARTY
SAT. FINAL WEEK OF REGULAR COMPETITION
IN SAT NITE FEVER DANCE�A�THON DONT MISS IT
SEMI�FINALS SAT APRIL 29th
FINALS SAT MAY 6,h
Sun. Ladies INite





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with
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will
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icent
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Pirates smack Maryland 9-7
eywoysrEWAflr
Staff Writer
Monday night at Harrington
Field, the East Carolina baseball
team held off several surges by
the Maryland Terrapins to win
their 21st game.
The game started off with
both sides being retired easily in
the first. The Pirates were ?ble to
still control the Terpsir, tlv opof
the second, but the Terps were
unable to hold off the Pirates any
longer.
Bobby Supel started the
inning off with a triple. Raymie
Styons followed with a long
sacrifice fly enabling Supel to
score. Maoon Moye and Robert
Brinkley then followed with two
walks. Eddie Gates then rapped a
single to score Moye. Billy Best,
the next man in the line up, was
then hit by a wild pitched ball to
load the bases up.
Pete Paradossi then received a
walk enabling Brinkley to take an
easy trot home scoring the third
and final run of the inning.
In the third, the Bucs were
again able to hold Maryland off
for the first half of the inning. In
the bottom half of the inning
Bobby Supel started the inning
off by blasting the ban over the
left field fenoe fa his seventh-
home run of the season. This gave
East Carolina a 4-0 lead early in
the game.
Maryland was able to score in
the top r4 the fourth when Billy
Owens sii lied to drive Mark
Poehlman &toss the plate to
make the score 4-1.
I he Terrapins put three hits
together in the fifth to score
another run to close within 4-2.
In the sixth, with the bases
loaded.M auire singled fa Mary-
land to drive Kerley and Jackson
in to kna the score at four all.
Oswald then soaed on a wild
pitch to put Maryland up by one.
In the baton half of the sixth
the Pirates refused to fold. With
one man on, Eddie Gates hit his
eighth home run of the year to put
the Bucs back in the lead. That
home run tied Eddie Gates with
Jim Snyder (1968) fa the most
home runs hit in one season. He
has twelve mae regular season
games to aeak the recad.
In the eighth Maryland was
again able to tie the scae when
Kerley homered with nobody on
base.
In the baton of the ninth with
the scae tied the Pirates were
able to put the game away.
Raymie Styons drove Butch Davis
in fa the winning run, to make
the final scae 7-6.
Pete Oonaty was the winning
pitcher raising his recad to 5-4.
Soott Venturelli was the losing
pitcho fa Maryland making his
recad 2-2.
The leading hitters fa the
Pirates were, Bobby Supel who
went 2-4 with a triple and a home
run, Raymie Styons who went 2-4
and drove in the winning run, and
Eddie Gates who went 2-5 with
one home run.
TOM DURFEE �CO-Athlete of the Week
LINDA MASON "CO-Athlete of the Week
FOUNTAINHEAD
Co-Athletes
of the week
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
This week, the "Athlete of the Week award goes to two very
deserving people, Linda Masai and Ton Durfee.
" Fo the first time this year, the award will be split between two
athletes. Not only is the award being split between two people, but it is
also between male and female athlete.
Linda Mason receives oo Athlete of the Week" fo her fine track
perfomances this past weekend at the Delaware State track
Invitational held in Delaware. Linda was the only girl to win fa East
Carolina and competed against many excellent teams.
�I was very pleased fo Linda this past weekend stated coach
Laurie Arrants "Linda ran very well and practiced very hard fa th.s
meet It was nice that she won
Aside from this past weekend, Linda has won three of the four
meets entered. Ho only loss came at the W. Va. f ��J
earlier this year. She has broken the school recad fo the 400 m
hurdles, which by the way, was her own recad set last year.
The sharer of Co Athlete of the Week is Tom Durfee.
As a senio, Ton has been playing tennis here at ECU all four
years From his freshmen to iunio years he was playing in the number
one position. Na until this y. r nashe been moved to the number two
slot. That move however, haK hindered Tom from playing his best
at all times.
Last week, Tom was the only member of the Pirate tennis team to
win against in-state rival N.C. State. He also proved instrumental in
Sports
20 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
Intramurals
by JOHN EVANS
Handball team
stages exhibitions
The East Carolina University Team Handball Club will put on an
exhibition on Thursday, April 20 at 830 p.m. in Memoial Gym.
The team is currently preparing to play in the National Team
Handball championships at Hofstra University in Long Island, New
Yak.
Sane members of the ECU Team Handball competitive team are
being considered fo invitatioisto try out fa the United States Olympic
team this summer.
The ECU team will be competing amoig 16 teams in the natioial
champioiships which will be held on May 4-6.
PLAYOFFSBEGIN
Playoffs in both men's and women s soft ball competition were
supposed to begin this week and rain has caused a great deal of havoc
with this week's schedule so far facing postponement of several
games.
As it is, though, the divisional finals and all-campus championships
are set to be played during the first part of next week.
This week's pre-tournament women's top ten showed few real
changes as most of the top team oontinued to win handily, especially
the top-ranked Tyler Going-Fa-Two team, which took 19-5 and 20-0
victoies. The second-ranked Tyler Clowns won 13-3 as bah teams
finished the regular season at 7-0. Tuf-E-Nuf won their last game, too,
to wind up at 6-0. The Oaten Bunnies, at 6-0, were the only Oher
unbeaten team.
This week's pre-tourney top ten:
1. Tyler's Going Fo Two
2. Tyler's Clowns
3. Tuf-E-Nuf
4. P. E. Majors
5. Ootten Bunnies
6. Alpha Phi 1
7. Hypertension Last Chanoe
8. Fletcher Soft-N-Pretty
9. Fleming Floozies
10. Alpha Xi Delta
In men's play, the standings pretty much stayea the same,
although the Umstead Orioles and Jones Jailers bah lost.
Marty was out-of-town this weekend and didn't give me his top ten
befae he left, so you'll just have to settle fo my pre-tourney top ten
1. Soott TimeOuts 6. Belk2nd Floo SSFarm
2. Lumber and Lightning 7. Belk Sensations
3 Phi Kappa Tau 8. Twin Baggers
4 Heartaeak Kids 9. Soott Pickups
5. Jones Bones 10. Phi Epsilon Kappa
VOLLEYBALL PLA YOFFSBEGIN
Co-Recreational Volleyball playoffstook place earlier this week, but
we didn't get the winners fa publication.
The teams finished undefeated during the regular season, the
Bumpers and the Ultimates.
They received first round byes fo the playoffs.
Other teams which made the playoffs were the Teke Sky Kings,
Thrown Together, Who Knows and Kappa Sigma.
MEANSJOHNS TAKE BADMINTON
In Badminton Mixed Doubles action, Larry Means teamed with
Josephine Johns fa the title. They defeated Richard Haugg and Donna
Daggs in the finals.
DELIGHT STILL REIGNSSUPREME
The Monkberry Moon Delight oontinued to dominate the action in
Co-Rec Innertube Wato Basketball play last week with a couple of
lopsided victoies.
The Delights sank the UnsinkaWes, 43-16, on Tuesday, then
defeated the Sammers on Thursday, 60-14.
The Catfish fell from the ranks of the unbeatens last week as they
came up a player short in each of their games & likewise, wound up on
the shot end of the scae. They lost 42-30 to the Waterbugs and 30-14
to Delta Sigma Phi.
In one of the most exciting games of the season so far, the Aqua
Kings topped the Splashers, 34-32.
what head ooach Randy
the win over St. Augustine's.
In the Sate match, Durfee played
Randolph called "his best game ever
Tom beat Tom Cspikay, one of the top ranked tennis players in the
country said Randolph. "I was very excited watching Tom in his
victay over Cspikay.
Holding an 11-5 recad, Tom has the best recad on the dub.
Mow as Tom and Linda start tc peak in their success as athletes,
they deserve the Co Athlete of the Week" award.





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 AprJI1978
Karate Club brings national attention to ECU
AL FIORE-LEADING point fighter in the Southeast ft nt kick as instructor MacDonald looks on.
KARATE CLUB GOES through drills before upcoming tournament.
ATTIC mm rcsTOAL week ATiTIC
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Phone m ordar (a p-up or delivery � Hwne 72-6130 521 CotenaheSt Georgetown Shoppee
INot valid on deliveries.
By GEORGEFRANKE
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
Although the ECU Karate
Club is not widely-known on
campus, its reputation has spread
throughout the nation as a result
of its continued success at
southeastern karate tournaments.
The club has not had a losing
season since its beginning in
1963. This past season the club
won tournaments in Charlotte,
Atlanta, and Columbia, earning
the East Coast Championship, the
Southeast Championship, and the
Southern States Championship.
The Karate Club is under the
IntramuraJs Dept which prov-
ides the funds for several tour-
naments each year. Competitors
are usually from the upper ranks
(green, brown, and black belts)
but some students start compet-
ing in their first year, as white
belts. Head Instructor Bill
McDonald, a Go-Dan, a fifth-
degree black belt, teaches the
advanced students. Many of
these students are on the compet-
ition team. Others enjoy being in
the club without competing. The
club operates as a team. Other
schools have commented on the
support the club gives to its
members at tournaments. This
teamwork pays off in victories: 14
members went to the Atlanta
Pro-Am in January, and came
back with 14 trophies, the most of
any club of any size there.
Sense, or instructor, Bill
McDonald gave praise to the
entire club fa its successes at
tournaments this year. However,
one member deserves special
recognition. Black belt Al Foire
won five first-place trophies in
fighting this year and, won the
South-East Karate ssociation
Competitor of the Year Award.
While the competitive aspect
of Karate is responsible for the
ECU Karate Club's national
recognition, there are other as-
pects that are just as important to
the karateist. The ECU Karate
Club Consitiution states that
martial arts will develop the
dedicated student in body, mind,
and spirit as well as providing
him or her with an effective
means of self-defense Many
people join the dub for the
physical fitness and confidence
karate can provide.
Several years ago beginning
female students on two occasions
were able to snare off an attacker
by simply knowing how to handle
themselves. Karate also helps
develop self-control. A student
once took karate here to work off
his aggressions, at the recom-
mendation of a psychologist. A
The philosophy of karate is
"based on the ancient Buddhist
belief that the ideal state of
existence is possible on earth by
right living, thinking, and believ-
ing; it promotes the idea that
mental strength is more impor-
tant than physical strength, even
in the art of self-defense
The benefits of karate are
available to anyone who will work
to gain them. New members are
welcome at the beginning of each
school year, and receive instruct-
ion twice a week from advanced
members of the dub. Over 360
people started taking karate at
ECU this school year.
Several students have started
here as white belts and graduates
as black belts. Some have even
gone on to teach Karate as a
career. Every year, a few people
enroll at ECU after talking with
Karate Club members at tourn-
aments. Karate can provide fin-
ancial benefits as well as physical
and spiritual benefits. Some ECU
graduates now teach Karate for a
living from knowledge gained
through this i 'ub - and a former
president of the Karate Club has
had art ides published in national
karate magazines
There will be a belt test for
students on April 27. Students
who pass will be able to take pride
in their accomplishment, because
the test calls fa much knowledge
and physical ability. On the 29th,
the dub will get together fa its
annual picnic. With luck, the dub
will be able to celebrate another
victay at the last tournament of
the school year, which will be in
Nafolk on April 23. With every-
body in spedal shape fa the belt
test the following week, the dub
should win quite a few trophies
and possibility add another
championship to its string.
Mr. McDonald gives spedal
thanks to Dr. Wayne Edwards
and Marty Martinez of the
Intramural Dept. fa their suppat
of the Karate Club. This suppat
has enabled the dub to attend
several tournaments this year,
bringing further national acdaim
to the dub and to ECU.
STUDENTS PRACTICE SELF-defense and self realization.





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m pH
������������H
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20 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pcqe 15
Late season batting surge paces Pirates, 21-13
April 1 is sometimes known as
April Fools' Day, and at the
conclusion of a doubleheader
against Old Dominion on that
recent Saturday, that is exactly
how the East Carolina baseball
team felt.
The Pirates had just dropped
hoth ends of a doubleheader to
the Monarchs, both by one run.
I ne twin bill loss gave ECU a five
game losing streak, and dipped
the season record to 10-11.
From that time forward,
though, East Carolina has be-
xxne i different team. Following
the tCU-ODU games, the Pirates
were batting a lowly .245 as a
team. Suddenly, the big bats
came alive. East Carolina has won
II of 13 contests since then,
including wins over nationally
ranked North Carolina, Virginia
Tech and South Carolina. In each
triumph, the Pirates' bats were
the difference. ECU scored 12
runs against the Tar Heels, nine
against the Hokies. and nine
against the Gamecocks. In fact,
before being stopped last week by
N.C. State in the first game of a
twin bill, ECU had scored 107
runs in the nine previous games,
collecting 122 hits in the process.
The team batting average has
jumped to a strong .290. The 1978
Pi rates have set school records for
most home runs (38 in 33 games),
runs scored (229), hits (319) and
RBI's (193). With 12 games
remaining to be played, the totals
will increase. Every regular in the
lineup has hit at least one home
run, and nine players have double
figure RBI totals.
All of this has second year
ECU head coach Monte Little
smiling broadly these days.
"I'm thrilled with the way
we're hitting the ball now he
said, "especially against the
stronger teams. We've played
some of the top teams in the
oountry, and have shown that we
can beat them.
"It's satisfying to see the
change that has come over this
team in the last couple of weeks
he continued. Our people are
beginning to play the kind of
baseball we knew they could all
along. They are playing relaxed,
and are having fun. They are fun
to coach and fun to watch
That last statement can be
backed up by East Carolina fans,
who are coming out in record
numbers to watch their team.
Harrington Field, the Pirates'
home park, seats 1500. When
Clemson came to town earlier in
the year, a crowd of close to 2000
was on hand. The East Carolina-
North Carolina game brought
around 2500 to the field. Against
the University of South Carolina,
another over-capacity crowd was
on hand.
"The support of our fans has
meant as much to our success as
anything Little stated. "With
them behind us, it is a pleasure to
play. It gives you something extra
to work fa
Classifieds
for rent Off)
FEMALE ROOMMATES: needed
May 12 thru summer and possibly
next year. Furnished 2 bdrm.
townhouse on SGA bus route. $58
mo plus '3 utilities. Call Lee
758-9721 or Mary 758-9802.
FEMALE ROOM MATES: needed
for a 3 bdrm. apt. at Eastbrook.
Call Cindy 752-8405.
TWO ROOMMATES: needed to
live in house on 9th St. fa the
summer. Located adjacent to
campus, behind library. $50
month plus utilities. 758-5151
anytime.
MATURE FEMALE: roommate
desired fa summer fa an apt. 3
blocks from campus, low rent,
unfurnished, and has two bdrms.
752-8336.
NEEDED: Male roommate fa
summer to share 2 bdrm. apt.
with AC and pool. Rent $62 mo
plus utilities. Call 752-2492.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: Fe-
male needed fa summer to share
rent and utilities fa 2 bdrm.
townhouse apt. on Willow St.
Close to campus, AC, 1 Vi baths.
Call Suzy a Card at 752-9972.
ROOMMATES WANTED. 1 a 2
people to share 2 bdrm. apt at
Langston Park Apts. fa summe
and a next year. Call David after
11 :30 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
fa summer at Greenway apts
rent is $58 plus utilities. Call
Carol after 5 p.m. 756-6273.
FOR SUBLET: 2 bdrm. apt. fa
summer. 758-0126 Tar River
Estates.
FEMALE ROOMMATES: Need-
ed fa a 3 bdrm. apt. at
Eastbrook. Call Cindy, 752-8405.
ROOM MATES WANTED :1 a 2
people to share 2 bdrm. apt. at
Langston Park Apts. fa summer
anda next year. Call David after
11:30 p.m.
NEEDED: Someone to sublease
apt. in summer. Private on ECU
Bus route. Close to campus. 45 ft
living room. Perfect fa Art
majas. Fenced in back yard. One
bdrm. $75 mo. Steve 758-6009
after 6 p.m.
FEMALE STUDENT: needs a
place to live this summer thru
next year. Prefer to have cheap
house a apt fairly close to
campus. Call 758-1361, ask fa
Mel. Leave number.
ONE OR TWO roommates need-
ed beginning in May fa summer
and next year at Kings Row Apt.
one mile from campus and on
SGA bus route. Call Burlon at
752-1929.
TO SUBLET: 2 bdrm. apt. at Tar
River Estates fa summer and
available fa next year. 752-3573.
ROOM FOR RENT: Private en-
trance. Located across from univ-
ersity. Call 758-2585.
What lies ahead in the re-
mainder of the season fa the
Pirates?
"We've got 12 games left on
the schedule said Little, "and
each one of them is as important
as the next. The kids know what it
takes to win now, so I' m confident
they'll do well. After that, we'll
just have to wait and see, but this
is an awfully exciting team.
We're definitely wath watch-
ing
1978 BASEBALL STATIST
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERS
Baseball naes:Here are some of
the recads broken a tied to
date
Most runs scored: ECU has
scaed 229 runs in 34 games. The
old record was 216 set last year.
Most triples: ECU has hit 15
to date, the old reoad being 12 in
1967.
Most home runs (team): ECU
has 38, the old reoad was 27 in
1968.
Most total bases (team): ECU
ICS OVERALL RECORD:
TTY
HITTING
has 500, aeaking the previous
mark of 461 set last year.
Most home runs (individual):
Eddie Gates has tied Jim Sny-
der's 1968 mark with eight.
Most triples (individual):
Bobby Supel has four, breaking
the reoad of three held by nine
ahers.
Most career runs scaed: Pete
Paradossi has scaed 76, surpas-
sing the reoad of 71 held
previously by Geoff Beast on
21-13
HOME: 16-3
ROAD: 4-9
NEUTRAL: 1-1
NAME G AB R H 2B
Butch Davis 27 95 25
Robert Brinkley 31 81 16
Billy Beat 34 119 23
Raymie Styona 33 106 8
Eddie Gatea 34 119 36
Pete Paradossi 34 126 27
Bobby Supel 34 112 33
Jerry Carraway 34 115 15
Macon Moye 26 72 7
Tim Hardison 22 45 12
Max Raynor 22 49 9
Mite Sage 15 31 6
Scott Layden 10 18 0
Larry Anderaon 3 5 2
Chip Giannettino 9 2 10
Tommy Warrick 4 7 1
Othera 2 0 0
Pitcher8 Fielding
32
26
36
32
36
33
30
29
15
16
15
7
6
2
1
2
0
7
3
3
3
5
2
3
3
3
1
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
3B HR TB
2 4 55
1 32
1 46
6 53
0
2
0
1
0
4
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
8 67
5
7
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
50
62
37
26
22
25
10
6
3
3
2
0
RBI
19
10
16
23
21
24
23
18
11
9
8
2
3
3
2
1
0
BB SO
7 8
6 12
13 5
11 12
35 21
21 6
25 26
12 12
5 8
2
12
7
1
0
1
0
0
5
5
9
2
1
1
1
0
AVC
.337
.321
.303
.302
.303
.262
.268
.252
.208
.356
.306
.226
.333
.400
.500
.286
.000
ECU TOTALS 34
0PP TOTALS 34
No longer on team
1102 229 319 37
1076 145 265 40
15 38 500 193 157 133 .290
3 15 356 120 96 27 .246
for sale
FOR SALE: A 4.3 cu. ft.
refrigerata. Great fa use in a
dam. 758-5794 after 530 p.m.
FOR SALE: L60-14 inch tires
mounted on Keystone rims. 36
miles on tirer No saatches on
rims. $150.00 752-9908.
FOR SALE: VW engine parts.
everything in good oond. 752-
9908.
FOR SALE: '77 Yamaha 360CC
street bike. 243 miles. Great
oond. Two helmets included.
$900.00 fa whole deal. 752-9908.
FOR SALE: 1 Michelin ZX radial
tire. Siza 18570 Sr14. Great oond.
Only 1200 miles on tire. $40.00
752-9908.
FOR SALE: Realistic 4 channel
8-track tape player, never been
used. Sells fa $73 will take $60.
Also Scalding Smasher tennis
racket, sells fa $42 will take $25
excellent cond. 4x6 wall tapestry
fa $25 Buck hunting knife with
case $15. Albums fa $3. 752-
6870.
FOR SALE: Sears elec. port,
typewriter Pica type. Excellent
cond. Like new. $80. 758-9322
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Mens 26" 3 speed
bike. Like new. Includes light
generata and lock and chain.
Carry bag and move. $45.00 Call
Chris at 758-6198.
FOR SALE: Realistic STA-65C
stereo AMFM receiver, 2 realist-
ic "optimus" 2-B air suspension
speakers, plus turntable, sells
new fa $400 plus, will deal at
$125. Call Steve early a late
758-8491.
FOR SALE : 70 Hoida CL-175 in
good cond. Only $250. Must sell
immediately 758-9200.
FOR SALE: Magnavox 8-track
AMFM stereo system in excel-
lent oond. $85 call 752-8676.
FOR SALE: Books from education
professional file. Low prices. Call
Jan 752-9633 a come by 712
Tyler.
FOR SALE: Handmade jewelry
fa guys and girls, turquoise,
tigereye, jade, ivay, oaal,
rrother of pearl, and more. Good
quality stuff. Call Jeff 752-5070.
FOR SALE: 69 Dodge Caoiet
slant six engine with standard
shift. Gun blue with white top.
Great economy. Call 758-7434.
FOR SALE: Sanyo 8-track 4
channel car tape player plus 2 air
suspension speakers with 20 oz.
magnets in good oond. A steal at
$45. Contact Wes at 758-3413.
YARD SALE: Sat. April 22 at
1406 Broad St. 752-0034. Stereo
equip camera, ciahes, books,
mag wheels, etc. Begins at 9 a.m.
FOR SALE: Double bed, book-
case, plant stand, 4 framed
pictures. Call a see at 200
Geagetown apts. 758-4395.
FOR SALE Stereo speaker. Heil
Tempest 2-way fa $150 pair. Also
Utah 3-way set.best offer. 752-
0034.
personal�
SPEEDO TYPIST: will type
thesis, manuscripts, term papers,
etc. Reasonable rates. Call after 6
p.m. 758-8241 Susan Cassidy
TYPING: Prompt, high quality
work at reasonable rates. 756-
7874.
lost
LOST AT MOSERS FARM : keys
left in red Budweiser cooler,
whoevery ga the cooler has the
keys. You can have the cooler
with my blessings but I have a
few one-of-a-kind keys on the
ring. It's just a 3-inch piece of
leather with about twelve keys on
it. Please leave at
FOUNTAINHEAD office. Reward
can be arranged. 752-5692.
LOST: A yellow gold aoss pencil
engraved ML. Dickens - has
sentimental value. Rev;ard. 758-
6277 after 5 p.m.
LOST: Sean Elec. slide rule
calculata in room 205 Physic
bldg. call 752-5636. Reward.





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 April 1978
noimtaiiieertng!
roNMMENTALSQF
�TtoUi'SSSitoeerEg aU about? 1 snouia
B just topn to te an aeWrfes
Yet anyone flK(S master it Simply study-
a
AV3
. �
.� �� �-�-� �-�.liT
. � �.����. v���!
Sdft
I
appropri- '3
-ately enough,
'starts by select-
, ing the correct site.
�� To do so, pick up
. a bottle of Busch
This is commonly
called heading for the
mountains.
SB
i'Sli
m
SsESfS
y, here's
,j where the fun be-
gins. Hold the mountain
' firmly in your left hand,
grasp the mountain
top with your right
hand and twist
the little fella off.
There you go.
"W
itf
3 Now for the
t tricky part.
Neophytes, listen
up: the proper pour
is straight down
the center of the
glass. Only in
this way will
the cold, invigo-
rating taste of
the mountain
come to a head
"X� mountaineer will te 1 you the onty�V SWallow of the
t CDitaSTtot, don't be Q
SSSS PfeKtopractice. Soon enough, havmgV(
StoolSS and filledur soul. you too will be a y JJ
mountaineer. jtN
a
t
Don't just reach for a beer.
BUSCH
Head for the mountains.





Title
Fountainhead, April 20, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.645
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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