Fountainhead, February 2, 1978






Were it left tome to decide whether we
should have a government without news-
papers or newspapers without government, I
should not hesitate a moment to prefer the
latter - Thomas Jefferson
Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a drculation of 8,500,
this issue is 12 pages.
Fountainhead
ONTHEINSDE
Chancellorp. 3
SU chairpersonsp. 5
Montoya. p. 7
Lady Bucs winp. 10
Vol. No. 53, No. 33
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
2 February 1978
Trustees free campus media of SGA
trol
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
The ECU Board of Trustees
removed all campus media from
the authority of the SGA and
created an independent media
board at its meeting Tuesday.
The proposal presented by
Neil Sessoms, SGA president and
member of the board, provided
fa the immediate transfer of all
appropriated funds and property
currently in use by campus media
from the SGA to the newly
created Media Board.
The board is responsible for
approving the budgets and ap-
propriating funds for FOUN-
TAINHEAD, BUCCANEER, The
REBEL, EBONY HERALD,
WECU, and the Photo Lab.
The board also selects the
editors or managers of the
organizations.
The proposal was the result of
several months work by Sessoms,
Reed Warren, SGA vice-presi-
dent, Charles Sune, legislator and
Robert Swaim, FOUNTAINHEAD
advertising manager.
The proposal dted freedom of
the press, more effident opera-
tion of campus media, and the
two to one vote by the student
body, in a referendum on the fall
elections ballot, favoring media
free of government control.
Sessoms said the need for an
independent, non-political board
was long overdue and the time
would never be better to separate
the media from SGA.
The Media Board is compos-
ed of the SGA president, Student
Union president, MRC president,
WRC president, IFC president,
Panhellenic president, an admin-
istrator, a faculty member, and a
day student.
The administrator is appoint-
ed by the chancellor, while the
faculty member is appointed by
the Media Board, in consultation
with the chairperson of the
Faculty Senate.
The IFC and Panhellenic
presidents will have one-half vote
each. The dean of student affairs
will serve as the permanent
advisor to the board.
The chairperson is a student
member elected by the board.
A committee composed of two
appointments of the chancellor,
three appointments of the SGA
president, and the SGA presi-
dent, will be organized todraw up
Rentals position
available
By RICHY SMITH
Staff Writer
This year the refrigerator
rentals program underwent
complete change, according to
Ron Lewis, refrigerator rentals
manager.
One thousand new refrigera-
tor units were ordered to meet the
needs of the students at ECU.
"They were a necessity to
the program commented Lewis.
According to Lewis, the old
refrigeration units had worn
themselves out.
We were looking towards the
future when we purchased the
1,000 new units added Lewis.
"We had two choices, buy the
needed units on a lease or
through a loan. We dedded we
would defeat our purpose by
buying them on a lease
Cliff Moores, vice chancellor
for business affairs, helped in
setting up the loan with Wachovia
Bank and Trust Cc , along with
the SGA.
"We have a payment to make
every Sept. 9 fa five years and so
far it has been made stated
Lewis.
"We also traded in the old
units which helped
The refrigerata program bud-
get is set on what it takes to run
the program from year to year.
Because there is no profit involv-
ed, the refrigeration rental price
fluduates yearly.
"Laba cost to repair the
units have been cut because
they're new, so we have an
unexpeded surplus of money.
This will be used fa another
payment Lewis continued.
There are usually 950 units
rented out to the student body
with the freshman dass having 50
per cent of the rentals.
"We had no problems in the
past and we haven't had to turn
anyone rway who wanted a unit
Lewis said.
"I'veenjoyed the year. It's
a constitution fa the Media
Board.
"Student fees will not have to
be raised because of the board's
action; all the proposal does is
take the money the SGA spends
on the media and place it under
anotha authaity said Ses-
soms.
"The money spent on the bus
system, legal aid, refrigerata
rental, and other SGA programs
hasn't been touched
James H. Tucker, dean of
student affairs, explained the
aganization of publications on
other campuses throughout the
state and said that ECU was part
�- �
of a small minaity of schools with
government contrdled media.
"Only UNC at Chapel Hill,
UNC at Wilmington, Western
Carolina Univasity, and the N.C.
School of the Arts have media
which is contrdled, to some
extent by the student govern-
ment Tucker said.
THESE PERSONS ARE responsible for creating a
media board for overseeing campus publications.
Left to right, Neil Seaaoms, Robert Swaim, Charles
Sune, and Reed Warren. Photo by Pete Podeszwa
Bad weather slows
expansion
PON LEWIS
Photo by Brian Stotler
been a successful one added
Lewis.
"It's been wak, but fun and
I've made a lot new friends. The
SGA has really been cooperative
and I've had a lot of help
Because Lewis will graduate
this spring, applications fa the
manager position are being ac-
cepted daily until Feb. 10 in the
SGA office and the refrigeration
rentals room in Mendenhall
The new manager will start
training March 1 so he will be
familiar with the program.
If interested pasons need
more infamatioi, oontad Ron
Lewis fa details and make next
year's program as successful as
this one.
r: �
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
The Ficklen Stadium expan-
sion program has been slowed by
recent bad weatha conditions,
aooading to James Lowry, direo-
ta of the physical plant.
Lowry said that the recent
rains have delayed the driving of
the pilings which support the
stands, and that future delays
may be caused by freezing wea-
ther, which prevents the pouring
of oonaete.
He also said that the McDevitt
and Street Co the Charlotte
oontradas responsible fa the
projed, face sevae monetary
penalties if the wak is not
finished by the start of the
football season next fall. Lowry
said that the oontradas have
allowed fa plenty of "down
time and at present they see no
problems in completing the pro-
ject with time to spare.
The project cost will be $2.6
million, which indudes all design
and oonstrudion fees plus a
contingency fund to oova any
unfaeseen expenses.
Lowry said that the stadium's
seating capacity will be increased
approximately 17,000 seats
to a total of approximately
35,000 seats.
The seating will be contained
in four new quadrants, which will
be built on each end of the
existing stands. The new qua-
drants will be angled inward to
provide the best view of the field.
The expansion projed also
indudes replacing the existing
press box with three-tier press
boxcornmunication center indu-
ding eievata service.
The bottom level will be fa
spats writers and sports-casters,
and the second level will be a
communication center between
field and press box, and will
house the oontrds fa the score-
board. The third level will cons, at
of a deck fa television cameras.





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
Concert
Practice
Handball
Red cross
An instructa course in
American Red Cross Standard
First Aid and Personal Safety will
begin Tues Feb. 7 from 7-10
p.m. in Minges Coliseum, room
142.
The course is fifteen dock
hours; cost, $.75 fa a book.
Eligibility: student must have a
current Standard First Aid and
Personal Safety certification and
be at least 17 years old.
Fa further infamation, oon-
tact Mrs. Ruth Tayla, Executive
Secretary, American Red Cass,
752-4222, a Nell StaJ lings,
Minges, room 151.
ERA
Student rates are available fa
those desiring to attend the ERA
ratification campaign this week-
end in Raleigh.
Students may register fa the
meeting fa $1, luncheon not
included; also, students may
travel on the chartered bus fa $2.
Atheists
Atheists wanted! I am doing
research on student approaches
to religion and intellectualism. I
am looking fa sincere and
articulate atheists and agnostics,
and skeptics. I would like to talk
with faculty and students, and
would appreciate your input. Call
758-2039 and ask fa Sarah.
iergy
Second Passive Solar
iference will be held in
Madelphia, March 15-19. The
is sponsored by the
rtment of Energy, the Inter-
nal Solar Energy Society,
1ccordinated by the Mid-
Solar Energy Assoc.
:Ai This will be a confer-
evaluate developments
ive Solar Energy; to
the state of the art, and
te widescale application,
of the noted speakers
David Wright, architect,
rnia; Peter Van Dresser,
I, New Mexico; Maria
IES Delaware, Harold
therm, California; Steve
rks, New Mexico,
22 other designers,
scientists and re-
rarf admission fee fa
iis$50 and must be
6. For further
Linda Knapp,
Architecture,
Fine Arts,
lia, Phil-
and
Home Ec
The School of Home Econo-
mics is sponsaing a staff dev-
elopment wakshop on WRITING
FOR PUBLICATION on Mon
Feb. 6, from 4 to 7:45 p.m in room
205 of the Home Economics
building.
Ms. Mary Kay Overholt,
directa of the publications divi-
sion, American Home Eoonomics
Association, Washington, D.C.
will lead the wakshop. Ms.
Overholt will provide direct con-
sultation fa students and staff
wanting to begin an article fa
publication and fa those who
have articles in progress. Besides
this direct consultation Ms.
Overholt will also present a brief
overview of writing techniques
used fa publishing.
The infamation presented
should be especially valuable to
graduate students in home econo-
mics as well as graduate students
and staff in other related discip-
lines.
Further infamation can be
obtained from Dr. Lilla Hdsey,
School of Home Economics, 757-
6903.
cso
The Center fa Student Oppa-
tunities has funds available to
employ sophomaes, junias, and
seniors who are interested in
tutaing students in subject mat-
ter areas such as chemistry,
biology, physics, math and other
oourses fa prehealth and health
professional trainees. Contact the
Center fa Student Oppatunities,
208 Ragsdale Hall.
SOULS
There will be a S.O.U.L.S.
meeting this Thursday as prev-
iously announced. The next meet-
ing will be Thurs Feb. 9, at 7
p.m. in the Afro-American Cul-
tural Center.
Communion
A service of Holy Communion
will be celebrated Ash Wednes-
day at 5:30 p.m. at St. Paul's
Episcopal church. Infamal fel-
lowship discussion will follow. All
interested students are cordially
invited to oome. The Rev. Bill
Hadden, Episcopal chaplain, will
celebrate the service and lead the
discussiai.
Fellowship
There will be a meeting of the
King Youth Fellowship on Tues-
7, at 7 p.m. in
The Popular Entertainment
Committee of the Student Union
will present Arlo Guthrie in
ooncert Mon Feb. 13. The
concert will begin at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditaium. Tickets will
be $3.00 fa students and $5.00
fa the public. Seating is limited,
so get your tickets now befae
they're all gone.
Diamond D
There will be a meeting fa
anyone interested in being a
Diamond Darling fa the East
Carolina baseball team Tues
Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. The meeting will
be held in room 143 of Minges
Coliseum.
Tutoring
Free tutaing services are
available fa minaity and or
disadvantaged students who are
interested in improving their
academic progress to become
nurses, allied health profes-
sionals, and physicians. Contact
the Center fa Student Oppatun-
ities, 208 Ragsdale Hall.
Alpha Xi
Pledges of Alpha Xi Delta
saaity are having a fashion
show, "Spring into Summer at
8 p.m. in Mendenhall. Come and
see all the latest spring and
summer fashions.
Prophecy
call day, Feburars
There's a growing interest in
Biblical prophecy today. There
will be a lecture by Martin
Magan on messianic prophesy,
Thurs. at 7:30 p.m. in Flanagan
307. Mr. Magan has traveled
throughout the U.S. and has
spoken to students at over 25
colleges.
Fellowship
This Sunday night, why not
take a break from studying and
oome to the meeting of Inter-
Varsity Christian Fellowship and
join us as we sing praises to the
Lad and discuss some of the
problems that we encounter in
relationships. The meeting will be
at Mendenhall, room 221, at 8
p.m.
Psychology
All psychology majas and
minas are invited to apply fa
membership in the Psychology
Hona Society, Psi Chi.
Applications are located in the
psychology departmental offioe.
Minimum requirements are: be-
ing in the upper 13 of you class,
and having completed at least 8
semester hours in psychology,
and having at least a B average in
"psveriorogy.
Alright girls, pracuce those
kicks, trim that waist! Pom Pom
tryouts will be held tha weekend
of March 17, 18, & 19. Check
FOUNTAINHEAD and dam bull-
etins for mae infamation later.
Plan ahead
Psycology
Dr. Linda Wilson, the ocord-
inata of psychological services at
Caswell Center, and Dr. Steve
Tacker, a professa of psychology
at ECU, will give a presentation
of the behaviaal modification
techniques employed at Caswell
Center fa the severly mentally
retarded. Field placement posi-
tions are available to graduate
students and certain undergrad-
uate students. Everyone interest-
ed is oadially invited to attend.
The location is in room 129
Speight at 7 p.m. on Tues Feb.
7.
Phi Alpha
Phi Alpha Theta, international
histay hoia society, will meet
Mon Feb. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Richard Todd Room (across from
Brewster D-110). Individuals
seeking membership in the soc-
iety must fulfill the following
requirements:
Undergraduate: 1) 20 quarter
hours or the equivalent in histay.
2) A 3.1 grade-point average in
histay. 3) A 2.67 OVERALL
grade point average.
Graduated) One third of the
residence requirements fa a
masters degree should be com-
pleted. 2) A 3.5 grade point
average in histay ,
All interested histay majas
and minas are invited to attend.
Refreshments will be served.
Prayer
Inter-varsity Christian fellow-
ship will have a prayer meeting
this Thursday afternoon at 4 p.m.
at the Methodists Student Center.
Outing
The Outing Club will meet
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Brew-
ster B-205. We have some really
nice trips scheduled and would
like to let you know about them.
Come join us and bring a friend!
Film
The Minaity Arts rjommittee
will sponsa the filmfla's'n In The
Sun, Sun Feb.5 in Mendenhall
Theatre. The film will be shown at
8 p.m. and admission is by ID and
activity card.
Scholars
The ECU League of Scholars
will have an important meeting on
Tues Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. in room ,�
247: MsWdehhhr
Anyone interested in playing
European team handball should
meet at Memaial Gym, Sat
Feb. 4 at 8 a.m. In oder to
practice, everyone will need a
physical; if anybody doesn't have
a physical contact Jim Chastam,
758-8619 a 309-C Belk.
Coffeehouse
Thurs. and f-ri Feb. 2 and 3
are ladies nights at ECU'S finest
entertainment center, the ECU
Coffeehouse. Shows begin at 9
and 9:45 p.m. on Thursday night
and at 9and 10 p.m. Friday night.
Holly Van Auken McKee, first
lady of American tradition, tunes
along with some British Isles and
old Scottish songs. Holly accom-
panies herself on guitar, auto-
harp, and dulcimer.
Maria Dawkins, a proclaimed
product of the Roxy, Tree House,
and even the Rathskeller, will
perfom songs by Carly Simon
and many aiginals.
u can enjoy these talented
perfr mers fa the low, low, price
of fit cents, which includes all
the Qvxjies your gluttonous heart
desires. Come on down to the
Coffeehouse this weekend, room
15, Mendenhall.
Real peace
Good news. If you ate dealing
with drugs as an answer to your
search fa real peace of mind, and
haven't found any answers, oome
see and hear a fellow student who
has already been over this
ground. Myles Cartrette will
share his experience in a candid
and interesting way. Fall Gospel
Student Fellowship, Thur Feb.
2, 730-9 p.m. in Mendenhall,
room 221. You will not want to
miss this meeting.
Coffeehouse
Attention all singers, players,
bellydancers, jugglers, clowns,
and dancing bears: auditions fa
the ECU Coffeehouse will be held
Thurs. and Fri Feb. 9 and 10,
from 8 until 11 p.m.
Persons interested in audit-
ioning should sign up by Feb. 1 in
the Student Union offioe.
Eta Mu
I he Eta Mu chapter of Sigma
Gamma Rho soraity will hold a
rush on Feb. 7, 8, and 9 at 7 p.m.
at the Afro-American Culture
Center.
All women who are interested
in learning more about the
saaity should attend these
meetings.
WAF
W.A.F. will present a film
Occurences at Owl Creek Bridge,
Fri March3in JenkinsHne Arts
Center Auditaium.





2 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
jld
to
ive
in,
Chancellor
candidates
visit ECU
By JOYCE EVANS
Staff Writer
Candidates fa successor to
Dr. Leo Jenkins are visiting the
ECU campus, according to Troy
Pate, chairman of the Chancellor
Selection Committee.
The field has been narrowed
down, but Pate declined to gre
specific details.
"I'm not able to talk about
specifics at this point he said.
Originally, the list of appli-
cants contained 200 names, but
the figure is less than that now,
according to Pate.
Pate said no deadline has
been set for announcing the
committee's final selection. How-
ever at this time the commit-
tee's goals are to decide on two
candidates and to submit these
names to UNC President William
C. Friday about March 1. If the
candidates are approved, they
will be considered fa the select-
ion.
"The Chancella Selection
Committee set internal guidelines
attempting to find the best and
most qualified person said
Pate.
The candidates are from a
broad range of people from all
over the country, accading to
Pate.
Accading to the mandate by
the UNC Board of Governas, the
canmittee must operate under
strict confidentiality.
The canmittee will not be
directly involved with the select-
ion of the next chancella. There
are 14 persons on the selection
committee.
Thirteen join
Phi Sigma Pi
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Thirteen persons have
been inducted as members of
ECU chapter of PhiSigmaPi hona
society.
New student membrs are Bill
Balance and Jerry Price of
Freemont, Tona Black of Kann-
apoiis, Carolina Blaokwekk of
Oxfad, Keith Fuller of Louis-
burg, Jimmy Hooper of Burling-
ton, Robert Magill of Falls
Church, Va Jamie McKinney
and Caty Burns of Kinston, Jean
Murdoch of Glen Ridge, N.J
Henry Peele of Williamston and
Patty Wells of Roanoke, Va.
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Greek Forum
By JAY CHAMBERS
I.F.C. Public Relations
The Greek system provides
mae than a social life at ECU. It
offers an oppatunity to improve
one's academic standing.
Academics are the main
reason we are attending ECU.
The Greeks can play an impatant
role in our educational system.
With the experience of upperclas-
smen you will have personal
guidance in planning curriculum,
choosing classes and instuctas,
and waking through problems of
school. Many chapters have tutor -
ing programs, and a few organ-
izatiois have a filing system to
help in review fa quizzes and
tests.
Statistics show that a greater
number of Greeks graduate then
independent students, nationally
and at ECU. It has also been
shown that the grade point
average of Greeks is higher than
that of independents.
Although the Greek system
offers a tremendous social life,
academic excellence is a maja
goal of each chapter. Each
fraternity and saaity will help
you as much as they can,
However, it is up to the individual
to put fath the effat ta do his a
her very best.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Alpha Xi Delta has plans
underway fa their 18th annual
All-Sing. Fraternities and soror-
ities participate by doing a
musical number a arrangement,
with the best perfamance award-
ed by a trophy. Janette Inman
says the March 2 production will
prove to be the best ever.
The Sig Eps have just comp-
leted the third rush of the '77- 78
school year. The Sigma Phi
Epsilon District Convention will
be held this weekend in Knox-
ville, Tennessee, with five re-
presentatives planning to attend.
This weekend the Phi Kappa
Tau fraternity will hold its annual
Little Sister Brunch at the
Candlewick Inn. The "original"
champagne breakfast will start at
11 a.m. on Saturday.
The brahers of Kappa Alpha
are proud to announce the
induction of their faculty advisa,
Ovid Pierce, into their order's
Council of Hona. The indict ion
was held at the statewide con-
vivium in Raleigh. Only three
aher men have had this hona
bestowed upon them. The ECU
chapter also celebrated convivium
in Greenville last Saturday.
"Convivium as it isknown toall
KA's, celebrates the founding of
Kappa Alpha and Robert E. Lee's
birthdav.
The TI-57 The super slide-rule that'll
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Even if you've never programmed before.
For the student who re-
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TI-57 delivers an exceptional
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much more.
And as long as you're in
the market for a super slide-
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gramming at your disposal?
Programming a calculator
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The endresult is more effi-
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All this and more is ex-
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INCORPORAT ED
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Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
ECU media declared
independent - at last
The ECU Board of Trustees granted indepen-
dence to all campus media in its meeting Tuesday,
thus freeing all publications, the photo lab, and
WECU radio from any government control. The
Board should be highly commended for making a
move that finally gives the student body the free
press that they wanted and most definitely deserve.
SGA President Neil Sessoms, Vice-President
Reed Warren, Legislator Charles Sune, and Robert
Swaim, former legislator and FOUNTAINHEAD ad
manager deserve thanks for preparing the proposal
and should be commended for the hard work they did
in assimilating information that was needed in
creating a Media Board.
A referendum was presented to the student body
during the fall SGA elections asking if the students
favored independent publications and a one-term
presidency. Students voted two to one in favor of
independent publications.
The creation of the Media Board will hopefully
end the political problems that faced ECU
publications while they were under SGA control. No
newspaper in the United States, be it a student
newspaper or other, should be under the control of
any government-student or otherwise. The First
Amendment applies to all newspapers in this
country.
The Media Board will be a non-political body
whose chief function is to set policy, provide
direction, and offer continuity-in other words, the
board will serve as publisher. A media board of this
sort is long, long overdue. Too much politicking in
the past has hampered not just the publications, but
most importantly, the students.
The students did not receive a yearbook last year
because of hassles between publications and the
SGA. The students paid fa a yearbook that was
never printed because the SGA legislature did not
appropriate enough money for the BUCCANEER
taff to print a yearbook the size ECU students were
jstomed to having. Hopefully, hassles of this sort
in the past forever.
fhile many students on campus believe in
lorn of the press there are, unfortunately, some
not. Some students in the SGA who wanted
rtions to remain under the control of the SGA
jr-mongers, wanting only to be able to
the budgets of the publications and try to
le press itself.
students resent power being taken away
power that should not be given to a
nt anyway. Unfortunately, the press in the
States is not totally free for the U.S. Supreme
as the power to censor the press. However, no
(tion should be subject to government control.
haps some students tend to forget that the
s who responded to the referendum voted in
h independent publications.
NTAINHEAD would like to thank the Board
ees members on behalf of the publications,
lab, and WECU for approving the creation of a
Board.
members of the Board are as follows: Dr.
L Bridgers, Mrs. J.G. Burgwyn, Dr. J. Earl
�y, Glenn R. Jernigan, William L. Powell, Jr
pd Greene, Dr. Andrew A. Best, John F.
Kahley B. Futrell, Troy W. Pate, Jr
i, A. Louis Singleton, William H. Stanley,
Jenkins, chancellor, and Neil Sessoms,
3ss can of course be good or bad, but,
without freedom It will never be
Albert Camus
WE'RE BIG" F0T1S Nw, pAPPy SAYS WH"
CAN SPEND OU.R OWN tAONBYll hJOMORE ALLOWAMCK!
Forum
REBEL editor explains art selections
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Re: the REBEL Art Show-
-there have been some pretty low
oomments directed towards the
REBEL staff this past week
oonoerning the selection of work
in the show. This letter is
intended to clear up some of the
more blatant misconoeptions
we've encountered while fending
off irate art students.
Over 165 pieces were signed
up for the show. There is no way
the Mendenhall Gallery can ac-
commodate that many pieces-
there is simply not enough space.
Most open art competitions-like
the lllumina and the Delta Phi
Delta shows-are juried before the
show is hung. We had no way of
knowing how many pieces would
enter the show, so the following
rule was included on the REBEL
Art Show poster. "The staff of
The REBEL and lllumina reserve
the right to refuse any submis-
sions due to limited space
These posters have been display-
ed on every bulletin board in the
Art building since mid-
December.
We knew, however, that
people would resent the REBEL
staff-who supposedly can't tell
Duchamp from a Rockwell-
making snap decisions about
"fine art We therefore asked
Nancy Krowl, one of the three
outside judges for the show, to
help us jury out some pieces in
order to keep the whole thing
down to a managable size.
One of the most frequent
complaints we heard about last
year'b show was that the judges,
being ECU art faculty, were
slightly less than impartial since
they already knew most of the
work and the artists involved.
This year we attempted to
side-step that problem by recruit-
ing qualified judges from outside
the ECU community. In addition
to helping judge the show on
Wednesday, Ms. Krowl was kind
enough to lend her expertise (a
MFA in Art) in jurying last
Sunday.
Quality of the work was not
the only factor considered in
jurying each individual piece. We
wanted to present a large variety
of work which represented all
mediums. Some individual pieces
were just too large to be included
in a show where the space
involved was critical. A few 3-D
pieces simply would not fit in the
cases. Personalities of each in-
dividual artists were NOT discus-
sed. No member of the REBEL
staff or of lllumina juried his or
her own work.
To those of you whose work
See FORUM, p. 5
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor over titty years.
"Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coak'ey
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Joe Yaeger
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.





Forum
2 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Papa 5
was not included in the show:
thank you fa your understanding
and interest. Every member of
the staff has experienced rejec-
tions of their own work-whether
it was a poem, a story, a a
photo-and we sincerely sympat-
hize. To those of you who have
threatened to remove your work
because of the way it was hung:
we made every effort to work
around the problems of fitting an
already oversized show into a
comparatively small space without
cutting any more pieces. Every
piece cannot be hung at eye-level.
The REBEL Art Show was
intended to benefit the students
by giving them a chance to exhibit
their workandtooompete openly
for publication in the magazine.
Judging from the reactions we've
seen this week, perhaps work
appearing in the REBEL should in
the future be selected as it was
several years agc�by invitation
only. It certainly would be a lot
easier on the staff. Anyone who
knew the amount of grief, worry,
physical labor, and sheer inoon-
vience we went through to plan
and hang the show would realize
that we didn't hold the Third
Annual REBEL Art Show just to
acquire pieces fa the magazine.
There are easier way to fill pages.
Sincerely,
LukeWhisnant,
Edita, The REBEL
Student Union to accept
chairperson applications
The Student Uniai will be
accepting applications fa Com-
mittee Chairpersons fa the 1978-
79 academic year beginning
Mon Feb. 6.
All students interested in a
positioi will be required to
complete an application and have
an interview with the Student
Union President-elect who will
make the selectiaio. Applications
fa the 11 positions may be
obtained at the Infamatioi Desk
of Mendenhall Student Center a
through the Student Union office
in room 243 Mendenhall.
The deadline fa filing is Feb.
24.
The Student Uniai is ate of
the largest student aganizatiois
oi campus, the other being the
S.G.A. The Uniai is the maja
programmer of entatainment
and cultural events on campus.
Every student who pays an
activity fee is a member of the
Union and it is from these fees
that its income is derived.
The committees which one may
choose from are:
Art Exhibition - This oommit-
tee is responsible fa providingthe
students with a wide variety of art
displays and aher visual arts
programs within the student
center.
Artists series-This committee
is responsible fa programming
cultural and musical attractions to
be presented at ECU. The aim of
the oommittee's programming is
the education as well as the
entertainment of the student
body. This year the oommittee
has presented such well known
artists as Ruth Laredo, the
Norman Luboff char, the Buffalo
Philharmonic, and ahers.
Coffeehouse - The Coffee-
house oommittee provides a quiet
atmosphere fa students to enjoy
music far removed from the
mainstream of oontempaary
commercial music. Located on the
ground floa of Mendenhall
the Coffeehouse aeates a
unique atmosphere of intimacy
between the perfamer and the
audience.
Entertainer - The purpose of
this committee is the publication
of the monthly Entertainer and
the pronohon of the Student
Uniai as a whole. This is an ideal
oommittee fa anyaie wishing to
gain experience in promotion and
writing.
Lecture- The Lecture oommit-
tee is responsible fa selecting,
planning, promoting, and pre-
senting a lecture series consisting
of widely recognized personalities
from a wide range of interests.
This year's series will include
Leonard Nimoy.who will appear
in February.
Minaity Arts - This commit-
tee is responsible fa presenting
programs of particular interests
to minaity students and to
educate the campus about mina-
ity cultures. This canmittee
should prove of particular interest
to international students and
blacks.
Films - The Films committee
is responsible fa the Friday &
Saturday popular films, the Wed-
nesday night classics, and film
festivals. This year's committee
has been the most suocessfu1
ever, presenting such great films
as Rocky, Network, Casablanca,
The Front, and Silver Streak. The
Films oommittee is probably the
most popular in the Union and
hopes to oontinje in that vein.
Theatre Arts - The presenta-
tion of professional theatre fa the
ECU campus is the goal of this
committee. This year such shows
as Grease, Cabaret, Keith Berger
- Mimi, and William Windom
playing Thurber have been pre-
sented.
Travel - The Travel oommittee
aganizes low-cost trips fa
students, staff, and faculty of
ECU. This year the oommittee
has sponsaed trips to New Yak,
Hawaii, and the Bahamas.
Maja Attractions - This
oommittee is responsible fa
presenting oontempaary enter-
tainers to satisfy the campus need
fa big-time popular entertain-
ment. So far this year the
oommittee has presented
"Firefall and "Jimmy Buffett"
with ahers still to come.
Special Entertainment - This
committee is responsible fa
presenting concerts that bridge
the gap between Coffeehouse and
Maja Attractions programming.
The committee presents the free
mall concerts- and most smaJler
shows in Wright Auditaium.
Reviewer chastised - again
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
The readers of the
FOUNTAINHEAD might have
been served better by a factual
news coverage of the Young
Artist Competition than by the
vay poaly written aitical review
of Kent Johnsoi, (Jan. 24, 1978,
Page 9). Mr. Johnson appears to
lack the credentialses a musician,
a listener, a aitic, a writer, and a
gentleman.
Beatrice Chauncey,
Professa of Music
Forum policy
Forum letters
should be typed or
printed, signed and
include the writer's
address or telephone
number. Letters are
subject to editing for
taste and brevity and
may be sent to FOUN-
TAINHEAD or left at
the Information Desk
in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
STORE-WIDE CLEARANCE
Continues
Shoes
SWEATERS
Dress Shirts
Jeans
Price
Sport Shirts
Belts
Leather Jackets
Outerwear
1 Group of
Dress Shirts & Short Shirts2 for $16.00
A Large Group Levi Cords$8.00
All Alterations Extra
HEADSTRONG CLOTHING
University Arcade
218E 5th St.
752-5621
Western Sizzlin will feature a
luncheon special on number 1.
Sat. 11.00-4.00
8 oz. of Sirloin steak with baked potato
or French fries & Texas toast.
ALL FOR
2.39





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
ill
VAH
INIWEMAK
MUSIC, IT'S MAGIC!
On sale February 3-9
MOTOWN'
Stevie
Wonder
LOOKING BACK

L
Limited Edition
LP
s6.
Pitt PI
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Montoya wet received
Flamenco guitarist a success
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Carlos Montoya brought
flamenoo guitar to life in his
performance at Mendenhall
Student Theatre last Monday
night. The capacity audience
grew increasingly amazed and
respectful as the eld Spanish
guitarist demonstrated his dex-
terity and skill.
Flamenoo guitar is the ancient
art of the gypsies, combining the
passions of gypsy tradition with
the expressive potential of six-
stringed guitar.
Montoya's great contribution
is capturing and notating the
folklore into written music. Each
of the pieoes performed Monday
night were Montoya's own
arrangements of ancient gypsy
themes with his own composition
in the traditional vigorous
rhythms.
As with the best of any
improvisatory art, the music
becomes a unique communication
between performer and audience.
True to folklore form, Montoya's
music became a tribute to his
infectious sprirt, given extra zest
by the drama of Gypsy tradition.
In "Fiesta the audience was
introduced to the crisp flamenco
style of complex rhytims and
embellished melodies over simple
harmonies. In Soleares
Zapateao and "Tarantas
Montoya demonstrated intricate
variations drawn from his rich
vocabulary of flamenoo tech-
niques.
Rapid percussive strumminq,
cadenzas played entirely with the
left hand, light knocking on the
guitar wood, vibrato, trills and
repeated notes all displayed both
the technical virtuosity and flex-
ibility of the guitarist.
In "Seguinya y Solea por
Medio Montoya'shard playing
took its toll on intonation.
Bulenas" ended the first set
with passionate flamenoo
rhythms that brought visions of
red-oostumed Spaniards dancing
for a carnival crowd.
Trends
2 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
FLA MENCO GUI TA RIST CA RLOS Montoya drew standing ovation
Monday night.
The second set included the
highly syncopated "La Rosathe
more melodic "Fandango and
the bullfighter's "Macareno en
Tango
After exploring a different
flamenco flavor with the Cuban
Caribe Aflamencao Montoya
cooled the overly intense atmos-
phere with the lighter
"Garrotin the only arrange-
ment designed to show humor
instead of Spanish fire.
The second set closed with the
tragic "Taranto in which a
long, exating cadenza moved
over slowly changing harmonies.
Despite on-stage tuning, the
climax was marred by the intona-
tion problems created by
Montoya's furious music.
Following a 15 minute inter-
mission, Montoya opened the
final set with the steely
"Zambrilla "Granaina"
featured the shimmery agitation
of repeated melodic notes.
With "Zambra Montoya
again captured gypsy fantasies
through imitations of the dancing
girl's tambourine. The rich bass
melody of "Malaga" created a
romantic contrast to the dazzling
dexterity of the finale,
"Fabruca
An immediate standing
ovation brought forth a heavily
accented "Thank You
Montoya's first spoken words in
an hour and a half rich in
communication. A teasing enoore
called out the militia with plucked
bugle calls and the rattle of the
snare drum on Montoya's ever
versatile guitar.
Montoya pleaded enough with
a second enoore "por finish,
because it is very hard for me
Difficult or not. the final tune was
a foot tapping celebration of the
best of flamenco guitar.
Whether or not they liked the
sometimes harsh sound of
flamenco guitar, the audience
responded to the Spanish charm-
er who, in his old black suit and
bow tie, threw his heart into his
music and shared it with them.
Company will perfon
Sousa's 'El CapHan'
COURTESY
ECU School of Music
John Phillip Sousa is quite
likely America's best-known
oomposer. The rousing tunes by
"The March King" are familiar
to anyone who has attended a
football game or a band ooncert.
Sousa also brought his gift of
melody to a series of comic
operettas which were popular in
the United States from around
1895 to 1913.
So successful was the operetta
"ElCapitan" that Sousa pub-
lished a medley of tunes from the
work asa march bearing the same
name. A revival of the operetta
has shown it to be a grand
entertainment, full of political
satire as well as a rich assortment
of musical plums.
The National Opera Company
will offer a rare opportunity to
enjoy this Sousa stagework when
a sparkling new production of EL
CAPITAN will be presented in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall on the
ECU campus this Sunday, Feb-
ruary 5, at 8 p.m.
The National Opera Company
was founded in 1948 by Mr. A.J.
Fletcher, a Raleigh, N.C. attorney
and businessman, and Chairman
of the Board of WRA-TV.
Theaspirationsof the founder
were simple: To introduce as an
art form to North Carolina school
students; to create audiences by
presenting opera in the language
of the audience; and to give
experience and employment to
young singing artists. The results
have been outstanding.
Bedford and Hoffman daring due
free flick All the President's Men
Kathleen Carroll of, the New
York Daily News calls it "A
riveting and unforgettable exper-
ience Vinoent Canby, New Yak
Times, raves: a spellbinding
detective storya breathless
adventurean unequivocal
smash-hitfirst and foremost a
fascinating newspaper film
The list of superlatives goes on
and on.
Robert Redford and Dust in
Hoffman give brilliant perfor-
mances as Bob Woodward and
Carl Bernstein, the Washington
Post's dynamic reporting duo who
nail the Nixon gang with persis-
tence and daring journalistic
abandon. Their sage-like editor,
Ben Bradlee, is portrayed by
veteran of stage and screen Jason
Robards, Jr.
The film, recipient of numer-
ous Academy Awards, traces the
reporters in their plight for
political justioe as they dissect the
oorrupt executive organ of the
U.S. Government.
All the President's Men is a
post-Watergate recount that
accurately and precisely depicts
all of the events, times, places,
and people involved in the
controversial "cover-up
The dramatic tension is
heightened by the recounting of
every incredible event that led to
the unprecendented resignation
of an American president. With
Bernstein and Woodward as
technical consultants, facts re-
main intact and a high level of
accuracy is achieved.
All the President's Men, this
week's free flick, will be shown
DUSTIN HOFFMAN AND Robert Redford are hot on the Nixon
gang's trail in a scene from "All the President's Men
The National Opera Company,
a highly professional troupe,
believes that through dedication
to the presentation of opera the
language of the audience, opera
will achieve its rightful popularity
in American culture.
��AMAZING TROUPE"
This amazing troupe of sing-
ing artists has been proving the
validity of this belief since 1948 in
tours oovering some 36 states.
Through oolorful production of
well-known operas in English,
they have in many instances
created audiences where none
previously existed. This troup
believes that it is noteworthy that
in European countries, where
opera has always been an out-
standing popular art form, the
audiences demand that the opera
be presented in the vernacular.
"ENGAGING, ENTHUSIASTIC"
These engaging, enthusiastic
young performers, chosen from
nationwide auditions prove daily
that "Opera in English" is both
entertaining and fun, as witnes-
sed by the spontaneous laughter
and applause-ingredients too
often missing when an English-
speaking audience attends a
conventional performance of
opera sung in a foreign tongue.
The troupewill be accompani-
ed by an orchestra comprised of
students from the East Carolina
Universty School of Music, under
the directing of Donald Wilder.
The National Opera Company
is brought to Greenville aud-
ienoes by the generosity of its
founder, Mr. A.J. Fletcher. The
performance Sunday night is free
and open to the public.
9 9
Friday and Saturday night at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre at 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
Student admission is by ECU
ID and activity card. Staff and
faculty members may use their
Mendenhall Student Center
membership cards.
THANK YOU
By Catherine Roberson
You gave me presents
without boxes or bows.
Gifts I oould not hold
or touch
but I could feel.
Things I oould not see
until I closed my eyes.
You sang me a song
without any words.
The tune was in your heart.
A thank-you note seems
inappropriate for a gift you cannot
see,
� � � � .
13 I I �-�'�





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
Visual Arts Forum
Artist Holt begins symposium
COURTESY
Visual Arts- Forum
The Visual Arts Forum will
begin a symposium of nationally
and internationally renowned
artists on Monday, February 6,
with the work of Nancy Holt, an
environmental sculptor,of inter-
national reputation.
Her showing will begin at 10
a.m. with a slide lecture on Ihe
artist's work , in the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center Auditorium. At 3p.m.
two films by the artist, Swamp
(oo-authored with Robert
Smithsen) and Pine Barrens will
be shown, also in Jenkins Audi-
torium.
Nancy Holt recently docu-
mented her work in "Probing the
Earth: Contemporary Land Pro-
jects an exhibition at Washing-
ton's Hirshorn Museum. She has
shown extensively on an interna-
tional scale and has had over fifty
articles and commentaries written
about her in prestigious arts
publications.
She has exhibited in the Sao
Paolo and Whitney Bienelles and
her films and video presentations
have been presented at the
Concora, Whitney, Hirshorn;
Modern Museum of Art, Paris,
and many more. Ms. Holt's most
widely recognized land sculpture
is Sun Tunnels located near
Ludn, Utah.
She has been awarded Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts
Grants in both sculpture and
video.
SUN TUNNELS LOCA TED near Lucin, Utah, is Nancy Holt's most
widely recognized land sculpture.
Other artists included in this
series will be Jack Burnham on
Feb. 27; Diane Waldman on
March 28; George Kokinas on
April 3; Donald Kuspit on April 4;
and Nicholas Krushenick on April
10
Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble in concert Feb. 10
The Annual Winter Concert
by The Symphonic Wind Ensem-
ble and The University Jazz
Ensemble will be Friday, Feb-
ruary 10, at 8:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
The Wind Ensemble, under
the direction of Herbert Carter,
ECU School of Music, will feature
oboist David Hawkins in an
original composition fa oboe and
winds by William P. Latham
entitled Andante and Allegro.
Before joining the ECU School of
Music faculty this fall, Mr.
Hawkins was instructor of oboe at
Washington State University an
performed for two seasons with
'

.o
V
o.
r,
uff
Entire month of February
AAJkyie ou Come xfad I
BE OUR VALENTINE
BUY A SUB
& YOUR SOFT DRINK IS 10c
Phone in order fa pick-up a delivery � Phaie: 752-6130 � 521 CotancheSt Geagetown Shoppes
the Spokane Symphony Orches-
tra. He is a graduate of the New
England Conservatay of Music in
Boston. He has perfamed with
chamber ensembles in Carnegie
Recital Hall and the Concert Hall
of the Kennedy Center fa the
Perfaming Arts in Washingtai.
He appeared most recently as
guest artist with the Idaho Falls
Symphony Orchestra in Novem-
ber. Other selections to be
perfamed by the Wind Ensemble
will include Opus 99 March by
Prokofiev, William Byrd Suite by
RIGCAIS
SHOfTSHOP
�E�AW ALL
LEATMCR 00006
Oowntonwi Greenville
JjHSBScl.
Gadon Jacob, Masquerade for
Band by Persichetti, Variation on
a Theme by Robert Schumann by
Robert Jager, and Bugler's Holi-
day by Leroy Anderson, featuring
the trumpet section.
JAZZ ENSEMBLE
The Jazz Ensemble, conduc-
ted by Benny Ferguson, graduate
teaching fellow in the ECU School
ol Music, will perfam Ornitho-
logy by Charlie Parkerarr. Ded-
rick, Hay Burner by Sammy
Nestico. The Blues by Dai Ellis,
and Ain't Gonna Ask No More
and Road Time Shuffle by To
shiko Akiyoshi.
The program is free and open
to the public.
ipeau
MOTN�R
COUMG�
mnJAer cAticlre
THE
OTHER
HALF
February 7,8,9, and 10
Students $4.50 per show
or
See All Four For $10.
King
Stop By The Playhouse Box Office
In McGirmis Auditorium
or Call 757-6390
NOW OPEN
WED - SUN
752-7303

-�t�K) behind THE ATTIC
Fri Open House
sat PEARL
Two fine female vocalists
Sun Open House flf
dnema 1&2
PITT PLAZA CENTER � 756-0088
THE BEST OF THE BEST
IN LATE SHOW ENTERTAINMEN
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WOODY IMAM.
AIIFA KEATON
LOVKandDKATII'
Untied Artists





2 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
MID
ADVERTISED
ITEM POUCY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each AbP
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
prices effective thru sat feb 4 at aap in Greenville
: WINTER SALE
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
Intramurals
by JOHN EVANS
ECU drops Marines 3-1
The East Carolina intramural basketball representatives toon two of
three men's games and the women's games in Saturday's games
against the teams from Camp Lejeune that visited here.
Next week, four other ECU teams travel to Camp Lejeune for the
rematch. Representing ECU in those games will be the Mudsharks, the
Carolina Stars and the Belk Pleasers from men's play and a yet-to-be
determined women's representative. In Saturday's Play, the Scott Ball
Team took an exciting, 76-72, win over the Marines third team,
The Marines led at the half, 35-30, but the Scott Ball Team rallied in
the second half behind Kent Chamberlain. -Chamberlain scored 22 of
the ECU teams 4e second-half points to finish the game with 36 points,
the top individual performance in the four games. We hit 13 field goals
and 10 of 14 free throws. Teammate Mark Hill added 13 points and
Keith Biggs scored 12 points.
The only ECU loss came in the second game as the Marines 2 team
demolished the Fraternity All-Stars, 99-51. The high scorer for the
All-Stars was Bob Wylie of Pi Kappa Phi with 17 points.
In the women's garrjeat 4 p.m ECU s representative, the Peace
Pirates, routed the Lady Marines, 56-24, after grabbing a 31-4 halftime
lead. Sherry Coats led the ECU team with 21 points.
In the feature game of the night, ECU' stop-ranked men' steam, the
Nutties Buddies, took an easy 92-73 win over the Marines. Leading
only 39-36 at the half, the Buddies tore away fa 53 points in the second
half for the easy win. Tony Collins led the Nutties Buddies with 18
pontsand Eric Dawson and Cliff Williams added 17 points each for the
winners.
JMEN'SBASKETBALL
Well, Marty is back jn prime form this week in regards to his picks
for the Intramural Top Ten. After being fooled by the early season
antics of the Belk Enforcer, Martinez turned his backon the Enforcers
and has ranked the Carolina Stars as the top intramural team this
week. He dropped the Nutties Buddies to third and the Enforcers to
fifth after watching them play last week.
In one game last week the Scott Semitoughs, led by Billy Bass and
Chris Seagraves, almost handed the Nutties Buddies their first loss of
the season. The Buddies didn't win until the dosing seconds, 50-48,
but stayed unbeaten. The Enforcers also squeaked out a narrow win
last week, nipping the Ayoock 5-0's, 43-39.
In another key game last week the Sociology Anthropology Club
handled FCA, 43-27, in a battle of unbeaten teams.
Among our unmentionable teams that are on probation, the Belk
Pleasers and the Scott No Playing White Boys remain unbeaten, as the
Pleasers dropped the previously unbeaten Scott Ball Team, 76-31.
MARTINEZ
1. Belk Carolina Stars-4-0
2. Jones Jaguars-4-0
3. Belk Nutties Buddies-3-0
4. Mudsharks-4-0
5. Belk Enforoers-4-0
Belk Our Gang-4-0
KappaAlpha-5-0 ,
break Kids-4-0
es Bones�4-0
Anth. Qub-3-1
EVANS
1. Belk Nutties Buddies-4-0
2. Belk Carolina Star s-4-0
3. Belk Enforcers-4-0
4. Hatchets-4-0
5. Mudsharks-4-0
6. Kappa Alpha-5-0
7. Heartbreak Kids-4-0
8. Jones Bones-4-0
9. Soc.Anth. Qub-3-1
10. Belk Who Knows-4-0.
MUELLER REPEA TS FOR THIRD WIN
I M ueller defeated M iokey Francis in the 176-200 pound division
his third straight intramural arm-wrestling championship.
finals were held in Minges Coliseum on Wednesday at 9 p.m.
, who won in the 156-175 pound class the past two years,
ly through the higher class.
Browning took a surprise victory in the 150 and under
defending two-time champion Paul Osman did not even
finals. Browning defeated Greg Copeland in the finals.
151-175 pound weight class, Mike Godfrey defeated
oung
yweight championship, Nathaniel Wigfall took the title
s.
-ever women's arm-wrestling championship, Donna
Kathy Markle
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
's bf ketball play last week the first big game of the
act Monday when the Peace Pirates took a 50-35 win
and previously unbeaten Tyler Cool and the Gang. The
Pirates into first place in the women's top ten, ahead of
mies. Cool and the Gang dropped to third, just ahead of
Lady Bucs win big
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
Tuesday nights win over
Campbell College was quite plea-
sing to Catherine Bolton and her
Lady Pirates basketball team.
After a loss to Longwood over the
weekend a win at Campbell, who
almost beat ECU in Minges
Coliseum in the season opener,
was a question mark. As it turned
our however, Pirate fans had
nothing to fear as ECU routed
Campbell 83 to 65.
The high scorer for ECU was
Debbie Freeman with 18. points.
She was followed by Rosie
Thompson with 13. Rosie playing
with a broken nose played only 14
minutes the entire game. Two of
those minutes were at the begin-
ning of the game when the injury
oocured. The last 12 minutes was
when she returned to spark the
Pirate rout.
Marcia Girven a 6-0 freshman
center had a great all around
game. She scored 8 points and
blocked 7 shots, haulting Camp-
bell drives under the boards.
Lydia Roundtree continued
her improvement in every phase
of the game. Many times during
the game she would daze the
Campbell players with her speed
and ball handling ability.
April Ross a 5-7 junior from
Bath added 8 points and played
solid defense to aid in the rout.
Coach Bolton on reflecting on
the game Wednesday afternoon
was pleased with the win and with
the play of the team as a whole.
"Our offense has been coming
along throughout the season
Bolton said. "Lydia Roundtree is
just solid. She gave us so much on
defense. Even though she only
soored 4 points she helped out in
so many ways. Her quickness and
speed are something to behold
"April Ross has matured
greatly and is doing a very fine
job for us
"Gail Kerbaugh is currently
playing the third guard role. She
had a good game at both ends of
the oourt and finished with 8
points
"Kathy Suggs came off the
bench and shot 5 of 5 from the
floor.
"Overall everybody played
well and we certainly hope the
momentum from that game will
take us into the UNC-CH game
"We must be ieady fa
UNC Bolton was quick to say.
"Three nights ago they blew
Appalachian State off the oourt
Our girls are not intimidated
by UNC though Bolton said.
"They feel they can and should
win the game.
Sports
Blue destroys ECU
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Edita
The Monarchs of Old Domi-
nion invaded Minges Coliseum
Tuesday night and clobbered the
Bucs 112-81 behind the shooting
of Ronnie Valentine and Richie
Wright.
The Pirates could not slow
down the running gunning Big
Blue as they pushed towards a
59-31 halftime lead.
Wright pulled off some in-
credible off the wall shots that
dampened the Pirate spirits and
Valentine waked inside to the
tune of 22 points and numerous
rebounds.
Eight points separated the
teams with 8.50 to play in the first
half when Oliver Mack hit a
jumper to make the 25-17 but
then the Big Blue went ape and
went on a 25-4 surge that buried
the Bucs in a rut from which they
could ntf recover.
��� i �
40 K YLE POWERS blocks shot against ODU. Powers has been a
bright spot in an otherwise lackluster week. Photo by Kirk
Kingtbury tfBHHMH
In the second half the ODU
lead was cut to 20 at 82-62 behind
some strong play by Kyle Powers
and Greg Canelius.
Powers played well in the
Duke game Sat. also and finished
with nine points against the
Monarchs despite playing fa oily
a shat period of time. He, along
with Herb Krusen, combined fa
23 points at the one faward
position.
The Pirates played the rest of
the game on even terms until a
stretch with seven minutes re-
maining when a 3-point play by
Wright sparked a rally that put
the Blue up by 32 at 99-67.
Oliver Mack led Pirate sooring
with 22 points despite still being
slowed by the flu, and Herb
Krusen added 14. Herb Gray led
the board play with 14 rebounds.
The loss was even more
dissapointing considering a
strong showing at Duke last
Saturday. Coach Larry Gillman
explained really don't under-
stand it He oontinuedWe
played well at Indiana, in the
Charlotte tournament and we had
good halves at State and Duke.
But here I think we played only
one good game, against Athletes
in Action. We had good halves
against St. Peter's, William and
Mary, but that was it
The Bucs are at home Satur-
day against Richmond as the
Spiders will carry a 3-14 reoad
into the game.
Bernard Hill is likely to return
to add some depth at faward.
Hill has missed two games due to
the flu. Garry Kerr was back in
action Tuesday after missing the
game at Duke
The Pirates are 4-13 on the
season with nine games remain-
ing It is possible fa the team to
finish .500 fa the year. A rout
Saturday would be helpful. Tipoff
isaf'730: : '�� �





2 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Lady Pirates win two of three games on road
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
With three of five consecutive
road games already played, the
Lady Pirates are ready to head fa
hone. The girls have already
played three very tough and
emotional games against Virginia
Canmonwealth University, Long-
wood College and Campbell Col-
lege, including wins over V.C.U.
and Campbell College.
The Pirates opened their road
series invading the Richmond
Coliseum and beating the Rams
of V.C.U. 62-61.
"The scae (62-61) doesn't
clearly indicate the game com-
mented Coach Bolton, 'we were
in conplete oontrol the entire
game. They (V.C.U.) really put
pressure on us the second half but
I feel the outcome was never in
doubt
However the Ladies next
game was against a very strong
Longwood team, in which ECU
came up shy of the winning
basket.
Rosie Thompson left the game
early because of foul trouble and
thus the offensive punch was
muffled.
With the scae 45-28 at the
half the Pirates were in need of
something, the answer came from
the quiet faward Debbie Free-
man. Debbie had oily 6 points at
the half and finished the game
with a game high 31 points.
"Debbie was unreal, she
played just super. Without a
doubt it was her best single game
ever said Coach Bolton, "I was
very pleased with her
With Thompson fouling out
early in the second half freshmen
reserve Lynne Emerson came off
the bench to spark a second half
comeback. She hit seven points
and ignited a comeback that saw
the Pirates out scae Laigwocd 50
to 34. However the deficit of the
first half proved too great and the
Pirates lost 79-78.
"Foul trouble seemed to be
our biggest problem declareo
Bolton. "Rosie fouled out, Debbie
had three, and Lynne Emerson
somehow managed to get into
foul trouble too
The third stop on the road trip
was with small,but tough Camp-
bell College.
The Pirates had no problem as
they quickly mounted a lead that
was never relinquished. Unfor-
tunately the game held some bad
Sands Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave. at
College View
Cleaners
ATTIC
Thurs. A Fri.
brice street:
Sat. Nightshirt
moments fa Rosie Thompson.
Two minutes into the game
Rosie went up fa a rebound and
received a sharp punch in the
nose. She was faced to leave the
game and her injury was diagnos-
ed as a broken nose. Onoe again
Debbie Freeman came to the
rescue and stabilized the offense.
However Rosie returned the
second half and did her share of
soaing, bioken nose a not,
ending wit'i 13 points, second
only to Debbie with 18.
Marsha Girven did a fine job
of defense fa ECU having 7
blocked shOs and several re-
bounds.
The Pirates have two remain-
ing games befae they head fa
hone, the biggest game being
against Nath Carolina at Chapel
Hill and Duke. The game will be
fa undisputed second place
$ DOLLAR DAYS $

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
9:00 to 5:30
All Sales Final
ALL Warmup Suits- Ys OFF
ALL Ladies Tennis Shorts & Shirts- 25 OFF
ALL Men's Tennis Shorts (other than Boast) - OFF
ALL Men's Boast Tennis Shorts & Shirts- 20 OFF
� ALL Tennis Jackets- 1a OFF
� SHOE CLOSE OUT- Will be sold at dealer cost andor less
Puma Hardcourt (Men's)
Adidas Cadet (Children)
Yamaha Asahi (Ladies �r Men)
Adidas BSK II (Ladies)
Adidas Newcombe (Men)
Bata Poiymate (Ladies)
Adidas Bill (Children)
Nike Junior Allcourt Navy
(Children)
Nike Junior Woffle Trainer (Children)
Tiger Enduro Woffle Trainer
Nike Leather Cortez (Men)
Nike Nylon Cortez (Men)
Adidas SL76 (Men)
Adidas Superstar II (Men)
Puma Nylon Jogging Shoe
Pro Keds Navy wCushion Collar
Hi Cr Low Tops
ALL Wilson, Marcraft, Vittert, & Davis Racketball Rackets- OFF
Archery Supplies- 25 OFF
Recurved Bows- OFF
Compound Bows- 10 OFF
ALL Hunting Pants, Coats, Vests, Shirts- Va OFF
Down & Polar Guard Coats, Vests, Ski Pants- OFF
Thermal �r Insulated Underwear- OFF
Hunting Caps, Hats, & Tobogans- OFF
ALL Rods- 25 OFF
Rod building supplies. Rod Blanks- 20 OFF
ALL Tackle- 20 OFF
ALL Reels- 10 OFF
Free Monofilament Line
Dog Training Supplies- 10 OFF
Reloading Supplies- 10 OFF
Black Powder Guns �r Kits- 10 OFF
Used Rifles & Shotguns- 10 OFF
Gun Cases- 10 OFF
Decoys- 20 OFF
Field- Goose Decoys- $35doz.
Buck, Gerber, Browning Knives- 10 OFF
Freeze Dried Foods- 10 OFF
ALL Camping Supplies- 10 OFF
ALL Swimsurts by Head & Speedo- OFF
ALL Tennis Dresses- price
Al TOP- OF- THE- LINE RACKETS reduced to dealer cost or
less- large selection of rackets by PDP, Head, Aldila Cannon,
Wilson, Slazenger, Spalding, Adidas, �r Yamaha
H.L.H0DGES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phon� 752-4156





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 February 1978
Alabama ar
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
East Carolina men's and
womens swimming teams drop-
ped two last Saturday in a double
dual meet at Tuscaloosa, Ala-
bama.
The men lost to last years
B.F.Goodrich
Car Care Service
4 POINT BRAKE CHECK
1 Pull Front Whaalt. Impact Lining and Drum.
I Chack Grea Saala. W��l Cyllndartfor LMkagt.
i inttMCt Front Wheel Bearings.
4. Adlust Brakaa on All Four Wheelt for Foil Pedal
lleg. Price ��-With Cert. Service Only $3.SB
����"�
Most US. Cars, Toyotas 4 Datsuns
call for appointment
" wIkerIervice'avaIlableTn city,
STUDENT PRICE S8.50 WITH STUDENT ID
MOT,ZtTZr P�- a, B.F.Goodrich de.ie.
HlFGoodrich Coggins Car Care
STIRE CENTER
Phone 754-5144
BO W. HWY. 24 BY-PASS
0�HMVILLK.N.C
number two team in the nation,
Alabama, 72-38 and to LSU 64-49.
Coach Flay Scharf said that
John McCauley swam excellent
against Jonty Skinner in the 50
and 100 meter freestyle but lost
both. Jonty Skinner holds the
world record in the 100 meter
freestyle. John Tudor finished
second in the individual medley,
but swam his best time at 1 56.8
Ted Nieman won the 500 meter
freestyle but lost to Ail-American
Scott McDonald in the 200 meter
freestyle. Diver Tom Bell finished
second in the diving competition
against LSU.
Coach Scharf said that the
pirates swam poorly against
Alabama and LSU. He said they
could have beaten LSU but, in the
freestyle eventsour strong point,
they were able to pick up points
1
� �
- Fri. End of Week Party
IH4frflHltf 3:30 to 7:0�
For their 1st Appearance In Greenville
MA URICE WILLIAMS & THE ZODIAC
WITH THEIR MILLION SELLING HITS STAY AND MAY l
Sat.
the contest you have been waiting for 1
! SAT NIGHT FEVER : Dance a Thon
Beginning this Sat. nite and runninq for 12 weeks with weekly winners rv1'n9rf(v
dinner for two at the Villa Roma Resturant and $25.00 plus a chance p
at the GRAND PRIZE OF $500.00 CASh"
or $!000.00 m
TO THE SCHOOL OF nflI
2nd place winners recievelOU-UU JV
gift certificates from Scraps and Snooty Fox
3rd place $100.00 in albums from
apple records.
I by10:00 Sat. nite. No entry fee and it is possible to enter more than"crar
Dont miss out on the ! A in
SAT NITE FEVER dance - a- thon
Classifieds
and break up our soorina.
The Lady Pirates had an
equally rough time last Saturday.
They lost toAlabama63-24 and to
LSU 82-30.
Julie Shafferbroke three uni-
versity records fa women's var-
sity swimming. She broke her
own record in the 100 and 200
meter butterfly. In the 100 meter
butterfly her record time was
1 00.9. while it was previously
1 02.18. In the 200 meter butter-
fly she broke her old record time
Coach Scharf said that the
lady swimmers swam well con-
sidering the layoff they had had.
This was the first time they had
swam since December.
The Pirates next meet will be
at Duke next Saturday at 1 00
where they will try to up their
record to 6-2. Coach Scharf says
that Duke should be tougher than
Carolina and we barely got by
them. He said that the Pirates can
win this meet but it depends on
how hard they work and how
determined they are to win.
Coach Scharf asked that ev-
eryone oome to Duke Saturday
and back the Pirate swimmers.
for sale
FOR SALE: Toyota Celica, '72
with AMFM stereo radio and
tape-player, AC , landau vinyl
top. Steel belted radials. Good
oond. Excellent transportation.
Call 756-4046 a 756-4136. (leave
name if not there.)
rOR SALE: AM FM radio. $5.00.
Call Alex Cunningham, 324 Slay
dam 752-9943.
FOR SALE: Stereo equipment,
Kenwood Receiver 7600, 80 watts
pch; Pioneer 7171 cassette play-
er; Koss Earphones, and two
Tempest Lab 3 speakers. Asking
$700.00. Call 758-9706.
FOR SALE: Vega hatchback.
AC, AMFM, power steering,
steel radials, factay rebuilt
engine, properly maintained.
Excellent oond. 758-3830.
FOR SALE: 5 piece bedrm. suite
includes dresser with mirra,
chest of drawers, 2 angle beds,
and night table. $125.00 cash.
Call 758-2577 after 530 p.m.
FOR SALE: New Serta perfect
sleeper, double box springs,
mattress, and frame set. Cost
$250, will sell fa $190. Call
Richard at 752-1884.
torrent (J
FEMALE ROOM MATE: Wanted
to share house across the street
from campus. Only $50 moith
rent plus a share of the utilities
Call 752-4152 a 752-2064 after 6
p.m.
FEMALE ROOM MATE: Needed.
Summer oily. On Jarvis St. Bus
service. Only $50 per month plus
DANSKIN'S
Newest swmsuHleotards
available MOW.
AT BARREltd
806 Dickinson Ivs.
762-6186
SALE
Winter Inventory
vN no s Jp
V" W GOLF SHIRTS
d&lAF' LONG AND SH0R7
sX JtwL ' sleeve
J&l 0l SPERRV T0P-SIDER:
HA RAIN SLltKERS, PANTS,
Tll 'rn
jv
Vs.

SHOES
SftT.
utilities. Call Cathy 758-7894.
found 3
FOUND: In parking la behind
library, ladies gold oolaed Timex
bracelet watch. To claim oome by
FOUNTAINHEAD office.
WANTED: Infamatioi leading to
purchase of '56 VW a parts. Call
752-0582.
NEEDED: Part-time seaetary fa
a medical office now through
May, 1978. Needs typing and
secretarial skills. Reply to PO.
Box 6043, Greenville, N.C.
JOBS ON SHIPS: American,
faeign. No experience required.
Excellent pay. Waldwide travel.
Summer job a career. Send $3.00
fa infamatioi. SEAFAX, Dept.
I-5 Box 2049, Port Angeles,
Washington, 98362.
WANTED: Persons interested in
faming a car pool from Washing-
ton Mon. thru Fri. My classes are
MWF 9-12 T-Th 10-330. Willing
to compromise on the time.
Please call 946-9812.
ALTERATIONS: Winter things
too long? Too big? Call Kathy
752-8444 a 752-8642.





Title
Fountainhead, February 2, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.626
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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