Fountainhead, April 6, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 12 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE IN9DE
Ratp. 3
Terrorismp. 5
Brass reviewp. 6
Softball winsp. 10
Vol. No. 53, No. 45
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
6 April 1978
(Juss of 78 senior class gift
Scholarships offered
byDOUGWHIT,E
News Editor
Ten $250 scholarships are
being offered to full time ECU
students as this year's senior
class gift, according to Mark
Snyder, chairperson of the
Student Government Association
(SGA) Senio r3ifi Committee.
The oommittee will be made
up of not more than nine seniors
who will select the scholarship
recipients.
English
By MARTHA OAKLEY
Staff Writer
An ECU English professor
recently co-edited and published
a book fa business and technical
writers.
Applications are available in
the SGA office until 5 p.m. Fri
April 7.
REQUIREMENTS
Applicants must be (1) pre-
sently enrolled at ECU. (2) be a
full time student at ECU fall
semester 1978, (3) have excelled
academically, and (4) have prov-
ided outstanding service to the
university, according to Snyder.
"These scholarships are open
to any full time student whether
they are undergraduate a grad-
uate students Snyder said.
Snyder said the scholarships
will not be cash awards, but will
be sent to the Cashier's Office
and deducted from the student's
tuition.
"Scholarships are usually
based on need, but while most
people here may not be needy, fa
many, college tuition puts quite a
burden on their parents Snyder
said.
wi
"Hopefully, this scholarship
I help relieve that burden
The
THE RECENT WARM spell has enticed many students outdoors,
but some must mix homework with sunshine. Photo by Brian
Stotler
The text, "The Practical
Craft: Readings fa Business and
Technical Writers coitains es-
says oi business and technical
writing. The essays cone fron a
variety of sources.
Dr. Keats Sparrow said the
sources fa the essays include the
Harvard Business Review,
Readers Digest, and other well-
known and lesser-known books.
Sparrow and Donald H.
Cunningham of Maehead State
University, the junia edita,
together wrote introductions to
each of the essays.
Accading to Sparrow, the text
is designed to transcend class-
room writing and to aocomodate
non-student and experienced
writers.
Sparrow spent two years
preparing the book and was
halfway through when
Cunningham became involved.
Printing took up another two
years.
The text is being published by
the Houghton Mifflin Co. and is
now available in the ECU Student
TALENTED STUDENTS MAKE a sunny day all the
more enjoyable by jamming on the mall. Impromptu
concerts like this one will probably continue to
spring up around campus as long as the weather
holds.
'But the giris weren't interested'
Unescorted males 'just making time'
when caught trespassing in female dorm
ByJEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Edita
Two males were arrested fa
trespassing in a wonen' s dami-
tay this week aocading to
Francis Eddings, chief of campus
police .
Eddings said the two males
were seen unesoated in a
wonen's dam and repated to
polioe, who identified the men
and issued a warrant.
Eddings said that the two
males were identified as being
involved in a similar incident
about a year ago.
A warrant was issued and the
men arrested.
"The two black males were
involved in an incident about a
year ago and were banned from
the women's dams and the
campus said Eddings.
"Basically, they were just
making time, trying to get a
date said Eddings.
"But the girls weren't inter-
ested at all" he added.
Eddings saia that there had
been other incidents of unes-
oated males repated but said
campus security didn't arrive in
time to catch the men.
Supply Stae.
Sparrow said the preliminary
reports about the book have been
exciting.
This is Sparrow's first cook,
but he said he has signed
contracts fa future aies.
Sparrow has been teaching at
ECU since 1973.
He teaches "Writing fa Bus-
iness and Industry" at both the
undergraduate and graduate
levels.
Befae coming to ECU.
Sparrow taught at the University of
Kentucky.
Media Board selects
temporary chairman
By STUART MORGAN
News Edita
The Media Board oonsented
last night to having Dean James
H. Tucker serve as its temporary
chairman.
"There will be new members
joining the media board, and his
serving as temporary chairman
will allow the new members the
opportunity to get to know each
aher said Tommy J. Payne,
SGA President.
"And, it will prevent present
members from acquiring an edge
of experience over the members
who'll soon be joining the
board added Payne. "This way,
everyone who will be serving on
the board will have a fair chance
to oompete fa its several posi-
tions
Also, the board agreed to
purchase a new $4,108 dollar
headliner machine fa FOUN-
TAINHEAD.
To do so, the board had to
transfer $2,000 dollars from the
newspaper's salary budget and
$2,200 from its supply
budget to aeate a new equipment
budget of $4,200.
"FOUNTAINHEAD didn't
have an equipment budget said
Robert Swaim, advertising man
ager of FOUNTAINHEAD.
"Therefae, it was necessary fa
the board to aeate such a budget
in ader to purchase the new
headliner machine
"We've had several mechani-
cal failures with our machines this
year said Cindy Broome. edita
of FOUNTAINHEAD. "Fa
example, we couldn't print one
paper last semester due to the
developer machine breaking
down.
"The headliner machine is
giving us alot of trouble now, and
if we don't get another one soon, I
don't know whether the present
one will make it through the year
or not added Broome.
"The machines we have now
were used by aher newspapers
befae we bought them. They're
old, and we need new equipment
periodically she further added.
In addition, the board decided
to examine the budgets of FOUN-
TAINHEAD,EBONY HERALD,
BUCCANEER, REBEL, and
WECU.
On April 18, it will also tour
their offioes to examine their
equipment and view operations.
Next Friday, the board will
elect a new day representative.
The filing date fa that position
has ended





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
BUG
Pinball
Walk
Photo jobs Rebel checks
There will be several positions
open for the 1978-79 school year
as campus photographer. Any
interested ECU student may
come by the FOUNTAINHEAD
office between 9 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. weekdays to obtain an
application for screening.
Be prepared to list previous
work experience and photogra-
phic knowledge. Also, small
portfolio, (preferably black and
white, although color will be
accepted), must be submitted.
The portfolio is not necessary
until after the applicant has been
contacted for an interview.
The SGA needs your help in
working on a new visitation
policy. If you have some good
ideas, goto your hall advisor and
g-ve them a list of what you think
will be a better plan.
Be sure and do it before April
21. We appreciate your help!
Peace corps
The Peace Corps is not fa
everyone. It's demanding, but it
could be the toughest job you will
ever love.
We would like you to think
about it so you can deacfejf-ite fa
you.
I f you are interested in finding
out mae about the Peace Caps
opportunities, phaie (757-6586)
a visit our office in room 425
Flanagan Bldg.
Life
Tired of the hum-drum dam
life? Got the uptown same thing
blues? Dr. Artie Hansen from
N.C. State puts life into religion
tonight at 730 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall.
Coffeehouse
This weekend, the Student
Union Coffeehouse Committee
will present what is probably our
finest act of the year: Sally
Spring, Thursday and Friday
night, at 9 and 10 p.m in rcom
15, Mendenhall.
A native of Goldsbao, she
now lives in Winston-Salem. She
has appeared in the Coffeehouse
fa the past two years to
enthralled audiences.
Copies of her latest album
BIRD will be available.
Sally writes and sings some of
the most tender and introspective
songs you're likely to hear on this
a any aher campus.
Doit miss this excpetional
perfamer
Fa the token sum of fifty
cents, you can enjoy the inimit-
able Sally Spring, plus all the
snacks you want a need.
The following people have
checks in the Rebel office: Tim
Wright, Roxanne Reep, Tony
Eder, John Quinn, John Maris,
and Daethea Finlay.
Phi Sigma
Tau chapter of Phi Sigma
national hona fraternity is spon-
saing an exhibit in the lobby of
Joyner Library displaying the
many awards and recognitions
Phi Sigma Pi received over the
years, plus some of the histay of
the fraternity, the oldest fraternal
aganization of campus
Phi Eta Sigma
Initiates into Phi Eta Sigma,
Freshman Hona Society, are
reminded that the initiaiton cer-
emony will take place on Thurs
April 13, in the multipurpose
room of Mendenhall, beginning
at 7:30 p.m.
Dress should be casual but
neat. Male students should wear
coats (tie optional). Any questions
should be directed to Dr. John D.
Ebbs (214 Austin).
Nag's Head
There will be a Christian
Coffeehouse at Nag's Head this
summer.
All interested in finding out
mae about it come to a meeting
Tues April 11 at 8 p.m. in room
221 Mendenhall a contact Karen
King (752-8023) a Matt Garrett
(752-5480).
Bowling
Every Friday fron 2 p.m. until
5 p.m. is Happy Hour at the
Bowling Center in Mendenhall.
Prices are one-third off so come
over and take advantage of the
great savings.
INDT
The INDT Club issponsaing i
Pig Pickin' on Sat April 8, at 5
p.m. at the Pitt County Wildlife
Club. Tickets are $2 and can be
purchased from any dub member
a at the gate.
Fencing
The Fencing Club is having an
aganizatioial meeting Mai
April 10.
It is impatant that all these
interested attend. We will be
discussing business and setting
up new meeting dates.
We will meet at 730 p.m. in
the dancing rcom at the bottom of
Memaial Gym. All new comers
are welcome.
Any aganizatioi that does na
have a picture and an inamatiai
sheet into the BUCCANEER
office by Tues April 11, will not
appear in the 1977-78
BUCCANEER. If you have had
your picture made, please cone
to the BUCCANEER office any
Tuesday a Thursday afternoon
and identify the members in your
picture. We must have this
infamatioi fa the yearbook, too.
Real estate
The Pho Epsilon Real Estate
fraternity, in cooperation with the
Nath Carolina Association of
realtas and the Nath Carolina
Real Estate Educational Founda-
tion, will sponsa its third annual
symposium on April 12 in Men-
denhall Student Center.
The program will begin at 9
a.m. and conclude at 4 p.m.
The topics to be covered
include Residential Brokerage,
Property Management, Matgage
Banking, Residential Land Deve-
lopment, Commercial Brokerage,
and Real Property Valuation.
The purpose of this program is
two-fold: First, to give the
student some insight into the
oppatunities open to them in
real estate specialties; second, fa
those realtas having openings in
their firms to offer such positions
to graduating students of interest
to them.
Several real estate firms have
expressed an interest in hiring
ECU graduates. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
Dinner
The International Student As-
sociation is holding a fund raising
dinner Mon April 10, fron 4.30 -
8 p.m. at the Internatioial House
309 East 9th St. Greenville.
Tickets are $3 and can be
obtained by calling 752-5355.
Elbo
Social time at the Elbo Room,
April 12, from 830 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Doa prizes, contests, and
mae fa just 50 cents admission.
Crusade
Leadership Training Class,
sponsaed by Campus Crusade
fa Christ, meets ai Thurs. at 7
p.m. in Brewster C-103.
After a time of fellowship,
there is an opportunity to learn
mae about how to love God and
love others. The four classes
offered are Christian life, dyn-
amics of disapleship, dynamics of
ministry, and life of Christ which
is open to those interested in
investigating the person of Jesus
Christ.
Who's the ECU "Pinball
Wizard?"
Mendenhall would like to
know. So, to find out who's
campus champ, a Spring Pinball
Tournament sponsaed by Men-
denhall will be held Monday
through Thursday, from 9 a.m.
until 11 p.m April 3 through
April 20.
There are 13 chances to win
with the Grand Prize going to the
person who accumulates the most
high soaes fa the tournament.
The first place winner will
choose from prizes wath $25
each - a Happy Stae gift
certificate, dinner fa two at the
King & Queen, a billiards cue
stick with case, a a Brody's gift
certificate, plus the ECU Pinball
Championship Trophy.
Fa second prize, T-shirts will
be awarded to the twelve indiv-
idual winners.
If you're into pinball, get on
over to Mendenhall fa the Spring
Pinball Tournament.
You may be the ECU "Pinball
Wizard
Tournament rules are avail-
able at the billiards center in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Pho Epsilon
The Pho Epsilon Real Estate
fraternity will meet on Thurs
April 6, in room 221 Mendenhall
at 4 p.m.
The symposium is April 12,
and it will be planned at this
meeting. New officers will be
nominated.
Seniors
ATTENTION: Second Semester
Graduates.
Undergraduate caps and
gowns are on ader.
Delivery date fa caps and
gowns is April 4, 5, and 6 at the
Student Supply Stae.
Graduate caps and gowns will
be delivered April 4, 5, 6, at the
Student Supply Stae.
These Keepsake gowns are
your to keep providing the $10
graduation fee has been paid.
Fa those receiving the
Masters Degree the $10 fee pays
fa your cap and gown, but there
is an extra fee of $7.95 fa your
hood. Any quest ions pertaining to
caps and gowns should be
referred to the Students Supply
Stae, Wright Building.
Fellowship
Looking fa Christian fellow-
ship?
The Fa ever Generatiai will
meet Maiday night fa Christian
fellowship and fun.
We'll be having a relevant
Bible study, good singing, and
delicious refreshments.
Jim Zimmer, a prospective
missionary to Japan, will speak.
That's Monday night, April
10, at 9 p.m. in Brewster C-304.
Why not join us?
Can Vou walk 20 kilometers
(12V? miles?).
Well the ECU Hunger Coal-
ition invites you totry on April 22.
The fun starts at Green
Springs Park at 7:45 A.M.
check-in, then a pleasant walk
through Greenville. The money
that is raised will help fund the
Campus Ministers Kitchen Aid
Drive as well as a Caribbean
self-help food program.
Free lunch is provided at the
BSU after the walk. So start
looking fa sponsas to suppat
you perkilometer a help out by
sponsaing another walker. Visit
our sign carrier outside the
Student Supply Stae fa mae
info a call 752-4646. Please "put
a little heart in your soul
Thanks.
Inter-varsity
Inter-Varsity Christian Fel-
lowship will meet this Sunday
night, at 8 p.m. at the Afro-
American Cultural Center.
SOULS
Our weekly S.O.U.L.S. meet-
ing will be on Thurs April 6 at 7
p.m. at the AACC. Please be
prompt.
Outing
The Outing Club meets Thurs-
day evenings in Memaial Gym at
7:30 p.m.
Anyoie interested on plan-
ning, leading, and a participat-
ing in outdoa trips is encouraged
to attend.
Extravaganza
The first Annual Spring Extra-
vaganza is being held in Green-
ville Wednesday through Satur-
day this week.
This four day sale sponsaed
by the Merchants Committee of
the Greenville Area Chamber of
Commerce, is the second of four
city-wide promotions sponsaed
by the committee this year.
Accading to John Shannon-
house and Bill Fuqua, co-
chairman of the Merchants Com-
mittee of the Chamber, all
merchants who are members of
the Greenville Area Chamber of
Commerce will be offering special
bargains and encouraging shop-
pers to dress up, fix up, and dean
up to celebrate the beginning of
Spring.
The maja shopping areas in
which merchants will be partici-
pating in the Spring Extravagan-
za are as follows: Pitt Plaza,
Downtown Merchants, Nichols
Area Merchants, Arlington Bou-
levard Merchants, Greenville
Square Merchants, and West End
Shopping Center Merchants.
Shoppers can readily locate
part id pat ing merchants by look-
ing fa the official Spring Extra-
vaganza posters displayed in the
merchants' windows.





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Psychology experiment involves operant conditioning
6 April 1978 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Laboratory rat learns to paint
Ome Oh VAN Gogh" the rat's original finger paintings.
A Put. . MR
A rhe Advertising Council "��!
Coux�
We make
By A RAH V ENABLE
Staff Writer
A laboratory rat in the psych-
ology department is learning to
fingerpaint by means of operant
conditioning.
The rat's name is Van Gogh
and his teacher is Jenny Miller, a
psychology graduate student.
Miller is experimenting with
the art as a project for Dr.
Tacker's Contingency Manage-
ment dass.
Miller said her first task was
to get the rat to press the bar for
food.
The rat receives a pellet of
food for each correct response.
The second task for Miller was
to get the rat to stick his paws in
the paint. Everytime he did, he
was rewarded with a pellet.
The final and most difficult
task was to make the rat stick his
a little
go a long
way.
Give.
Red Cross
is counting
on you.
J
Tonite is Concert Nite with
HIGH ft MIGHTY
at the
eeso Bear
Don't Miss Em.
Fri. 3-7 End of Week Party
Sat. - Sat Nite Fever
(Only 3 weeks left before finals!)
Sun. - Ladies Nite
Students come to the
SPRING
EXTRAVAGANZA
in Greenville April 5-8
Special Spring Bargains Will Be
Featured By Merchants Throughout
The City Of Greenville !
w
e�
3V
cv
Major Shopping Areas Participating :
. Pitt Plaza Merchants
. Downtown Merchants
. Nichols Area Merchants
. Arlington Boulevard Merchants
. Greenville Square Merchants
. West Knd Merchants
VV
VV
Sponsored By The Merchants Committee
Greenville Area Chamber Of Commerce
I
paws on the paper after sticking
them in the paint. He has to stand
on his hind legs to do so.
The rat is put in a cage. A
sheet of white cardboard is placed
on one side of the cage. The paint
is placed in a jar lid and taped to
prevent the rat from turning it
over.
Behavior Modification is be-
ing used on Van Gogh. He is
being reinforced with food pellets
to get him to behave a certain
way.
Van Gogh learns to associate a
dick with the food he is given.
The click and the food are
used to strengthen responses.
The projects are scheduled for
six weeks. This is the fifth vr�k
Each student in Dr. Tacker's
dass must do a project. Some
students are using children in
their projects, teaching them
multiplication tables and other
things. Tacker said it's the same
prindple.
If a student has no access to a
child, Tacker said, then a lower
organism, such as a rat, must be
used.
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
'Obscene' material
merits protection
Much controversy has arisen during the last year
concerning pornography and whether it warrants
protection of the First Amendment.
Many people consider Penthouse and Hustler
magazines "obscene Some want to see these
publications cease to be printed.
The people who dislike magazines such as those
mentioned above should ask themselves what
obscene" really means. The U.S. Supreme Court
cannot define "obscene Actually, the definition
should depend upon the individual's own interpreta-
tion of the word and his own likes and dislikes of
various material.
A painting, for example, may be obscene to one
person and art to another. The same thing goes for a
story or a photograph.
Hustler publishe Larry Flynt has been under fire
concerning the material which is printed in Hustler
each month. The question has been asked whether he
should be allowed to print such material and whether
this "obscene" material is protected by the First
Amendment.
The First Amendment states: "Congress shall
make no lawabridging the freedomof the
press If this amendment is to be interpreted
literally, then the government has no right to demand
the cessation of a publication, even if it is offensive to
a group of people.
Perhaps these people have not realized one
thing�they have the freedom of choice not to buy.
No one is forcing any individual to buy a magazine
just because it is there. Besides, some people
apparently enjoy these magazines, otherwise they
would have gone out of business long before now.
Perhaps these magazines should be placed in an
area where children will not have access to them.
Other than that, the people should reserve their right
to buy them if they choose to do so. If others find
them offensive, then they don't have to buy them.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
" Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News Editors Doug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Forum
Student angered at Secretary Califano
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
"Warning: The Surgeon
General Determined that Ciga-
rette Smoking is Dangerous to
Your Health
The words above are noted on
the side of a cigarette pack. All
brands are required to have this
important warning. This is the
subject the Secretary of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW) is
speaking on.
At the head of HEW is Joseph
A. Califano, Jr. who was appoin-
ted tr this cabinet post by Pres.
Carter. Califano is telling the
people what tney stiouia not ao
But how is he affording to do this?
Is it by taxpayers' money? Or is it
by private groups?
Mr. Califano is preaching his
philosophy to the people to do this
and don't do that on a $30 million
budget.
But the cigarette companies
spend in advertising an excess of
$500 million. These oompanies
want to draw more oonsumers
than they already have.
Compare and oontrast the two
advertising campaigns. Cali-
fano's is a mere $30 million and
Cigarette Companies a small
half-billion dollars. Both are to
benefit the consumer, however,
in oontrary viewpoints. This is
like David against Goliath. But
who is to say who the victor will
be? Will it be government
regulation (if that) or oorporate
spending?
The enterprise doesn't care at
all who smokes cigarettes, as long
as they make their payroll. But,
Mr. Califano preaches no, don't
smoke; stay alive and healthy.
Evidently Mr. Califano
doesn't understand human
nature. When an authority tells
one not to do something the result
is the tendency to rebel. This is
human nature.
Fa example, remember when
the Church said no one should see
the movie The Exorcist? What
happened? Most people had to go
see it.
As a matter of fact, Mr.
Califano used to be a smoker. He
at one point must have found total
enjoyment in this habit. But out of
fear from statistics he quit this
habit. Statistics are the almighty
numbers broken down by items
on a blank piece of paper.
It is said that little numbers on
a piece of paper can be read and
interpreted in whatever a re-
searcher wants understood.
A trend of thought is found by
several statistics supporting the
idea that cigarettes do harm to a
smoker's health.
Furthermore, here is no sub-
stantial evidence to form a sound
theory that cigarette smoking
does cause harm.
Cigarette smoking has many
ambiguous facts about it. These
ambiguous facts are what Mr.
Califano is preaching to the
public. But how is Mr. Califano
able to do this?
It is my opinion that Mr.
Califano is not totally sincere
about this campaign against
smoking. In reflecting back in this
nation's history, one will acknow-
ledge that a similar campaign was
brought to a head againU booze.
When people were living
comfortably, there was Prohibi-
tion.
The 18th Amendment or
otherwise known as Prohibition
was ratified in 1919. This amend-
ment "Forbade manufacturing,
sale or transportation of intoxica-
ting liquors This was contrived
by a small percentage of people
with great influence.
There were bootleggers,
blackmarkets, and underground
organizations that sold liquor
illegally. Today there are many
wealthy and influential families
as a result of this market.
As you know, this was repeal-
ed by the 21st Amendment in
1933. This amendment took 14
years to do away with all the
provisions in the 18th Amend-
ment. As a result, citizens can
buy booze legally.
Now if Mr. Califano was
sincere about this venture he
would have initiated and propos-
ed the 28th Amendment.
This amendment would liter-
ally formalize another limitation
of our civil I iberes granted in the
Constitution.
One must realize that all of the
consequences that occurred in the
1920s will happen again.
Can you Imagine today ciga-
rettes being bootlegged or sold on
a black market?
Can you fantasize running into
your basement to have a smoke?
Mr. Califano, how about making
your proposals formal and stop
wasting the governments invalu-
able time?
Mr. Califano, aren't there
more pressing matters that
ought to be resolved than this
tobacco fiasco?
MarcAdler
L





���������IB
nnm
6 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Greek forum
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Co-Greek Public Relations
The fraternities and sororities
will be kicking off Greek Week
this Saturday at Pi Kappa Phi
Field Day.
All socializing will begin at 10
a.m. Saturday morning and the
activities will begin at 11 a.m.
Some activities include horse-
shoe throwing, volleyball, tug-of-
war, a pie-eating contest, and
that inevitable "swimming and
drown-proofing contest
When Saturday arrives there
will seldom be a dull moment.
Activities for Greek Week will be
as follows:
Monday - Greek Games and
Track Meet.
Tuesday - Delta Sigma Phi
Bed Race; Alpha Delta Pi VW
Stuffing Contest; Co-Greek Ban-
quet; Panhellenic Happy Hour.
Wednesday - Lambda Chi
Kappa Sigma
Alpha Raft Race.
Thursday -
"Funky Nassau
Friday - Phi Kappa Tau Happy
Hour; Co-Greek Dance.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Phi Kappa Tau Frater-
nity will hold an Hawaiian Luau
on Fri. April 7, consisting of a
Hawaiian feast and dancing to
beach music.
The Phi Taus will sponsor a
Italian terrorism described by
former ECU biology student
K101 Spring Fling Disco Party on
April 14 from 330 until 6:30 p.m.
at the house.
There will be free beer for
everyone and several door prizes.
The drawing for the Beach
Weekend for two will be held
during this Spring Fling.
Tickets are still available from
any Phi Tau or Little Sister fa $1
The Pi Kappa Pi Fraternity
recently initaited two new bro-
thers and elected new officers.
The Sigma Nu's completed
their annual Greeville Area clean-
up week where they collected
trash throughout the city.
The Sigma Nu Beach Week-
id will be held April 29, at
Emerald Isle.
The Chi Omega Sorority held
their Spring Cocktail Party last
weekend for all sisters and
alumnae.
On April 9, the Chi O's honor
their seniors at the Beef Barn.
Sigma Sigma Sigma will be
celebrating their Founder's Day
on April 18.
The Tri-Sigma's Spring For-
mal will be held on April 21 at the
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
downtown Greenville
111 West 4th St. 758-0204
By KINGSLEY HOEMANN
FOUNTAINHEAD European
Correspondent
Editor's Note: Kingsiey
Hoemann is a senior biology
student at ECU who is currently
attending Medical School in Sas-
sari, Italy. FOUNTAINHEAD
received this article in a letter
from Hoemann.
The News Desk felt his
reporting of the turbulent situa-
tion in Italy would provide a more
personal, human angle than
standard wire reports of the
political climate there.
SASSARI, ITALY-The kidnap-
ping of ex-premier Aldo Moro
occured after nearly 60 days
without a government-that' s how
messed up things are over here.
As I'm in the center of things
over here I thought you might
want an eye-witness report.
After the Red Brigades, (an
Italian terrorist group) trial pre-
paration was finished, the as-yet-
uncaught members of the Brigisti
Rossi (BR, Red Brigade) tried to
stop the trial by kidnapping an
important politician, Aldo Moro,
who is the chief of the Christian
Democrats and who was going to
be (many experts think) the next
Italian president.
The President (here it's the
number two post in the govern-
ment, since the premier is the
head of the government and the
presidential term ends this com-
ing December) and the Premier
are, of oourse, very heavily
guarded.
Moro, being one of the five
most important persons in the
government, had only five body-
guards.
The BR want to establish a
Marxist dictatorship in Italy.
They have been terrorizing the
country by assasinating or inten-
tionally shooting to wound all
those public figures who are
loudest in criticizing the terrorism
of the BR.
When some (actually about
18, more than half of all BRs)
were captured, the BR said that
the captured members, since they
were "fighting to change the
political order of Italy were
actually prisoners-of-war and
should not be tried in criminal
courts since their bombings,
murders, and assaults were poli-
tically, and not criminally, based.
The BR has decided not to
participate in any way in their
trial, as they feel they're political
prisonersPOWs and the verdict
has already been decided.
The BR told the judges,
jurors, witnesses and BR's own
PEACE CORPS
It offers professional development and
challenge.
Requirements:
� must be a U S citizen
� although the minimum age is 18 years, very few applicants
under 20 have the skills and experience necessary to qualify
� must meet medical and legal criteria
Training.
� lasts from 4 to 14 weeks, usually in the host country
� empha. izes language and cu'tural studies
Compensation:
� monthly allowance for food, lodging, incidentals
� medical care
. readjustment allowance of $125 per month, set aside in the
U.S usualK payable at completion of service
� optional n�e insurance at minimum rate
� personal Mtisfaction and overseas career development
NEEDED: People with experience or degrees In:
Agriculturefarming
Business
Education, especially mathscience
special education, Industrial arts
Engineering, especially Civil Engineering
Nutrition, Home Ec (Degree required)
Health Professions
Skilled Trades
AutoDiesel Maintenance
interviews: Frank Cook cr David Jenkins
Room 425 Flanagan Building ECU
Tel. 757-6586
court-appointed attorneys that
the BR will kill anyone participa-
ng in the "farce of a trial
They have already killed
several persons involved, includ-
ing the president of the Regional
Law Society.
This kidnapping of one of the
�nost widely-respected and known
en in Italy has everyone up in
ms.
The Fascists (the Italian
jocialist Movement or MSI) want
a establish a strong government
to stop these BR actions.
The communists PCI (34 per
cent in the last election voted PCI,
i.e. Communist, and that was
only 4 per cent less than the
largest party, the Christian
Democrats) have condemned the
BR.
The BR is trying to provoke
the beginning of a police state
which they hope would develop
into a full-scale civil war, during
which the Marxists (the 'pure'
communists, not the less-radical
and more conservative off-sal
Communist Party, or PCI) could
seize power.
IN THE LAST EDITION OF
FOUNTAINHEAD THERE
APPEARED AN AD FOR UBE
WITH COUPONS. THE AD
STATED THAT COUPONS
WERE GOOD 1JNOL SAT.
APRIL 1. THE COUPONS
ARE IN FACT GOOD UIYITL
SAT. APRDL8. THIS WAS A
TYPOGRAPHICAL ERROR.
ATTENTION
GARDEN LOVERS
cA
A LIQUIDATION ON ALL GARDEN SUPPLIES II!
ALL BLACK & DECKER EDGERS,
HEDGE TRIMMERS, etc. Less20
ALL ORTHO PRODUCTS Less 25
ALL FERTILIZER �r PEAT MOSS Less 25
ALL GARDEN HAND TOOLS Less 25
ALL RELATED GARDEN ITEMS Less 25
MANY ITEMS AT BELOW COST.
1 only Smith 3 gal. Sprayer $19.00 Reg. $29.75
Peat pots - Pkg. of 25 2 in. pots 29� pkg.
Aluminum I Lawn Edging edging 20 ft 50 40 ft $1.00
6 only Garden dusters reduced to $4.75 Reg. $7.39
3 only Gal. Ortho Lawn Green $2.50
6 only Gal. Ortho Greenol- Liquid Iron $2.50
1 only Junior Set of Garden Tools $5.00 Reg. $10.50
and many other items at give away prices
COME EARLY FOR CHOICE ITEMS SORRY NO PHONE
ORDERS-NO HOLDS �ALL SALES MUST BE CASH AT
THESE PRICES III
H.L.HODGES
m






Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
Canadian Brass 'first-rate fun, first-rate music9
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Canadian Brass is first-rate
fun, first-rate music. In their
Mendenhall performance on
Monday, April 3rd, the young
Canadian musicians played
"straight" music with wonderful
taste and "light" music with
magnificent tackiness.
The concert opened with
works by Scheidt, Handel, Purcell
and Gabrieli played with expert
attention to dynamics, articula-
tion and the delights of Baroque
ant i phony.
Amusing introductions to the
music helped musicians and
non-musicians alike to hear and
appreciate the themes and tech-
nical difficulties of each piece.
A demanding organ tran-
scription of Bach's "Toccata and
Fugue in D Minor" showed off
technique, but just missed the
perfection of the original organ
piece.
The subdued humor was let
loose in the "Suite from the
Monteregan Hills" of Canadian
composer Morley Calvert.
Each artist proved himself to
be a frustrated oomedian in this
hilariously tacky work full of
musical puns, slapstick, and
teasing comic dialogue between
instruments.
The only aspect of their
performance I would question is
how they keep from laughing as
they play.
A schmaltzy medley of all the
favorite Sousa marches followed
intermission.
Then, with carefully planned
spontaneity, the quintet intro-
duced Ronald Romm on the
trumpet solo of "La Virgin de la
Macarena The brass were
Trends
THIS YEAR'S YOUNG Artist Award Winner, Mario Gaetano will
perform Tuesday night at 8 p. m. in the Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.
Goings On
THURSDAY:
Noted film-lecturer John Roberts will appear at Mendenhall
Student Center to present his travel-film Caribbean Paradise. The film
will be shown at 8:00 p.m. in MSC Theatre Adm. ECU ID and Activity
Card.
Coffeehouse: Talented singer-songwriter Sally Spring returns to
the Coffeehouse at 9 p.m. Adm. fifty cents. Copies of her new album
Bird will be available.
FRIDAY.
Coffeehouse, 9 p.m. (See above).
School of M use presents Contemporary Chamber Ensemble at 815
p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Adm. it free.
Student Union Free Flick The Seven Percent Solution at 7 and 9
p.m. Adm. by ID and Activity Card.
SATURDAY:
Free flick at 7 and 9 p.m. (See above).
ECU Jazz Ensemble performs at 815 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. Adm. is free.
SUNDAY:
The Fourth Annual lllumina Art Show and Competition will be
held in the Menu-Yihall Gallery through April 23.
MONDAY:
Mime Keith Berger will perform in the Mendenhall Student
Center at 800.
relatively straightif you don't
count the ay of "Hole at the
end.
The Vivaldi "Conoerto in G"
was also relatively serious, if you
ignored the introductory compari-
son of piccolo trumpeter Fre
Mills' face to the four seasons.
(The dead face of winter moves
through the rosy glow of spring
and bright red cheeks of summer
to the exciting climax of autumn
when poor Fred turns purple and
his hair fallsout, all in time to the
music, of oourse.)
Tubaist Dr. Charles Daellen-
back next performed great feats
of manual and digital dexterity on
Rimsky-Korsakov's "The Flight
of the Bumble Bee
TUBAIST PERFORMSGREA T
FEA TS OF MA NUA LAND
DIGITAL DEXTERITY
Jelly Roll Morton's "Shreve-
port Stomp" included not just the
Brass's remarkable agility and
musicianship, but a few flapper
style hand waves as well.
The conoert closed with
Bach's "little Fugue in G Minor,
performed with a beauty that
gave new insight to the well
known organ work.
A lively encore of "Just a
Closer Walk With Thee" in a
Dixieland-gospel theme and var-
iations led to an enthusiastic
standing ovation.
The highly successful perfa-
mance was sponsaed by the
Student Uniai Artist Series Com-
mittee.
TRUMPET PLA YER RONA LD Romm wails in lively encore ' 'Just a
Closer Walk With Thee" with Dixieland-gospel variations. The
"Canadian Brass was first-rate fun, first-rate music. "
Photo by Brian Stotler)
Award winning percussionist Mario
Gaetano performing in recital Tuesday
By RENEE DIXQN
Staff Writer
Young Artist Award winner,
Mario Gaetano, Jr. will perfam
Tuesday evening, April 11 at 8:00
p.m. in the Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre. Mario is a
graduate student in the ECU
School of M usic and is completing
his Master of Music Degree in
Percussion Perfamanoa. He is a
student of Mr. Harold Jones.
Mario graduated Magna Cum
Laude from Cran School of Music,
State University of New Yak at
Potsdam with a Bachela's
Degree in Music Education. In
1977 he won the Crane Merit
Award fa academic excellence,
and the Crane Perfamer's Certi-
ficate.
This talented musician has
perfamed all over the eastern
United States with such groups as
the New Yak Youth Orchestra,
the Crane Wind Ensemble, the
Crane Percussion Ensemble, the
Union and Wheaton , Colleges
Combined Chaale, and the ECU
Percussion Ensemble.
In addition to being an
outstanding student and perfam-
er Mario also shares the musical
art as an educata and composer.
He has participated in the
Crane Youth M usic program at
State University of New Yak as a
summer staff oounsela and per-
cussion instructa. Mario has also
taught private perscussion les-
sons in Upstate New Yak fa the
past six summers.
Two of Mario's compositions,
"Song of the Libra" fa vibra-
phoie, and "Prelude No. 1" fa
marimba have been ooitracted
fa release next year by Music fa
Percussiai, Inc.
Mario composed "Prelude
No. 1" to perfam ai a recital
befae the young participants in
the "Crane Youth Music" pro-
gram during the summer he
taught on their staff.
The Thematic material in
"Prelude No. 1" evolves from an
opening motif of four descending
arpeggios. Mario composed this
marimba work to display the
virtuoso qualities of the instru-
ment in a musical presentation
that junia and senia high scholl
students could understand and
enjoy.
"Prelude No. 1" will be a
premiere ECU perfamance oi
Tuesday evening's program.
Other selections from the
recital program include "Two
Movements Fa Marimba
Tanaka; "Four Verses Fa Tym-
paniHoullif; "Logarithms" -
Sebesky; "Mexican Dance
No. 2Stout; and "Sources III
Burge.
Mario will be assisted by Pat
Flaherty-percussion, and Ronnie
Woot en-clarinet
Annual'Day of Dance' Sunday
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The Department of Drama and
Speech at ECU will sponsa its
seoond annual "Day of Danoe"
fa young danoe students at
Wright Auditaium April 9.
The Sunday afternoon's activi-
ties will include master classes in
ballet, jazz dance, and modern
danoe, as well as a lecture
demonstration of the classical
Indian Kathak fam.
Conducting the ballet master
classes this year will be Melissa
Hayden, wald-renowned prima
ballerina fa nearly two decades
with Geage Balanohine's New
Yak City Ballet.
At her retirement fron the
oonpany in 1973, Balanchine
ohaeographed a farewell ballet,
"Catege Haigrois in her
haia, which she perfamed to
invariable standing ovations.
Her talents were honaed by
the City of New Yak that same
year, when Maya Lindsay pre-
sented her with the Handel
Medal!irjn, the city's highest
cultural award.
An outstanding dance educa-
ta as well as perfamer, Ms.
Hayden received honaary de-
grees from Skidmae and Siena
Colleges.
The jazz dance master classes
will be conducted by Frank
Wagner, head of ECU'S dance
program.
Wagner has waked through-
out the professional wald of
danoe on both sides of the
Atlantic, and has ohaeographed
Broadway musicals, variety
shows, touring revues, operas
and television specials.
MASTERCLASSESIN
MODERN DANCE
In response to requests from
people who participated in the
"Day of Dance" last spring, this
year's program will feature mas-
ter classes in modern danoe, to be
oonducted by ECU dance faculty
member Patricia PertaJion.
Registration fa the "Day of
Danoe" is limited to danoers ten
years old a older.
The registration fee is $5.00.
Registratioi fa fams are availa-
ble by mail from " Day of Dance
Dept. of Drama and Speech, East
Carolina University, Greenville,
N.C 27834.





' ��������
wtmrn, JB&&&
�HH
Recently visited the Carolinas
6 April 1978 FOUMTAINHEAD Pig� 7
Eric Clapton again finds the road to success
By MICHAEL FUTCH
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
Clapton was off Friday
night.
But his seemingly inexhaust-
able supply of creative energy
was not to be denied the following
evening.
RSO recading artist Eric
Clapton performed on successive
nights in Charlotte, N.C (March
24) and Columbia, S.C (March
25), during his current RSO
labeled "World Tour .1978 It
includes his first American tour in
approximately 212 years.
The tour, coupled with SLOW-
HAND, his hottest-selling LP
since the 461 OCEAN BOULE-
VARD comeback album of '74,
has managed to revitalize attent-
ion to one of the (if not THE)
premiere blues guitaristsvocal-
ists, white or black, of the modern
amplified blues age.
At his best, Clapton is a
master of blues interpretation and
rock musicianship. During the
60's he became the prototype of
the guitar hero, or more accurate-
ly, the guitar superhero. Luckily
for Clapton, as well as fa his
devoted audience, the young man
was able to live up to the majority
of the hype expectations. How-
ever, when the pressures became
unbearable, Clapton made his
retreat into seclusion until the
timely Rainbow Concert and 461
OCEAN BOULEVARD.
Clapton has had a lengthy
diverse and interesting career.
He was hurled into the spotlight
after he became lead guitarist for
the Yardbirds. and the groups
that he later temporarily joined
are numerous and legendary:
John M avail's Bluesbreakers,
Cream, Blind Faith, Delaney &
Bonnie & Friends, and Derek and
the Dominos.
Currently there is talk of a
�comeback" - the truth of the
matter is that since he kicked an
almost 3-year junk habit in the
early 70' s, the guy has never left.
Alcohol has been, and remains,
his current crutch since he
re-surfaced in yet another stage
of his varied career, with the
vocals as the focus of his music.
Alcohol seems to have imobi-
lized the Clapton-as-God Figure-
head of the blues-rooted '60's.
461 OCEAN BOULEVARD,
THERE'S ONE IN EVERY
CROWD (75), NO REASON TO
CRY ('76), SLOWHAND ('TD-aW
possess a quiet, delicate and
reserved sound, showing traces of
an artist satisfied with his role in
a unit. Adding a supporting role.
And overly-generous at sharing
the spotlight.
These albums are not except-
ionally strong. But on the other
hand, they are not to be discarded
and forgotten - some of the
material has already become
standara Clapton' during live
perfor maces.
One exception during this
period, reaffirming the critics that
arthritis has yet to cripple those
fingers, was E.C. WAS HERE
('75) - material. The intensity he
so often produces onstage is
CLAPTON VISITED THE U.S. for
(' 75)a tasty and definite acknow-
ledgement of where Clapton
stands with live mateial. The
intensity he so often produces
onstage is never more apparent
than on this blues-powered disc.
The current tour material has
been changed since that album,
his first time in 2V2 years.
but the looseness, spontaneity
and imagination remain.
Clapton was not necessarily
bad in Charlotte; he was definite-
ly not good, but rather mediocre.
Luckily the bluesman was in no
possible way of being over-
shadowed by the back-up act.
X

John Martynan Island re-
cording artist from Scotland) had
recently replaced Player as back-
up before Clapton's entry on-
stage. Martyn proves himself "an
entertainerRobin Trower of
the accoustic-lineplaying his
accoustic through an assorted
collection of phase-control gad-
getry, machine-gunning his way
oh uga-ch uga-ch uga- wah- wah-
wah-wahthrough his overlong
set.
The Chardtte crowd used his
set to find a seat or take a leak
before the main attraction. The
Columbia audience enjoyed
Martyn much more - they
applauded. Martyn's electronic
display was piercing, quasi-
impressive. But how much of the
exhibit should be attributed to the
guitarist and how much should
be attributed to the prominent
pedal panel on the floor?
wxv
The Eric Clapton Band took
more than ample time both nights
before rambling onstage for their
14-number set. Totally distress-
ed, the Charlotte audience was
left desiring much more than
Clapton could muster. Through
binoculars, he appeared needy,
irritable and rarely cracking a
smile, ready fa the show to end
befae it began.
The true highlights of the
show proved to be his live
renditions of J.J. Cale's rejuvena-
ted "Cocaine and Clapton's
craftsmanship handling of
"Layla" - his immatal 'chef
d'oeuvre' - with piano ending
intact, and a hearty guitar
trade-off between Clapton and
guitar foil Geage Terry.
At ate point the band seemed
to instrument ally fall apart, on
See CLAPTON, p. 8
Evans St. Mall, Greenville
open daily 9:30-6
Phone: 752-8965

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Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
SU presents mime Keith Berger
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The Student Union Theatre
Arts Committee will present
KEITH BERGER, one of Ameri-
ca's most exciting performers of
the ancient art of mime, at
Mendenhall Student Center on
April 10, 1978 at 8:00 p.m.
Berger is only 24, but he has
been called "the best by the
best-Marcel Marceau.
Keith Berger works com-
pletely alone. He, the audience
and the stage are his only
properties.
His performing credits range
from television commercials to
the New Orleans Superdome.
With all the words and music
television has to offer, Keith
Berger has created some of its
most eloquent moments with
silence For all the colors availa-
ble in print, this small, lithe
mime, in black leotard and white
face, often catches attention first.
Whether moving or still,
Keith Berger expresses the emo-
tions of joy, surprise, fear and
wonder.
Whether Mechanical Man,
gorilla in a cage, or hard-shooting
cowboy, Keith Berger has every
eye on him. Attention never
wavers.
Before Berger's performance,
he does a teaser on campus or
city grounds. Don't be surprised
if, on the morning of April 10, you
discover that you have an extra
shadow.
You will surely recognize
yourself in the illusion Berger
creates of your personality.
In addition to Berger's eve-
ning performance, there will be
an afternoon workshop. Please
contact the Program Office at
Mendenhall Student Center for
details on the workshop.
Tickets are $1.00 for ECU
students, $2.00 for ECU faculty
and staff, $2.00 fa groups of
twenty or more, and $3.00 for the
public.

;
��HE HAS BEEN called 'the best' by the best-Marcel Marceau.
The exciting and versatile Keith Berger has mastered the ancient
art of mime. Berger will perform in the Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre this Monday night at 8 p. m.
CLAPTON
Continued from p. 7
Otis Rush's 'Double Trouble a
blues number from The Band-
inspired NO REASON TO CRY.
Clapton is a brilliant soloist but
there were few flashes of flurried
brilliance during the Charlotte
performance.
The hard punchiness of Bot-
tle of Red Wine" - the enoore -
allowed Qapton to end the
evening on an essential high note.
It, along with "Layla" and
"Cocaine" salvaged the unin-
spired concert.
Eric Clapton is one of the few
guitarists (or any instrumentalists
for that matter) who manages to
transcend the physical obstacles
of human and instruments as
individual entities - when
Clapton is on the mark, the two
become one. His emotions are
transferred to his guitar, whether
it be anguish, pain, ectasy or
pleasure, the results can be
electrically spinetingling. Clapton
is a master guitar virtuoso who
decided to use the rock medium to
display his talents
Like a true professional who
bounoss back from a weak
showing, Clapton came back and
clicked in depressing Columbia.
His band, consisting of: Carl
Radle, bass; George Terry,
guitar; Marcy Levy, vocals, guitar
harmonica; Dick Sims, key-
boards, accordian; and Jamie
Oldmaker, drums, jelled for the
show and delivered the 'fire' that
they are capable of when mentally
prepared.
Clapton apparently enjoys his
social as well as vocational
relationship with this group of
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Tulsa-based musicians - it is a
unity born of compatability. The
group remains basically intact
(minus Yvonne Elliman, now on
her own) from its formation in
1974. The line-up has also
survived longer than any other
outfit Clapton has been a member
of. This dose-knit relationship
from years of work was never
more obvious than in the Satur-
day night perfromance.
Clapton used a workmanlike
approach both nights, rarely
addressing the audience, but
rather letting the music speak for
him. He weaved rock ("Badge
"Layla"), country ("Rodeo
Man"), blues ("Key to the
Highway "Double Trouble"),
and reggae ("Knockin' On Hea-
ven's Door") throughout the
show, pleasing the old cult of fans
along with the newly acquired
SLOWHAND fans. Clapton also
professionally altered the
material's focus - whether it be
vocals or guitar. He is an artist
who is as proud of his songwriting
and singing abilities (after years
of encouragement), as he is with
his guitar-work.
As should have been expect-
ed, SLOWHAND material made
up the nucleus of Clapton's
repertoire fa both shows - an
intentional album push, by RSO
andor Clapton for promotional
reasons. "The Core with its
heavy intro opened the per-
formance on the strong side and it
was evident that the guitarist was
in a much more relaxed state than
in Charlotte.
The current single, "Lay
Down Sally was given an
enhanced dimension with a solid
Clapton solo. "Wonderful To-
night" was vinyl-strong, proving
Clapton's vocals to be genuine.
Marcy Levy, who joined the
bad a short time before THERE'S
ONE IN EVERY CROWD, was
given two solo spots (a B-side
Buddy Holly number which
Clapton himself wanted to record
at one time, "Fool's Paradise
and the standard, "Nobody
Knows You When You're Down
and Out"), besides her frequent
contributions on harmony. She
torched her way through both.
Clapton acutally caught stride
on a Don Williams-ish
country song, "Rodeo Man
The band, with old sideman Carl
Radle (he's been with Clapton
sinoe the Dominos) supplying his
melodic bass-bottom, came tog-
ether on this number and power-
ed its way through the remaining
material.
Clapton worked "Cocaine
into a frenzy, vertically extending
the solo at a hot and determined
pace. "Badge "Layla "Key
to the Highway" and "Bottle of
Red Wine" furthered the inspired
direction that the entire band was
achieving at will.
The Eric Clapton Band proved
itself as one of the belter rock and
roll bands around. Even on a sour
night, there were enough pyro-
technics to save the price of the
ticket. Like a good wine, Eric
Clapton seems to get better with
age. He can rook, sway, amaze,
funk, out-country most of the
country establishment, and tran-
scend the standard, the norm,
much in the tradidtion of a rock
and roll Coltrane.
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 11:00 to 10:00
Fri.fr Sat. 11:00 to 11:00
hursday Lunch and Dinner Speck
No. 12 Chopped Sirloin Steak
with or without Mushroom Gravy
Texas Toast with Baked Potato and melted
butter or French Fries
Altar
$1.59





����IHM
��m
6 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. APRIL 8 AT A&P IN GrttllVillt
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS AND WHOLESALERS
LOOK FOR THE ACTION PRICE SIGN - THROUGHOUT
YOUR A&P STORE When A&P buyers make a special pur-
chase at a lower price we pass the savings on to you that
lower price is an action price And these Action Prices are in
addition to our money-saving weekly specials.
HIDRI
? PAPER TOWELS 2 &TS 88c
HUNTS
1 WESSON OIL 2b4t�lz 88c
CHEF BOY AR DEE GROUND BEEF. MUSHROOM
V SPAGHETTI SAUCED 59�
CHEF BOY AR-DEE
9 BEEF RAVIOLI 3 �3 $100
m CHEF BOY-AR DEE FROZEN 4 LITTLE
D177AC � sausage 10'jOz QQc
T rlttMO � PEPPERONI PKG 79
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CANS
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SAUSAGE 10'iOZ
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CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
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FRENCH S MASHED POTATOES
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SPLASH-ON LOTION
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Sports Softballers now 7-4
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
Intramurals
by JOHN EVANS
Frisbee Tournament
McDonald's and the ECU Department of Intramurals will
co-sponsor a Frisbee Tournament on Tuesday, April 25 on the ECU
campus. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers in the
overall competition. Overall competition will be based on five
categories which will test a thrower's accuracy, distance and hang
time
The cash prizes will be awarded by McDonald's. First prizes will be
$50.00. second prize will be $25.00 and third-prize will be $10.00. In
addition the top 30 finishers will receive t-shirts made especially fa
this event. Everyone will be a winner, though, because certificates fa-
free french fries will be given to each Frisbee tournament contestant.
Registration fa the event will begin on Friday, April 14 and run
through Friday, April 21. Register at the McDonald's oi Fifth Street.
Bobby White won the title in the annual intramuial golf tournament
held last week. White finished with a six-over par, 36-hde total of 150
for the tournament and nipped Ron Stuber and Joey Hines by one
stroke. Rusty Baird and Mike Wrobel tied fa fourth place with 153
totals. The rest of the top ten were; Alien Smith 154, Pat Patrick 155,
Mike Dickens 156, Ben Gilliam 157, Lee Fulcher 158. Dasett Ward
160, and Ron Hughes and Lee Norman at 161.
The Kappa Alpha fraternity won the individual team title with a
team scae of 631, finishing eight strokes ahead of the Belk
Headhunters, who had a 639 total. The Duck Hooks finistied third with
a 671 total.
The intramural co-rec Innertube Water Basketball season begins
Tuesday night and the defending champions are so confident that they
have already issued a challenge to the rest of the teams.
Monkberrry Moon Delight is the only team to ever win the campus
championship in the three-year histay of the spat. Now, in the fourth
year of water basketball on this campus, the team's captains are after
another title. This will be their last year befae they graduate and the
team made up of ECU swimmers want to finish their four-years of
Water Basketball with an undefeated recad and their fourth straight
title.
Their closest competitiai from among the other 12 teams will be
from the Neaomancers. The Neaomancers are also in their fourth
season and each year they have finished second behind the Moikberry
Mcon Delight
All games will be played in Memaial Gym and games will be
played oi Tuesdays and Thursdays.
MIXED DOUBLES TENNIS ENTERSQUARTERFINALS
Conpeiitioi in the Co-Rec Mixed Doubles tennis intramurals has
reached the final four teams, with a few upsets along the way spicing
up the action in the early rounds.
As expected, two of the pre-tourney favaites have reached the final
four teams, but two of the top seated teams were eliminated earlier
The favaites, Lee Weeks and Warren Marshall, disposed of fifth
seeded Paula Godard and Joe Zahran, 7-5. 4-6. 6-4, to reach the
quarterfinals.
In the other quarterfinal bracket, Janice McVeigh and David Helm
downed the team of Wiggs and Lupton; 6-3, 6-2; to reach
quarterfinals. They will play Speed and Joyner, a darkhase team mat
has been impressive so far. Speed and Joyner knocked off Donner and
Scott in the second round. 7-5. 6-2, after Donner and Scott knocked off
the third-seeded te Janet Hoepp and John Irby in th
the maja upset so far
Congratualtions are appropraite fa Greenvilles Bill McDonald.
Mci � ictor fry the ECU Karate Club,
amed I f of the Year fa 1977 by � ast
ed Instructa of the Yoar fa 1977
Sou: ial Kar
This � 'imethat a sport v �KA)
full o ition (the NKA) have voted th
ructa of the year
Arm � canoe
u i ia 2 1
ns to M � K rir.it (Jut,
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Spats Edita
The Lady Pirates soft ball team
had quite a busy week with five
games.
Two were a double header
agmst N.C. State and the other
three were in the UNC-Charlotte
Womens Softball Tournament.
Last Friday the Pirates split
the double header with N.C.
State
The Pirates won the first game
in a close 2 to 1 decision and lost
the second to the Wolfpack 8-6.
I n Charlotte the Pirates played
against UNC-G, last year's N.C.
Softball champ, Eton and Camp-
bell.
Also participating in the event
were teams from N.C. State and
Appalachian State.
ECU was the only undefeated
team in the six team field.
In the first game the Lady
softballers defeated Elon 8 to 7
behind the pitching of Mary
Bryan Carlyle. ECU had 12 hits
and 12 erras. Gay Hins was the
outstanding player of the game
with three hits and five assists.
The second game saw the
Pirates win a big 12 to 4 game
over UNC-G.
The Pirates jumped all over
the defending state champs in the
first two innings fa eleven hits
and eleven runs.
UNC-G was held only four
rui s of their own and , Pirates
added one more run to win teh
game 12 to4. The winning pitcher
was once again Mary Bryan
Carlyle.
After the big win over UNC-G
head Softball coach Anita Dillon
was elated with the girls perfa-
mances.
"We feel like this is a big
victay fa us Dillon Commen-
ted "It was a super win because
they were the defending state
champs in Division I
In the third game behind the
pitching of Lee Sellers the Pirates
destroyed Campbell 15-3 to
avenge an earlier defeat by the
Camels.
The Pirates collected six hits
including one grand slam by
Denise Dickson.
The game was called due to
the ten run rule which requires
the game to be halted if one team
is ahead by ten runs in the 6th
inning.
After the tournament was over
coach Dillon was pleased with her
team to say the least and was
looking forward to the rest of the
i ison.
"These wins bring our recad
to 7 and 4 and we go to A & Ton
Tuesday (April fajrth), then to
ASU said Dillon.
"We would like to have as
ly people as possible come out
to Thursday's game. '
The game is against Carnbell
igh
. on
W .t ur foui
Dillon
ire
tournament m �
maal booster fa us because
everybody was able to play. That
will help us because we play in a
tournament at N.C. State next
weekend
Dillon also oommented on the
overall areas that need improve-
ment .
"We're still looking to
improve especially on our erra
problem oommented Dillon.
"Our hitting
looking better
is definitely
r� nr.
�ATHLETE OF THE Week Herman Mdntyre.
Herman Mdntyre
is FOUNTAINHEAD
'Athlete of the Week'
by David Merriam
Fountainhead has decided tore-instate a tradition that was stopped
over the summer months. It will be a special column run once weekly
on Thursdays called "Athlete of the Week
This will highlight and give special attention to a deserving athlete
who, under the estimation of the spats staff, should have special
recognition.
The first recipient of the "Athlete of the Week" award is triple
jumper and All-American Herman Mdntyre.
Herman over the past week has broken several triple jump records
fa ECU along with his concentrated efforts to help develop the track
program.
This past week Mdntyre jumped a recad breaking 53 feet 1 inches,
in what Mdntyre calls his "second leg of the journey
"My first objective was getting in shape, next was jumping well
and qualifying fa the nationals, and the thirdwell, if you couldn't
guess, was being national champion in the triple jump stated
Mdntyre.
"I really feel that ECU deserves sane national attention in sports
We have a oouple of the best athletes in track and quiti � few in many
other spats. I just want to do my share in helping ECU gain that
recognition
Mdntyre has successfully achieved two of his pri lUS
far. He is in top physical shape and qualified fa tl , �lie
weeks back.
A dose call with a bruised heel howevei i ,an
from jumping his besl
I bruised my right heel in prad ,Pr
l wouldand, a try to extend the a
l took it easy fa a while and tri,
erybody else practio
ke you hav (s
part of your daily routine, and wi
wh" . iff
Now M
m gut! and deti i on
Mdntyre, after heannrj of h
ichonaedt
rill)





�����������������WHBiBBBHI
HHIHHBHBI
6 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Styons out to disprove sophomore slump ' theory
The term sophomore slump is
nothing new to the world of
sports. Many athletes, both ama-
teur and professional, fall victim
to this malady each year. It does
not strike in one sport only. It can
strike any player of any sport
who is in his second year at the
current level.
There is one player on the
East Carolina University baseball
team who is out to disprove the
idea. In fact, he says he doesn't
even believe in it.
"I don't even think about a
sophomore slump said second-
year Pirate catcher Raymie
Styons. "You always hear about
it. but I put it out of my mind
completely before this baseball
season began
That statement holds a lot of
truth toit. Through ECU'S first 18
games of the season, the Ply-
mouth, N.C. native is the team's
leading hitter, with a .339 aver-
age. This follows a freshman
season in which Styons finished
with a .254 mark.
"Last year the Pirate back-
stop explained, "I had a lot to
think about trying to learn to be a
catcher. It was the first time I'd
ever done that for any length of
time. I concentrated more on
becoming familiar at the position
that I did on my hitting.
"This year he continued,
"I'm still learning to be a catcher,
but I feel like I'm comfortable
enough there to concentrate more
on my hitting
And concentrate he has.
Through March 30, Styons was
the team co-leader in home runs,
with four, and was second on the
team in RBI's (11; and total bases
(33), besides having the top
hitting percentage.
It's really the first time since
Peatu A1Tnc
i; zi
WI. � Iliur. M I Student.
1 : prior nil l (O tin �)
rri. S�i. A Sun. Ki-iluml admission
from 9 BW� 9:30 on m�.t nights
Special Power Hilt driver side, over 150
to choose from, reg. $44.50 NOW $33.50
Largest selection of golf shoes in area
at sale prices, sizes 3 to 16.
? Titleist, Toplite, Wilson, Hogan and all
other golf balls, SI 1.50dozen.
� Excellent selection of used golf clubs
at unbelievably loir prices.
IS etc arrivals, tennis shorts � shirts,
��. s warm-up suits, Etonic KM pro
gf fessional jogging shoes,
ill tennis rackets 30-50Vt off
We accept Master Charge


4
Gordon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
Greenville Golf & Country Club
Off ('i Memorial Or.
Phone 756-0504
Open 7 days a Aeek until dark
my sophomore year in high school
that I've started a baseball season
hitting the ball well the sopho-
more stated. "I've changed my
stance a little and gotten rid of a
hitch in my swing, so now I can
hit the better pitching. I hit it well
during the summer (a .336
average), but I usually start a
season slowly. Not this year,
though
East Carolina sported a 10-8
record through the first 18 games
of the season, but the ever
optimistic catcher feels that the
independent Pirates can still get a
playoff berth.
That's the most important
thing to me right now he said.
"To me it's more important than
hitting home runs, or getting
some personal honor. I want us to
win, and get back to the region-
als. Personal goals do not mean a
thing unless the team is win-
ning
Lest one's thinking of Styons'
abilities get out of hand, he
maintains that despite his .339
average, he is not hitting the ball
as well as he can.
"I've only had about three or
four games where Ive hit well
he said. "One of them was the
game against Southeastern Mas-
sachusetts.
ARMYNAVY
STORE
Pa coat. fi�W flight, bomb
snorkel, tanker jack, lainwtr
parkas, comboot. work clothes,
dlsrtes 1501 S Evans Street Open
11:30-5 30
We now have
a large selection
of wicker
picture frames.
H.L. Hodges
FISHING SPRING BONANZA
5i HiLilVL.5 Giant Grab Box of assorted Lures
Fly rod and reel combo - $12.95
9 Surf rod and reel combo - $29.95
10 Surf rod and Garcia Ball Bearing Reel with 20 lb.
Stren line - $34.95
Fresh water Spinning rod and reel combo - 19.95
Free ice chest to first 8 rodreel combo sold
18 lb. spool of Trilene mono 8,12,14,17, lb. 2.95 reg. 5.95
Ande Leader Mono 3.50 18 lb. spool reg. 4.95
Air Cel Fly Line less 20 White Stag framed back packs less 21
Line free on all reels purchased
line will be 12 price on all Penn Senators
All Rod Blanks and Supplies 10 off
all loz. spool Standard D thread 50 off
All rods 20 off includes Daiwa, Ugly Stick, Fenwick, Eagle
am i ii i� -cw ni Claw, Browing Browning, etc.
Mann,s Jelly worms .60 Pkg. 6
Igloo Coolers 20 off Jansport framed back packs less 10
Cypress Garden W ater Skis less 20 All Takle Boxes less 10
New Uncle Josh Ripple Pork Rind .99 jar
All sinker molds less 50 Coleman Propane lantern 17.50
All Buck, Browning, Gerber Long Sheath Knives less 20
Dog Training Supplies includes Dummies Books leads.
Low Boy Fish Coolers 6.50 reg 10.95 less 20
Coleman Double Mantle gas lanterns 21.95
60 lb. test wire trolling line 5.50 for 100 yards
Back pack tents less 10 Freeze Dried food less 10
1 group Rods at very special discount prices





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 6 April 1978
Lady track team now coming of age and performing
SPECIAL TO FOUNTAINHEAD
Overall they are young, quick,
aggressive, good looking and out
to let the students of East
Carolina know that to be a woman
athlete is something of which to
be proud.
In her third year as founder of
the women's track team, Coach
Laurie Arrants has something to
be smiling about when talking
about women's track at ECU-and
smile she does.
"We certainly haven't burned
the national record books - but
then we never anticipated that -
not for a while anyway. We want
to build a very stable program;
not just one of sprinters, or
distance people a just jumpers or
throwers. We will certainly have
areas which excel over others, but
we want some strength in all
areas
And the young lady pirate
squad is showing a good founda-
tion for such a team.
"Returnees from last year's
team are really producing for us
this year says Ms. Arrants.
Cookie McPhatter never broke
the 60 second mark last year yet
she has been oonsistantly in the
58 and 57 second range in every
meet this year. At Madison she
ran the open 440, the mile relay
(a 440 anchor leg) and the 440 leg
in the 880 medley relay. She also
took 2nd in the long jump.
Another pleasant onslaught
on personnel best records has
been given by the team's only
haif-miler Joy Forbes.
" I just can't say enough about
Joy's attitude, hard work and
pure determination oomments
Ms. Arrants. Forbes best time
last year was a 2:36 and in the
indoor meet at Deleware she
brought it down to a 228. Since
that time the trend has continued.
At the Madison meet Forbes
blistered everyone in the field of
half milers by four seconds or
better with a time of 225.1.
Then this past weekend
Forbes ran her best yet- a 222.1.
"I think the Virginia meet
gave Joy the confidence she's
been needing. She led her heat
the entire way, yet placed seventh
overall. Had she been in the
faster heat and been pushed, I
truly feel her times would have
been even better commented
Ms. Arrants.
Other returnees who have
really tumbled their own personal
best marks are Anne Holmes,
Anna Bailey and Linda Mason.
Holmes and Bailey perform in
the mile and two mile events.
"At Madison these two girls
ran the mile, the two miles, the
three miles, and each ran a half
mile leg on the two mile relay
team. That's six and one half
competitive miles. They're just
two super competitors Linda
Mason isour only 440 hurdler and
also runs a leg on the mile relay
team. She may not be your classic
runner in technique, but she's
described as a "winner" by her
coach.
In the field events two return-
ees are turning their own record
books upside down. Debbie
Knight, who specializes in the
javelin released a throw of 107'8"
in the heats at Virginia and
knowing that to be her personal
best relaxed and threw another
personal best on her next throw
witha110'11-12" flight.
Ms. Arrants commented,
"Debbie is so dedicated and
studies her event so thoroughly. I
was so pleased with her perfor-
mance because it was certainly a
result of many hours of patient,
dedicated practice
Debbie Freeman has returned
for her final year in the throwing
events. In the meet at Madison
she set a personal best mark in
the shot with 391-V4
Coach Arrants comments on
the senior shot putter "Debbie
isn't perfaming near her capacity
as yet since she came in late due
to basketball. She's just now
beginning to iron out some
technique problems and I feel the
upcoming three meets will be her
PIRATE TRACK MEMBER wins first place
best
As fa newoomers to this
year's team, Ms. Arrants is once
again get reason to be positive.
"We've definitely added strength
to our program with year's
freshman athletes. We've been
awfully weak in sprinters in the
past, but this year certainly
turned that around
All one has to do is look at the
440 yard relay team to understand
the sparkle in the coach's eyes.
An all freshman relay team of
Dawn Henderson, Cathy Suggs,
Maria Gudjohnsen, and Lydia
Rountree is only 1.5 seconds away
from national qualification.
The team has only run in two
meets fa in Virginia Rountree
was pulled out with an injury. But
with three very fast and competi-
tive meets to go in the season, the
team should be leaving only
smoke and opponents behind
them.
Other standouts are Maria
Gudjohnsen who in addition to
running on the relay team also
runs the 100 hurdles and long-
jumps. Sandy Sampson has been
perfaming well in the high jump.
As with any young team,
perfamances have been some-
what inconsistent, but what a
future to look to. It looks like Ms.
Arrants will have reason to keep
smiling.
"We've got the youngest
team we've ever had and the best
potential we've ever had. We
haven't had the budget to travel
to as many of the quality meets as
we would like, but I feel that the
situation will improve each year.
The girl's track programs in the
high schools are expanding rapid-
ly and since East Carolina has the
best developed oollege program, I
think we will surely reap benefits
from the quality high school
programs
The Lady Pirates will be
traveling to Dover Deleware on
April 15th and to the University of
South Carolina on April 22nd.
Then they will host the First
AIAW State Track Championship
on Friday, April 28th at Bunting
Field.
Classifieds
tor rent

APT. FOR SUBLEASE: May 1 -
Aug. 31. 2 bdrm kitchen, liv.
rm furnished. Great location -1
block from campus, 2 blocks from
Overtons, 2 blocks from down-
town. Prefer responsible female
grad. student a marrieds. call
758-1636 after 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: 1 bdrm. apt. fa
sublease during summer. Call
752-8065 after 6 p.m. Grad
student preferred.
MALE COLLEGE graduate mov-
ing to Raleigh by May, looking fa
someone to share an apt. Call
756-5645 atr 3.
MALE ROOMMATE: needed fa
summer Rent 62.00 plus Va
utilities. Call 752-2492. Close to
campus.
GET OUT OF THE DORM: Pay
$10 more a moith and enjoy life.
Two males needed to sublet apt.
fa summer. Call 752-6123.
WANTED: 1 a 2 male room-
mates fa both summer sessions
and next year to live at Kingsrow
Apt. Call 752-8444.
NEEDED: 1 a 2 people to sublet
a 1 bdrm. apt. iooated on E. 6th
St. Apt. oomes furnished, rent is
$125 plus utilities. Call Debbie
758-7821.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: to sub-
lease 2 bdrm 1V2 bath, fully
carpeted, AC, luxury townhouse
apt. next to campus. Open May
15 till end of August. Ask fa
Debbie a Betsy. 758-7786.
NEEDED: Grad student needs 1
bdrm. apt Single occupancy
beginning in the fall. Please
contact Dale 758-8201.
for sate
FOR SALE: Light blue Burton golf
bag. Lighweight ana perfect fa
long rounds. Matching cover
included. $30.00 Call 758-3497.
FOR SALE: Magnavox 8-track
AMFM stereo system in excel-
lent cond. 752-8676.
FOR SALE: '67 Poitiac Tempest
in good cond. $400.00 Negotiable.
Call Charlotte 758-7821. Keep
trying.
FOR SALE: Ladies 10-speed
Murray bike, hardly ridden. $50.
Call 756-7684 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Speakers Heil
Tempest 2-way pated set-hand-
les 40 watts rms channel. Contin-
uous a 100 watts in. peaks.
260.00 new but will sell both fa
150.00 752-0034.
FOR SALE: Dam size refrig.
with stand. $75.00 in good cond.
Call 758-8122.
FOR SALE: FM converter by
Audiovox in excellent cond. Sells
fa $20 but will take $12.50. Also
Scalding Smasher tennis racket,
aluminum, sells fa $42 but will
take $30 used one summer. Call
752-6870.
FOR SALE: Female clothes size
7-9; two single bed mattresses
and boxsprings; plants, coffee
table, couch, headboards and
bedframes; mirra; toaster oven.
Will take best offer.758-7786.
personaKg)
WANTED: Group needs exper-
ienced drummer 'or weekend and
summer wak. Ca Jell i-8776.
WANTED: Peugot a Raleigh
used bike. Call Ton 752-8676.
ALTERATIONS: Summer things
too long? Too big? Call Kathy
752-8444 a 752-8642.
lost
2
LOST: Large maaame pocket-
book Mon. night at Chanelos.
Reward offered. Call Dawn at
752-8817 a take to lost & found
at Mendenhall. No questions
asked. HELP.





Title
Fountainhead, April 6, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 06, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.641
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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