Fountainhead, February 16, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
Vol. No. 53, No. East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina 16 February 1978
ONTHEIN9DE
Gov's. stationeryp. 3,
Semester effectsp. 8
Guthriep. 8
Pirates beat ODUp. 12
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
New SU president selected
By DOUG WHITE
News Edita
Mike Mase was selected to
be the new Student Union presi-
dent Wednesday by the Student
Union Board of Directas, ac-
cording to Dennis Ramsey, out-
going Student Union president.
Mase is a junia fran
Raleigh, majaing in psychology,
and has been active in the Union
fa the last three yars.
This past year, he served as
edita of the ENTERTAINER.
"Everything's gone so well
this year, I hope to just continue
the good job Dennis Ramsey has
Service
sorority
chartered
ByARAHVENABLE
Staff Writer
The Eta Mu Chapter of Sigma
Gamma Rho saaity was charter-
ed at ECU December 3 with 16
charter members.
Louise Rosenbaough,
basilus, said it is a service
saaity which emphasizes schol-
astic achievement.
A person interested, in pledg-
ing must be a full-time student
with a 2.0 over-all average.
Rosenbaough added that a
person interested in pledging
should be dedicated, have a
pleasant personality, and an
overall interest in the saaity.
The pledge period fa the
charter members started Oct. 5,
and lasted eight weeks.
At the end of the period, they
rece.ved their charter.
The alumna advisa was
Phyllis Shivers of Greenville who
attended Elizabeth City Univer-
sity.
Fa service projects, the sao-
ity visited rest homes, sponsaed
a clean-campus drive, a Thanks-
giving basket, and a Christmas
can food drive, accading to
Rosenbaough.
She said they plan to visit the
Caswell School fa the Retarded
and O Berry Center and Cherry
Hospital to wak with the eduo-
able mentally retarded (EMR).
" We are al I very excited about
becoming Greeks. Many of us
were looking fa something differ-
ent in a soraity and came
together to become charter mem-
bers Rosenbaough said.
"We are looking faward to
waking with other Greeks here
on campus and would like to
thank all Greeks and non-Greeks
fa helping us reach our goal, fa
patronizing our activities, and
giving us maal suppa
Rosenbaough added.
done Mase said.
Mase's plans fa the caning
ear include splitting the Popular
Entertainment Committee into
two committees, as it was two
years ago.
"Splitting the committees
jvoi't cost the Union anymae,
but it will allow fa more student
part ia pat ion.
"We're also expecting a sur-
plus of money this year, and if
that comes in I'd like to inaease
the budgets of the Coffeehouse,
Lecture, and Minaity Arts Gan-
mittees. If we get more than we
expect, then other committees
will receive an inaease 'Mase
said.
Mase said that attendance is
up at practically all Unioi events
and that he hopes this trend
continues.
Mase will officially assume
the office of president at the
annual Student Union banquet
April 14.
"I am pleased with the
board's choice and feel that the
Union will be in good hands next
year Ramsey said.
In addition to his wak with
the Student Union, Mase is a
member of Psi Chi (psychology
hona society), and Phi Sigma Pi
(scholastic hona fraternity).
STYX, SHOWN HERE when they appeared on campus in 1975, will
return March 1.
Fleming Hall chosen
for quiet dormitory
By RICHY SMITH
Staff Writer
Fleming Hall has been des-
ignated as the quiet dam fa
ECU coeds who requested such a
facility, accading to Carolyn
Fulghum, dean of women.
"We have about 250 girls'
names who requested a quiet
section and several who wanted
no visitation. We only have
names fa that number even
though we had more requests
Fulghum added.
Fleming fits the need fa
accornodating the number of
people in question.
If Fleming fills up, then part
of Jarvis Hall will be used as a
quiet dam.
The idea was set in motion by
surveys circulated by the Assoc-
iate Dean of Student Affairs'
Office concerning visitation and
noise within the dams.
"Over 250 women,and four
men Fulghum stated in a
meeting with Fleming Hall resid-
ents Monday night.
The students who do not wish
visitation except in the lobby area
will have a wing set aside in
which they shall have this free-
dom.
"Those students that sign up
fa this dam will draw up thier
own contract fa quiet hours and
fa rules governing the dam
Fulghum oontinued.
Anyaie violating the rules will
be removed from the hall.
The reaction of the present
Fleming residents was obvious at
the Monday meeting.
"Naturally the residents are
upset. We feel the whole matter
was dropped in our laps with the
decision already made com-
mented Cathy Crawley, hall re-
presentative fa seccnd fkxr of
Fleming.
Accading to Crawley most of
the problem stems from not being
able to return to Fleming next
See QUIET, p. 3
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT-etect Mike Mase f Photo by Pete
Podeszwa
'Exciting'Styx will
in Minges
� �
By DOUG WHITE
News Edita
A & M recording artists, Styx
will appear in Minges Coliseum
March 1 at 8 p.m accading to
Charles Sune, chairperson of the
Student Union Popular Entertain-
ment Committee.
Tickets will be $4 fa ECU
students and $6 at the doa and
fa the public.
"Styx has a reputation fa
putting ai an exciting show, as
was evident when they came here
three years ago.
"We will also be the first to
present Styx in the state and the
only university in the state to
present them Sune said.
Accading to the Feb. 18 issue
of Billboard, (a reoading industry
magazine), Styx's latest album,
The Grand Illusion, is rates
number seven among the top
selling popular albums in the
nation.
In the Greenville area, ayx's
Equinox album is the band's best
seller, accading to Tan
Ferryman, owner of Apple
MM
Recads.
"They're real popular in this
area. I'd rank them fourth a fifth
among that type of music
Perryman said.
Appearing with Styx will be
Charlie, a four piece rock band
with two albums to their aedit.
"Charlie is not a particularly
well known band, but among the
so-called progressive aowd, they
have a firm following Sune
said.
"In addition to this concert,
Popular Entertainment Commit-
tee will present jazz flugelhanist
Chuck Mangicne in Wright Aud-
itaium March 29
Tickets fa the Mangiaie
concert are $3 fa ECU students
and $5 fa the public and at the
doa.
Another event of intaest to
jazz enthusiasts will be the Mary
Lou Williams concert Men Feb.
20 at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre.
Tickets fa this concert are
$1.50 fa ECU students and $4 fa
the public and at the doa.

Law Day program may
feature N.C. Chief Justice
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
The ECU Law Society has
several important events coming
up, and is calling fa new
members interested in law and
the prospect of attending law
school.
The society's "Law Day pro-
gram" is scheduled fa later
April.
Jerry Cox, president of the
Law Society, says they are
hopeful of securing North
Carolina Chief Justice Suzy
Sharpe as speaker fa the pro-
gram, which will be open to the
public.
The society will be making
their annual trip to Washington,
D.C. during the first week in
April.
Participants will attend a
Supreme Court session, and also
a session of Congress. Partici-
pants will also visit other sites of
interest in Washington.
The society will be making its
law school visits fa interested
persons during mid-March, ac-
cading to Cox.
The purpose of the law
society, accading to Cox, is "to
acquaint students with the legal
profession through activities, and
also to acquaint them with the
essentials of law school





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HiiiHBWMBBB
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 February 1978
Psi Chi
Methodists Testing
Debating club FG
Are there any students that
find it difficult to clearly express
what is on their mind? If you are
one of these people the debating
club is for you. The dub will help
develop a student's clarity in
debating issues. Furthermore, it
will aid the student's confidence
in public speaking. Plus the club
will better a student's capacity on
investigating issues. The debat-
ing dub will cause a student to
speak his thoughts much faster.
This rapid speech pattern shall
just make the student more
valuable on the job market.
Wouldn't you like to speak in
front of people without your knees
knocking? The Speech and Drama
Department need the student's
response to sponsor this dub. Fa
more Information oontad Marc
Adler 758-9523, 161 Umstead
Dorm.
The Forever Generation in-
vites you to join us Monday nights
for Christian fellowship and fun.
We're having a relevant Bible
study, good singing, and delic-
ious refreshments.
Speaking this Monday will be
Dave McKean, a Pro-Teen staff
member from Rocky Mount.
We meet at 9 p.m. in Brewster
C-304. Why not plan on being
there?
STYX
S.0.U.LS.
There will be a S.O.U.LS.
meeting Thurs Feb. 16 at 7 p.m.
at the Afro-American Cultural
Center.
Please plan to attend.
ROTC
Air Foroe ROTC's ECU 600
Basketball Tournament will run
Feb. 24 and 25.
Friday's game schedule is
from 12 noon till 5 p.m Sat.
game schedule is 8 a.m. till 5
p.m. The public is cordially
invited.
Inter-varsity
Inter-Varsity will meet this
Sunday night at 8 p.m. at the
Afro-American Cultural Center.
Delta Sigma
Delta Sgma Phi Run-A-Thon
for the Heart Fund Drive.
We will be starting Feb. 19 at
930 from Atlantic Christian
College and conduding about 7
p.m. at the fountain on campus.
Donations will be honored. Call
758-4916.
The Student Union Popular
Entertainment committee will
present Styx, with spedal guest
Charlie, on March 1, at 8 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 for ECU
students and $6 for the public.
All tickets are available from
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
Public tickets are available
from School Kids Records -
University Arcade, Apple
Records - East 5th St and the
Music Shop - Greenville Square
Mall. For further information call
757-6611.
Officials assoc.
The 1978 organizational meet-
ing of the Greenville Offidals
Assodation will be held at Elm St.
Gym's T.V. room on Thurs Feb,
16 at 530 p.m.
Anyone interested in umpir-
ing high school, college: recrea-
tion and tournament softball
anda junior high baseball
please attend.
Fa furtha infamatiai call
Joe Applegate at 752-5214.
Psi Chi is offering a pre-
registration briefing fa all
psychology majas and minor s on
Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. In Speight room
129.
You will be able to find out
what courses will be offered and
the instrudas of these course
Come and find out about your
"favaite professas
Fashion show
Cone see the new summer
fashiois!
"Spring into Summer a
fashion show sponsaed b the
pledges of Alpha Xi Delta will be
held Tues Feb. 21, at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall.
Tickets may be purchased at
508 E. 11th a. or at the doa. Fa
more infamatiai call 758-2381.
(Refreshments will be provided.)
The first meeting of the
Winterville Mission will meet
Sunday evening at 730 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Centa.
All students are invited to this
infamal gathering of the newly
famed United Methodist congre-
gation. This service will be led by
Thurman McLean.
Chairman
Anyone intaested in serving
as Spring Elediots Chairman
should apply In the SGA offioe,
room 228 Mendenhall.
The Allied Health Profes-
sions Admission Test, will be
offered at ECU on Sat March 11.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to the
Psychological Capaation, P.O.
Box 3540, Grand Central Station,
NewYak, N.Y. 10017 to arrive by
Feb. 11. Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Bldg ECU.
Gospel
Psyc majors
r
All Psychology majas and
minas are invited to apply fa
membership Into the psychology
hona sodety, Psi Chi.
Applications are located in the
psychology departmental office.
Minimum requirements are:
being in the upper Va of your dass
and having completed at least 8
semesta hours in psychology and
having at least a "B" average in
psychology.
MRC debate
Crusade
A time of fun, fellowshop and
Bible study sponsaed by Campus
Crusade fa Christ, meeting ai
Thurs. at 7 p.m. in Flanagan 307.
This indudes dynamics of the
Christian life, dynamics of dis-
dpleship, dynamics of ministry
and dynamics of the life of Christ
fa skeptics, as well as those
interested in growing in their
relationship with Christ
Come see political sdence
professas Dr. East and Dr.
Yaraough fight it out at the
M RC's first debate on Wed Feb.
22 at 730 p.m. in roan 244,
Mendenhall.
Visual arts
Visual Atts Faum presents:
"Japan: The New Art" at 12 noon
in Jenkins Fine Arts Building
Auditaium, Feb. 17.
Omnicrom
Omniaan Delta Epsilai,
econanics hona sodety, will
have an organizational meeting
Thurs Feb. 16 at 6 p.m. in Rawl
201.
All members are urged to
attend and interested persons
invited. Bucaneer photo will also
be taken.
Comic book
The ECU Comic Book Club
will meet at room 247 on Tues,
Feb. 21 fron 7 til 9 p.m.
Sdence fidion is also discus-
sed. All Interested persons invit-
ed.
Happy hour
Happy Hour Feb. 21 from 9
p.m. until 1 a.m. in the Elbo
Room.
Doa prizes and fun sponsored
by Interia Design senias.
Help us raise moiey fa senia
house project.
Planning
'A meeting fa students inter-
ested in pursu�ng a maja a
mina in urban and regioial
planning will be held Tues Feb.
21 at 730 p.m. in room D-209
Brewster building.
Planning faculty members and
the President of the Students
Planning Assodation will be
present to answer questions
regarding the planning curricu-
lum and career opoortunities in
dty and regional planning.
Sophomae and junia level
stcTnts oonsidering a plannign
career are urged to attend this
meeting. Additional infamatiai
may be obtained from William W.
Hankins, direda, urban and
regional planning program at
757-6465 a 757-6230.
Thurs Feb. 16, Mark Ernest
will be the speaker at the Full
Gospel Student Fellowship.
Mark is an ECU alumni who
will be bringing us an interesting
message.
Evayone is invited to meet
with us in room 221 of Menden-
hall from 730-9 p.m.
Jas piano
The Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee will
present intanationally famous
jazz pianist Mary Lou Williams in
oonoert Mon Feb. 20, at 8 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.
Tickets are $1.50 fa ECU
students and $4 fa the public and
at the doa.
Peace corps
The newly opened Peace
Caps office is located in room 425
of the Flanagan Bldg. Drop in a
call 757-6586 fa infamatiai.
Ceramics
The Ceramics Guild and the
SGA sponsaed Visual Arts
Faum will feature Join Gill,
assistant professa of ceramics at
Colaado State University, in an
open wakshop Feb. 16 and 17 in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center,
room 103.
Daily demoistrations will take
place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Gill reoeived his BFA from
Kansas City Art Institute and his
MFA in ceramics from Alfred
University in New Yak.
Fran 1975-1977 he taught
at Rhode Island School of Design
as an assistant professa of
ceramics. He primarily hand
builds ceremonial vessels from
earthenware and porcelain and is
very much of a designer and
oolaist in how he executes and
fires his waks.
We are very lucky to have
such a fine contempaary artist as
Gill at ECU and hope that
interested persons will feel free to
part id pate. A mae detailed
schedule of wakshop events will
be posted in the ceramics depart-
ment
Phi Alpha
Attention all new Phi Alpha
Theta members! Every new mem-
ber must fill out an official
registration card and pay his a
her initiation fee in ader to
receive a membership certificate.
The society will meet Mon
Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Todd
Room. Each member may take
care of the afaementioied items
of business at this time.
Another announcement: pic-
tures fa the BUCCANEER will
be taken at the Feb. 20 meeting.
Please wear semi-famal attire fa
the shot.
A business session and re-
freshments will follow. All mem-
bers - old and new - are urged to
attend this meeting.
Screenings
Screenings fa SGA legisla-
ture will be held wed Feb. 8 at 4
p.m. in room 239 Mendenhall.
Positions indude two open-
ings in Belk and one opening in
Fletcher.
Apply now in the SGA offioe.
Outing club
The Outing Club meets Thurs-
days at 730p.m. in the basement
of Memaial Gym. We have sane
really nice camping trips, hikes,
canoe trips, and backpacking
trips you won't want to miss. All
ECU students are encouraged to
attend.
Thanks
SPECIAL THANKSto each of
the following Greenville busi-
nesses and merchants fa sup-
pating the Social Hour at Blim-
pies on Feb. 8 and 9 by your
contributions;
Apple acads, Belk-Tyler
Co Blimpies, Blount-Harvey
Co The Book Barn, Brody' sine,
Central News and Card Shop,
Certain Things Inc Countryside
Leather Shop, C. Herber Fabes,
Gazebo, Harmony House South
Inc Headstrong Waning, H.L
Hodges & Co. Spating Goods,
Hungates Hobbies & Crafts,
Juliennes Flaist & Gift Shoppe
Inc Markay Rings and Things,
Platique, Floyd G. Robinson
Jeweler, School Kids Records,
The Silver Thread, Steinbeck's
Mens Shop.
Sincerely,
The Occupational Therapy
Student Association (O.T.S.A.)





HnHnHBHHIBHnHHMIBHMHBi
Ait student designs Gov.
Hunt's schedule stationery
16 Ftbrmry 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD ftg�3
l
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Terri Eloshway, an ECU
senior in the School of Art, had
the unusual privilege of designing
the schedule stationary fa the
governor of North Carolina last
semester.
Designing the stationery was
only one of the exciting assign-
ments which Terri, a communica-
tions arts major, was given as
part of her duties while a designer
with information services, N.C.
Department of Administration,
working through the Cooperative
Education program at ECU.
In waking on the station-
ary, Terry had the oppatunity to
wak with two of the governa'S
press seaetaries, Stephanie Bass
and Gary Pearce.
"They are so young. I was
surprised Terri was also able to
go to some of the governa's
press conferences and was espec-
ial ly interested in those confer-
ences dealing with infamation
about Cherry Hospital, located in
her hometown of Goldsbao.
She was also impressed by the
fact that she could hear exactly
what the governa said and then
go home at night and hear it on
television a read about it in the
newspaper.
"I really got caught up in the
state government. I heard about it
befae it got in the paper Terri
commented.
Terri also designed a number
of publications fa the state,
including a pamphlet fa the N.C.
Bureau of Indian Affairs, a
QUIET
Continued from p. 1
year, fa a great number of
students have lived there fa two
to three years.
Some of the residents are
upset because they now have to
look elsewhere fa a room not
knowing what will be left to
choose from.
The most disappointing part
which alot of people fa get was
that Fleming won the Chancel-
la's Cup in Intramurals last year
and is in the lead fa it this year
added Kay Belcher, Intramural
representative fa the dam.
"We've waked together.
We're mae than just a dam
Belcer added.
"The decision was difficult to
make because we knew the
students of any hall chosen would
not be pleased.
"But the Board of Trustees
wanted the request filled fa a
quiet dam so we are to have the
facility available Fulghum said.
"Fleming was chosen fa
many reasois, but mainly fa its
size and location she added.
bookmark fa the Offioe of Citizen
Affairs, a booklet fa the N.C.
Canmunity Watch Program and
other booklets, brochures, and
stickers fa doasand windows fa
different departments of state
government.
She is very excited about
seeing her wak being issued all
over the state and nation. She
says she is delighted at being able
to say, "I did that
About the wak experience
Tern said: "I was nervous at first.
Now I feel better equipped when i
go looking fa a job. This job
faced me to wak in situatiais
that school aoesn't provide. I now
know that you need to watch what
you say and how you say it. We
sell us
Terri represented ECU as a
member of the student panel at
the Nath Carolina Cooperative
Education Association convention
held in Raleigh in October.
On the ECU campus she has
just been elected to WHO'S WHO
IN AM ERICAN COLLEGES AND
UNIVERSITIES fa 1977-78 and is
active in Design Associates, a
student aganizatioi.
In additioi to her other
activities, Terri is Layout Man-
ager of FOUNTAINHEAD.
She isoneof approximately 20
communications arts students
who have participated in the
Cooperative Education program
at ECU.
TERRI ELOSHWA Y DESIGNED Gov. Hunt's stationery as part of
her co-op iob in Raleigh last semester.
Marijuana arrests increase
(CPS)Marijuana arrests in-
aeased dramatically last year
after declining in 1975 fa the first
time in ten years.
Accading to the FBI's annual
Unifam Crime Reports released
in September, 441,000 arrests
occured.
The high figure almost equals
1974 s figure of 445,000 arrests.
A fnghtneing aspect of law
enofrcement attention and activ-
ity was revealed in the repat.
The number of marijuana
arrests in 1976 were mae than
the toal oanbined arrests fa the
violent crimes of aiminal homi-
cide, rape, robbery, and aggrava-
ted assualt.
One Week Only
Special Introductory Price On
Men's Traditional Siladium Ring
Only $59.95
Regularly $82.00
IRTQ1RVED
That's when the ArtCarved representative will be here to help you select your custom
made college jewelry. It's also the day you can charge your ArtCarved college
jewelry on Master Charge or BankAmericard.
place: Student Supply Store
Mon. - Fri Feb. 20 - 24





BHBHHl
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 February 1978
Media Board will
not drain SGA funds
Many students have expressed concern dealing
with the issue of funding publications.They seem to
think that an independent Media Board is going to
rob them of money they have previously had in the
past. This simply is not true.
Apparently some SGA memebrs are telling some
organizations that they will get no more monev from
SGA next year because publications is taking so
much out of SGA's budget. Those organizations will
suffer no more than they have in the past. Visual Arts
Forum, Marching Pirates and others will not suffer
financial cutbacks, unless the legislature cuts their
budgets, simply because publications is operating
under an independent Media Board.
Approximately the same amount of money that
has been spent on publications in the past will be
spent on publications in the future. No additional
money will be taken out of the SGA budget.
In a letter in today's Forum, Legislator Kevin
McCourt cited several organizations and how much
money each received. McCourt neglected to tell,
however, when these organizations received this
money. Did these groups receive these particular
amounts of money this year or last year? Or perhaps
earlier than that?
Where McCourt received these figures is
unknown, but several of them are wrong. McCourt
said that $70,000 is needed to fund the transit
system. Strangely enough, $59,550 was appropriated
for the transit system last year. And an extra route
was even added.
This year, though, only $49,735.20 was approp-
riated to the transit system operations, and a night
route and a special van fa handicapped students
were added.
Where does McCourt get this $70,000 figure?
Perhaps he is trying to make the monetary situation
look worse than it really is.
Model UnKed Nations was appropriated $6,482
this year, and $4,421.79 last year. Neither one of
these figures is very close to $5,000.
McCourt also wrote that ECU's NCSL (North
Carolina Student Legislature) receive $4,000. This
year,NCSL received $1,883 and last year it received
$3,649. McCourt sould have specified that NCSL
received almost $4,000 last year.
McCourt said that the SGA executive council
received $30,000. Reading McCourt's letter, one
would think the council received this amount this
year. Actually, last year's executive council received
$31,433. This year the executive council received
only $19,558.
By citing inaccurate figures, McCourt is telling
the student body only half of the facts. These figures
are rounded figures, of course, but even so, the ones
mentioned are wrong.
McCourt also wrote that rOUNTAINHEAD asked
(he used present tense) for $64,000 and the SGA
appropriated $56,000. FOUNTAINHEAD has not
received $56,000 from the SGA in the last two years.
Last year, FOUNTAINHEAD was appropriated
$51,064.35. This year, the newspaper received only
$35,244.91. However, this year, FOUNTAINHEAD's
ad revenue is reverting back to the newspaper, which
should have been done in the first place since that
money rightfully belongs to the paper. This year's
budget was approximately $51,000.
McCourt asked-in his letter how would the SGA
appropriate $190,000 if the SGA had only $130,000.
Well, the SGA appropriated approximately $7,700 to
the Marching Pirates when SGA actually had only
about $600.
Some legislators make statements obviously
without caring whether they are wrong or not. To
reiterate: legislators should do their homework.
(the cloisters)
UHBtV X SIGNED UP FOR. V0 VlSlTATZOt
DIFFERENT SETTHG BUT THIS IS RWlCVLOUsii
Forum
Student di
mm
to FOUNTAINHEAD:
To say the least, I am
somewhat disappointed by the
opinions expressed in both the
editorial and forum sections of
Thursday's FOUNTAINHEAD.
Though opinions vary greatly, on
the issues of a seperate Media
Board and the ouster of SGA
Speaker Tommy Joe Payne, the
facts are more concrete.
At the ECU Board of Trustees
meeting, a basic principle of
President Sessoms' Media Board
presentation was a student poll
listed on the ballot during the last
fall's elections. At first, the poll
was referred to as a "referen-
dum but actually read, "The
following is merely an opinion
poll, not a formal referendum
President Sessoms' proposal
went on to say, "Students have
requested an independent board.
In a campus wide vote, students
favored creation of an indepen-
dent Media Board by a margin of
2to1
However, the question on the
ballot actually read, "Do you
support funding of publications
with student fees but indepen-
dent of Student Government As-
sociation control?" Nowhere
within that question is a Media
Board mentioned, while one is
left to wonder what organizations
are considered publications.
yted in editorial, letter
fund the transit system ($70,000),
Model UN ($5,000), NCSL
($4,000). Drama Dept. ($30,000),
Art ($20,000), Executive Council
($30,000), Music ($16,000),
Marching Pi rates ($7,700) and the
Legal Service ($8,800).
How can the SGA appropriate
$190,000 worth of programs with
only $130,000? Prior to January
31,1978, the SGA had $277,000 to
work with this fall.
The publications. REBEL,
FOUNTAINHEAD, EBONY
HERALD,
See SGA, p. 5
was merely an opinion poll, and
that only 12 per cent of the total
student body answered the poll. I
do not think that a 2 to 1 margin
and 12 percent voter participation
could justify such an important
move as publication independ-
ence.
Those that think funding the
Media Board will have no effect
on the SGA, better think again!
The Media Board will not only
drain SGA of an estimated
$125,000, but also another
$30,000 fa the summer months.
The SGA is left with $130,000 to
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
"Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
Editor
Cindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News Editors
I totally disagree with Pres-
ident Sessoms' plan because he
by-passed the students, mis-
represented the facts, and left
other SGA organizations out in
the cold.
He never told the board of
trustees that his "referendum"
Doug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends Editorsteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hoiloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually





1
Forum
16 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Payne's removal from speaker position 'contradicts'procedure
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
To put it bluntly, Tommy
Joe Payne was screwed last week
anc the SGA legislature acted as
the phallus.
It is a travesty of justice to
remove from office an elected
official simply on the basis of raw
emotion.
With no facts before them as
to what was actually said or not
said at the ECU Board of Trustees
meeting, the legislature was
easily ooeroed by the emotional
oratory of Craig Hales and other
demagogues involved in so-called
student government.
As if this weren't enough,
Payne's removal contradicts the
accepted procedure fa dealing
with unwanted officials.
According to Robert's Rules of
Order, (1915 revised ed.), the
power of a body to rescind any
action previously passed does not
apply to "one who has been
elected tomembership or
office (Article VI, Section 37).
I was present at the board
meeting and I can attest to the
fact that what Neil Seesoms told
the board was true, there were
no dissenting votes, and Tommy
Joe Payne did relay the opinions
of the legislature to the board.
Payne told the board the
SGA
Continued from p. 4
BUCCANEER, WECU, and the
Photo Lab) did not take a big
chunk of the SGA budget, but
also had alot of funds reverting
back near the year's end.
I will give you an example and
try to emphasize the severity of a
sudden break from the SGA.
Under the SGA,
FOUNTAINHEAD asks for
$64,000 and the SGA appropr-
iates only $56,000.
The $8,000 that did not get
appropriated is open to any
organization in the SGA to shoot
for. Under the new Media Board,
that $8,000 reverts back to the
Media Board where only the other
five publications can take a shot
at it. The bargaining power of a
$277,000 organization is chopped
to $130,000, but the politics has
not been decreased.
I think that independent pub-
lications could pass, but the issue
should have been studied instead
of railroaded through. If Presi-
dent Sessoms was so confident
that the students would support
his views, he would not have
by-passed them. As Robert
Swaim once said, "Never take
things at face value
Respectfully,
Kevin McCourt
Sophomore Class Pres.
Editor's Note: McCourt said that
FOUNTAINHEAD received
$56,000, although he did not say
when. This paper received
$51,064.35 hum the SGA last
year, and $35,244.91 from the
SGA this year. See editorial fa
more details.
legislature probably would not
pass the proposal. If anyone can
truthfully tell me that was not
true and in fact the legislature
would have passed the proposal,
I'm listening.
Speaking from experience as a
former legislator, discussions
usually center around two or
ihree legislators standing on each
side of an issue. The legislature
sits quietly, docile as sheep.
The outcome of a vote is based
on whichever side delivered the
most emotional, most impassion-
ed plea. SGA is more a debating
society than a legislative body.
Charges that since the 2 to 1
vote in last fall's election favoring
campus media free from SGA
control was voted on by only 12
per cent of the student body, and
therefore not a true voioe of the
students, are absurd.
If one follows that path of
logic, then the legislature has no
right to sit as a governing body,
since the highest vote getter
received only 300 votes, out of an
estimated day student constit-
uency of 6,000 students. Some
legislators assumed office with
only 10 votes. That's one hell of a
mandate from the people.
And more than one-third of
those currently serving in the
legislature were never elected.
They were appointed.
Those persons who are cur-
rently screaming about not
enough money should realize that
publ ications are taking no more of
a bite out of SGA than they ever
did.
Anyone foolish enough to
believe that an independent
media bill would pass the legis-
lature would probably buy beach-
front property in Winterville.
Neil Sessoms didn't by-pass
the students when he went to the
board. He by-passed a petty,
faction-riddled circus pretending
to be a legislative body. It was the
only way the students oould be
represented.
The entertainment at legis-
alture meetings is tops on this
campus. Perhaps the Student
Union should absorb the SGA in
order to insure the continuation of
such a grand amusement.
Doug White
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PH�6 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 February 1978
Greek forum
By JAY CHAMBERS
I.F.C. Public Relations
Fraternities and sororities at
ECU have a long tradition of
leadership in campus activities.
Greeks hold several key posi-
10ns on campus in SGA and the
Student Union.
They also have been involved
in FOUNTAINHEAD and profes-
sional organizations (i.e. National
Honor Societies).
This is not to mention the
inter-fraternity Council (I.F.C.
and the Panhellinic Council,
which are the governing bodies of
the Greek system.
Beyond this, fraternities and
sororities, each with its own
positions, offer opportunities for
one to develop their leadership
potential.
It is for this reason and many
more that the Greek system plays
an important part in campus life
and in the college experience of
many men and women.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
This week the Greeks have
not only a great opportunity to see
some excellent women's basket-
ball, but also to participate in the
Roberson beverage oompany's
"The Dr. Pepper Spree
The spree involves a "concen-
trated effort by ECU'S fraternities
and sororities with banners, noise
makers, cheers, and costumes to
win a cash prize of $500 - in each
division
The fall pledges of Alpha Xi
are sponsoring a fashion show
Tues Feb. 21 at 8 p.m. in
Mendenf.all 'otudent Center.
With a theme of "Spring into
Summer top brand names of
the new summer fashions will be
presented. For more information,
call 758-2381.
This weekend, the Alpha Xi's
will host the chapter's provinoe
Informal poll shows students prefer
quarter system over semester svstei
By DAVE THOMPSON
Staff Writer
The semester system has been
in effect at East Carolina since
this past fall, and student reaction
thus far shows that most still
prefer the old, ten-week quarter
system.
In an informal poll taken at the
crowded Croatan cafeteria and at
various other campus hot spots,
this writer found that the majority
of ECU students would rather be
one the quarter system.
By an overwhelming .majority,
about two to one, students
preferred the ten-week terms
over the 15-week semesters.
While most students prefer
the old system, the administrative
employees who were quizzed spl it
about evenly in their reaction to
semesters.
ECU Cashier Jenny Tripp,
whose stamp graces each stu-
dent's Activity Card, noted that
the registration and drop-add
periods went much smoother this
year than in past years.
Tripp also remarked that oosts
this year for the two semesters
equalled the oost of three quar-
ters except for a slight increase in
tuition, which probably would
have occurred anyhow.
A secretary in the history
department said she prefers the
quarter system and feels the work
load then was much less. She
added that most of the secretaries
she knew feel the same way.
Although the student reaction
was one-sided in the favor of
quarters, the reasons varied.
See SEMESTER, p. T
director, Madra Britt. She will
be here to evaluate the sorority
and provide new ideas on Greek
living.
The Gamma Phi chapter is one
among five in its province.
Sigma Nu Fraternity has
recently expanded its ranks with
the induction of eight novioes.
Also, Jamie Barrow is being
honored as the Chapter's 200th
initaite in Sigma Nu's national
magazine, the Delta.
This Saturday will mark Sigma
Nu's third annual "White Star
Formal honoring graduating
Seniors and outstanding oolleg-
iates.
There will be a dinner at the
Candlewick Inn with live enter-
tainment by the band "Five
Degrees South
Sigma Nu Little Sisters have
been very busy over the past
months redeoorating the interior
of the Sigma Nu house. Besides
helping with color schemes and
furniture selection, they have
prepared several meals fa the
chapter during the weeks.
Other events in the near
future include the Disneyland
Daytona Beach Week in early
March and the annual Myrtle
Beach Weekend in April.
A clothing drive to aid disaster
victims is being chaired by Sigma
Nu Sammy. Rabhan. Rabhan
hopes to oollect a substantial
quantity of clothing to be donated
via the Salvation Army by Feb-
ruary 24.
The Little Sisters have cur-
rently scheduled a champagne
breakfas to the brothers on an up
coming weekend.
The ball's in your
court now . . .
BIRTH
DEFECTS
ARE FOREVER.
UNIiSS
YOU HELP.
TO
PROTECT
THE UNBORN
AND THE
NEWBORN
Give to the MARCH OF DIMES
-E PUBLISHER
Make your
YEARBOOK
PORTRAIT
appointment
now
at
h
��t- �'�tr
?&
'�H
Jlll� BUC office 757-6501,6502
PLEASE HELP INSURE THE
CONTINUATION OF THE
YEARBOOK TRADITION AT ECU!
A photographer will be here
from Tuesday, February 14th
through Friday, February 24th
from 900-5:00 in the BUC office.
It doesn't cost you a cent to have
your picture taken
there's NO SITTING FEEI
There will be no wait if you'll
make an APPOINTMENT-EARLY I
Call Now I Don't delay.
Group pictures will also be taken
at the same time. If your group
doesn't receive an information
sheet call the BUC office.





Student Union provides
successful entertainment
16 Fttmary 1978 FOUNTAINHEAP
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
During the past calendar year,
the ECU Student Union has
sponsored successful concerts
and renowned speakers, and
has "iiown movies to capacity
audiences almost every weekend.
The driving force behind the
improvement of the Student
Union this year has been its
president, Dennis Ramsey. A
senior from Cramerton, N.C
Ramsey has made no drastic
changes in the overall Union
organization. His success formula
has been very simple.
"You have to make a sincere
effort to keep in touch with all the
students on campus said Ram-
sey. "You have to bring attrao
tionson campus which will please
the majority rather than cater to
the small interest groups. There's
always that pressure from parti-
cular groups on campus. You
simply have to think in the best
interests of the campus and
community
Last year, the Student Union
was heavily criticized for its
allegedly poor selection of con-
certs. The concert committee lost
more than $63,000 in less than a
year, according to Ramsey.
After two of his appointees
resigned, Ramsey chaired the
concert committee himself this
year. All four concerts held so far
this year have made money.
"Barry Robinson, last year's
Student Union president was
unfairly criticized explained
Ramsey.
"The concert committee was
largely at fault fa many of the
mistakes. It goes to show stu-
dents at ECU how much extensive
planning has to go into a concert
for it to be successful
However, the oonoert oommit-
tee is just one of the ten
committees in the Student Union.
According to Ramsey, he is
responsible for all the various
committees which operate from
an annual budget of $248,000.
The Artist Series has sponsor-
ed pianist Ruth Laredo and the
Suzuki Talent Education Tour.
Both attractions sold out. The
Buffalo Philharmonic and the
Norman Luboff Choir will be on
campus later this year.
The Theatre Arts sponsored
"Grease" and "Cabaret two
productions which drew large
crowds while the Lecture Com-
mittee sponsored Gil Eagles.
Jack Anderson is scheduled to
appear March 28 while Leonard
Nimoy appeared last night in
Mendenhall.
"Speakers and name groups
are becoming harder and harder
to schedule every year said
Ramsey. "Consequently, when
you finally manage to land a good
one, you want a good turnout
from the student body and the
community so the speakers will
want to oome back again
"We've had some embarras-
sing crowds fa some excellent
attractions around here. I don't
like to see that happen
This year, Ramsey and the
committee chairpersons have con-
ducted numerous opinion polls
and have a ,ecked with local radio
and recad staes concerning the
popularity of different musical
groups.
"We increased our advertis-
ing tremendously said Ramsey.
"We also started buying time on
the radio fa the first time which
really improved the attendance of
several of our attractions. I think
the advertising has beep the
number one reason we have had
so much success this year
Week in and week .out,
probably the most widely atten-
ded Student Union attractions are
the weekly Free Flicks at Men-
denhall Studerft Center.
Some of the top movies shown
this year have been "Network
"Rocky "Silver Streak and
"The Omen Jhe movies are
usually shown twice- on Friday
and Saturday night and have
SEMESTER
Continued from p. 6
I personally prefer the quar-
ter system responded a curly-
haired business maja, "because
of the larger variety of females I
get to check out
Other reasons cited in fava of
quarters were the more interes-
ting variety of classes, less
pressure oi exams, a later
starting date that doesn't hamper
summer jobs a vacations, and
the fact that time seems to fly
faster on quarters.
"If I fail a class, it's a lot less
painful on quarters than on
semesters, remarked a concer-
ned coed whose opinion was
echoed by many.
Fa each reasoi cited favaing
quarters, there was another
favaing semesters.
�' One gets mae of a chance to
become mae deeply involved in a
subject on the semester system
instead of merely saatching the
surface, asserted art maja
Steve Wright.
Getting out of school earlier,
fewer exams, and a longer
Christmas brea were other rea-
sons cited by pro-semester stu-
dents.
To get a feeling of what the-
campus instructas' opinion was,
this writer talked to Dr. Alvin
Farner of the histay department.
Farner said that the new
system was better as far as the
registratiai period, graduate
work, and for ECU overall since it
was the only state school that
wasn't on the semester system.
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT Dennis Ramsey.
played in front of packed houses priaities here at ECU said
fa nearly every perfamance. Ramsey I hope we can continue
"Getting the top movies has to maintain the suocess we've had
always been one of the too so far
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8 FQOWTAINHEAD 16 Ftyuary 1978
gsbruary 1978
uthrie presented ECU audience with a 'thoroughly
professional assimilation of music and wit'
By MICHAEL FUTCH
Special toFOUNTAINHEAD
"Howdywe're goin' to play
some silly folk songs
Arlo Guthrie used these words
to open, as well as describe, his
performance Monday night in
decrepit Wright Auditorium.
And to consider the concert in
retrospective, the description
cannot be improved, a disregar-
ded. It fit the casual, lackadaisical
performance to a tee.
Approximately 1,250 persons
tore themselves away from the
continuing drama of NBC's
"King as well as numerous
other recreational goodies, to
witness and observe the son of
legendary Woody Guthrie.
The result proved to be a
highly unusual, but thoroughly
professional assimilation of music
and wit.
Arlo and Shenadoah, his
back-up band, delved from nearly
every conceivable music form for
the performance. And when the
notion hit him, Arlo let loose with
a few of his notorious, keenly
calculated between-song raps or
stories, very much in the tradition
of his father.
WITTY, SPONTANEOUS
Arlo proved to be witty,
spontaneous, interesting, and,
from an artistic standpoint, a
oompetent if not necessarily
awesome, musician. He aJterna-
SHENENDOAH, GUTHRJE'S BACK-UP bandrwedto oea
"more than adequate instrumental backup" Monday night in
ted-along with his material-
between aooustic and electric
guitar, banjo, and keyboards
during the loose performance.
Shenadoah oonfirmed them-
selves as a more than adequate
instrumental back-up group for
the former office boy, harmoni-
cally adding a vocal dimension
which was vinyl-strong. The
intervals, musically mixing tradi-
tional with contemporary, East
with West, spiritual with reggae,
and personal material with perso-
Wright Auditorium.
Trends
nal favaites-an eclectic perfor-
mance from a performer with
eclectic taste.
The mood of the program was
low-key, spontaneous at various
ARLO GUTHRIE IS "most definitely a folk rock as a bond with a volume-oriented generation '
singerusing the amplification of contemporary Photo by Pete Podeszwa
harmonies within the band
brought back memories of the
harmony-knit folk groups of the
late '50's and early '60's. The
vocals were that tight, and in this
case, as important fa the overall
effect.
The material fa the perfa-
mance ranged fron the Beatles'
"I've Just Seen a Face Lead-
beliy's "Rock Island Line
"Tennessee Stud Randy New-
man's "Just a Rider on the
Range Dylan's "You Ain't
Going Nowhere several tradi-
tional Irish tunes, Woody's
"Ramblin Round Your City to
a song which Arlo said went back
to Biblical Jeruselum ( Some-
body was there recording it and
we learned it off the recad)
Casually clad in blue jeans,
cowboy shirt, and wan brogans,
Arlo seemed to hit his high point
when he chugged into "Coming
Into Los Angeles" and followed
that with the power of the Staies'
"Connection Another highlight
was his rendition of the tradi-
tional hymn, "Amazing Grace
with Arlo at the piano delivering
some exceptionally strong and
emotional vocals, full of grit and
oonvictioi. There was as much
'religious soul' put into that hymn
as any Sunday maning gospel
group oould possibly muster.
The main link throughout the
show was the folk songs. Arlo
Guthrie is most definitely a folk
singer, merely using the amplifi-
cation of contemporary rock (post-
Charlie Christian era) as a bond
with a volume-aiented genera-
tion. Electric-folk, unlike Woody,
but with its own merits and style.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
The show had aie-if any-
mina drawback. Arlo left the
stage befae the end of the first
set, and the audience was treat-
ed' to what seemed to be an
over long Shenadoah set (seven
numbers). Without a doubt, these
are fine musicians and vocalists,
but would you have paid the same
price to see only them? Arlo gave
them unselfish exposure, but
then again, Arlo was the focal
point. A mina flaw, but an
moonvenient one, considering the
lengthy intermissico which fol-
lowed the Shenadoah set.
The sound equipment crew is
to be praised. The sound fa the
Guthrie show was as good as this
reviewer has ever heard in
acoustically dead Wright. The
perfamance went without sound
problems, which is almost a
miracle in that aging building.
Popular Entertainment lost a
serious amount of money on the
show, but considering the Mon-
day night response, the commit-
tee should be satisfied with the
result. Greenville is rarely treated
to a perfamer and talent oi the
level of Arlo Guthrie. Usually a
oonoert with the salability' of a
Guthrie would be quickly voted
down due to the special ized aowd
heshe would draw. The commit-
tee took a chance, took the
expected loss, but more impor-
tantly, gave this area a much
needed treat. It was satisfying to
discover that 1960 products con-
tinue to draw a sizeable cult
crowd.
Arlo's future is in the past.
But his past, and his roots, are
reason enough fa him to make
the tour circuit. There are few
perfamers who can fill m the
footsteps of an acclaimed father
or mother, adding their own
aedentials and manage to con-
tinue the authenticity of the
parentArlo Guthrie is one of
those few.





School of Music presents Tardif in fccuty nek
Internationally r
16 February 1978 FOUNTA.NHEAD Papa 9
� �
gnized pianist to perform Feb. 21
VERSATILE PIANIST PAUL Tardif mil be presented in faculty
recital on Feb. 21, at 8:15 p.m. in Fletcher Recital hall.
Photo by Marianne Baines, ECU News Bureau
0 0
BALLOONS
By CA THERINE ROBERSON
There sa place somewhere m a corner of the sky past the clouds
where all the lost balloons gather - all the balloons that slip through
fingers and float away
oome to rest in this corner.
There must be millions there
it's beautiful
none of them burst.
But it's also sad and lonely
there's no one around to enjoy them.
There's a plaoe somewhere in a corner of me
past my heart
where all my memories gather - all my memories of you
that skip through my fingers and float away.
it's beautiful none of them burst,
but it's always sad and lonely
when no one is around
to share
or enjoy them.
Catherine Roberson is a freshman from Wanohese, N. C.
�.PLAZA i
dnetna 1&2
PITT-PLAZA CENTER
756-0088
entertainment
CINEMA
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erythi
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�R

ELLIOTT GOULD
DIANE KEATON
PAUL SORVINO
I Will, I Will
FbrNow
11:30 p.m.
fHNAVISKDN-
PRINTS BY DELUXE
ALL SEATS W-50
ByRENEEDIXON
Staff Writer
Pianist Paul Tardif of the ECU
School of Music Faculty will
perform a recital on Tuesday,
Feb. 21 at 8:15 p.m. in A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. The pro-
gram includes opuses by Mozart,
Debussy, Bartok and Chopin.
Most recently Dr. Tardif has
performed at Virginia Intermont
College, Millersville State Col-
lege, Linooln Center for the
Performing Arts, Bucks County
Community College, and UNC
Chapel Hill. He is also a superb
jazz artist and will perform a solo
jazz recital at Atlantic Christian
College in Wilson on April 17.
Last summer Dr. Tardif was
Artist-in-Residenoe at the
Sewenee Summer Music Festival
in Sewanee, Tennesse where he
performed both solo and chamber
music programs. Also during the
summer of 1977, he received a
grant from the ECU Research
Council and traveled to Switzer-
land to study the Chamber
Conoerto Sketches of the contem-
porary Austrian composer Alban
Berg.
Dr. Tardif began his formal
piano training at the Eastman
School of Music as a student of
I See TARDIF, p. ;pi
located behind
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10 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 Ftbruary 1978
Opera Theatre to present The Magic flute'
A 33-member Opera Theatre
cast at East Carolina University
will perfam Mozart's comic
opera "The Magic Flute" in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall later
this month.
Scheduled evening perform-
ances are Feb. 23, 24 and 25 at 8
p.m with a matinee Feb. 26 at 2
p.m.
According to Dr. Clyde Hiss of
the ECU School of Music faculty,
Opera Theatre director, "The
Magic Flute" is a lively comic
opera which has been a favorite of
audiences for almost 200 years.
First performed in Vienna in
September 1791, the opera is
set in ancient Egypt, and com-
bines good characters and vil-
lains, with its plot ending in the
union of lovers and the triumph of
good over evil.
The ECU production will be
sung in English with full orchest-
ral accompaniment. Some roles
will be sung by alternating
singers during the Feb. 23-26
run.
TARDIF
Continued from p. 9
CeaieuenrTaTTvvrTM
Eastman, he won first prize in the
International Piano Guild Compe-
tition and graduated with a
Performance Degree.
In 1963 this artist toured
Poland as a jazz pianist for the
U.S. State Department, and later
he resided in Munich, Germany
as a recipient of a Fulbright
Grant.
In 1965 the Salzburg Mozar-
teum awarded Dr. Tardif the
highly honorable Artist's Diplo-
ma, initiating his highly success-
ful Eurooean debut in Salzburg.
Also among his European aocom-
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOOD
DMffttOMffi Grwnvllto
pi ishments was an award-winning
performance in the Alfredo Cas-
ella Competition.
Prior to joining the ECU Piano
Faculty in 1971, Dr. Tardif taught
afthe University of Kansas and in
the Washington, DC area. While
residing in the Washington area,
he was invited to perform at the
Phillips Gallery, the University of
Maryland Summer Piano Festi-
val, and the Peabody Conserva-
tory of Music. Also during this
time he worked with the renown-
ed American pianist, Leo Flei-
sher.
Dr. Tardif has appeared with
the Kansas City Philharmonic,
the Rochester Philharmonic, the
Eastman-Rochester Orchestra,
the Corning Philharmonic, the
Kansas Little Symphony, the
Ottawa Little Symphony, the
Peabody Chamber Orchestra, and
the Washington Theatre Cham-
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Barbara Lynn Hicks of Hamlet
will perfam the Queen of the
Night role, which features bril-
liant coloratura arias. Her daugh-
ter Pamina will be sung by
Margaret Brooks of Wilmington
and Belinda Bryant of Centre,
Alabama.
The role of Tamino, an
Egyptian prince who falls in love
with Pamina, will performed by
Steve Walence of Marshal I berg.
Papageno, the spritely bird
catcher, will be sung by Anthony
King of Whiteville and Michael
McDonald of Round Hill, Va. His
destined bride Papagena will be
played by Susan Owen of Salis-
bury and Julia Moore of Canton.
Sarastro, high priest of I sis,
will be performed by Jeffery
Krantz of Charlotte and Donald
Greene Jr. of Hamlet. The moor
Monostatos, chief of the slaves of
the Templeof Isis, will be sung by
Jerry Deaton of Silver Spring,
Maryland, and Ira Jacobs of
Wilmington.
The orchestra will be directed
by ECU School of Music faculty
professor Robert Hause. Mrs.
Patricia Hiss is in charge of
costumes. Sets and lighting were
designed by Dr. Clyde Hiss, teh
Opera Theatre's director; and the
rehearsal accompanist coaches
are Teresa Watkins and Donna
Roman.
Tickets for the ECU "Magic
Fute performances are available
at the ECU Central Ticket Office,
telephone 757-6611. Public tick-
ets are $3 each.
ber Players. He has also perform-
ed at the Aspen Music Festival,
Carnegie Recital Hall, Jordon
Hall, and the Carnegie Institute
of Technology.
Tuesday evening's perfor-
mance will begin with the Sonata
in E-flat Major, K. 282, written by
Mozart at the age of eighteen.
This unusual sonata opens with
an adagio movement followed by
a second movement oomprised of
two adjoining minuets. The sona-
ta concludes with an allegro
movement that is reminiscent of
the operatic music from "The
Marriage of Figaro
Debussy's "Estampes" are
three musical impressions of the
landscapes of the Far East, Spain,
and the Idle-de-France. The
initial movement, "Pagodes"
(Chinese temples or sacred build-
ings) employs the pentatonic
scale in a characteristic display of
Oriental exoticism. The second
movement, "Soiree dans Gre-
nade translates as "Evening in
Granada" and has beei descri-
bed by Spanish compose, Manuel
de Fall a as a most vivid captiva-
tion of the essence of Spanish
music. This sensual habanera
brims with the evocative Iberian
SDirit.
The Bartok Senate, written in
1926, illustrates the creativity of
its oomposer in applying melodic
and harmonic experimentation to
the structural forms of the
classical period. The piano is
treated percussively in this disso-
nant style, particularly in the
driving rhythmic themes of repea-
ted notes, and tone clusters
famed by chadal structures of
2nds, 7ths, and 9ths.
The extremely slow second
movement is based on a type of
funerai chanting called "keen-
ing" that ispracticed by Irish and
Hungarian mourners. The third
movement exemplifiesthe Balkan
influence of folk-like themes fa
which Bartok is renowned.
The Chopin Sonata in B
mina, Opus 58, is a maja
ranantic wak, the last of Chop-
in s three piano sonatas. It begins
with a rhapsodic sonata move-
ment highlighted by a beautifully
melodic second theme. A fast
shat scherzo is followed by a
lyrical third movement in the
fam of an extended nocturne.
The fourth movement builds
con st an 11 y t o a t remendous cl i max
by returning the theme in inaeas-
ing intensity and ends with a coda
in the maja key.
Tuesday evening's perfa-
mancs is free and open to the
public.
Dog Day Afternoon -
of pathos, fright and
This week's Student Union
Free Flick is Dog Day Afternoon,
a film starring Al Pacino.
Pacino displays an amazing
versatility as Sonny, a oonfused
and frantic ex-con who attempts,
and very nearly pulls off, what
turns out to be one of the most
bizzare bank robberies ever reca-
ded ai the New Yak City legal
slate.
Pacino I tour de face is only
one of the movie's many assets.
Charles Durning gives a solid
perfamance as the tough-as-nails
precinct captain who is wryly
sympathetic to the disturbed
Sonny as he cajoles him in their
plight.
John Cazale rounds out a
superb cast as Sonny's estranged
transsexual lover. His perfa-
mance, unlike Pacino's, is laced
The treat American Debate
Featuring
iTjohn � Dr.Tinsley
ast a &rbrouh
OF THE POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPT.
AT
MBMDEIMHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUDITORIUM
ROOM 244
FEBRUARY 22,1978
TIME 730
ADMISSION FREE
PUBLIC INVITED
SPONSORED BY
MENS
RESIDENCE
COUNCIL
with a restrained lunacy.
However, all cinematic roads
lead back to Pacino himself. His
perfamance is the heart and soul
of Dog Day A tier noon.
The film isa oollage of huma,
pathos, fright, and chaos. It is a
frenetic, but carefully etched and
poignantly rendered, real-life
account that could be no less
intense than the genuine event.
The movie will be shown this
Friday and Saturday night at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m. in the Menden-
hall Student Center Theatre.
Admission fa students is by ECU
ID and activity card.
ATTIC
THUrA FEB 16
Mvai
Fri and Sat
In Concert
HAWK
Sun
MEDLEY
BROTHERS





Their message 'simple, yet complex'
16 Ftyuyy 197B FOUNTAINHEAP Pap 11
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
The building is like an old
Free Will Baptist Church: paint
curls from the wall and the floor
boards creak beneath the feet of
the faithful pilgrims headed fa
their seats on wan benches. An
ancient wicker basket waits pa-
tiently fa the praiseful donations
tooome.
Here the old men gather,
when they are not on the circuit,
dressed alike in black suits and
white shirts, to bring their
message to the congregation The
message they bring is simple, yet
complex, filled with bittersweet
exuberance. They play the music
of the street parades, saloons,
and riverboats of New Orleans,
the lingering vestige of a vanish-
ed lifestyle, in the Preservation
Jazz Hall.
The musicians are a travelling
Jazz Music Hall of Fame: Manuel
Crusto on clarinet, who's been a
pro fa 45 of his 58 years; Alfred
Father Al" Lewis on 4-string
plectrum-style banjo, who started
his musical career on the Steamer
Ochita; and Preston Jackson on
trombone, the only Chicago-bred
jazzman in the band, who cut his
first album with Bernie Young's
Creole Jazz Band way back in
filled with exhuberance
1923, playing the nan his mother
had given him only three years
earlier.
James Edward "Sing" Miller
plays piano now, having played
violin, bass and banjo at the Okey
Lounge in New Orleans; Louis
Barbarin, who has toured the
U.S Europe, and Asia, is the
drummer who provides the all-
important beat; the spunky Ches-
ter Zardis, whose been playing
since 1915, beats the hell out of
his acoustic bass; and one-legged
Ernie Cagnolatt; wailson trumpet
now because, as a kid, he'd been
too small to carry a drum.
"Where are we? Is this
Greensbao?" asks one of the
band members.
"No, Greenville answers
Father Al, who has drawn a
ragged tour schedule, nearly
translucent now from countless
folds, from his back pocket.
I note that they'd had a
one-day break (in ader to travel)
during January.
"Yep, I've been all over.
Europeall over he continues.
"Folks wahn hear me, they used
have come to New Orleans,
"PRESTON JACKSON RLAYED the trombonehe cut his first
album way back in 1923 Photo by Brian Stotler
Theatre to present The National Health
The Studio Theatre at the
East Carolina Playhouse is buz-
zing with activity as the Play-
house prepares to open Peter
Nichols' satirical oomedy The
National Health, or, Nurse Nor-
ton's Affair.
The third show of the Play-
house's four-show season, The
National Health weaves several
themes together to spoof the
wald of medicine. "Documen-
tary-rear' scenes of patients
facing death are juxtoposed a-
gainst richly humaous sequences
in which the hospital staff become
highly romanticized charac-
ters of televisions's hospital
shows.
Aooording to directa Edgar
R. Loessin, the play "deals withg
the joys and pains of living in
today's society as seen through
the eyes of six male inmates in a
London hospital ward, where
concern fa individual human
DON CART WRIGHT IS a doctor
The National Health
beings is often in conflict with
aganizational efficiency.
"This production is dedicated
to the ECU medical school with
admiration, affection and a touch
of inspirational admonition
The oomedy will be perfamed
at 8:15 Feb. 20 through 25 and
Feb. 27 through March 1 in the
Studio Theatre in ECU's drama
building. General admission
turned patient in a scene from
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
tickets are $2.50 each and are
available from the Playhouse Box
Office in McGinnis Auditaium,
phaie 757-6390.
The Box Office is open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday though
Friday.
ly
out
o0tf
B.F.Goodrich
Car Care Service
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WRECKER SERVICE AVAILABLE IN CITY,
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Mailer Chain BankAmtncard. American F xpraia.
Often it shown at 8 F Goodrich itor.j Compelllivaly prtcad at B.F Goodrich daalar.
BPGoodrich Coggins Car Care
Stuff
eoe
rnoM"
0tF
oarV
nowthey take me to 'em
The band doesn't plan the
program; instead, they choose
numbers from their broad reper-
toire according to audience re-
sponse. They may play "Basin
Street Blues "You're Nobody's
Sweetheart Now "Just a Closer
Walk With Thee "I At Up the
Apple Tree traditional tunes,
adaptations, or originals by band
members. The one certainty is
that they will finish the evening
wailing with "When the Saints
Go Marching In
The gig finished, they pile on
the Greyhound bus backed to the
stage door, and head out. Eleven-
thirty p.m dinner time.
Where's the fried chicken
place? Too Far They' II just grab
burgers, tonight they have to be
inRaleigh?
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I � �.� � - Eg
Haaaaaal
Pay 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 February 1978
Pirates abuse
� I
U
Intromurals
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
The great turn around con-
tinued in Pirate basketball Tues-
day night as the red hot Bucs
downed Old Dominion 76-72.
For ihe Pirates it was their
fourth straight victory and their
first win since 1974 over ODU.
It was also sweet revenge
against the Monarches. ODU had
routed the Bucs in Minges
Coliseum 112 to89 just two weeks
ago in the most lopsided loss of
the year fa ECU.
The Bucs however showed
their real talent and ability by
gaining the win,
�" r" '�
both centers Roger Curnand Greg
Cornelius.
After Cornelius picked up two
quick fouls, Roger Carr came in
for the rest of the half.
In that half the Pirates had the
lead fa the vast majaity of the
time. Still the Monarchs clawed
away at the Bucs trying to hit a go
ahead basket.
With Don Whitaker leading
the floa game and Gray and
Krusen hitting their shots the
Pirates held onto a slim lead until
the last 15 seoonds of the first
half.
At this point ODU took a one
point lead into the locker room as
the Pirates were unable to hit a
Sports
Once again the bia twosome
fa ECU was Herb Gray and
Oliver Mack
It was Gray who led the
charge in the first half and Mack
m the .second.
The first half was a tight battle
fron start to finish. Both teams
were playing tough, physical ball.
ODU's Tommy Conrad hit the
deck numerous times along with
Roger Carr and Greg Canelius.
The tough play brought about
foul problems fa both teams. Fa
ODU, Conrad, Neyland, Reese,
Chris Picket all ga into early foul
trouble.
The Pirate foul problems were
shot at the buzzer.
The first half had to be a real
frustration fa Oliver Mack0"
who had broken Jim Medlin's
soaing recad last Saturday night
with a 47 point perfamance, was
only 1 of 9 from the field.
Mack did hit 6 of 6 free
throws, however, fa 8 points.
The second half was a differ-
ent stay however, as Mack
scaed 24 points to lead the
Pirates to victay.
In the second half the Pirates
grabbed a quick three point lead
and soon built it up to 13.
The lead was cut however, by
two questionable technical fouls
against Greg Canelius and Larry
Giliman.
ODU was able to cut the lead
even further but the Pirates
refused to give up.
Even though both Buc centers
collected their fourth fouls they
still played with reckless aran-
don.
Herb Gray who blocked num-
erous shots and grabbed 10
rebounds, kept the game on the
boards close as did Roger Carr.
With five minutes left in the
game the Pirates went to their
"weave" delay offense.
It was during this streak that
ECU had to hit well from the line
as ODU fouled the Pirates to gain
posession of the ball. Also during
that time Herb Krusen, the
number two freethrow shooter in
the oountry, missed a one and one
attempt that oould have put the
game on ice.
Still the Pirates wouldn't be
stopped as they hit mpatant
freethrows to beat ODU fa oily
the fourth time in recent ECU
histay.
Fa the game Oliver Mack was
12 of 24 from the field and 8 of 9
from the line fa 32 points.
Herb Gray shot a hot 7 of 12
from the floa and was 6 of 10
from the line. He also hauled
down a team high 10 rebounds.
Herb Krusen also shot in
double figures hitting 6 of 7 from
the field fa 12 points.
Fa the game the Pirates shot
59.2 precent from the floa.
Gn
9 9
lers face UNC
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Although the East Carolina
wrestling team has suffered
through a somewhat disappoint-
ing season thus far, Pirate head
coach Bill Hill is the first to admit
a victay over ACC rival Nath
Carolina could certainly change
some things.
East Carolina, now 3-6 over-
all, lost to the Tar Heels earlier in
the season 25-15 and since then
have also dropped two matches to
N.C. State. The Pirates have
never lost to both UNC and N.C.
State during the same season.
"A win over Nath Carolina
might be just what we need
said Hill. "After those two dose
losses to N.C. State it would
certainly pick things up fa us,
especially with a big match
against William and Mary coming
up next week
Once again, the key to victay
over North Carolina will be the
Pirates' perfamance in the lower
weight classes. In the first
meeting back in January, the
Heels won four of the first five
matches to take a commanding
16-0 lead, befae the Pirates
managad to oome back and win
four of the last six. But by then,
UNC's early advantage was too
much fa ECU to overcome in the
upper weights.
"We're capable of winning
admitted Hill, "but we've just got
to get a oouple of wins early if
we're going to pull it off. The
key to the match will be how we
wrestle at 118 and 134.
Freshman Bob Passino (9-8)
will probably face UNC's Bobby
Monahan (5-2) at 118. Monahan
defeated Passino 12-6 in the first
match although Passino wrestled
the entire match with an injured
knee. Howeva, Passino is almost
back at full strength and will be
ready to go.
"He shot in on me early and I
got my knee twisted right at the
beginning of the match said the
Falls Church, Va. native.
"That was the turning point
because I just limped around the
rest of the match. I should have
won, I just choked.
"I know we can beat them
though oontinued Passino. "I
should have won my match and
Paul Osman and Steve Goode
should have won their matches. If
we could have taken those we
would have beaten them
In the 134 pound weight dass,
Paul Osman (14-7-2) will probably
meet Joe Galli (2-1). Osman was
beaten by UNC's Kenny Evans in
the first match but Evans has
been sidelined with an injury
most of the season.
East Carolina will be without
the services of freshman star
Butch Revils in the 167 weight
dass. Revils is out of the lineup
with the flu and will be replaced
by either Aubrey Wynne a David
McNamara.
"It'sanaher tough break but
you've got to keep going said
Hill. "Without Butch it's really
going to be tough which is all the
mae reason we need a oouple of
wins in the lower weights
Completing the rest of the
Pirates' lineup will be Charley
McGimsey at 126, Dan Foster a
Frank Prewett at 142, Frank
Schaede at 150, Steve Goode at
158, Vic Nathrup at 177, Jay
Dever at 190, and D.T. Joyner at
heavyweight.
Joyner, currently ranked fifth
in the nation by National Mat
News, owns a 14-1 recad and is
9-0 in dual matches.
East Carolina will host Wil-
liam and Mary Feb. 23 in its last
dual match of the stison befae
moving on to the Eastern Re-
gional March 3-4 in Williams-
burg, Va.
byJOHNEVANS
Dunk registration
Last vear the NBA held its own spedal Slam Dunk contest as a
publidty gimmick fa its televised games. Now the East Carolina
campus will be treated to the same as the ECU intramural department
will be holding ECU'S first ever Intramural Slam Dunk oontest from
Feb. 27 to March 2 in Memaial gym.
Any ECU student who is not affiliated with the Varsity basketball
team is eligible to oompete fa the title of "Doda Dunk The
competition will be divided into two levels fa those dunkers standing
6-3 and under and those standing at over 6-3. A total of six dunks will
be used to determine the winner, four mandatay dunks and two
free-style dunks in which competitas can truly "show their stuff
Among the mandatay dunks will be a lay-up dunk, and one-handed
reverse dunk, a distance dunk, and an under the basket dunk fa the
6-3 and under divisioi. Fa the over 6-3 division, a distance dunk and
an under the basket dunk. Each dunk will be graded on a five-point
scale fa style and awarded five points fa a good bucket - since the idea
is to make the basket. Five points will be deduded as a "technical
foul" if any oompetita is caught hanging on the rim during a dunk try
a during pradice.
Registration fa the Slam Dunk competition will begin on February
21 and run through February 24. Fa mae details drop by the
intramural office and see Steve Millard a Sam Williams.
We missed bringing you up to date on intramural bowling last
week, so we'll give you the leading individual highs of the year so far.
In men'splay, Mark Matthews of the Sigma Nu Number One team has
rolled both the high game and high set. His high game was 234 and his
high set was 585. Jeff Fasythe of the Zack Attack has the highest
average fo 178.5. The high team set is 2,086 by the Soott Studs. The
women's leaders are Nancy Quincy and Jeannie Williams. Williams
has the high set of 512 and the high average of 153.3 while Q lincy has
the high game of 217. The Strikers have the high team set with 1646.
Intramural Ice Ball begins its fourth week with eight of the 31 teams
still unbeaten. The best teams to this point seem to be the
Neaomancer- and the Macaroni Malefada. Bah teams play in the
same league, but haven't met yet. They should both make the playoff,
too, since the top two teams fromeach of the fiveleagues will make the
playoffs.
Leading their respedive divisions going into this week were
unbeaten Ice Busters in Rink League, the Ice Bums and Bourbon On
Ice, both unbeaten, in the Shoes league; the Neaomancers and the
Macaroni MalefadasintheBall League; Who knows in the Ice league,
and the Ice Holes in the Puck league.
Intramural men'sand women's basketball play has entered the last
week and there are still nine unbeaten men's teams and three
unbeaten women's teams.
Leading the list in the men's league are the Nuttie Buddies (6-0),
the Carolina Stars (7-0), the Jones Jaguars (6-0), the Jones Bones (6-0),
Who Knows (6-0), the Enfacers (6-0), the Mudsharks (6-0), the
Heartbreak Kids (6-0), and the Hatchets (5-0). Among the other top
teams are the Scott Non1Playing White Boys and the Belk Pleasers.Both
have only one loss, which resulted from a fafeit assessed them fa
missing the Intramural Captians' meeting befae the season. In ader
to make the playoffs they must finish the regular season undefeated.
While every other division has an unbeaten team top its ranks, the
fraternity division does not - as Lambda Chi Alpha and Kappa Alpha
lead the league with 5-2 recads. They are one game ahead of a pack of
three teams with three losses each. Four teams from the Fraternity
League will make the playoffs.
In women's play the three remaining unbeatens are the Peace
Pirates, the Jarvis Jumpshots, and Sigma Sigma Sigma. Teams with
one loss each are the Cotten Bunnoes, Hypertension, and Alpha Xi
Delta. Playoffs begin Wednesday in the saaity divisioi and on
Thursday fa the other leagues.
Softball play will begin following spring break and the Intramural
offidals' dinic will be held on Wednesday, March 1 from 4 to 7 p.m. in
room B-102 of Brewster Building. The entire dinic will be held on one
day this year. This date is different is different from the one listed on
your intramural master schedule, so be sure to change it so you won't
miss the oppatunity to pick up extra buck this spring.
Registration fa intramural softball will begin on Februrary 27 and
i-n through March 1. Spring break is Mrach 5-12 and softball play will
begin March 13.





Pirates fare well in Winth
16 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
9 �
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
This past weekend, the Lady
Pirates traveled to Rock Hill,
South Carolina to play in one of
the season's biggest tournaments
fa girl's basketball on the East
Coast.
The Wintrhop Tournament
attracts such schools as Georgia,
UNC-Greensboro, Appalachian,
College of Charleston, and Long-
wood College.
ECU opened the tournament
facing a very tough Long wood
team, a team that had previously
beaten the Pirates in Farmville,
VA. by a single point.
"We didn't play well against
them (Longwood) the first time,
and in this tournament we sure
didn't play up to par said
Catherine Bolton, head coach of
the Lady Pirates. "We were just
not aggressive enough on de-
fense, and nothing would fall on
offense
Nevertheless, the team was
ahead at halftime by four and
continued to hold the lead and
control the tempo of the game.
Unfortunately, Longwood
came out at the start of the second
half shooting red hot, and nothing
head coach Bolton could do was
able to stop the hot Longwood
team.
"They just didn t miss a shot
the second half said Bolton.
We were shooting better too,
but Longwood just wasn't missing
a thing. We really would have
liked to avenge our earlier season
Trackettes
compete
ByPAM WALLACE
Staff Writer
Coach Laurie Arrants was
pleased with the performance of
her track team Saturday at the
University of Delaware. She said
that the meet helped the team to
evaluate training so far this
season. Considering the weeks of
dismal weather in Greenville and
the limited practice opportunities,
the girls performed well. Some-
times practices have been as
infrequent asoncea week making-
the performance that much more
respectable.
The meet was held in the
Univeristy of Delaware's beauti-
ful indoor facility. It was a long
meet (1:00-8:30) with good fast
competition. Sammy .Sampson
took 5th in the high jump. She
went out t 5'6" - her best this
season.
Sampson's teammate Maria
Gudjohnson took 3rd in the long
jump, and Cookie McPhatter
captured 6th in the same event.
Dawn Henerson, who hasn't
run for two years ran an excellent
60-yard dash. She also led off the
880 relay which placed 5th in the
meet.
Hardworking Joy Forbes
turned in her best time for t, e Vz
mile at 228. Coach Arrants had
much praise for Forbes' efforts
Sunday.
loss to them in this tournament,
but I guess it just didn't happen
The final score showed ECU
coming up on the short end of the
winning bucket, losing 74 to 71.
The next night, ECU had to
face UNC-Greensboro in the
consolation bracket of tournament
play.
"It was really difficult to get
pysched up for this game, since
the loss to Longwood the night
before was an emotional drain
said Bolton, "but the girls were
LYDIA ROUNDTREE
tournament
fantastic, and I couldn't have
asked for any more from any of
them
ECU didn't seem to have any
problems against UNC-G, run-
ning off 21 straight points in the
second half and shooting 47 per
cent from the floor.
Saturday, ECU had to play an
early morning game against a
young, Dirt tough Appalachian
team.
The Lady Pirates faired far
better then expected, having
already played two games in two
days.
ECU ran up a 31 point lead at
one point in the qame and
assured itself of rights to play in
the finals of the consolation
bracket.
In the finals of the consolation
bracket, the Lady Pirates met
southern strong horse Georgia.
"The girls seemed to peak
right about the final game said
Bolton. "I was pleased with all
our games, except the opening
one against Longwood
rt&P)fy"
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners

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open dLulu u,
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Specializing nTSJTUlJQi TOOT)
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beainnlno al 8 pm
am eol cdl
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Complete catering and
banquet facilities available.
other delicious dishes
lasagna. Stuffed peppers,
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JtflHcotti.Tettrcinl
oil iinntf 14?Wvjk � j
Soup, spaandsxavd c�rtk.DfT�d.
a vorithj of dzltdcik- byrtditnit
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uiementi





p
Pag 14 FOUHTAINHEAP 16 February 1978
Lady Pirate swimmers to meet NC State
SENIOR HELEN WALDROP
THE 77-78 LADY Pirates swimming team.
Swimmers entertain State
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
The East Carolina men's and
women s swimming teams have a
very important dual meet with
N.C. State in Minges Natatorium
on Saturday at 1 00.
This will be the last home
meet for five pirate seniors. They
are John McCauley. Billy Thorne,
Ross Bohlken, Ron Schnell
Barry McCarthy.
and
State will be brining in a very
strong team. They have been the
ACC champions fa the last eight
years. They were ranked eleventh
last year and should be the
toughest team ECU has faced
besides Alabama.
Duncan Goodhew and Dan
Harrigan will be leading the State
team. Duncan Goodhew swam on
the British Olympic team and is
ranked first in the- breaststroke.
Dan Harrigan swam for the
United States team and captured
a silver medal in the 1976
Olympics in his speciality, the
backstroke.
The swimming team feels that
with the help of the student body
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 11:00 to 10:00
Fri. &Sat. 11:00 to 11:00
hursday Lunch and Dinner Special
No. 3 Beef Tips
Texas Toast with Baked Potato and melted
butter or French Fries
All for
at the meet they can defeat State.
There will be several events that
should have tough competition.
So come out and support the
Pirates Saturday as they take on
State.
Win
a Presidential
Sports Award
in a
lifetime sport
For information
write
Presidential
Sports Award
GREENE,
RHODE ISLAND
02827
$2.09
mi
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ByPAM WALLACE
Staff Writer
When asked how swimming
affected her social life Captain
Sharon Burns replied, "Swim-
ming is our life. We eat, and
sleep, and swim The Women's
swimteam has been accused of
eating (more than sleeping and
swimming) by their male team-
mates, but it has been assured
that the men can down cookies
the lady buccaneers provide for
bus trips in record time.
Senior Helen Waldrop, a
Greenville native, likes swimming
with the men. "It makes you work
harder (She only began swim-
ming competively as a junior in
highschool where she was the
only girl on the team.) All agreed
they wouldn't like it .any other
way. The change of Ray Scharf
working with the men and women
which took place this year tough-
ened the lady Bucs. They pract-
ice between 6:45 and 8:15 in the
morning, and run to class with
frozen hair. After classes it's back
to workout, 300-5:30, which
consists of weights and lots of
hard swimming. This year the
women accompanied the men to
Florida for winter workouts dur-
ing Christmas break. It was not
the "holiday" they had anticipat-
ed; but a lot of hard work. The
season is longer this year (last year
it was from September to Decem-
ber), the workouts longer and
teugher; and relations between
men and women at the beginning
of the year weren't friendly. The
men resented the women because
they had to share pool space and
their coach. The women say that
relations are 100 per cent better
these days.
Next year looks even more
hopeful for the women's swim-
team. Scharf has some bright
recruiting prospects - though
scholarships are limited.
Julie Shaffer is the only
woman on scholarship this year.
Hers is a partial scholarship.
Besides new talent they'll
have experience plus thier co-
hesiveness to help out.
East Carolina faces final dual
meet of the season at Minges
Saturday, February 18 at 1 p.m.
I
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AN ADVENTURE IN EATING ' J
Thurs. 11:30 pm 1:30 pnVTV �
All subs for 1:00 (3J3
with purchase of soft drink �ND , I
not valid on deliveries ajj?1 fin
752-1828 706 Evans St Q '
open Mon-Sat at 11:00 Sun 12:00





IVHI
Ficklen grows slowly
16 F�bruy 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
Work on Ficklen Stadium is on
schedule, according to Athletic
Director Bill Cain.
'he project, which will add a
new press box facility and expand
seating in the stadium to 35,000,
should be finished in time fa the
1978 football season.
So far, most of the concrete for
the steel beams has been placed
down on one side of the stadium.
The steel framework fa the
new pressbox was also started
this week. Its construction is
being aided by a large crane
which was moved in last week.
Meanwhile, the old pressbox
is almost completely tan down.
When finished this Septem-
ber, the stadium will become the
fourth largest in the state,
surpassing Wake Faest's Grove
Stadium which seats 30.100.
It will also help ECU meet the
aiteria set fa membership in the
NCAA's Divisiai IA.
One of the aiteria is that a
school have a stadium that has
30,000 seats.
The first game that will be in
the newly enlarged stadium will
be against Western Carolina of
the Southern Conference.
Questions?
If you have
an
unwanted
pregnancy
� � � � help
is as close
asyour
phone
If you're troubled and uncertain
Call Hallmark Clinic and Counseling Service.
One of our telephone counselors can help you.
She can tell you about the personal and dignified
care you receive at Hallmark . . . and about a
free pregnancy test.
Our Hallmark staff includes a gynecologist,
qualified nurses . . . and specially trained
counselors. We offer first trimester abortions
for $175.00 . . . and that one fee includes lab tests,
examination, birth control information, private
counseling and follow-up visit.
First Uc�n�d abortion clinic in North Carolina.
HALLMARK CLINIC
1316 East Morehead Street
Charlotte, N. C. 28204
Call; Charlotte � 376-1615
Long Distance Toll-Free:
N. C: 1-800-432-6066
All other states: 1 -800-438-4094
AN ARTIST'S CONCEPTION of Ficklen Stadium when completed in September. Drawing by Wayne
Newman
Classifieds
for sale
VAN FOR SALE: "71 Fad
Supervan. Paneled, carpeted,
mechanically sound, body in good
shape, 4 new tires, 3 gas tanks.
$1000.00. Call 752-4745 anytime.
FOR SALE: '73 Hcoda Civic in
excellent cond. and dean. Cal.
752-2098.
FOR SALE: '71 Hcoda, Chopped,
Black, low mileage. Call 758-
3768.
FOR SALE: Les Paul Deluxe.
Natural finish, hardshell case.
Excellent cond. Call 752-2819.
FOR SALE: 4.2 cu.ft. refrigera-
ta. In excellent cond. Call
758-9950 after 530.
FOR SALE: Violin, bow, and
hardshell case. Excellent cond.
752-2819.
FOR SALE 71 Cavette with AC,
convertable. Price negotaible.
$3,800. Call 75&6119 afternoons
and evenings a 946-1429 after 6
p.m.
FOR SALE: Queen size bed in
good cond. $25.00. Lafayette
LA-950 stereo amp RK-84 8-
track player. Call Brian 756-1459.
FOR SALE: '64 van GMC 65,000
mi. Good tires, new battery,
alternata, coil, and gas pump.
Must sell, $750a best offer. Call
David at 752-9489.
torrent (jj
ROOMMATES NEEDED: to
share a house on West 4th St.
(505 W. 4th). Just 5 blocks from
campus. Nice house with fire-
place. Call 758-6890 a stop by.
MALE GRAD: student desires
female grad student a mature
female to share 2 bdrm. house
dose to campus. Call 758-6158
afternoons a evenings.
MALE ROOMMATE: needed be-
ginning March. $50 plus utilities.
Only 1 block from campus. Call
758-7519.
WANTED: Male roommate to
share apt. in Tanglewcod. Half
rent and utilities. Close to campus
(Walking distance). Call 752-
1477.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Two
bdrm. apt. $45.00 mo. Call
752-8670.
FOR SUBLEASE: 1 bdrm apt.
Available from May-August. Lo-
cated on Avery St. with central air
and water induded in rent.
752-7572.
FOR RENT: One bdrm. apt. on
1305S. CotancheSt. Upstairsapt.
with rent of 85.00 mo. plus
utilities. Call Raymond Jones.
243-2753.
WANTED: One a two female
housemates to share house 2
blocks from campus. Reasonable
rent! 752-6612 after 5 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed to share apt. dose to
campus. Rent 58.75 mo. plus
utilities. Call 758-7786.
lost
at
Tree House and Greene Dam.
Anyaie finding this ring a
knowing where it is please contad
Dotna Zills, 602 Greene Dam,
752-9052. Reward.
LOST: Two ID holders containing
ID, adivity card, license, and
library card. Please return to
Arah Venable, 302 Clement Hall,
7586120.
LOST: Brown leather ' shoulder
bag. Contains wallet, ID, drivers
license, and aher important
artides. Lost at Austin around
1130 Fri Feb. 10. Reward.
758-8210.
personal�
LOST: A topaz ring between the
WANTED: Bass player fa rock n'
roll band. Must have own equip-
ment. Fa mae infamatiai call
Ann at 753-5182.
NEEDED: Riders to Flaida fa
spring break via 17 & I-95. Call
758-9960 after 630 p.m.
WANTED: Open fishing boat, 14
feet a over. Call 752-4434.
WANTED: 1 male Siamese kitten
a laig hair. Will provide loving
home. Call Michelle a Susan at
758-7854 after 6 p.m. Also ride
Atlanta, Ga. on 2-22 a 23. Will
help with expenses.
HELP WANTED: need delivery
help, day and night. Must have
own car, call a come by Chanelc
Pizza, 758-7400.
SAIL: the Bahamas .and live
aboard a 40' ketch at spring
break. Sailing, swimming, sna-
ke! i ng, shopping at Straw market,
gambling at casino, etc. Depart-
ure Ft. Lauderdale March 4th,
return March 11th, 350.00 Side
show and discussion Thurs. at
730 p.m. Presbyterian Student
Center. Fa reservations and
mae infamatiai call a write:
Scott M Smith, P.O. Box 836,
Reidsville, N.C. 27320. 919-349-
8714.





Page 16 FOUNTAtNHEAP 16 February 1978
f� Great A&PQuaKty
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Price
j
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. FEB 18, AT A�P IN (.nijellv llli'
EM YUM IM Of Ihe ANIMAL WORLD
IN 21IMILM HAM) HOLM)
VOLIMFS
COLLECT ALL 21 VOLUMES
MAKE THIS
ENCYCLOPEDIA
AN IMPORTANT
PART OF YOUR
HOME LIBRARY
VOL 3 NOW
ON SALE
FOR ONLY $1 99
VOLUME 0NLy
NO. 1
EACH WITH $3 PURCHASE
99
iainless (flatware
ON SALE THIS WEEK
WITH EVERY $5 PURCHASE
NO PURCHASE
BEQUIHEO
atLOWCOSt!
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
PORTERHOUSE OR
T-CONE STEAKS
JANE PARKER GOLDEN 2-CUT
POUND
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Stock your freezer!
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE BONELESS
BEEF RIBS
KNV (18 TO 22 LB AVG. WT.)
mit rnrc inTH ML ��lMMLW JfdH
US d4 INSPECTED
BAKING HENS
SAVE
A 50c r
25 OZ.
PKG.
TROPHY FROZEN SLICED
STRAWBERRIES
SEALTEST (VANILLA OR STRAWBERRY
ICE CREAM
JANE PARKER
CHERRY PIES
99�
CUT FREE INTO
BONELESS RIB STEAK
. AND ROAST OR
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AND TRIMMINGS
$98
U.S.D.A.
GRADE
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONELESS TOP ROUNDS
WHOLE 14 TO 18 LB AVG
39'
B1
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CTN I
22 OZ $1 19
PKG
CUT FREE
INTO ROAST
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$38
A&P is a country larm pork shop
PORK CHOPS
99
WHOLE PORK
LOIN SLICED
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS AND WHOLESALERS
C A&P picks the best dairy
NNET
MARGARINE
A&P HOMESTYLE OR BUTTERMILK
BISCUITS
6 79c
ANN PAGE REGULAR WAFFLE
PANCAKE MIX
Ann PAGE WAFFLE 4
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STOKElY CUT OR FRENCH STYLE
59c GREEN BEANS
ALlinO A UAVo � cocomj choc cmh� 15 OZ
CHIPS AHOY � CMOC CMOC mm P�Q
3c�ns 89c
89c MIXED VEGETABLES 3&S 89c
87c CHERRY PIE FILLING 2l!i 89c
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12 $299
OAHION Of
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Offer Good Only In Greenville
We pick the best produce
WASHINGTON STATE EXTRA FANCY
APPLES
RED OR
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SAVE
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WHITE POTATOES 10 & 79c !� FOR VALENTINE'S DAY .
Z,S�tD � . it CHECK OUP EXCELLENT QUALITY
DA DC CD I I IT 4i B� of 79� U OF FRESH BLOOMING TULIPS, MUMS,
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Title
Fountainhead, February 16, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.630
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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