Fountainhead, February 9, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of o.ouu,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSIDE
Umsteadartp 6 ,
Corporal punishmentp. 7
Presi vation hallp. 9
Ladies winp. 14
Vol. No. 53, No. 35
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
9 February 1978
Committee investigates
security answering service
By A RAH V ENABLE
Staff Writer
and
STUART MORGAN
News Editor
An ad hock (temporary) com-
mittee, consisting of two mem-
bers, has been appointed by the
ECU Board of Trustees to investi-
gate the present answering ser-
vice at campus security, accord-
ing to Joseph Calder, Director of
Campus Security.
The questions concerning the
present answering service at the
security on campus have evolved
as a result of an incident early fall
semester and recent complaints.
Around September 1, 1977, a
girl was raped on campus.
Another student, looking fa help,
called campus security from a
telephone located in Garrett
Dorm.
Unfortunately, about a 10
minute period followed before
Greenville polioe arrived in the
area.
Between July 1 and December
9, 1977, there was no radio
communication between the cam-
pus police and Greenville city
police.
The answering service in the
campus security office automati-
cally contacted Greenville polioe
after receiving the student's call.
Receiving the signal but una-
ble to take the message right
away, the Greenville police pla-
ced the call on hold until someone
could do so.
After the police heard the
message, they immediately called
campus police.
However, no communication
oould be made. The Greenville
police then dispatched one of
their cars to the area on campus.
"There exists an understan-
ding between the Greenville
polioe and the campus polioe that
we handle matters in our respec-
tive areas of responsibility said
Calder.
They followed the correct
procedure. The delay was due to
the fact that there was no
effective communication between
our department and theirs in
existanceat that time explained
Calder.
"Greenville changed to a new
system, using high frequency, on
July 1 said Calder. "The
campus security office was still
using the old, low frequency
system.
"If anyone should be blamed
for the delay in our adopting the
new system, it should be the state
purchasing department said
Calder.
"We no longer have a com-
munication gap said Calder.
The campus security office
now has two systems fa commu-
nication with the Greenville
Polioe Department.
See ANSWERING, p. 3
JOE CALDER, DIRECTOR of campus security.
NCCU student dies following fraternity initiation
A 20-year-old junia at North
Carolina Central University, loc-
ated in Durham died
following an off-campusfratanity
initiation rite Saturday night.
Nathaniel Swinson, fron
Kinston, was dead on arrival at
Durham County General Hospital
Sunday maning, approximately
six hours after he oollapsed.
AuthaiUes questioned mem-
bers of the Omega Psi Phi
fraternity Tuesday in connection
with the death.
Accadinp to students,
Swinson complained erf aamps
and dizziness after running sev-
eral miles and doing exercises as
a pledge of the fraternity.
The cause of death had not
been determined Monday night,
according to Dr. Mack Ftoavis. a
state medical examiner. An
autopsy was perfamed Sunday,
but the results of several tests will
nrt be known until later, Reavis
said Tuesday.
An NCCU spokesman said
that a chapter of the fratanity
had been suspended from opaa-
ting on campus mae than a year
ago as the result of "some
infraction" of univasity regula-
tions.
The chapta was reaganized
and received a new charta from
the national fratanity, the
spokesman said.
An investigation is undaway -
to see as far as possible that
things like this don't happen
again the spokesman said.
Approved fratanities and
saaitie-b are allowed to hold
initiations on univasity grounds
so long as rules are not broken,
the spokesman said.
Aocading to univasity
officials, Swinson was a tending
NCCU ai a football schdarship
and had an insignificant histay
of high Wood pressure.
Swinson was described by Dr.
S.E. Harrell, a physician at
NCCU, as "a big, healthy fellow,
200 pounds
Two students, Edmond Purdie
and Kenneth Koonoe said they
sat up "most of the night" with
Swinson following his collapse.
They told police that Swinson
was among a group of 15 pledges
who were required to do exacises
and run four miles.
Afta completing the run,
about 3 a.m. Swinson was sweat-
ing heavily, students told police.
Swinson told them he had fallen
into a ditch.
The pledges were allowed to
rest fa a half-hour befae they
began wind-sprints. Swinson col-
lapsed from aamps while run-
ning the wind-sprints.
He was taken to an apatment,
placed in a tub of ha salt wata
and givoi a glass of salt wata at
his request.
Approximately two hours
lata, the students said they
wrapped Swinsoi in sevaai blan-
kets to keep him warm, and about
830 a.m. he asked to ue taken to
a hospital.
Enroute to the hospital, he
drank a batle of apple juioe. He
then became vay dizzy and was
unable to hold his head up, they
said.
irtment needs
replace equipment
ByJULIEEVERETTE
Staff Writa
Equipment in the bidajy
department needs repair a re-
placement but the department is
shat of money, acoading to
James S. McDaniel, professa
and Chairpason of the biology
department.
"The equipment is about 10
years old and most of it is in a
declining state McDaniel said.
"We do not have enough
money to replace the equipment
and the state is not in a position to
fund us
McDaniel feels the lack of
funds is due to continuing inflated
costs.
According to McDaniel, a
maja patiai of the funds cane
fran the state.
Fa the purpose of working to
improve the equipment the
biology department has famed
an Equipment Conmittee accord-
ing to McDaniel.
Three people presently serve
on the oommittee.
The oommittee will set pria-
ities fa the purchase d new
equipment and review the state of
equipment fa possible repairs
and replacement, acoading to
McDaniel.
"The oornnittee will make an
effort to find out which pieces of
equipment are in poa shape and
attack them one at a time
McDaniel said.
"The menoy would be betta
spent to replace the present
equipment ratha than buy new
types of equipment McDaniel
said.
"We have to set priaities
McDaniel said.
Ario Guthrie to appear.
mmm
ARLO GUTHRIE WILL appear In concert next Monday at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Tickets are $3 and $5.
"Arlo remains a roving troubador oftraditional AmericaHis
style is dry and witty, matching the material he mites. He comes
on like a new Lenny Bruce See article p. "
10.





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Bikers
Concert
The Student Union Major
Attractions committee will pre-
sent Arlo Guthne in oonoert at
Wright Auditorium, Mon Feb.
13 at 8 p.m.
Arlo Guthne is a mellow folk
singer whose unique style of
performing has received wide
acclaim throughout the country.
Arlo credits much of his
unique folk singing style to his
father, the legendary Woody
Guthne.
One of the most fascinating
aspects of an Arlo Guthne concert
is Arlo's ability to combine
narration and music in a very
special and personal way, there-
by captivating his audience.
This factor alone accounts fa
Arlo's universal appeal and elev-
ates him to a position of prom-
inence among others in the folk
entertainment field. In addition,
Arlo is a superb songwriter,
guitarist, and a bnllaint producer
with eight albums to his credit.
The magic of an Arlo Guthne
concert is a performance you
won't want to miss.
Chemistry
W. S. Kistler, professor of
chemistry at the University of
South Carolina, will present a
seminar on "The Chemical Basis
of Masculinity: A Look at the
Mechanism of Action of
Androcens , Feb. 10 at 2 p.m. in
room 201, Flanagan bldg.
Refreshments will be served
in the conference room.
LIBS
Alpha Beta Alpha, National
Library Science honor fraternity,
will meet in the LIBS student
lounge on Feb. 14, promptly at 4
p.m. All members please attend -
it won't be too long!
FG
The Forever Generation in-
! vites you to join us Monday nights
for Chnstain fellowship and fun.
We ll be having a relevant Bible
study, a good singing, and
delicious refreshments. Speaking
this Monday will be Don Tioe,
former president of the Forever
Generation national organization.
We meet at 9 p.m. in Brewster
C-304. Why not plan on being
there?
Sigma Phi Ep
Don't have anything to do
Valentine's Day? 3gma Phi
Epsilon will have a Valentine
party Tues Feb. 14, at Chapter
Ten.
There will be plenty of music,
50 oents beverage, prizes and
oontesi
Ccx aJeo-
tine's D � .x until 1
h m. at O �. :
Fellowship
Come to the meeting of
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow-
ship, thisSunday night, where we
will discuss the greatest love of
all: the love of God. The meeting
will be at the Afro-American
Cultural Center, at 8 p.m.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffee-
house committee will hold audit-
ions Fri Feb. 10, at 730 p.m in
room 15 Mendenhall.
Drop by and take advantage of
the best (and cheapest) entertain-
ment around. Fifty cents gets you
in the door for some great music
and free eats.
Psychology
All psychology majors and
minors are invited to apply for
membership into the psychology
honor society, Psi Chi.
Applications are located in the
psychology departmental office.
Minimum requirements are:
being in the upper V3 of your
class; having completed at least 8
semester hours in psychology;
and having at least a -B"
average in psychology.
Phi Alpha
Attention all new Phi Alpha
Theta members! Every new mem-
ber must fill out an official
registration card and pay his or
her initiation fee in order to
recievea membership certificate.
The society will meet Mon
Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Todd
Room. Each member may take
care of the aforementioned items
of business at this time.
Another announcement: pic-
tures fa the BUCCANEER will
be taken at the Feb. 20 meeting.
Please wear semi-famal attire fa
the sha.
A business sessiai and re-
freshments will follow. All mem-
bers - old and new - are urged to
attend this meeting.
Lecture
Leonard Nimoy will appear
Wed Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre. Nimoy is presented by
the Student Union Lecture Series
oommittee. The topic of his
lecture is "Mr. Speck and I
Admission fa ECU students is
free with ID and Activity card.
Happy hour
Don't miss "Happy Hour" at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Every Monday afternoon, from 3
p.m. until 6 p.m billiards and
00
naly you
or
jn
Theatre
To those bikers who are
interested in faming a club call
Tommy Dickens at 752-9821. This
aganizatiot is being famed in
cooperation with the ECU Intra-
mual Dept.
Bowling
Whether you'd like to polish
up your game with some steady
practice a invite three friends
along fa sane friendly compet-
ition, you can rent a bowling lane
to use fa aie hour and it only
costs $2.50. Lane rentals are
available at the Mendenhall
Bowling Center every Saturday
from neon until 6 p.m. Stop by
and try it out, it's a great way to
spend an hour.
The Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter Dinner Theatre will be presen-
ting Bill Manhoff's play "The
Owl and the Pussycat" on Feb. 9,
10, 11 and 12. Tickets are now
available fa perfamanoes of the
play which is to begin at 8 p.m.
each night except Sunday when
curtain time is set fa 6 p.m.
Dinner is at 7 p.m. nightly
save fa Sunday when it will be
served at 5 p.m. The ECU
Department of Home Eoonomics
will prepare and serve the meals
which will consist of turkey with
cranberry jelly, beef burgandy
with rice, sweet potato casserole,
minted green peas, haseradish
beets, tossed salad, assated
French rolls, peach cobbler with
whipped aeam, ooffee and tea.
Applications Camp
Applications are now being
accepted fa Attaney-General.
Deadline to apply is Mon Feb.
13 at 12 noon. Apply in SGA office.
The Blue Ribbon oommittee will
meet Mon Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. in
Whichard room 220.
All MRC members and their
dates are invitea to the MRC
Valentine Day Dance. Tickets are
available from your residence hail
officers. The Ethics will be
playing fa this Feb. 14 semi-
tamai event at the Moose Ledge.
See the posters in the dams fa
mae infamaiiai.
Peace corps
The newly opened Peace
Caps office is located in room 425
of the Flanagan Bldg. Drop in a
call 757-6586 fa infamatiai.
Spoleto fest
Program and Ticket Infam-
atiai Brochures will be mailed to
everyone who is on thp -Spoleto
Festival mailing list. Toget on the
list, oontact Spoleto Festival
Tickate, Post Office Box 704,
Charleston, South Carolina
29402, 803-722-2764.
Spoleto Festival, the wald's
most comprehensive arts festival,
iscelebrating itssecond season in
Charleston. It will present opera,
dance, drama, music, and vir-
tually all of the perfaming and
visual arts.
Crafts
Spring Semester member-
ships are now available fa the
Mendenhall Student Center
Crafts Center. This hobby area is
fa use by all fulltime ECU
students, faculty, and staff.
Photography, ceramics, jewelry,
and textiles are some of the aaft
areas in which members may
wak. Located at the ground f loa
a� Mendenhall, the Crafts Center
operating hours are from 3 p.m.
� II
Ext
On Feb. 16 Hugh H�Cameron
will be at the Methodist Student
Center, 501 E. 5th St to
interview interested students fa
jobs as camp counselas and staff
members. Applicants will be able
to choose between three camps:
Chestnut Ridge in Efland, Don-
Lee near Arapahoe, and Rockfish
near Parkton.
Interviews will be between 10
and 12 a.m. and appointments
should be made befae this date.
Fa mae infamatiai and ap-
pointments call Methodist
Student Center at 758-2030.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Student Center table tennis
rooms each Tuesday evening at 8
p.m. when the Table Tennis Club
meets. You will find players of all
levels of ability participating.
Various activities, including
ladder tournaments, are often
scheduled. All ECU students,
faculty, and staff are welcome.
Concert
Tonight, Thurs. Feb. 9, a
contemporary Chnstain group,
The Bridge, will be in oonoert at
Martin Community College Aud-
itaium in Williamston. Everyone
is invited to cone with the Full
Gospel Student Fellowship to this
free oonoert. We will meet in the
lobby of Mendenhall at 720 and
leave at 7 30.
YAF
V.A.F. will present a film
Occurences at C wl Creek Bridge,
Fri March 3 in Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditaium.
Models
Models needed fa figure
drawing aasses. Contact School
of Art, Wesley Crawley (room
1340 Elizabeth Ross (room
215U Geage U& mres (room
Testing
The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be oompleted
and mailed to Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
Feb. 24. Applications are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Bldg, Room 105, ECU.
Testing
The Allied Health Profes-
sions Admission Test will be
offered at ECU on Sat March 11.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to the
Psychological Caporatioi, P.O.
Box 3540, Grand Central Station,
New Yak, N.Y. 10017 to arrive by
Feb. 11. Applications may be
obtained from the Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Bldg ECU.
Practice
Alright girls, pracuce those
kicks, trim that waist! Pom Pom
tryouts will be held tha weekend
of March 17, 18, K 19. Check
FOUNTAINHEADandctorm bull-
etins fa mae infamatiai later.
Plan ahead
Tutoring
Free tutaing services are
available fa minaity and a
disadvantage students who are
interested in improving their
academic progress to become
nurses, allied health profes-
sionals, and physicians. Contact
the Center fa Student Oppatun-
ities, 208 Ragsdale Hall.
VAr
The Visual Arts Faum will
hold a general meeting fa all art
students Fri Feb. 10, 12 noon in
Jenkins Auditaium. There will
be a great free film shown
immediately following the meet-
ing. All interested parties attend.
BUCCANEER
Anyone interested in the
positions of advertising sales-
person a business manager of
the BUCCANEER, please come
by the office and apply by
February 20th. Applicants should
have yearbook experience and
must have taken some business
courses. The editor will be in from
2-5 p.m. on Tues. and Thurs.
English
Interested in a writing job fa
Fall term? The English Depart-
ment's Practicum program has
openings in Washington, D.C
Greenville and surrounding
areas; Atlanta, GA; and Raleigh.
Full-time a part-time wak is
available, fa which you receive
three to si x semester aedit hours.
Scr up
yot '? interested
1 1 .





9 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Greek forum
By JAY CHAMBERS
IFC Public Relations
The college Greek society is as
old as this country itself. It was
founded on Dec. 5, 1776.
The Declaration of Indepen-
dence had been signed the
previous July, and the oc.onies
were in open rebellion. Amidst
this atmosphere, a group of
William and Mary students gath-
ered at Raleigh Tavern in Wil-
liamsburg and founded Phi Beta
Kappa, the first American Greek
letter society.
It was established "to foster
friendship, morality and learn-
ing
Phi Beta Kappa served as
precedent fa fraternities to fol-
low.
Since then, fraternities and
saaities alike have grown tre-
mendously and have spread
throughout our nation.
TaJay the fraternity system in
America is a reflection of our
American society. This reflection
has changed during the nation's
history just as society itself has
changed.
This did not spell the demise
of fraternities, but rather their
growth. A growth in not only
supplying, a basic sociological
need but also an atmosphere in
which each member can exper-
ience the essence of group living,
social responsibility, self-govern-
ment, community leadership and
lasting friendships.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Sig-Ep's this past week-
end had five brothers and a
pledge attend their annual re-
gional academy in Knoxville,
Tenn.
Asa special treat they had the
oppatunity to meet their newly
elected Grand President, John W.
Hartman. Also, Robert Brinkley
was presented the district six
Sigma Phi Epsilon National Scho-
larship Award.
Sig-Ep's will be celebrating
Valentine's Day with a cocktail
party followed by a famal danoe
at Lake Ellswath.
Sigma Sigma Sigma inducted
two new pledges, Kim Johnson
and Karen Schlerp. Like all
saaities and fratanities, the
Sigmas are waking hard on
"All-Sing" fa the upcoming
production on March 2.
Delta Zeta saaity has been
quite active during the months of
January and February.
They participated in the Cere-
bral Palsy Telethon fa Branch
Banking and Trust Co. They are
currently involved in a fund
raising project with the Phi
Kappa Tau and Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternities fa the Pirates
Club.
Proceeds will go toward en-
larging Ficklen Stadium.
Delta Zeta Carol Perkins is the
new Sigma Phi Epalon sweet-
heart.
Diane Kyker has beerv named
to " Who's Who Among American
Colleges and Universities
The new president of the
Delta Zetas is Faye Hall. The
Panhellenic Council held elec-
tions and Carol Perkins has been
elected as carespondence secre-
tary.
Answering service now operating efficiently
Continued from p. 1
One system, the waJkie-talkie
type, enables campus police to
talk with the Greenville police
anywhere and anytime, said
Calder.
The other system oonsists of
two remote communication units
on two of the desks in the security
office.
Calder demonstrated each of
the two systems and each one
operated efficiently.
"Another problem area in
communication, still unsolved, is
with the radio dispatchers who
wak here at the security office
said Calder.
In the fall semester of 1975,
the board of trustees asked the
Chapel Hill Board of Trustees fa
two permanent radio dispatchers
to wak full-time at the security
office, said Calder.
' But, the board denied the
fund salaries fa the two person- Calder.
John Minges renames
Thursday night at ECU
ECUNEWSBUREAU
John F. Minges, Greenville
businessman and trustee of East
Carolina University, apparently
has a good pipeline onto the ECU
campus.
Carolyn Fulghum, dean of
women, presented a repat on a
campus visitation policy quest-
lonaire. and added that Thursday
nights appeared to be most noisy
in the women'sdamitaies.
Minges told the board his
infamation is that at ECU,
there isn't any such thing as
Thursday night. It's little
Friday.
BONANZA CONTINUES IT S
AMAZING COUPON OFFERS
Offers good with coupon through Feb. 15
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SIRLOIN STEAK DINNER
U .S. D .A . Choice
includes texas toast,
$1.99
Large baked potato plus
all you can eat from
our super salad bar
Offer good any day 11-9 p.m. Thru Feb. 15
RIBEYE DINNER
Includes texas toast,
$1.49
Large baked potato plus
all you can eat from
our super salad bar
Offer good MonSat. 11-4 thru Feb. 15
TRY US !
BONANZA
520 W. Greenville Blvd.
264 By-Pass
WE'VE
CHANGED !
nel we requested.
"As a result, we now have
only two part-time dispatchers
supplied to use by the financial
aid office said Calder.
The security office can't ex-
pect those two students to be
available all the time, said
"What we need is two full-
time radio dispatchers said
Calder. "But, there is nothing we
can do about it
"We're still operating this
campus like the small one it used
to be as ECTC. Our existing
system, although not the best, is
effective now
ARMYNAVY
STORE
Pea coats, field flights, bomb .
snorkel, tanker jackets. Rainwear,
parkas, comboots. work clothes,
dishes. 1501 S. Evans Street. Open
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Phone 752-7105
8 a.m7:30 p.m.
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Phone 758-4104
8 a.m10 p.m.
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Candies by:
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Whitman
Hollings worth
Pangburn 35� to $49.95
RED FOIL HEART
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SATIN HEART 2 LB
ASSORTED
CHOCOLATES
LB.





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Legis. acts irresponsibly
The SGA Legislature Monday night debated the
means by which the Media Board was created, and
questioned the "secrecy" under which the proposal
to create an independent media board was presented
to the ECU Board of Trustees last week. Some
legislators went as far to say the board of trustees
meetings were also "secret
In the first place, the board's meetings are open
to the public. Any student, faculty or staff member,
indeed, any interested person may attend. Unfortu-
nately, some legislators obviously do no homework
before attending legislature meetings.
President Neil Sessoms told the legislature that
the creation of the Media Board did not take any
money from needed areas such as the transit system,
legal service, or loans to students. The same amount
of money that is usually spent on publications, the
photo lab, and WECU each year was merely
extracted from the SGA budget and put under the
control of an independent Media Board.
Treasurer Craig Hales and many legislators
apparently feel that this amount of money will cause
a cutback in funds for symposiums, the Marching
Pirates band, the Visual Arts Forum and many other
useful activities. There is absolutely no way this will
happen. Hales, being SGA treasurer, should know
that this arrangement will not hurt the funds of other
organizations.
The legislature each year has appropriated money
to each campus publication, the photo lab, and
WECU radio. The lump sum of this money, an
estimated $125,000, has been taken from the SGA
budget, the same amount of money that would be
spent on publications next year, and put under the
control of the Media Board.
Hales and his cohorts are actually complaining
about nothing. Next year, instead of each publication
submitting a budget request to the legislature, the
budget requests will be scrutinized by the Media
Board and this board will appropriate money to each
publication.
Hales called Sessoms a "liar saying that
Sessoms tdd the board of trustees that the ratio of
students voting in favor of independent publications
last fall was 3 to 1, not 2 to 1. The 3 to 1 ratio was
stated on the proposal given to board members and
legislators.
However, Sessoms had said prior to Hales'
accusation that the board members had been tdd of
the mistake and actually did know that the ratio was 2
to 1, and not 3 to 1. Hales obviously was not
listening.
Tommy Joe Payne, former speaker of the
legislature, was criticized by some legislators fa not
informing the legislature of the board of trustees
meeting. It was not Payne's duty to inform the
legislature of every public meeting on this campus.
As speaker, Payne's duty was to offidate at the
legislative meetings.
The legislature then proceeded to make its
biggest faux pas of all this year. The legislature voted
to recal I Speaker Payne. I n a rdl-calI vote of 23 to 11,
Payne was ousted from his position.
Perhaps never before, except during some
instances in last year's spring election, has the
legislature acted in a more irresponsible manner.
The legislature voted Payne out of the speaker's
position fa absdutely no reason.
When the legislature was asked by Legislata
Charles Sune what charges it was bringing against
Payne, the legislative body had no answer.
The legislature owes it to the student body to tell
just why it voted Payne out as speaker. Citing "the
drcumstances" is not the answer. The legislature
acted sdely on emotions, not on facts.
Hopefully, the student body will carefully
examine the politicians who took such inane action in
the legislature and take care not to vote them into any
office again.
0.klAJtio KBBPS DRoppNG TH&S E PJNS.
Forum
independent media, Payne defended
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
As a conoerned student of
ECU I attended the meeting of
SGA Legislature Monday night,
Feburary 6. I attended the
meeting to increase my know-
ledge of how our legislature is
run.
The major item of discussion
was the passage by the ECU
Board of Trustees, of a proposal
making FOUNTAINHEAD,
BUCCANEER, and other publica-
tions at ECU "independent pub-
lications This meant that a
lump sum of money fa these
would be alotted to a special
board from SGA who would have
the responsibility of appropriat-
ing the money among the publica-
tions. Also, the proposal leaves
all publications free from SGA
control. I feel this is a good
proposal and will aid campus
publications greatly.
The most upsetting event of
the entire meeting was the
suggestion and procedings for a
re-election of speaker of the
legislature. The speaker, Tommy
Joe Payne, was cut down, and his
judgement and credibility quest-
ioned by several legislators.
These individuals used as
their argument the fact that
Tommy Joe didn't inform them of
the meeting of the board of
trustees on Tuesday, January 31.
Tommy Joe had no responsibility
to tell the legislature because the
meeting was open to the public
and anyone oould attend. He
attended because he wished to
and answered questions from the
board members, stating his own
opinion.
Public records will be avail-
able fa the public to view. The
legislature voted fa the re-
elediai, Tanmy Joe was nomin-
ated, but declined, and Ron
Marisoi was nominated, after
which ncminatiois were closed.
Fton became speaker of the
legislature by a majaity vote.
I feel that a great injustice has
been done Tommy Joe Payne. He
has served well in his position and
shows good leadership ability due
to the suppat of the student
body.
Now I would like to make this
appeal to each legislature mem-
ber. Examine your credibility
befae taking action against a
fellow member of the legislature,
there may be no action taken
because of Monday night's meet-
ing, but I hope that the students
of ECU will oome to the legisla-
ture meetings and see what
actions and attitudes the legisla-
tures take on our behalf.
Concerned Day Student,
DcnaldC. Wiiliams
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor over fifty years.
Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6306.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.





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Forum
9 February 1978 FOUNTAINMEAD Page 5
Tyler dorm coeds angered at campus cops' slack response
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
After standing in 24
degree weather at 2 a.m. this
past weekend for over 15
minutes, it would be putting it
mildly to say that we were gald to
finally see a campus policeman
driving up the hill. But is it
beyond us why he turned and
went to Scott Dorm rather than
letting us in Tyler. It certainly
couldn't be because he didn't see
Give Gillman
'fair chance'
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
The ever-increasing cries
for the resignation of Coach Larry
Gillman are premature by approx-
imately 700 days. Although he
shamelessly misrepresented his
product in the pre-season, he has
been granted three years to build
a team for which he will be
primarily responsible.
During the next two years,
Gillman will not be able to hype
fans into Minges. Instead, he will
have to assemble and coach an
exciting team that hopefully will
also win a few games. The
athletic department could make
this difficult task easier by
pumping as much money as is
legally possible into the basket-
ball program. While this suggest-
ion is repungent to several
people, particularly those assoc-
iated with minor sports, money
spent at this crucial time could
show a magnificent return over
the next few years.
When the selection committee
decided on Gillman, a three-year
contract was offered to lure him
from USF. If he isaxed, this same
committee will ask his successor
to produce a winner in one season
or else. Any offers of job security
should and will be viewed by
applicants as having the same
validity as those offered to Coach
Gillman.
Why anyone expects the
committee to do a better job
selecting a coach this year than
they did last year is beyond my
comprehension. I personally do
not care for Gillman's personal-
ity, but I do feel that the athletic
department and the University
should give the man a fair chance
to build his own team.
R. Davis Miller
Don't forget
forum policy
R1QGAH
SHOESHOP
REPAIR AJ.L
LEATHER OOOOS
Downtown Greenville
tani tan
us, especially since there were
nine of us huddled up under the
flashing light, all screaming for
him to come let us in. Finally,
someone in the dorm woke up
from all the noise we were making
and came to let us in.
We have no doubt that if we
had been in a men's dorm at that
time of night, we would have had
no trouble finding a cop; but
when we vere doing what we
were supposed to, there were
none to be found. When we called
to file a complaint all the woman
said was to call Monday morning;
she couldn't help us unless we
had been raped. It seems like that
is just a little too late fa that kind
of help. What security!
As far as we are concerned,
and many other people we have
talked to, the dorm visitation
policy has been extremely outdat-
ed and in need of revision for a
long time. College students
should be able to come and go as
they please, because they are
certainly old enough to decide
how they want to act. When we
called, we were toid it was our
responsibility to get in before the
door was locked. But we have the
same visitation policy as the guys
who can come and go as they
please, and therefore we should
be able to get in whenever we
decide to come in.
We don't know if the solution
is hiring more cops, leaving the
door unlocked, giving us all keys
to a main door (as other universi-
ties do), or what; but something
needs to change soon.
Signed;
Pam Davis
Joan Hughes
Susan Hardee
Joy Nichols
Dawn Flowers
Lynne Scarboro
Peggy Stoitz
Cathy Wetherington
Beth Massey
Brenda Hairr
DOo Showers
Tyler Dorm
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Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Umstead holds exhibit
By STUART MORGAN
News Editor
Six amateur photographers
from Umstead dorm exhibited
over 50 pictures in a photography
exhibit held Monday in the main
lobby of their dorm.
The Cultural Education Com-
mittee, under the House Council
of Umstead, sponsored the exhi-
bit.
Jeffrey P. Swisher, chairman,
said the committee's aim was
to recognize the photography
ability of students living in
Umstead.
The six students who entered
pictures were: Leon O. Robbins
Jr Allan Bolan, Richard Hair,
David Norris, Mike Duggins.and
Fleet Woodly.
The exhibit was free and no
winner was selected, said Swish-
er.
"We had some very good
pictures and most of the people
who came were very impressed
added Swisher.
Both black and white and color
pictures in a wide range of sizes
included landscapes, portraits,
still life, and abstracts.
' The Cultural committee here
in Umstead Dorm held an art
exhibit during last fall, and we
plan to have another one on April
17 he further added.
Swisher said the public is
always invited, although partici-
pants in such exhibits are limited
to those living in Umstead.
'How to buy hi-fi' class
to be offered March 15
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at College View
Cleaners
ECU NEWS BUREAU
"How to Buy Hi-Fi an
evening mini-class for the novice
who wants a "good-sounding
system" but is confused by the
various components on the mar-
ket, will be offered by ECU,
Wed March 15, 650-930 p.m.
Participants will acquire the
basic information to make the
best purchase when putting toge-
ther a sound system for home or
office. The following questions
will be answered:
What is high fidelity, and how
� m2 ���
Sue SHOPS rGREENVlUE and NAGS HEAD. NORTH CAROLINA
i
SPECIAL
I OFFER
50OFF
On Steak Sandwiches
Italian Sausage
Sandwiches
Deli Sandwiches
Offer Good Tues Feb. 7-
Tues Feb. 14
(not valid on deliveries)
Fast Free Delivery
To Campus
Open daily 11 am 1 a.m.
Sun Thurs. 6:00- 12:00 p.m.
Call 758- 0346
does stereo work?
What is quadraphonic sound,
and should I consider it?
How can components be mix-
ed and matched for the best
sound and value?
How should a dealer be
selected, and how can I avoid
being "ripped-off?"
The oourse will also help the
consumer-participant interpret
technical test reports and provide
instructions for the care of
records, the biggest long-term
investment in any sound system.
Instructor fa the mini-class is
James Rees, a member of the
ECU speech and broadcasting
faculty and director of ECU Radio
Services.
ECU STUDENTS TURN their backs to the cold wind and look forward
to warmer weather; despite Wednesday's blue and sunny skies, the
weatherman predicts continuing cold for awhi.e. Last week's snow sure
WaS fun Photo by Brian Stotler
Carter to announce aid program
President Carter will an-
nounce a major national aid
program to provide $700 million
for oollege students from middle-
inoome families on Wednesday,
according to Congressional lead-
ers.
Carter feels the program is
needed because the 71 percent
jump in oollege oosts has put the
students' chances fa higher
education in jeopardy.
The new program will be
aimed at the middle-income
group of Americans because
other programs have benefited
the poa a the wealthy, accading
to House Speaker Thomas P.
O'Neill.
Carter, hoping to stave off a
move in Congress to give a $250
tax aedit to the parents of all
oollege students, will propose a
combination of grants and loans
using $700 million he set aside in
his 1979 budget, said White
House press secretary Jody
Powell.
Under the government's cur-
rent $2.2 billion program, most
basic grants go to students from
families earning less than
$10,000.
At present, some 2.4 million
students attending oollege next
fall are expected to receive basic
grants averaging just under $900
apiece.
Fa 1979, Carter has proposed
$4 billion fa existing programs to
help college students.
He also proposed raising the
maximum grant from $1,600 to
$1,800and making mae students
eligible.
Between 1967 and 1975, Pow-
ell said, the oollege cost inaease
has put the average cost of
tuition, room and board fa each
student attending private school
at mae than $4,000 a year.
Fa each student attending a
public college a university, the
cost has climbed toabout $2,000 a
year, according to Powell.
ATTIC
Fri
Sat
I
in concert
with
RICH
REYNOLDS
former lead
guitar from
BLACK OAK
ARKANSAS
also playing
Rock City
CI
ATTIC
Tues
Feb 14
in concert
SNUFF
WRQR and the
Attic St Valentines
Day Concert Giveaway
2 nights for 2 in
'Atlanta at the hotel of
your choice
2 meals for 2
2albums for 2
2 tickets to the
concert of your choice
at the Omni
ATTIC
Wed
III It,
I Feb 15
in concert
TRUCKS
featuring former
ALLMAN
BROS
MEMBER
BUTCH
TRUCKS
Fri and Sat
HAWK





9 Frtruvy 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD FjMi7
Adult Art classes offered
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Adult classes in weaving,
batik, raku pottery, calligraphy,
wateroolor and darkroom photo-
graphy will be offered by ECU in
February and March.
All are taught by faculty
members a graduate students in
the ECU School of Art and will be
held in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center on weekday evenings or
Saturdays.
" Weaving Handcrafts"
(Tuesdays, Feb. 2&-March 28,
6:30-9:30 p.m.) will help partici-
pants create handmade items
using fibers and yarns, with such
techniques as coiling, macrame
and weaving.
"Batik" (Thursdays, March
2-30, 6:30-930 p.m.) will involve
use of the Indonesian method of
hand printing cloth and paper by
applying wax to areas not to be
dyed. The process is useful in
making greeting cards, toys,
framed pictures, table linens and
clothing.
"Raku Pottery" (Saturdays,
March 11 & 18,10a.rn3 p.m.), a
ceramics course using the 16th
century Japanese technique, will
give participants an opportunity
to design and create original
ceramic vessels.
"Calligraphy" (Tuesdays,
Feb. 28-May 9, 730-9:30 p.m.)
will give instruction in the art of
elegant lettering, which can be
used in designing letterheads,
invitations, certificates and pos-
ters.
"Wateroolor" (Tuesdays,
Feb. 28-April 26, 730-9 p.m.) is
basic course in the techniques of
handling wateroolor paints and
collage work. Experience in draw-
ing is helpful but not required.
"Advanoed Darkroom Photo-
graphy" (Tuesdays, Feb. 28-
April 25 7-10 p.m.) is open to
persons with some knowledge of
darkroom procedures. Involved in
the oourse will be demonstrations
and practice of specialized tech-
niques such as posterization,
solarization and photo-si I kscreen-
ing.
More details about the cours-
es and materials needed, as well
as registration materials, are
available from the Office of
Non-Credit Programs, Division of
Continuing Education, Erwin
building.
Child punishment can
cause unpredictable results
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Spanking or slapping a child
who misbehaves may actually
strengthen bad behavior, an ECU
psychologist said recently in a
speech given in Jacksonville.
Dr. Stephen Tacker, professor
of psychology, said the parental
use of oorporal punishment pro-
duces "unpredictable results
He was guest speaker at a
meeting of the local chapter of the
Association for Children with
Learning Disabilities.
"Aside from humane consi-
derations, the basic problem with
punishment is its unpredictabil-
ity. It may in the long run
increase the strength of the
punished behaviors, or other
equally undesirable behaviors
Punishment of bad behavior
might also decrease such behav-
ior or have no effect at all, he
added.
Since many parents use some
punishment in child rearing
"without obvious ill effects and
often with obvious success
reasons fa vigorous opposition to
the use of punishment are not
immediately self-evident.
However, psychologists
usually advise parents to be
"very cautious" in their use of
physical punishment, Tacker
said.
"If used incorrectly, punish-
ment can lead to emotional
difficulties, it can teach children
to lie or be sneaky, and it can
interfere with other important
parent-child relationships, such
as communication.
Having punishment work the
way parents want it to is far more
complex than most people realize,
because a large number of other
variables determine its effects
Since long-term effects of
punishment cannot be foreseen,
the average parent should rare-
ly, if ever resort to corporal
punishment, he emphasized.
Valentines At
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Satin Cord Chokers
Lion Head
Strawberry
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Henrt
222 E. 5th St.
Greenville, N.C.
752-5511
assorted colors
h the M
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In just one
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Call Red Cross today
about learning CPR-
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GOT THE EARLY WEEK WINTER
BLUES CHECK OUT THE
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APPRECIATION TIMES WED- ,5-7
MON AND TUES- 8-11 FRI 4-6
sat night - 9:00 enjoy easy listening
mLLEVECCffto 4ND ADAMS LIVE
mEfid
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CHILLY STUDENT OBSERVES surroundings. Photo by Brian Stotler)
STORE-WIDE
CLEARANCE
Continues
Prices Go Down
Price or Less
Shoes
Sweaters
Dress shirts
Sport shirts
Jeans
Belts
Leather Jackets
Outerwear
One group of Dress shirts &
Sport Shirts 2 for $1.00
A Large Group of Levi
Cords $8.00
All Alterations Extra
HEADSTRONG CLOTHING
University Arcade
218 E. 5th St.
752-5641
We will be open until 9:00 p.m.
Friday night





8 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Please Help Insure The
Continuation Of The
Yearbook Tradition
At ECU
A photographer will be here from Tuesday,
February 14th through Friday, February 24th
from 9-5 in the BUC office.
It does not cost you a cent to have your
picture takenthere is no sitting fee.
There will be no waiting if you will make an
appointment early. Group pictures will also be
taken at the same time.
ice.
your group does not
live an information
leet call the BUC
rjiiiiift
�� � �

HiHH
I. .��?





���i
Trends
Renowned flutist to appear at ECU 9 Febnwy we fountainhead Page 9
Rampal and Veyron-Lacroix:
highlight of SU Artist Series concerts
PRESERVA TION HALL JAZZ Band will be presented in an encore
performance Tues Feb. 14 in Mendenhall Student Center Theatre.
Valentine's Day
- and all that jazz
By RENEE DIXON
Staff Writer
This Valentine's Day
promises to be your happiest ever
when you spend it with the
PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ
BAND at Mendenhall Student
Center's Theatre at 8 p.m.
When they performed here
last year, they had the audience
literally marching in the aisles,
while many more had to be turned
away from the sell-out conoert.
These famous musicians have
traveled the world playing the
marches, quadrilles, spirituals,
blues, and ragtime that has
become known as New Orleans
jazz.
When not on tour, the band
performs its traditional music in
the old Preservation Hall, in New
Orleans' French Quarter, where
hundreds crowd in each night to
hear them play.
Preservation Hall is located
in the French Quarter of New
Orleans, the city of street
parades, saloons, and bayou
nverooats, where this music
originated around the turn of the
century.
The 60, 70, and 80-year-old
artists are the souls of a music
tradition that was born in the
hearts of hard-working men who
were never too tired to make
music even after long days on the
New Orleans docks.
Most of the Preservation Hall
band members have made and
played their music fa more than
50 years. While dated in origin,
their sound attracts fans of all
ages. Young musicians from all
over the world oome to Preserva-
tion Hall to learn the techniques
and patterns of the band
The Preservation Hall
Musicians do not use written
music, but improvise an original
program designed to generate
that spirit and joy which symbol-
izes New Orleans jazz.
Tickets for this February 14
concert are available at the
Central Ticket Office. Tickets are
$1.50 for ECU students, $3 for
ECU Faculty and staff and $4 for
general public. All tickets at the
door are $4.
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Jean-Pierre Rampal, one of
the most acclaimed classical
artists of this generation, will
perform in Mendenhall Student
Theatre at 8 p.m. on Feburary
16th. The Thursday night per-
formance will also feature
Rampal's long-time accompanist,
Robert Veyron-Lacroix.
Flutist Rampal is one of the
most recorded classical artists of
our time. His astounding output
of recordings many with harpsi-
chordist Veyron-Lacroix, con-
stitute virtually the entire reper-
toire of flute literature. His
recording of bestsellers competes
with his full schedule of concert
tours which span the globe.
Rampal's career has risen
simultaneously with the popula-
rity of his instrument. The flute
has been used extensively
by jazz and popular musicians in
recent years.
School bands are over-loaded
with them. Even most of the
uninitiated can identify the oool,
clean sound of the flute.
Some attribute this to the
re-discovery of Baroque music by
the post-World War II genera-
tion; the flute is a "natural" in
Baroque style and technique.
Others claim that flutes are
attractive to parents immersed in
school band programs; the flute is
as inexpensive as any beginning
band instrument, and its first airy
tones are not quite as obnoxious
as clarinet squeaks, cornet
screeches and trombone blats.
(That, however, is always debat-
able.)
Still others theorize that the
flute's light, sliver timbre recalls
the peace that our generation has
so popularly desired. The rest of
us just like how it sounds. And
especially the way Rampal
sounds.
Rampal is the only, flutist in
history to make a living, and a
good one at that, merely by
oonoertizing and recordings. The
master flutist began playing at
13, after a head start from
listening to his father, Jthe flute
professor at the Marseilles Con-
servatoire. It is to this back-
ground that Rampal attributes his
"glorious" sound.
Although originally slated �o
be a doctor, Rampal left fa the
Paris Conservatoire after 3 years
of medical school. He graduated
in 3 months with top honas,
hooked up with harpsichadist-
pianist Robert Veyron-Laaoix
and immediately began a career
of unbroken success.
THE MAGIC OF RAM PAL
While most classical instru-
mentalists struggle to make a
living and must compete fa the
few positions available across the
country, Rampal has aeated his
own position as a box-c-ffice
attraction wald-wide. Only part
of his renown is due to the recent
flute boon. The rest is his own
special magic.
Rampal boasts a fat, round
sound, a snake's tongue, and a
magician's fingers. But above all
he has charisma, an indefinable
instinct fa feeling out an aud-
ience and delivering what it
wants.
Perhaps it is a combination of
his French blood, his fanaticism
fa his own instrument, and his
own pleasure in his virtuosity.
Or his seaet might be, as
someone once said, that "he
plays from his toes
By all accounts, the French-
man has a presence that brings
listeners back again and again.
Mendenhall is expected to be full
to capacity with fans from
Virginia and aher distances
even New Yak.
They want to hear this man
who has been said to be "in a
permanent state of musical
grace who can pack in aud-
iences all around the wald, fran
Mexico City to Osaka. The master
flutist and his accompanist are
expected to be a highlight of the
Artist Series round of oonoerts.
Tickets are on sale now at the
Central Ticket Office at $1.50 fa
students and $4.00 fa public
admission.
JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL, the flutist considered to be "in a
permanent state of musical grace will perform here Feb. 16, along
with his longtime friend and accompanist, Robert Veyron-Lacroix.
Fox leaves audience' with hearts ringing'
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
He strode briskly across the
floa of he auditaium, his
silver-gray coat flapping around
his knees. Beneath the black
beret gripping his aanium, his
bulging eyes surveyed every inch
of the hall. Every correlating
aspect of the show must oombine
perfectly. Lights, agan, speaker
arrangement, screen, and the
thousands of oomponent parts
must mesh; the effats of fifteen
technicians, three roadies, and
two perfamers must fuse into a
single integrated effat.
He had perfamed as a soloist
with the New Yak Philharmaiic,
the Boston Symphony, the Phila-
delphia Orchestra, the National
Symphony and more than a dozen
of the Nation's other great
symphony achestras. He had
been the first non-German to play
a recital on the beautiful Thomas-
kircheagan in Leipzig, where his
beloved Bach had been aganist.
His travels around the U.S
bringing the maestro's art to the
uninitiated, had brought him here
Monday night. Hiseyesswept the
ancient hall, scrutinizing the
plaster falling from the roof onto
the dusty woodenfloa, the black
plastic taped over curtainless
windows.
He went first to David Snyder,
the "lumerist" who aeated and
controlled the $80,000 wath of
prisms, lasers, projectas, and
reflectas which made up the
Revelation Lights. David had
been waking fa Joe's Lights
during his perfamance at the
now-defunct Fillmae East Thea-
tre in New Yak City. Now he is
half of the Heavy Organ Show,
creating subtle and imaginative
images while Fox invokes Bach's
musical spirit on his custom-built
agan. His organ is the same as
the one in Carnegie Hall-4,000
pounds of ebony, ivay, and
silver, complete with 56 stops and
5 keyboards. Mae than 500
speakers were used to aeate his
sound, and a custom-built truck
was employed to haul the mam-
moth instrument to each of his
perfamances.
Quickly, feverishly, he flipped
the switches on the agan.
Suddenly the three introductay
notes of the Toccata and guein
D Minor surged forth from the
instrument, filling the hall with
mahogany resonance. Next, his
feet and legs sprang into action,
scurrying to and fro across the
pedal board.
It was 3 a.m but the
technicians who had been loun-
ging on a pile of coats in the
middle of the auditaium floa
after 9 straight hours of equip-
ment moving and frisbee flinging,
rose from their jumbled heap and
gathered around him, magneti-
cally drawn by the detamined
power of his playing.
He would return to that piece
in his perfamance later that
night. First, he would waship-
fully perfam the Chaale Prelude
"O Blessed Jesus We Are Here
while David flashed the majesti-
cally glowing visage onto the
saeen. Then he played the hymn,
bathed in majestic purple light.
He would lead the audience
through the Master's great
waks, from Toccata, Adagio and
See FOX p. 11)





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Arlo Guthrie: no one holds an audience better
By MICHAEL FUTCH
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
"Good morning America,
How are you?
Don't you know me,
I'm you native son,
I'm the tram they call
The City of New Orleans,
I'll be gone five hundred miles
When the day is done.
"The City of New Orleans"
Steve Goodman) Kama Rippa
VlusicTurnpike Tom
Arlo Guthrie's music is sim-
plistic, yet ingenious, while lyri-
cally conveying a destitute Amer-
ica, weaving out imagery of a
traditional and blue collar nation.
"Tradittonal Americanism
much in the vein of his late father,
Woody Guthrie, chronicler of
19301940 America.
Arlo managed to forge the
values and legend of his genera-
tion-that of the "60's-in song, as
located behind
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his legendary father Woody had
previously done with his legacy of
some one thousand songs.
INFLUENCE OF WOODY
Woody Guthrie was undenia-
bly the most influential single
figure in American folk music.
Besides his songs, Woody pro-
duced several cooks, hundreds of
articles, folk poems and essays,
and a lifestyle that was to be
emulated by subsequent genera-
tionsa search for self-identity
on the open road with only the
essentials packed securely in a
rucksack, and a temporary disre-
gard of personal problems.
The music of Woody Guthrie
is firmly entrenched in the
rawbone nakedness of dustbowl
America. Arlo, a commercial
child of the previous decaae,
remains a roving troubadour of
this traditional America, eclecti-
cally adding the electricity of
contemporary country and rock.
Arlo, now 30, played for years
in the bare brick rooms of
Greenwich Village coffee houses
and in Rettenhouse Square Park,
the Philadelphia equivalent of
Washington Square Park, at the
time.
ALICES RESTAURANT
His "Alice's Restaurant
Massacre" became an under-
ground hit through a tape played
by WBAI-FM. His first album
(and only gold record), ALICE'S
RESTAURANT,was released in
June, 1967. The deadly satire and
humor of the title track was later
translated in the film medium, in
Arthur Penn's ALICE'S RES-
TAURANT. It became a bitter-
sweet farewell to the '60 s.
We're having a
Valentine's
Sale
for you.
Feb. 9th, 10th and 11th
On sale will be jewlery, furniture, pottery
and n my more unique gift items.
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY
The Gazebo
corner of 5th & Cotanche St.
downtown Greenville
ARLO GUTHRIE WILL be in concert in Wright Auditorium on Monday.
Feb 13. Tickets are on sale now at the Central Ticket Office.
Arlo was the highlight of the
'67 Newport Folk Festival, and by
the time of his Carnegie Hall
concert in Nov 1967, at the age
of twenty, his underground repu-
tation had surfaced.
His first couple of albums
were pioneering efforts in style,
as Arlo became one of the
forerunners of the singer-song-
writing wave, whose ranks would
swell in the '70's.
In all, Arlo has produced eight
albums, with AMIGOS being his
last effort.
�GREAT STORYTELLER"
Arlo is considered a great
storyteller, again much like his
father.
"No one holds an audience
better with between-song raps
than Arlo, no one is more beloved
by the young wrote the late
Lillian Roxon, profound rook critic
of the '60's. "With a flawless
sense of the comic and the
absurd, he comes on like a new
young Lenny Bruce
Arlo is a versatile musician,
alternating acoustic and electric
guitars, banjo, mandolin, har-
monica and keyboards during
concerts.
Arlo's style is dry and witty,
equally matching 'he material he
writes. In the '60's he was
proclaimed a protester with a rich
sense of humor. He continues to
perform for numerous benefits,
such as Amnesty International,
and in behalf of the American
Indian.
According to PEOPLE maga-
zine, Guthrie's current perfor-
mances swing from traditional
("Will the Circle Be Unbroken"),
to his own material ("Coming
Into Los Angeles"), to the Rolling
Stones' "Connection
He also performs his father's
material, such as "1915 Massa-
cre" and "Pretty Boy Floyd
Arlo Guthrie and Shenadoah,
his back-up band, will perform on
Mon Feb. 13, at 8 p.m in
Wright Auditorium.
Guthrie deserves to be seen.
He belongs to a breed of
American consciousness which is
quickly being disregarded in the
success-slanted seventies.
Advance ECU student tickets
are $3.00; tickets for the general
public, as well as tickets at the
door, are $5.00.
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He may as well be the Fonz
9 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Winkler fails short of his mark in 'Heroes'
By STEVE BACHUER
Trends Editor
There was never any doubt
that John Travolta would survive
his bound from the confines of a
20 inch television screen to that
far more prodigious expanse
known as the silver screen.
Saturday Night Fever was his
cinematic slingshot and has cata-
pulted the Sweathog to super-
st ar dompost hast e
He is more method inspired
than Brando could ever hope to be
and destined to be every bit as
successful. His performance is
the embodiment of Strassberg's
unique art: It is "method acting"
incarnate. And on top of it all, the
man can dance. He is a 70's
Valentino who does the hustle
instead of the tango; every bit the
womanizer that "the world's
greatest lover" was and capable
of waltzing women into bed in 44
time, but reluctant to.
Can Henry Winkler stack up?
He is another sit-oom star, from
the same network yet, looking fa
meatier materialon the same
scale. His new movie, Heroes.
falls far short of the Winkler
mark. He doesn't play the Fonz
WINKLERAND FIELDS in a scene from "Heroes
pathos and cutesypoo"
but, as far as substanoe is
concerned, he may as well.
Next to Travolta, Winkler is
once again 20 inches tall and his
portrayal of the much affected;
nearly insane Viet Nam vet, Jack
Dunne is immeasurably superfi-
cial by comparison.
Winkler gives Heroes his best
shot but, unlike Travolta, fails to
get far enough inside the role to
be truly convincing. This style is
the antithesis of the Strassberg
technique whereby an actor be-
comes the character he is playing
via his spiritual fascination with
FOX
Continued from p. 9
Fugue, "Sheep May Safely
Graze and "Sinfonia to the
regally funeral "Come, Sweet
Death Through this piece, he
would tell of the power of Bach,
who was sure that the power was
great enough to give him life
would be no less great in death.
After the "D Major Prelude and
Fugue he would leave them for
the intermission.
After introducing the "Toc-
cata and Fugue in D Minor he
would humor the audience with
Scott Joplin's rag "The Enter-
tainer while David delivered
the fitting coup de grace with Mr.
Entertainer flitting and prancing
actoss the screen.
Next, he would woo them with
Debussy's "Claire de Lune
letting the mystic romance of the
piece prepare them for the
awesome and stunning "Passa-
caglia and Fugue in C Minor A
fiercely glowing orb would threa-
ten the audience while flames
licked and teased them in this
classic work in human torment.
When they screamed for his
return, he would warm them up
with a honey-toned "Now Thank
We All Our God As a testament
to Bach s genius, he would then
perform the "Gigue Fugue
which craftily spellsthe maestro's
name throughout the name of the
pieoe.
And finally, finally, he would
dazzle them with the dizzying
Perpetuem Mobile byMiddel-
schutte, which so few dare to play
and which he himself had learned
after a year of continuous study
with the composer.
Then, ne would leave them.
Leave them with their hearts
ringing from the power of music.
Leave them with the image of a
comical old man, a combination of
Bernstein, Wakeman, and Cap-
tain Kangaroo, yet a man who
dares to hope and believe, and
who is not afraid to draw a crowd
of stangers into his inner world.
And they will have entered the
inner world of the Master.
that personality. Winkler is hope-
lessly detached.
One gets the feeling that he is
playing the role entirely straight,
which is not in keeping with his
self-prod aimed mode. If the real
soul of crazed Jack Dunne is
buried somewhere in the Winkler
psyche, it is beyond the actor
himself to exhume it. He settles
for a shallow, surface representa-
tion laced with frivolous, half-
learned gesticulation.
He is not entirely at fault.
Director Jeremy Paul Kagan is
incapable of instituting his feel-
ings to the point where believabil-
ity might begin. He settles fa
limp cuteness, a quality that an
actress with the potential of a
Sally Field should not be entirely
content with.
She struggles with the part of
Carol Bell, the women who
inadvertantly falls fa Dunne, and
emerges a perfect oompanioi.
Field is as impartial to her plight
as Winkler.
There isone bright spot in this
vast, emotionless extent, and it
comes in the fam of screen
person Harrison Fad who, as a
cohat and fellow warn farmer,
manages to give some life to an
otherwise weary vehicle. Unfor-
tunately he is rushed oi and off
the screen much too quickly-
merely one in a long and very
trying line of character actas.
And so to the movie. Heroes is
little more than an ambitious
made-fa-TV ooncept laoed with
pathos and an annoying amount
of cutesypoo.
As Jack Dunne, Winkler es-
capes from the disturbed ward of
a Veterans Hospital to gad about
the oountry on his way to
self-actualization and fulfilling his
dream of starting a productive
warn farm. Alrjng the way, he
runs into Sally Field who is also
trying to find herself. They "meet
cute naturally, and you can take
it from there.
Dunne is anaher one of those
characters whose idealism, con-
stantly reinfaced by his reflec-
tion on the haras of war, and
sensitivity make it nearly impos-
sible fa him to sustain any kind
of close, personal relationship.
This is a taila-made Jack Nichol-
son premise if there ever was one,
an obvious and inexcusable ripoff
of Five Easy Pieces.
The days of the radicil,
counter-culture rebel whofrustra-
tingly lashes out against authaity
are at least ten years behind us.
Save fa the struggling but
attractive cast, Heroes, a movie
crafted as an assault on our
senses, attacks only our sense of
smell.
HEARTS
& FLOWERS
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I





�BHHHHMHHHBHnHHHBH
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
'Conceptual
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
An environmental sculptor of
international reputation, Nancy
Holt recently documented her
work in "Probing the Earth:
Contemporary Land Projects
exhibition at Washington's Hir-
shorn Museum. She has shown
extensively on an international
scale and has had over fifty
articles and commentaries written
about her in prestigious arts
publications. Holt has been awar-
ded National Endowment for the
Arts Grants both in sculpture and
video. She lives and works in New
York City.
A real artist came to Green-
ville Monday. I could tell she was
a real artist - she had a scarf on
Rute
her head and a poison ring and
everything.
The lady artist (Nancy Holt)
showed a videotape of her dead
friend, Robert Smithsen, on
Blimpe's B-l-G screen (He wasn't
dead then, but he is now, get it?).
Seems he had leukemia.
After the tape, people argued
about leukemia.
"If you've got leukemia, you
die - there's no way around it
"Well, my friend had it; they
gave him a year and he lived
five
Then everybody went to the
auditorium in the art building and
saw a movie that was called
"Swamp" but it wasn't about a
swamo.
If you live in New York City
with all those sidewalks and stuff,
I guess any field with some water
in it looks like a swamp.
The artist lady and her dead
friend who was alive then walked
around in a field that they thought
was a swamp. She had a camera
and he had a tape recorder. Very
oonoeptual stuff.
After the movie, the light
came on and somebody said,
"Around here, when someone
says' swamp' you think of cypress
treesdark
"A stadium is there now;
they filled it in with dirt and
everything was what the lady
artist said.
Then we saw a movie about
"pineys They live out in
nowhere in New Jersev and never
go into town. They don't know
very much, but when you're a
piney, "you've got a tree to go
to
The lady artist said the film
was about "evoking the land-
scape
She said she "didn't want to
clutter the film with the people
who lived there
Then she said, "My video is a
totally different world from my
film
$:$
Thank you for coming
Greenville, lady artist.
I like Art.
to
BLUNT INSTRUMENT
By THOMAS DAILY
If I could
I would posture words
To adorn description
Of your person
And be free of acidic
Seething eloquence
That cannot evade
This my
Battering ram tongue
Thomas Daily is an English
major from Fayetteville
f Wind Ensembles; All-State Band
Wide variety of music events coming up
Flutist Rebecca Thompson of
Kings Mountain, graduate
student in the ECU School of
Music, will perform in recital
Thursday, Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in
the A.J. Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall.
She is a candidate for the
Master of Music degree in music
education in music therapy and is
a student of Beatrice Chauncey of
the ECU School of Music tacultv.
Her program will include the
C.P.E. Bach Sonata in D Major,
TONITE AT THE
Super Sounds of
sandcastle
sat. BigWoow ELBORQQM
llllltMMIIMIlillllMigiMIIIIIIIMII�l�
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over $2,000.00 in prizes and gifts call
The Elbo for info Sun ladies nite
Fri. end of week party 3:30-7:00
Check it out
Ferroud's "Trois Pieces pour
Flute the Faure "Morceau de
Couoours" and Prokofieff's
Sonata fa Flute.
Ms. Thompson will be assist-
ed by pianist-harpsichordist
Alysa Wetherington.
ALLSTATE CLINIC
Approximately 170 student
musicians from 30 eastern North
Carolina high schools will partici-
pate in the annual East Carolina
University Band Clinic Feb. 10-
11.
Each of the young musicians
was selected by audition in
January to perform in either of
two bands: the Symphonic Band,
to be conducted by Robert Jager,
band composer and faculty mem-
ber at Tennessee Tech and the
Concert Band, to be conducted by
William McAdams from New
Hanover High School.
The ECU clinic is the eastern
division meeting of the High
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 11:00 to 1000
Fri. & Sat. 11:00 to 11:00
Thursday Lunch and Dinner Special
No. 3 Beef Tips
Texas Toast with Baked Potato and melted
butter or French Fries
All for
$2.09
School All-State Band Clinic and
is sponsored by the N.C. Music
Educators Conference and the
ECU School of Music.
Co-directors are Herbert Car-
ter, ECU'S Directa of Bands, and
Gene Lloyd of Jacksonville, chair-
man of the Eastern N.C. Band
Directors.
Highlights of the clinic are
concerts on Friday and Saturday
evenings. The Friday ooncert, to
begin at 8:15 p.m will feature
the ECU Symphonic Winds En-
semble, conducted by Carter, and
the University Jazz Ensemble,
conducted by graduate assistant
Benny Ferguson.
The Saturday evening conoert
will include performances by the
two high school clinic bands. It
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
WIND ENSEMBLE TOUR
The 52-member Symphonic
Wind Ensemble of the ECU
School of Music will tour several
western N.C. locations during
February.
The Ensemble, conducted by
Herbert Carter of the ECU Music
faculty, is a select group of
student instrumentalists. David
Hawkins, professor of double
reeds at ECU, is accompanying
the group as featured soloist.
Scheduled on the tour include
Freedom High School in Morgan-
ton, Feb. 14; Newton-Conover
High School, Feb. 14; Myers Park
High School, Charlotte, Feb. 15;
East Mecklinburg High School,
Feb. 15;andConoord High School
Feb. 16r
The Ensemble's program will
oonsist of William P. Latham's
"Andanto and Allegro with
soloist Hawkins; Prokofiev's
Opus 99 March; the "William
Byrd Suite" by Gordon Jacob;
Persichetti's "Masquerade for
Band "Variation on a Theme by
Robert Schumann" by Robert
Jager; "Bugler's Holiday" by
Leroy Anderson; Sousa's
"Gallant Seventh" and several
selected light pieces.
PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE
The East Carolina University
Percussion Ensemble will per-
form in concert Monday, Feb. 20
at 8.15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall.
Ensemble directors are ECU
faculty member Harold Jones and
graduate student Jack Stamp.
Included in the concert will be
"Bravura" by Phillip Faini, "Two
Movements for Mallets" by
William Steinhort, "Three
Dithyramboi" by Robert
Schectman, "Four Feathers" by
Barney Chi Ids and "Troccata for
Marimba and Percussion Ensem-
ble which will feature Donna
Southall as marimba soloist.
AN ADVENTURE IN EATING
Thurs. 11:30- Dm 1:30 p
AH subs for SI.00 C-
with purchase of soft drink clND
not valid on deliveries F? rfi??
752-1828 706 Evans st X�Q 1111





��MEHHHB
yhhhh
9 Fatoruary 1978 FOUNTAIMHEAD Pag 13
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Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 February 1978
Intramurals
i
by JOHN EVANS
USMC gains revenge
This past weekend wasn't a very good one for the East Carolina
intramural representatives who traveled down to Camp Lejeune to
play the Marines. Two weekends ago the Marines came up here and
lost three of four games, but when they got the ECU teams on their
home court and playing under international rules it was a different
stay altogether At Camp Lejeune the Marines won three of the four
games, losing only the women's game.
The only win by the ECU teams was a 44-27 win by the Women's
All Stars over the Lady Marines. The ECU women'steam was made up
of dorm women and their high scorer was Lillian Barnes with 10 points.
The ECU teams were shutout in the men's competition this
weekend. In the feature game against the top Marine team and the
Belk Pleasers, the Marines took a 63-57 win. In the second game
between the Marines Number Two team and the Non Playing White
Boys, the Marines won by a rout 82-41. In the third level game the
Marines beat the Hatchets in overtime, with a 73-66 win. Terry Nobles
was high scorer with 22 pants and Greg Pechman added 18 points.
While we're on intramural basketball we better list this week's
men'sand women'stop ten since there was no Intramural Newsletter
this week. Here they are:
Martinez Men
1 Nutties Buddies
2 Hatchets
3 Belk Enfacers
4 Belk Cardiac Kids
5 Belk Who Knows
6 JonesJaquars
7 Mudsharks
8 Jones Bones
9 Belk Carolina Stars
10Sec AnthClub
Evans Men
Nutties Buddies
Carolina Stars
Hatchets
Heartbreak Kids
Belk Enfacers
Mudsharks
Jones Bones
Belk Who Knows
JonesJaquars
SecAnthClub
Women
Peace Pirates
JarvisJumpshots
Sigma Sigma Sigma
PE Majas
Gotten Bunnies
Hypertension
Kool and the Gang
Alpha Xi Delta
Alpha Phi (tie)
Fletcher Bad Co
I must admit that the top tens are getting harder and harder to pick
each week and as far as the men's rankings are concerned, Martinez
and I are beginning to become closer together in our evaluations, even
though he still claims that I am just guessing. Only I know fa sure.
Anyway, there are oily 12 unbeaten men'steams left and two of those
teams, the Belk Pleasers and the Non Playing White Boys, are not
eligible to be ranked because of probationary status.
The Belk Pleasers set an intramural recad this week as they scaed
a 102-20 win over the Belk Bombers. The Belk Enfacers made a run at
the same recad with a 98-57 win over Jones SW Raiders, tying the
old recad. Also the unbeaten Belk Cardiac Kids upset the unbeaten
Belk Our Gang dub.
In fraternity play, the race is a stiff one as five teams share first
place with two losses each after Kappa Alpha lost its second game of
the season and its second game of the week.
I n women s play the Cotten Bunnies were handed their first loss of
the season by Hypertension 26-23 when two technicals helped to decide
the outcome. Both technicals were called on the Bunnies' Lillian
Barnes who also missed the entire first half fa soft ball practice.
The scae was 9-9 at the half and the Bunnies led by as many as five
points in the second half. The game ended up gang into overtime after
some last minute firewaks that saw the game tied on two free throws
at the buzzer by Annie Jones.
The dates fa the intramural golf tournament have been set fa
March 28-31 at the Ayden Golf Club. The first round will be played on
March 28-29 and the second round will be played a March 30-31.
There will be many new prizes this season so watch fa mae
infamatiai later on.
intramural swimming meets will be held on Tuesday, February
28, and registration fa both the men's and women's meets will run
winning ' md
winn
riyooncei .i in ECU intramural cai
I m the fan. Annual
, Registration wil
, 26 - � my 23
Pirates down Duke
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
A lot of good solid defense,
strong rebounding, anda little bit
of luck aided the Lady Pirates in
their action-packed win over
in-state rival Duke University
Monday night at Duke.
The Lady Pirates were led in
scaing by both Rosie Thompson
and Debbie Freeman, each hav-
ing twenty points apiece. Rosie
also had twelve rebounds, domi-
nating bah the offensive and
defensive boards.
Debbie Freeman of course
washer usual self. Teaming with
Gail Kerbaugh and Lydia Round-
tree fa assists and all of a sudden
the scae was tied 50-50, the last
time the Blue Devils would ever
be that close.
Freshmen Lynne Emerson
came off the bench to spark a
light point barrage of points. She
hit four baskets in a row, ran the
Duke defense ragged, and got
some excellent assits from April
Ross and Gail Kerbaugh.
"Offense is a big part of our
program fa sure, but we wak
hard oi defense. No matter which
end of the court we're at, the girls
are concentrating and applying
their knowledge to the situation
said Bolton.
Proof of this is shown by
Marsha Girven's eight blocked
shots, Thompsons twelve re-
bounds, and Kerbaugh, Round-
tree, and Ross' eleven assists.
As remarkable as all this
seems, Debbie Freeman is doing
her share to put tho icing on the
cake fa this basketball seasoi.
Debbie has virtually rewritten
Sports
the recad book fa women's
basketball on the Greenville
campus. She has changed four old
reoads and is definitely a fine
asset to the ECU team. Among
the reoads she has changed are:
Career rebounding: Debbie
has 798 to date. The old mark was
670 by Susan Manning.
Field Goals scaed: the old
recad was 565, Debbie has 588.
Field Goals attempted: Deb-
bie attempted 1451 to date, the
old mark was 1280 by Sheilah
Cotton.
In the most impatant recad
of all, career scaing, Freeman
has surpassed the old mark with
relative ease. She has scaed 1333
points, passing the recad of 1313
with still seven games to go.
At thispoint in the season, the
Lady Pirates have a chance to
capture the NCAIAW Division I
second place title; however, they
need suppat. Fans can make a
big difference in the outcome of a
game. Suppat the Lady Pirates.
Gray's 24 aids win
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Spats Edita
Herb Gray has arrived.
In the Pirates' 73-72 victay
over the University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga Gray did every-
thing but play in the band, scaing
24 points, grabbing 14 rebounds
and igniting the aowd with
electrifying dunks.
Gray took up the slack of Herb
Krusen and Oliver Mack leading
the Pirates to a 37-35 halftime
lead behind 15 first half points.
Mack and Krusen, unusually
off their mark with 15 and 5 points
respectively, set the pace fa
Pirate shooting as the team
finished the game shooting only
41.5 percent from the flea.
The Pirates hit oi just 27 of 65
from the floa prompting Coach
Gillman togoto mae of an inside
game. Gray and center Greg
Canelius got just as close as
possible "dunking" five baskets
between them, and enabling Gray
to make several "3 pant plays"
on the move.
The Bucs broke it open early
in the game as Gray and Oliver
Mack each dunked to spark an
11-2 Pirate lead.
With 11 :48 left to play in the
half the Purple ied 20-12 after a
fantastic triple pump basket by
Roger Carr that injured the pride
of the three would-be defenders.
Senia Dai Whitaker hit fron the
top of the key, Gray did a 3 point
play; and Carr hit a follow up
jumpei li i spot the Bucs their
est lead of the night, 27-14.
The Moccasins showed san;
of the reasons they were NCAA
Division II national champs la
ea as William Wright led
�urge that saw UT-CH pull within
two at the half DaYrell Payne and
HERB GRAY HAD his top game
iebou,ds against UTC.
junia college transfer student
Edsel Brooks hit a variety of shots
in a 14-4 stretch that only Gray
and Canelius oould counter.
The Mocks came out roaring in
the seoond half, jumping out to a
5 point advantage at 39-44.
With 16:30 to play th
�nee in the Mmges gym w.
�nmg. The roars returned
Mac Kyle Pi iwi
I Greg Canelius hit key
of the year with 24 pts. and 14
baskets to put the home team up
53-50.
Canelius dunked, Gray dunk
ed, and Kyle Powers hit an inside
layup to answer Kern rand
i1" Bucs seemed to be in
completeoontrol of ti. , but
h was not to
Edsel Brooks pulled the
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East
men
a lack
Pirate
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may !
whole
PI RAT I
Loi
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Due
Carolina
ped the
They los
59-54 at
The
swimme
perfam
ed at Di
to have
fava un
this ever
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turning f
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�HnmnmnNHi
9 February 1978 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 15
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Consistency is the word for
East Carolina University's wo-
men's basket ball team. Or, is that
a lack of consistency for the Lady
Pirates?
Head coach Catherine Baton
may say it either way, but the
whole idea is that the Lady
consistency in Lady Bugs
Pirates are seeking consistency
in their play.
"We go out and have a super
game, then the next time out we
appear not to be ready to play at
all explained Bolton. "It's my
job to have the team ready to
play, but I'm having a hard time
PIRATES' RECORD BREAKING Debbie Freeman.
Loss eaves Pirates 5-$
this year finding out how to do it.
We are not consistent at all
One might get the idea the
Lady Pirates are not doing well,
but on the season, the team
record stands 11-5 overall, and a
fight ison tocapture second place
for the regular season in Division
I NCAIAW play.
"Sure, we're pleased to be
11-5, but we really should be
14-2 said Bolton. "Our 73-67
overtime loss to Madison, ur
79-78 loss to Longwood and our
74-62 loss to North Carolina
should all have been wins. In each
case, it was just a matter of our
not being mentally prepared and
mentally into the game.
"And that's our entire prob-
lem this yearour own mental
preparation. Execution is fine
when we are mentally right, but if
wearen't, then that's when we
are not consistent. I really feel
we have the talent and ability
to execute the way we should.
"Our goal next week will be to
develop this mental concentration
and seek to develop some consis-
tency down the stretch towards
the state tournament
The next outing for the Pirates
will be the Winthrop Invitational
Tournament Thursday thru Satur-
day in Rock Hill, S.C. The
tournament will have 12 teams,
with East Carolina, Appalachian,
Duke outswims Pirates
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
Due to poor swimming East
Carol ma's men's swimming drop-
ped their third meet in a row.
They lost to Duke by the score of
59-54 at Duke.
The feeling most of the
swimmers had was that they
performed poorly and they chok-
ed at Duke. The Pirates seemed
to have the momentum in their
fava until 50 yard freestyle. In
this event John McCauley missed
his turn. This seemed to be the
turning point.
If you can have a hero in a
meet that you lose, John Tuda
would fit in that spot. What he
did was win three different
individual events. He captured
the 200 freestyle with Bill Fehling
finishing third. He also won the
200 individual medley with Joe
Kushy finishing second. John
Tuda's final victay of the day
came in the 200 backstroke.
Another high point fa the
Pirates came when David
Moody. Dan Newhaller. Ron
Schnell, and Bill Thane, com-
bined their effats to win the 400
medley relay. This was an event
that the Pirates were not expected
to win.
Other scamg fa the Pirates
came as follows. In the 1000
freestyle, Kevin Meisel finished
second while his teammate, Ted
Newman finished third. In the 50
freestyle, John McCavley finish-
ed second in the 1 meter and 2
meter diving. Ron Schnell finish-
ed third in the 200 butterfly. In
:he 100 freestyle, John McCauley
finished second and Doug
Brmdley finished third. In the 200
breaststroke, Dab Newhaller
finished third. The Pirates boun-
ced back and won the freestyle
relay. John McCauley, Ted
Nieman, Bill Fehling and Ross
Bohlken combined their effats to
win this event.
Fy �,r
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Western Carolina, and UNO
Greensbaoout of Nath Carolina.
Other teams include Anderson
College, host Winthrop College,
Flaida State, Loigwood College,
South Carolina, Geagia, East
Tennessee State and College of
Charleston.
"The Winthrop Tournament
we can win if we get mentally
right Bolton said. "We open
play there against Longwood,
which gives us a chance to avenge
that earlier loss. It obviously
concerns me what happened
there last year when we lost our
first two games in hideous
fashion
Perhaps part of the Lady
Pirates' problems have come
from the fact they have been on
the road so much. Only one game
has been played at home since
Dec. 5, that against High Pant
College on Jan. 24. That means
12 of the last 13 games have been
away from the Lady Pirates'
homeoourt. That in itself can
create a mental situation.
"Yes, it is hurting us to play
so many on the road admitted
Bolton. "We are obviously look-
ing faward to getting home at the
end of this week and having three
straight Division One games in
Mmges. Second place fa regular
seasoi is in our grasp and I'm
glad we are home at the end
This week it is a search fa
mental concentration and consis-
tency fa East Carolina women's
basketball team. The next two
weeks will be fa a second place
finish in regular season play and
fine" tuning fa the state tourna-
ment in Greenville, March 2-4.
Swimmers
host meet
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
The ECU athletic depart men-
and the ECU men s varsn
swimming team will be sponsor
mg the 23rd Atlantic Seaooarc
Inter scholastic Swimming ana
Diving Championships. It will be
held on Saturday, February 11 at
Mmges Natataium.
The founder of the meet is Dr
Ray Martinez. When he came to
ECU in 1954, swimming was
virtually non-existent. His first
year he famed a dub and it was
not until the following year when
he was able to fam a team.
Martinez had little moiey to wak
with, so recruiting was obviously
impossible. Fa that very reasoi,
the first annual high school meet
was famed. Martinez then put
East Carolina swimming rapidly
in the national limelight. He also
made this meet grow rrxxe and
mae each year.
There will be high schools in
this year s meet from as far nath
as New Yak and as far south as
Flaida.
The trails start at 9 a.m. and
the finals will be at 5 p.m. The
oompetiticn will be tough so come
out to Mmges Natataium and see
the actioi.
DANSKIN'S
Newest swimtuHleotards
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16 FOUMTAINHEAD 9 Fabruary 1978
Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 9 Httruary i� o
Rosie Thompson fights injuries, keeps playing
By DAVID MERRtAM
Staff Writer
Who ever said that girls'
basketball was not a contact
sport? Just ask forward Rosie
Thompson if she thinks that's
State wins
By TERRY YEARGAN
Staff Writer
Wrestling coach Bill Hill and
his Pirates were defeated by a
quick N.C. State team 22-16 on
Monday night.
The Pirates found themselves
down by 19 points when they lost
in five consecutive weight class-
es.
Coach Hill's matmen then
started a slow comeback, but time
appeared to be with the Wolf pack
It was the second win this year
over East Carolina fa the 9-4
Wdfpack.
true.
Rosie seems to be injury
plagued. She missed all but four
games of last season with a leg
injury. Two games ago Thompson
suffered a broken nose. She now
plays with a specially fitted facial
mask fa protection, and it does
cause problems in her play.
"Rosie is very frustrated at
the moment said Coach Cather-
ine Bolton. "She will have to play
with the mask through the
Winthrop Tournament. Rosie
must make some adjustments this
week in her game due to the
mask. Her ability to see down a
to see to each side quickly is very
much impaired
Despite her problems, Rosie
still soaed 22 vs. Nath Carolina
and 20 against Duke.
Even half lame she's a super
player noted Bolton, "I
couldn't ask fa more courage
from anyone. She has never
drawn back from action to protect
herself
"I'm uncomfatable with the
mask, it took some adjustments.
It affects my side vision and
looking up a down very quickly
causesa pain around my nose and
eyes said Rosie, "I'll be glad
when I won't need it anymae
Averaging 21.3 points per
game, Rosie is leading the Lady
Pirates in scaing.
A recad overlooked earlier
this season indicates that Rosie
tied the school recad fa most
points in a single game vs.
Appalachian State with 39.
"I'm looking forward to the
NCAIAW Division I Champion-
ships so we can play here
(Championship is at ECU fa the
first time) and play schools like
Carolina and State on our home
court concluded Rosie.
XX XX xxxx
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Washington, DC. 20036.
Pirates win
Continued from p. 14)
Powers basket fa basket until he
missed a free throw and the soae
was 71-70 with 331 left in the
game.
The team showed sane of its
better ball-handling of the year in
running the stack delay.
With 28 seconds left Powers
was fouled and missed only to
have Herb Gray tap it in to make
the soae 73-70.
Brooks came back to make it
73-72 with seven seconds left on
the clock. He fouled Don
Whitaker immediately and the
Mocs planned a final shot as
Whitaker missed in the one and
one situation.
UT-CH was unable to get a
sha off with 1 second left and the
final was 73-72. Coach Larry
Gil I man lauded the play of Herb
Gray, saying "without him we
couldn't have done it. Kyle
Powers also played very good
defense he added. The Bucs
will be facing a perhaps even
stronger team taiite in UNO
Wilmingtai.
liver Mack and Herb Krusen
are expected to have recovered
from the slump and join Gray to
gain revenge over the boastful
Seahawk squad. One player who
will certainly be changed since
the last meeting will be Greg
Canelius. Canelius was strugg-
ling in early season but has
looked sharp in recent games,
both scaing and rebounding.
A trtal team effat will be
needed to stop the sharpshooting
UNC-W team and the game looks
to be a thriller. Tip off isat8p.m.
Bolton wins
100th game
East Carolina coach Catherine
Bolton has surpassed the 100
victay mark in her career withthe
Lady Pirates. Bolton ooached her
team to a 77-71 win over Appala-
chian State in Boone, N.C. on
Jan. 21, marking her 100th win
with the Lady Pirates. In nine
years, Bolton has a 104-48 recad
to date.





Title
Fountainhead, February 9, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.486
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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