Fountainhead, January 26, 1978







Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 12 pages.
Fountainhead
Dr. Pepper, p. 3
Chapeau, p. 7
ECU vs. Duke, p. 10
Vol. No. 53, No. 31
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
26 January 1978
QmJBJrti withdrawn
Atty. Gen. position
n.lliiiiNwwy
� �
ByDOUGWWTE
News Editor
Kevin McCourt, nominee for
SGA attaney general, withdrew
his name from consideration fa
the post Tuesday.
McCourt explained in a letta
to FOUNTAINEAO that "I think
'it trtally unfair fa me to take
the position of attaney general
sinoe there is a possiblity that I
may run (fa office in the roring
elections.)"
SGA President Neil Sessoms
Sbbmitted McCourt's name to
legislature fa approval Monday.
Kiaan Shanahan remains the
acting attaney genaal.
Accading to Article V, Sec-
tion 10, Subpart A, the Blue
Ribbai oommittee, composed of
the head of the Review Board, the
chairpason of the Haxx Council,
two administratas, and the in-
cumbent attaney general, is
charged with screening appli-
cants and submitting two names
to the SGA President. The
president must then choose one of
the two and submit his choioe to
the legislature fa approval
Neil now has two choices: he
can either submit his second
choice to the legi slat ure, a he can
recoivene the Blue Ribbai com-
mittee and start all over again
James Mai lay, Associate Dean of
Students said.
"Kevin's withdrawal reopens
the screening procedure fa atta-
ney general.
The Blue Ribbai oommittee
will be called back, because
Kevin was never approved by the
legislature, he will not serve on
the oommittee as the incumbent
attaney general Sessonssaid.
A similar situatioi has never
happened during the last 25
years, and probably never befae
that, accading to Mallay.
"Afta the events which have
happened ever the past two
years, I would suggest the SGA
revise the selection system fa
attaney general and public de-
fender and use the one in effect
10-12 years ago which made those
two offices elective. The Hona
Council was also elected then
Mallay said.
It is possible that the position
of incumbent attaney general on
the Blue Ribbai committee may
remain vacant since the last
officially screened and approved
attaney general has graduated,
accading to Mallay.
The office has been officially
vacant since Sessoms fired fama
attaney genaal Karen Harloe
last April.
McCourt, howeva, served as
the acting attaney genaal dur-
ing the summer and Kiaan
Shanahan has been the acting
attaney genaal since Septem-
ba.
"I think Kevin ought to pull
out if he feels he cannot handle
the job. If something would
prevent him from carrying out the
duties of the attaney genaal
objectively, then of course he
should withdraw Sessoms said.
"We saiously doubt McCourt
could be objective anyway. We've
dealt with him befae. He
changes colas more often than a
chameleon Reed Warren, SGA
vice-president said.
Sessoms said he was glad he
would receive two new nomina-
tions, since he wants the best
possible pason to fill the offioe.
the legislature fa approval. a tncumoeni auumey yen�c��. r-�- r
Crafts center schedules workshop classes
Woman's best friend, ir�"
A DOG S LIFE isn't such a bad deal after all. This canine takes time
out for reflection while his friend continues her paper chase.
If you would like to learn how
to develop and print your own
film, make a quilt, throw a pot,
design youi own unique leatha
belt a have fun expaimenting
with the aaft of enameling, then
regista today fa a aaft wak-
shop now being offaed by the
Crafts Centa at Mendenhall
Student Centa.
A wide variety of beginna's-
level wakshops are available to
all full-time students, faculty and
staff. Dependents, aged eighteen
a ova, of faculty and staff are
aso eligible to participate. Upon
paymou of a $10.00 semesta
Crafts Centa membership fee, an
individual may regista fa any of
the available wakshops without
additional charges, excluding
costs of personal supplies.
All interested pasons must
regista at the Crafts Centa
during regular opaating hours, 3
p.m. until 10 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
3 p.m Saturday. The final day to
regista is Sat Feb. 4 and class
space is limited. Also, no fee
refunds will be made afta the
wakshop registration deadline.
SCHEDULE
The following wakshops are
now available:
Basic PWtay: (limit eight
pasons). Basic instruction in
wheel-throwing and hand-build-
ing techniques, glazing, and
firing of clay. Sec. A 630 p.m. -
9:30 p.m. (Tues.) Feb 7, 14, 21,
28 & Mar. 14. Sec. B 6:30 p.m. -
9:30 p.m. (Thurs.) Feb. 9,16, 23,
Mar. 2& 16.
Leatha Craft: (limit 10
pasois). Learn the methods of
creating your own beautiful lea-
tha articles. Belts, wallets, hand-
bags; the possibilities are end-
less. 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. (Thurs.) Feb.
9, 16, 23, & Ma. 2.
Enameling: A vay old simple
art, enameling can be beautifully
applied to aeate a variety of
items fron ashtrays to wall
plaques and is vay often used in
aafting jewelry. 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Wed.) Feb. 8, 15, 22, Mar. 1 &
15.
Printmaking: Lean sevaal
methods to print your own
designs on T-shirts, scarfs, yard-
age, etc. 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. (Wed.)
Feb. 8, 15, 22 & Ma. 1.
Quilting: Basic instruction in
contonpaay and traditional pat-
tans utilizing the techniques of
five patch designs, applique,
and emaoiday. 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Tues.) Feb. 7,14, 21 & 28.
Beginning Jewelry: Design
and make your own jewelry.
Possibilities include silva rings,
aacelets, key chains, necklaces,
pendants and earings. Tech-
niques used will allow fa a
numba of possible projects. 6
p.m. - 9 p.m. (Men.) Feb. 6, 13,
20, 27 & Ma. 13.
Floa Loom Weaving: Lean to
use a four-haness floa loom.
Techniques oi weaving will be
leaned by making a pillow fa the
first project, (limit 4 pasois).
Section A 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Feb. 6,
8 & 15. Section B 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Feb. 20, 22 & Ma. 1
Beginning Dakroorn: Basic
instruction in dakroorn tech-
niques. Students will develop and
print their own black and white
film. Section A 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Tues.) Feb. 7,14, 21.28& Ma.
14. Section B 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Thurs.) Feb. 9,16, 23, Ma. 2 &
16.
HERALD gets office
THESE CREA TIVE STUDENTS are hard at work weaving on the C
ter s floor loom.
By DOUG WHITE
NewsEdita
The EBONY HERALD has
been granted offioe space in the
Publications Centa fa the first
time since its inception five yeas
ago, accading to Jary Simmons,
Executive Edita of the EBONY
HERALD.
"Fa the last few yeas,
staff meetings have been held in
rooms rented from Mendenhall
by the SGA a the edita's dam
room, which has caused sevaal
problems Simmais said.
SGA Vice-President and
Chairman of the Communications
Boad Reed Waren described the
facilities as "nothing elegant but
oertainly a step fawad and
was happy to have found the
offioe space.
The new offioe is next doa to
the Buocanea office and was
famaly that publication's
business offioe. The office, how-
eva, has not been used fa
sevaal moiths.
"Thae ae sevaal advant-
ages ova the old ai angemaits.
We now have a pamanent,
oentrally located facility in which
to conduct our business and the
necessay functions of a publi-
cation.
"Also, we ae much doea to
our layout and production rooms
in the FOUNTAINHEAD offioe
and can shae a full time
seaetay with the otha campus
publications Simmons said.





r
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 January 1978
Films
The Student Union Films
committee will sponsor an Inter-
national Film Festival on Sunday,
Jan. 29. TheLinaWertmuller film
SWEPT AWAY will be shown at 2
p.m. After a one hour break,
Fellini's 8 Vi will be shown at 5
p.m. in Kobayashi's REBELLION
at 7 p.m.
Seniors
Senior class meeting is Tues
Jan. 31 at 630til 730 p.m. in 221
Mendenhall. There will be a
discussion and a decision con-
cerning the Senior class gift.
Manager
Applications are now being
taken for the refrigerator man-
ager post for school year 1978-79.
You may file in the SGA office or
the refrigerator office (room 231
Mendenhall) from 1-2:30 daily.
Filing deadline is Feb. 10. For
more information contact Ron
Lewis at 757-6611 a 752-2492
after 6 p.m.
Elbo room
Come to the Hootie Happy
Hour at the Elbo Room on Jan.
31, 9 until. There will be a
goldfish eating contest with a
prize of $30 to the person eating
the most goldfish. There will be a
$1.00 entry fee. All interested
contestants may register at the
door on Jan. 31 between 9 and 10
p.m. Come enjoy cheap beer and
lots of fun!
SOULS
There will be a S.O.U.L.S.
meeting Thursday, Jan. 26 at 7
p.m. at the Afro-American
Cultural Center. All vice-
president lal candidates and any
others interested in running fa
the offioe should attend.
French
French Culture Festival fea-
turing French wines and cheeses
will be at 8 p.m. Thurs Jan. 26
in ECU's International House,
306 E. 9th St across from
Mendenhall. Due to the high
quality of the wines and cheeses
to be served, a contribution of $2
will be requested. Sponsored by
the International Langauge
Organization and the Inter-
national Students Association.
Tickets will be sold by organiza-
tion members and at the Foreign
Language department. Please
buy tickets in advance.
Bowling;
Have you ever tried bowling in
the moonlight? Here's your
chance! Friday evenings from 8
p.m. til 10 p.m "Moonlight
Bowling" is held at the Menden-
hall Student Center Bowling
Center. Try your bowling skills in
this different environment. If
you're as sharp as ever you may
win a FREE game. The bowler
with the highest score during
each hour of Moonlight Bowling
will win one (1) FREE game.
There are always two winners and
one of them could be you.
Happy hour
Don't miss "Happy Hour" at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Every Monday afternoon, from 3
p.m. til 6 p.m billiards and table
tennis are v3 off. So if you're "a
regular" or just play occasionally
ycu can't affad to miss it.
Sigma tau
Sigma Tau Gamma wili be
having two rush parties Tuesday
and Wednesday night this week.
The party Tuesday night will be at
Pant ana Bob's and will start at 9
p.m. The party Wednesday will
be at Blimpies and will start at 7
p.m. Drawings fa the gasoline
donatioi will also be made
Wednesday night. Anyone inter-
ested is urged to join the brothers
of Sigma Tau Gamma, the fastest
growing fraternity at ECU.
Buccaneer
Any campus aganizatioi that
has nrt received a letter from the
BUCCANEER oonoerning your
particular aganizatioi by Fri,
Jan. 28, 1978, should oontact
THE BUCCANEER offioe at
757-6501 a 757-6502.
ccc
A time of fun, fellowship and
Bible study sponsaed by Campus
Crusade fa Christ, meeting each
Thurs at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-101. This includes Dynamics of
the Christian Life, Dynamics of
Discipleship, Dynamics of Min-
istry and Dynamics of the Life of
Christ fa skeptics, as well as
those interested in growing in
their relationship with Christ.
Phi eta
There will be a meeting of Phi
Eta Sigma, the Freshman Hona
Society, Feb. 1. The meeting will
be held in room 221 Mendenhall
at 7 p.m. Dr. Richard Todd will be
the guest speaker. He will discuss
setting up a scholarship fund.
Some impatant business items
will also be discussed. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
Practice
Alright girls, pracuce those
kicks, trim that waist! Pom Pom
tryouts will be held the weekend
of March 17, 18, & 19. Check
FOUNTAINHEAD and ckxm bull-
etins fa more infamatiai later.
Plan ahead ,
Fellowship Comics
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m in the Afro-
American Cultural Center.
Gospel
The ECU Comic Book Club
will meet at Mendenhall room 248
on Tues Jan. 31 from 7 to9 p.m.
Business will include plans fa a
conic book convention in the
Greenville area. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
Thurs Jan. 26 from 7:30 to 9
p.m. come and enjoy the singing
and sharing of the Full Gospel
Student Fellowship's weekly
meeting in room 221 Mendenhall.
Next week, Feb. 2, we have a
special speaker Myles Cart ret te.
Mylesisan ECU student who has
a liberating message fa all who
hear him. Everyone isnvited to
attend both O tnese meetings.
Any questions should be directed
to John Crowe 758-9538.
Worship
A note to see if you are
interested in meeting fa waship
afta the manner of friends. This
free-fom communication of the
spirit can be an exilarating and
meaningful encounter of the roots
of religious experience. Contact
Blake Noah at 756-0787.
Deadline
The deadline fa registratiai
fa the Bahamas Cruise and the
Floida trip is January 31st. Both
trips will be made during Spring
Oeak and are under the sponsa-
ship of the Student Union Travel
Committee. Call the Central
Ticket Office jn.MandenhaU. Joe.
more details.
Jhe ECU chapter of the
Student National Education As-
sociation is honaed to announoe
that Dr. Leo Jenkins will speak at
its next meeting. We oadially
invite all education majos to
attend. The meeting will be held
on Mon Jan. 30 at 4 p.m. at
room 244 Mendenhak. We look
toward to stoing you!
Whos who
Certificates fa Who's Who
may be picked up in room 204
Whichard.
Student union
The ECU Student Union is
now aocepting applications fa
president fa the 1978-79 aca-
demic year. Applications are
available in room 234 a at the
infamatiai desk in Mendenhall
Student Center. The deadline fa
filing is 5 p.m. Friday, January
27. Fa more infamatiai caitact
the Student Union offioe in
Mendenhall.
License
W
Visual Arts Fa urn presents:
"The Devil's Ball" 12 p.m. and
"The General" 3 to 5 p.m. (With
Buster Keaton) Fri Jan. 27 in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Building
Auditoium.
Coffeehouse
This weekend, the ECU
Coffeehouse presents two excel-
lent entertainers.
From the Roxy to the mount-
ains, Tommy Gillespie has enter-
tained a variety of audience with
aiginal hits, and even some
Dylan and Jackson Browne num-
bers.
Along with Tommy, the
Coffeehouse presents our own,
Joe Collins. Come on down to
room 15, Mendenhall this Thurs.
and Fri Jan. 26 and 27. Shows
are at 9 and 10:30 p.m. Fifty cents
gets you in to enjoy these fine
musicians and all the goodies you
want.
Don't foget auditiois Feb. 2
and 3. Sign up in the Student
Unioi office.
Concert
The Popular Entertainment
Committee of the St Jdent union
will present Arlo Guthrie in
oonoert Mon Feb. 13. The
oonoert will begin at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditoium. Tickets will
be $3.00 fa students and $5.00
fa the public. Seating is limited,
so get your tickets now befoe
they're all goie.
An evening course to prepare
amateur radio enthusiasts fa the
general class license will be
offered by ECU on Wednesdays,
Feb. 15-Apr. 26.
Prospective license holders
who participate in the non-credit
oourse will learn electronic theay
and acquire the necessary code
ability to pass the FCC General
Class amateur radio license
exam.
Amateurs who already have a
general license will find the
course helpful in upgrading to the
advanced levei license. Each class
session will include "hands on"
laboatoy experiments in radio
theay, alaig with regular in-
struction
Further infamatiai about the
course 1 s available from the
Office of Non-Credit Programs,
Division of Continuing Educa-
tion.
Fencing
The Fencing Club is begin-
ning an active new year. We have
moved our meeting place on
campus to a more convenient
location fa most people. We now
meet at Memaial Gym in room
102. Anyone interested in learn-
ing to fence a joining our young
club is welcome to join us any
Monday night from 7 to 9 p.m.
Fa further'infamatiai call Blake
a Bev. 758-4357.
Silver streak
You won't want to miss this
weeks Free Flick, "Silver
Streak, an action packed film
starring Richard Pryo and Gene
Wilder. This film will hit you like
a ton of laughing gas. Showtime
is7and 9 p.m. Fri. and Sat Jan.
27-28. Admission is by ID and
activity card.
Red pin
"Red Pin Bowling' is back fa
Spring Semester. Held every
Sunday evening fron 7 p.m. til 10
p.m. at the Bowling Center at
Mendenhall Student Center, Red
Pin Bowling is a game fa
everyaie. If you can make a strike
when the red pin is the head pin,
you win one(1) FREE game. It's
that simple! Come on over and try
it out this Sunday. It could be
your lucky day.
i
Hashes must be typed or neatly
printed. Handwritten flashes will
not be accepted. Deadlines are
Friday before Tuesday's paper and
Tuesday before Thursday's paper.





�������HBMi
I �p i
HHRBBBn
Greek Forum
26 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Paga 3
Dr. Pepper drawing
By JAY CHAMBERS
I.F.C Public Relations
The social life of fraternities
and sororities at ECU offers social
opportunities which supplement
those offered by the university.
They offer formal parties, infor-
mal social gatherings, and a wide
variety of other functions. These
events help members to make
new friends. Ask yourself if you
have the type of social life you
really want. The Greek system
could have the answer.
This spring semester has been
planned and anticipated to be the
most exciting and eventful time in
many a year. Both the Inter-
fraternity and Panhellenic Coun-
cils have scheduled a full sem-
ester of activities, projects, and
social functions that will be
announced in the upcoming
weeks.
This week got spring rush
underway for the Greek system. It
has been noticed that there is an
increase in prospective members
in most houses. Many Greek
observers attribute more invol-
vement to students having a
better attitude toward the Greek
image.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Alpha Phis Have set
the date of their pledge dance for
Feb. 3 and 4, with entertainment
by Five Degrees South
Sigma Sigma Sigma held a
special induction ceremony Jan-
uary 16 for their housemother,
Mrs. Myrtle Bobbins. January 21
they held her initaition at St.
Pauls's Episcopal Church. Im-
mediately following the initiation
the alumnae held the "Circle
Degree of the Sorority a brief
ceremony welooming initiated
Sigma's into alumnae life. After
the oeremony a reception was
held fa alumnae at the Club. The
Sigmas will hold their pledge
formal on Friday, Jan. 27 at the
Candlewick Inn.
On January 24 the new Chi
Omega officers were insatlled.
They are: Karen Sanders, Pres-
ident; Beth Worth, Vice-
President; Sylvia Honeycutt, Sec-
retary; Laurie Moore, Treasurer;
Mary Charles Stevens, pledge
trainer; Mara Flaherty, Person-
nel.
The Phi Kappa Tau frater-
nity's concentrated rush is ever,
however the door is always open
to those independent students
interested in our oganization. The
Phi Tau's are planning many big
events this spring which will
make this semester the best
ever.
On Tuesday, Jan. 24, David
Wright, ex-president of Phi
Kappa Tau, and Jay Chambers, a
Treasurer of I.F.C, were inter-
viewed on the WITN television
show "Almanac" concerning the
fraternities and Greek system at
ECU.
By STUART MORGAN
Assistant News Editor
A Dr. Pepper drawing, spon-
sored by Robertson Beverage
Co. from Washington, N.O, and
the Mendenhall Student Union,
was held Tuesday at 3 p.m. in the
Student Union.
The six winners were: Debbie
Harrison, Kay Etheridge, Terry
Parker, LaDonna Marshburn,
Dara Cline, and Wanda Turnage.
Bonnie Macauley and Terry
Flanagan, both from Fletcher
dorm, were randomly selected
from those attending to draw the
names of the winners.
About 500 persons registered
for the drawing between January
10 and 24, during which time
tee-shirts, toboggans, and
patches advertising Dr. Pepper
were distributed.
Each of the winners received a
set of four Dr. Pepper glasses
"We wanted to give the
people a chance to try something
else - something "hot" other
than ooffee said Ceal Phillip,
factory representative fa Dr.
Pepper in this area.
bSUHj
ks"t
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For only $44 per adult dbl. occ. HOLIDAY INN
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Admission to BUSCH GARDENSdiscover
Africa in Floridaonly 25 minutes away.
For reservations call 752-1212 or write
Sunshine Promotions
P.O. Box 3231
Greenville, N.C. 27834
752-1828
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Wed. Buck Day (12:00-2:30 pm)
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��PBBWW
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAO 26 January 1978
Selection committee
meetings not 'secret'
Legislator Rardy Ingram introduced a resolution
to the SGA legislature Monday night requesting
President Neil Sessomsto report to the legislature on
the chancellor selection activities, obviously not
realizing that President Sessoms doesn't have the
right to discuss the goings on of the Chancellor
Selection Committee to anyone.
Ingram apparently presumed that secret meet-
ings were being held to discuss the selection of a
successor to Dr. Leo Jenkins. According to Dr.
Clinton Prewett, executive secretary of the commit-
tee, the committee meetings were not secret, but
they were not open to just anyone. Prewett said that
selected persons, including vice chancellors, some
administrators, and student leaders were invited to
speak to the nominees in sessions separate from the
chancellor selection committee meetings.
Speaker of the Legislature Tommy Joe Payne
upheld the confidentiality rule, saying that no secret
meetings have been held to discuss the selection
process. Payne correctly said that Sessoms cannot
initiate discussions or meetings concerning the ,
chancellor selections.
rhe Chancel la Selection Committee has had to
opera under strict confidentiality as mandated by
the . Board of Governors. Ingram's questioning
of fne secrecy surrounding the selection process is �
1 andab�, cer tainly most people on campus are
ted in mowing who the next chancellor will
Acw comb on. whAT'5 Going on in thosz seeder,
CHANCELLOR $B LECTION mBETliG-S?
�A.
omm;ttee members recognize the need for
confidentiality and have proceeded to attend the
meetings professionally by not discussing the issue
with jons not directly involved with committee
activities. Sessoms has acted accordingly.
omrmttee will decide on two candidates and
will suomit their names to UNC President William C.
Friday I f the two candidates are approved, they will
be considered for the selection.
is resolution was preposterous concerning
the fact th legislature is in no way directly
mvo1 with the selection of the next chancellor.
Perhc, legislators should do a little homework
before introducing resolutions which border on beirrg
ridiculous.
Fountainhead
Serving East Carolina community for over fifty years.
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditaLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News FditasDoug White
Joe Yaeger
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevino
Sports EditorChris Holloman
: N7Ar.HF.AD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
"jtv � � oy the Student Government Association of
F .t and v rxjted each Wednesday during the summer,
�ng the school year.
Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
tditon. i 57-6366. 757 7, 757-6309.
Subsa,jons. Stt).6flarwxia4y. ; yy
Forum
McCourt explains withdraws decision
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
During the past nine months,
the students of ECU have been
without the services of a properly
screened SGA Attorney General.
Finally, on January 22,1978, SGA
President Neil Sessoms sent a
oorrespondencetotheSGA Legis-
lature nominating this legislator,
Kevin McCourt, as the new SGA
Attorney General.
A few days prior, President
Sessoms had spoken to me about
his decision, and I accepted the
nomination. I then used the days
that fell between President Ses-
soms' decision and his actual
oorrespondencetotheSGA Legis-
lature, to gather my thoughts.
I had applied fa the office of
SGA Attaney General in early
November with the hope that if
nominated and approved, I oould
take office in early December.
Instead, the saeening was not
concluded until December 1. My
name, as well as that of Ricky
Price, was sent to President
Sessoms no later than December
2. Though a name was picked and
finally submitted by January 22,
1978, a great deal has happened
between that day I applied in
November, and three months
later when the final decision was
made.
Both the excessive length of
Attaney General screenings, and
the approach of Spring Elections
has caused me to reassess the
situation. If the job had been
offered to me in early December,
I would have taken it because I
W'pnVMiqhtfmetosfraiq'hten c
the SGA Judicial System. I could
have also given the Blue Ribbon
Screening Committee (dean of
men, dean of women, present
attaney general, hoia council
chairman, and review board
chairman) enough notice so they
could pick my successa while I
was still in offioe. This way, the
new attaney general could take
over the day I stepped down,
should I decide to run in the
Spring.
But now, there is little time
between appointment of a new
attaney general and the Spring
Elect ions. I have always stessed
the need of a sitting attaney
general during the often contro-
versial Spring Elections. Though I
have not "thrown my hat into the
ring fa Spring Elections, I think
it totally unfair fa me to take the
position of attaney general since
there is a possibility that I may
run. I cannot be fair to this
University by accepting the posi-
tion of attaney general knowing
that I would soon vacate the offioe
and leave the students without a
judicial system that they desper-
ately need. I believe that anyone
who may be appointed to this
position, should stay in office at
least through the Spring Elec-
tions.
I decided to infam President
Sessoms of my decision to
withdraw my name from any
consideration fa the offioe of
SGA Attaney General. I tried to
contact President Sessoms many
times on the Monday that he sent
his correspondence to the SGA
Legislature My- attempts tnciu- �
ded calling, leaving messages,
and going to Mendenhall Student
Center many a time. He also tried
tocall me to return my calls, but I
was na in. I did not get to
President Sessoms befae the
SGA legislative meeting oi Mon-
day night, and was unaware of
the method he would use to
present my name to the legisla-
ture.
On Tuesday of this week, I
met with Presdent Sessoms to
infam him that my name would
be withdrawn from any considera-
tiai fa the offioe of SGA Attaney
General. At the same time I
highly recommended the other
nominee, Ricky Price, to Presi-
dent Sessoms I feel that he is
probably mae qualified than
myself when it comes to the
constitution. He would serve from
now through the elections, and be
under considerable scrutiny. I
echoed these facts to Dean
Frlghum (dean of women) that
same afternoon in hopes that an
attaney general oould take offioe
next Monday.
I hope that I have cleared up
some of the muddy water on this
issue, and I wish to thank
FOUNTAINHEAD fa allowing
this explanation to be printed. I
felt I owed it to the students.
Kevin McCourt
Sophomae Class President
Forum
Conttnued on p. 5!





�������H
HMH
HM
�I
26 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Forum
Student criticizes music reviewer
Don't forget policy
Letters to FOUNTAINHEAD must be
SIGNED or they wi not be printed
-To FOUNTAINHEAD:
A reviewer oertainly has
the right to criticize a perfor-
mance if he is knowledgeable
ertough to offer valid criticism,
but if he is ignorant of the area he
is attempting to review, as Kent
Johnson so OBVIOUSLY was in
. his article on the Second Annual
Young Artists' Competition, per-
haps he ought not be quite so
arrogant in his ignorance.
The whole problem is summed
up in the first paragraph, where
Mr. Johnson states, "People who
don't like classical music might
have some trouble sitting through
some of the pieces Unfortu-
nately, the reviewer did not allow
hisobvious lack of enthusiasm for
the assignment deter him in the
least. It would seem to be a
matter of expectations: if you're
looking forward to hearing a
battle of the bands, I suppose this
program might have proven to be
a disappointment, if not totally
incomprehensible. I mean, it's a
little like asking Rolling Stone o.
Crawdaddy to review a Boston
Symphony Concert-you get what
you pay fa.
Mr. Johnson's pseudo-
intellectual put-downs are just too
arrogant to be believable (refer-
ences to a long lost second
cousin, etc.) Just because some-
one whose previous experience
with saxophone players is appar-
ently limited to Paul Winter and
Boots Randolph was unable to
appreciate Mike Price's artistry
doesn't mean the rest of the
audience was as bored as he. One
would guess that Mr. Johnson's
acquaintance with the "sub-
titles" (sic) of the saxophone
might approximate that of some-
one who had flunked music
appreciation three semesters
straight.
I would also like to point out
that many people find listening to
Belinda Bryant's beautiful and
expressive voice a moving and
pleasurable experience. If Mr.
Johnson was bored or pained by
her fine performance, there are
many others who would find his
reaction inexplicable. And while I
admit that Vickie lannotta may
have given a program which
someone who considers Ian
Anderson to be the greatest
flutist whoever lived might find
tame, I would venture to say that
Mr. Johnson must be very nearly
alone in his estimation that it
would require patience to listen
to. And, while Mario Gaetano's
performance on the marimba is
admittedly different from the riff
in "Moonlight's Alright" one has
to remember that the Competition
was attempting to recognize
technical ability and musical
sensitivity (a feat which Mr.
Johnson might find hard to pull
off if ithit him in the nose), not to
see whether or not the guy oould
"tap dance on the marimba
In addition to a multitude of
(hopefully) typographical errors,
there were numerous gramma-
tical mistakes, misspelled names
(which is something of an insult to
a performer, although in this
case, it may have proven to be the
least insulting aspect of the
article), and other details which
author and proofreader really
should thrash out together before
the piece is printed. I am also
unable to oomprehend Mr. John-
son's apparent disdain for the
choice of judges; perhaps he will
present his suggestions to the
committee for their future con-
sideration (a at least amuse-
ment). I would I ike to suggest that
for the sake of good journalism,
Fountainhead ought assign him
nothing more difficult in the
future than editing classified
advertisements.
In conclusion, Mr. Johnson,
as the adage goes: "It isbetter to
remain silent and be thought
ignorant, than to speak up and
remove all doubt
Sincerely,
Eric Haas
PLAZA
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IHHHiHMHH
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Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 January 1978
fHlli Great A&P Quafity
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������������������I
�THAD JONES IS a master at creating a sensual effect of color as he explores unusual timbres and
instrument combinations
JonesLewis Jazz Orchestra
performed to small audience
By RENEE DIXQN
Staff Writer
The JoiesLewis Jazz Orches-
tra entertained a small ECU
audience Monday evening with a
unique experience in jazz. Their
music is probably best apprecia-
ted by the avid jazz enthusiast,
but fa those of us less knowledg-
eable in the genre, it was a
stimulating listen at a new kind of
music.
The musicians are a mixture
of old and "young, black and
white, and their casual dress and
mannerisms aeate ah infamal
atmosphere, but they make
serious music. They play the big
band sound of yesterday, modi-
fied by the genius of innovative
a�angingrand the result is a
distinctive iazz style.
Leader, arranger, and trum-
pet, soroist, Thad Jones is a
master at aeating a sensual
effect of cola as he explaes
unusual timbres and instrument
Combinations. His aiginal com-
position, "Fingers which came
iust before the enoae, is a
rarifiedexampleof hisgenius. He
iHfersperses a variety of solo
�Sections with a blast of ensemble
"timbre that is such a surprise that
the listener actually waits to hear
it again befae he believes it.
Other enjoyable selections
from Monday evening's program
were "Willow Weep" and the
ballad, "And I Love You So
featuring Harold Danko at the
piano. "Willow Weep" demon-
strated the versatility of a brass
section using low brass range,
trumpet-trombone solo combina-
tions, and muted ensemble ef-
fects. "And I Love You So"
converted the brass players into
an accompanying bossa nova
percussion section using mara-
cas, tambourine, and woodblocks.
The band's music involves
thick instrumentation and the
blending of seemingly incon-
gruous motifs.
This complexity of sound did
not always project cleanly in
Wright Auditaium.
Alaig with sane balance
problems in bass and piano, the
sound was often muddied. In a
recading studio, naturally, this
interference would be eliminated.
The highlight of the evening
was "Route 66 featuring vocal-
ist, Bertie Green. Jones' arran-
ging comes aaoss at its finest in
funky, downright dirty blues.
Power-and lots of it-is the
wad fa Miss Green's rich,
iextured voice, and she does it
best in bold and sassy down-home
Trends
26 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
CARLOS MONTOYA, INTERNA TIONALLY acclaimed guitarist will
perform in concert Monday, January 30, in the MSC Theatre.
Student tickets are available in the Central Ticket Office.
style blues. Dick Oatts equalled
her perfamance with an impres-
sive alto sax solo.
Leader and drummer, Mel
Lewis should be commended fa
playing what he preaches. In
Monday afternoon's dinic, he
emphasized that on drums, it's
often what you don't do, rather
than what you do that really
makes things happen fa a
number. Mel's finesse at "kick-
ing" the band without stealing
the spotlight speaks fa the art in
a professional rhythm section.
The Jones Lewis Jazz Orches-
tra impressed a receptive
audience with some stimulating
jazz Monday evening. These
musicians enjoyed making music
together, and they communicated
excitement to the listener. It's a
shame there weren't more ECU
listeners there.
Hubbard in recital
THE DECLINE OF the Puritan work ethic or grimy, gritty gloves on wood.
Photo by Brian Stotler
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Saxophonist Kenneth Hubbard.
senia student in the East
Carolina University School of
Music, will perfam in recital
Saturday, Feb. 4 at 7:30 p.m.
The recital is set fa the A. J.
Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
His program will include Paul
Creston's Sonata, Opus 19, C. P.
W. Bach's Sonata in A mina fa
Unaccompanied Flute and the
Karei Husa Elegy and Rondo.
Hubbard will be accompanied
by Geage Stone, pianist, a recent
graduate of ECU.
A candidate fa the Bachela
of Music Education degree,
Hubbard has studied with James
Houlik and James Fager.
His parents are Mr. and Mrs.
B. K. Hubbard of Raleigh.
McGinnis. February 7
Repertory company to perform Chapeau
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Breathless chases, mistak-
en identities, and delightful songs
will come to life onstage when
The Acting Company perfams
Chapeau at MoGinnis Auditaium
on February 7 fa two perfam-
ances.
There will be a matinee at 1
p.m. and an evening show at
8:15.
The appearance of The Ading
Company, a touring repertay
company of dassically trained
young actors famed by John
Houseman of the Drama Division
of the Julliard School in New
Yak six years ago is being
spoisaed by the East Carolina
University Department of Drama
with assistance from the National
Endowment fa the Arts and
Nath Carolina Theatre Arts.
Chapeau is a new musical
adaptation of Eugene Labiohe's
dassic French farce, The Italian
Straw Hat, featuring a bouncy,
aiginal scae with music and
lyrics by Alfred Uhry, and Robert
Waldman, whoaeated the Tony-
nominated The Robber Bride-
groom.
The complicated plot involves
the misadventures of Gerard, a
young man about to be married,
whose hase eats the straw hat of
an excitable lady engaging in an
illicit meeting with a soldier.
The soldier demands an im-
mediate replacement which is
most difficult fa Gerard because
his wedding party made up of the
bride, her father and aowds of
relatives, arrive at the same time.
Gerard leads the entire wedding
party on a wild chase to a
milliner's, a musical saree at the
Governa's mansion, and a
stranger's apartment in search of
the hat.
Complete with a singing and
dancing hase this broadly hum-
aous farce is set in colonial Latin
America and contains spirited
new songs induding "Even fa a
h'orse "Take What You Will"
arid "Consider Yourself Unmar-
ried
Chapeau will be directed by
Gerald Freedman, co-Artistic
Directa of the Ading Company,
who recently direded The Robber
Bridegroom. Intricate and enter-
taining chaeography will be
provided by Ethel Martin with
sets and oostumes designed by
1977 Tony Award winner Santo
Loquastoand lighting by David F.
Segal.
Brooks Baldwin is featured as
the frenzied bridegroom, Gerard,
and Leslie Geraa as his innocent
bride. David Schramm and Mary
Lou Rosato, both founding mem-
bers of The Ading Company, are
featured as Papa and Leopotdine
along with Patricia Hodges and
Anderson Matthews in maja
suppating rdes.
Tickets fa Chapeau, as well
as the other three Ading Com-
pany produdions may be obtain-
ed at the East Cardina Playhouse
Box Office in the lobby of
MoGinnis Auditaium.
Single pertamance tickets are
$7 each; tickets fa a'I four of The
Ading Company Produdions may
be purchased fa $18.
Fa reservations a further
infamation, call the East
Carolina Playhouse Box Office at
757-6390.





�� . � . ��� -�
��������i
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 January 1978
Rebellion to show in MSC movie festival
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Toshiro Mifune is consid-
ered one of the top two a three
actors in the world. His ability to
portray the complex character of
the Samurai warrior is astound-
ing. These highly trained swords-
men swore absolute loyalty to
their feudal lord. To the
Samurai the sacrifices of one's
life fa a master was not only
obligatay but an hona.
In Rebellion Mifune is a
Samurai who is faced to accept
bitter injustice at the hands of his
lad to the point of maximum
endurance.
The counter measure he takes
once that limit has been exceeded
are among the most ferocious
ever inflicted on a malignant
dictataship. He jeopardizes his
life in a challenge to this supreme
authaityfa love.
This feature represents all
that is best in the Japanese period
film. One man stands up against a
juggernaut who has become
inhuman and the human emotiois
of love, dignity, self-realization,
are as a matter of course aushed
beneath the weight of this
terrifying "machine
The feudal philosophy, still
existing in oontempaary Japan,
is attacked head oi and il the
hero is not allowed by directa
Masaki Kobayashi to win then he
makes a grand display of his
immolation.
Like the Western, this kind of
film is the product of masculine
tradition. It has its own senti-
ments, its own imagery, and its
own landscapes of remote stock-
ades and windswept uplands. The
film has to reacha point where the
hero has no choices left to take up
a classical stance. It is a quality of
genuine popular tradition,
whether Western or Samurai film,
found in Rebellion that made
Variety desaibe it as the "best
adult Japanese film
Rebellion will be shown at the
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre on Sunday the 29th of
January along with Frederioo
Fellini's 8V2 and Una
Wertmuller's Swept Away at the
International Film Festival.
Rebellion will be shown at 7
p.m.
Swept Away and 8V2 will be
shown at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.
respectively.
Admissioi is by ECU ID and
activity cards fa students and
Mendenhall Student Center
membership cards fa staff and
faculty.
TASHIRO MIFUNE, IS considered one of the two or three best
actors in the world.
Treasures of Italy to be presented on Tuesday
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Kenneth Richter, award-
winning travel-
film producer will appear in
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre on Tuesday, January 31
to present his film "Treasures of
Italy It will begin at 8 p.m.
The film opens with a view of
the Etna slopes, lush with lemon
and olive groves. Beyond
scenery, the film offers an
in depth look into the lives of the
mysterious Etruscans.
Helping in the description of
the ancient Etruscan Empire are
students from the Etruscan Foun-
dation of Detroit.
Other highlights of the film
include a visit to Verona and the
wald's oldest library, a view of
Bologna, a connoisseur's look at
a Chi ant i vineyard and tours of
Flaence - the birthplace of the
Renaissance - Pisa and Rome.
Valuable not only fa its
content, this film also provides
Newest swimsuitleotards
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AT BARRE,ltd.
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the stimulating personality of
Kenneth Richter live on the stage
of the MSC Theatre.
Richter was educated at
Thayer Academy and Harvard
University. He is well known to
audiences aaoss Canada and the
United States as a professional
film maker who produces highly
polished motion pictures to illust-
rate his infamative and enter-
taining narratioi.
Tickets fa the film are
available at the ECU Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center and are priced at
$1.50 fa the public. ECU
students are admitted by ID and
activity cards and faculty and
staff by MSC membership card.
J m O�mM�,
A Marvin Worth Production A Bob Fosse Film
Dustin Hoffman "Lenny'
Valerie Perrine AN seats $1.00
I
Henry Winkier-Sally Fields
'HEROS'
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�!�





�����'��������HHBIH
�MNHHBBl
2b January 197 FOUNTAINHEAD Pepe
Afro-American Culture Center airs Raisin
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
A Rasin In The Sun, a film
based on Lorraine Hansbury's
play of the same title will be
shown Sunday, February 5 at 8
p.m. in the Afro-American Cul-
ture Center
Sidney Poiter was just begin-
ning his career when he played
the lead in this film. Working
with veterans Claudia McNeil and
Ruby Dee, Poiter delivered a
remarkable performance, bring-
ing the film recognition as one of
the ten best films to appear the
year it was released.
Hansbury' s story concerns the
dreams and frustrations of a
South Side Chicago black family.
When the family receives an
insurance check for $10,000 their
alternatives in life suddenly ex-
panded.
As the young man of the
family Poiter views himself as a
giant among ants" and sees
money as the way to raise himself
out of his slum existence into a
more comfortable future. To each
member of the family the insur-
ance noney holds the promise of
fufillment to their own private
dreams.
Like the play, the movie
version of A Raisin In The Sun is
laanaed with sharp wit, rich
humu and intensely moving
drama.
The play and the film titles are
taken trom a poem by Langston
Hughes, Dream Deferred.
A Raisin in ihe Sun is rooted
in the struggle of blacks in this
country to overcome a situation
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society creates for them solely
because of the color of their skin.
But the courage and indom-
inable hope exhibited in the face
of crushing poverty by the family
in A Raisin In The Sun provides a
gripping experience that can t�
shared in by any member of the
University community and not
merely its black students.
The film is sponsored by the
Minaity Arts Committee. All
students are invited to attend the
�8 p.m. screening in the Afro-
American Culture Center.
Admission is by ECU ID and
activity cards or Mendenhail
Student Center membership card.
Pop corn and soft drinks wi
be served.
An early arrival is reoon
mended for space is available f
no more than 35 to 40 people.
if
NOW OPEN
WED-SUN
7527303
GENE WILDER AND Richard Pryor yuk it up in Silver Streak.
located behind THE ATTIC
The LINE'S best bands
FPU PAULTARDIF
SAT TR,�
GALLERY
Members are urged to make
reservations
Find out how next week. That's when you'll
be getting "Insider"� a free magazine supplement to your college
newspaper. It's another better idea from Ford
Insider can't promise a Phi Beta Kappa key. but it might provide
thejey to better grades. The subject of next weeks
"Insider' is "Tactics and Strategies: An Exam Planner'
Watch for if
Look for Insider-
Ford s continuing series of college newspaper supplements,
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 January 1978
damaged again
For the second time this year the intramural fields near Ficklen
Stadium have been damaged by being used for parking following heavy
rams. These fields were overhauled this past summer at the cost, of
$30,000 to the University of North Carolina capital improvements fund.
In the fall, some damage was suffered by these fields when heavy
rams preceded an ECU home football game and the fields were used
for parking for the game. While the damage was minimal the first time,
tl damage is far worse this time.
The field damaged is located behind Ficklen Stadium on the south
Sii behind the Pirate Club Parking lot. This area is used fa Pirate
O ib parking fa hone basketball games when other lots are full. On
last Tuesday night when the damage was done, the other areas were
filed because nobody was allowed to park on the grassy areas
surrounding Minges Coliseum.
So the Pirate Club patrons used this area to park on, to re-up the
entire infield of one field with tire ruts and skid tracks. The kind that
cccur when automobiles attempt to move in the heavy mud. We might
add that these fields stijl hadn't become firm from the reseeding that
took place to improve them. Even the metal stakes that were meant to
mark off where the infield was to be were run over and plowed down
into the mud so deeply that they can't be located.
Whether a not the,parking situation is the fault of the Athletic
department a someone,else is not what is disturbing, the fields were
damaged nonetheless. We aren't going to stick the blame with anyone
because we aren't sure who should shoulder it, but we hope that this
won't happen again.
NO oily does the damage ruinate of six fields in that area, but the
ruts and the holes left behind make the field unsafe fa playing until
the damage can be f ixed-and where the moiey will come from is hard
to tell. The project was aiginally completed through state funds,
without students having to shell out anything, but now at least some of
the wak has been wasted, na to mention the money
Turning to mae pleasant thoughts, we' II have four teams from the
Camp Lejeune Marine Base here this Saturday to take on some of East
Carolina's top intramural teams.
The three men's and one women's teams from Camp Lejeune were
chosen through base tournaments, while the ECU teams were chosen
through faceoffs between individual teams. Most of the teams fa this
weekend's games, in addition to the games that will be played at Camp
Lejeune next Saturday (February 4) are now known.
Representing East Carolina will be the Belk Nutties Buddies, the
Scott Ball Team and the Kappa Alpha-Fraternity All Stars fa the men
and the Peace Pirates fa the wanen. Next Saturday's representatives
will travel to Camp Lejeune and will be equally as tough. The men will
be represented by the Belk Pleasers; an independent team that is
undefeated, and the Carolina Stars. The girls representative is
unknown right now, but it will probably be one of three teams: Cod
and the Gang, the P.E. Majas a the Ctften Bunnies. Games this
weekend will be at 10 a.m 12 noon, 4 p.m. and 6 p.m with the
featured " A game coming at 6 p.m. between the Nutties Buddies and
the Marines' number one team. The women's game is at 4 p.m.
THREE UNBEA TENS TOPPLE
In men's intramural play earlier this week, three unbeaten teams
were toppled from their perch. In the most surprising of all the upsets,
the winless Aycock Spacemen defeated the unbeaten Aycock
Kamikazes, 52-39, knocking the Kamikazes out of a shot at playing the
Marines. In the aha upsets, the Biodegradestopped the Crapshcoters
and the Scott Ball Team defeated the Jones Dealers. In that contest,
both teams entaed unbeaten, but in the game of basketball only one
team can win.
In a big game played befae the ECU Varsity game last Saturday
night, the Nutties Buddies established themselves as early season
Dam favaites with a 99-78 win over the Belk Enfacers. The game was
an exhibition game and will not count in the standings, but the two
teams were ranked going into the game as the top two teams in the
intramural field.
The only undefeated team in the fraternity ranks is Kappa Alpha.
KA holds a narrow lead over three once-beaten teams. Those teams
with one loss are the Sigma Nus, Kappa Alpha Psi and Tau Kappa
Epsilon.
And of oourse we couldn't leave the ladies out
In intramural play by the women, the Peace Pirates and the P.E.
Majas established themselves as the teams to beat The Peace Pirates
knocked off the pre-season favaite Cool and the Gang, with a 40-35
display that left the Gang with their first defeat of the season. The P.E.
Majas got 33 points in two games from Kim Michael as they chalked
up a 51-4 win over the Stardusters and a 66-5 win ova the Jolly Green
Giants.
See INTRAMURALSp 12
Pirates
OT
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Edita
Oliva Mack and Hab Krusen
combined fa 64 points but it still
wasn't enough Monday night as
the Univasity of Tennesee-
Chattanooga gained a 110-101
overtime victay ova the hard
luck Bucs.
Mack came up just one point
shy of Jim Modlin's ECU one
Sports
OLIVER MACK HIT 4 in I
Photo by Brian Stotler

VV
TRA MURALS & 12 HERB GRA Y SHOWS his fqfn.
PhotiteGrmsmHxi.
game scaing recad with 41
points canning 16 of 28 from the
floa and 9 of 13 at the charity
stripe.
The Moccasins staked the
Bucs an early 8-2 lead but came
back to take a 12-10 lead when
Bernard Hill and Greg Cornelius
left the game with two fouls each.
The see-saw battle continued
through the first half as the
Pirates went into the locker room
with a 55-54 lead.
The Moccasins, last year's
Division II NCAA Champions,
soored the first points of the
second half but were then faced
with a 10-4 spurt by the Pirates.
Herb Krusen staked the Bucs a
75-67 lead after a three point
play, and Oliver Mack later
stretched the lead to nine on a
layup with 8:49 left to play
UT-C's William Wright led a
Moc comeback that gave his team
a 92-90 lead with less than a
minute to play. Pirate Point guard
Walter Mosely was fouled with 24
seconds to play and hit two tough
free throws to tie it with 24
seoonds left. Regulation ended
92-92.
The Bucs fell behind 100-96 in
overtime when freshman Roga
Carr was fouled after a dunk and
cut the Moccasin lead to one. The
Mocs then pulled away, out-
sooring the Pirates 10-2, with the
final 110-101.
The Pirates have no time to
dwell on this game, though as
they visited Statesbao, Geagia
last night to meet the Eagles of
Geagia Southan. The Bucs
return Thursday befae traveling
to Durham Friday fa a Saturday
game with the Duke Blue Devils.
The Blue Devils carried a 12-2
recad into their game with
Virginia and are led by front court
playas Kenny Dennard, Eugene
Banks, and Mike Gminski. Duke
will counta Mack and Krusen
with Bob Benoer and Jim Spanar-
kel, a 20 ppg shooter.
Greg Conelius, slightly injur-
ed in the Chattanooga game
should be able to play against me
towaing Gminski, while the
muscular freshman Roger Carr
looks to be a sot id replacement, if
needed, following his strong
play against UT-CH.
Oliva Mack usually soores
well against tougha opponents
and his leadership will be an
important facto against the quick
Bill Foster coached team.
The two teams last played in
1976 and the Pirates came out on
the shot end of an 88-65 decision.
The last comrnoi opponent of the
two was Lasalle. The Devils won a
dose game in Philadelphia while
the Bucs dropped a one pdnt
double ovatime game in the First
Union Invitational Tournament.
Foward Bernard Hill played
High School ball against Eugene
Banks and that inside matchup
could also prove to be a facto
against the Atlantic Coast Con-
faence oo-leadas.
Though all tickets to the Duke
game have been sdd, the game
can be heard on the Pirates Spats
Netwak with Jim Woods. Tipoff
; js at 7.86 p.m.






������������������iMMMOHPMBMI
Hjiiwmiii
26 Jwuary 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
CState tonite
By SAM QOG�RS
Staff Writet.
Prior to 1976, John Welborn's
East Carolina wrestling teams
dominated Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence rivals North Carolina and
North Carolina State. Ouring that
time the Pirates rolled" u0a total
of eight victories over N.C. State
as well as six wins over North
Carolina.
But, as the old cliche goes,
times have changed.
Tonight in Minges Coliseum,
a much improved N,(X State
wrestling team squares off
against East Carolina, and for the
first time in many, many seasons,
the Wolfpack will be heavily
favored to win.
N.C. State head ooach Bob
Guzzo has done an outstanding
job recruiting Pennsylvania, New
York, and New Jersey wrestling
talent during his three years as
the Wolfpack coach. Last season,
State finally ended ECU'S dynas-
ty with a narrow 21 -15 victory and
it might just be the beginning of
another wrestling dynasty in
North Carolina.
The Wolfpack stopped North
Carolina last week 24-18 and will
certainly present Bill Hill's grap-
plers with all they can handle.
"They're a helluva team
said Hill from his office Tuesday
afternoon. "When they put it all
together they're really tough to
stop. They've lost some matches
this season they should have won,
but they have beaten Wilkes and
UNC and they look like they're
really going now
The Pirates had no trouble
destroying Appalachian State last
week taking a 35-8 win and are
Presbyterian
Student Center
401 E. 9th St.
Supper and Bible Study
every Tues. at 5:30
Supper $1.50
Free coffee, donuts
and discussion
Sun. at 10a.m.
EatkUk
Bv Popular Request�the Return of
JASMINE
SAT JAN. 28th.9:00PM
JAZZ - POP � BLUES 5 PC. BAND
WITH FEMALE VOCALIST
ALSO LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
THURS JAN. 26th WITH
THE VERSATILE GREG MORRIS
THE DRIFTERS Tonight only
at the
There wl be T.V. so don't worry about
missing the game
Fri. & Sat Finest in Disco with
Dave Douglas Don't forget
End of Week Party Fri. 3:30-7
SUN IS LADIES NIGHT
now 2-4 in dual fnatches this
season.
But East Carolina will be
without the servioes of freshman
BobPassinoat 118 who re-injured
his knee last week during prao-
tioe. He will be out of the lineup
for at least a week. Hill said
Charlie Fine, another freshman
from Norfolk, Va. will probably
replace Passino at 118.
"Bob's injury will definitely
hurt us in the lower weight
classes said Hill. "We're pro-
bably not as strong as State in the
lower weights and they can just
dcout matcn us man ror man m
the upper weight classes. We'll
have to be at our best to beat
them. I think there will be several
pins which will determine who
wins the match
N.C. State will probably go
with sophomore Jim Zenz at 118,
Joe Butto at 126, Dave Polsinelli
at 134, Mike Koob at 142, and
Barry Armstrong at 150.
The Pirates will probably
counter with Fine at 118, Charlie
McGimsey at 126, Paul Osman at
134, Scott Eaton at 142, and
Frank Schaede at 150.
The key matchup in the lower
weight classes will be ECU s
Osman, a two-time national quali-
fier and Southern Conference
champion and State's Polsinelli, a
national place winner in the junior
college tournament in 1975.
In the upper weights, the
Wolfpack will probably use two-
time ACC champ Terry Reese at
158, Rick Rodriguez at 167, ee
Guzzo at 177, Joe Lidowski at 90,
and Lynn Morris at heavyweight.
East Carolina will likely use
Steve Goode at 158, Butch Revils
at 167, Vic Northrup at 177, Jay
Dever at 190, and D.T. Joyner at
heavyweight.
The upperweight classes will
have several exciting matches,
which should go right down to the
wire. At 158 State's Rodriguez
was a first team All-Freshman
selection by Amateur Wrestling
News last year while freshman
Butch Revils has won two tour-
nament championships and is
12-4-1 this year.
At 190 ECU'S Jay Dever
boasts a fine 11-4 record while
State s Guzzo was an ACC finalist
at 177 in 1976.
The classic battle of the
evening will be in the heavy-
weight division. State's Lynn-
Mans narrowly defeated D.T.
Joyner last year 3-2 and will be
hard pressed to win again.
Joyner, now 11-1 this season, is
much improved from last year
and will probably give Morris all
he can handle.
B.F.Goodrich
Car Care Service
co�L�s
Mmmtltcmmmr.
4 POINT BRAKE CHECK
1. Pull Front Wheels, Inspect Linings and Drums.
2. Check Grease Seals, Wheel Cylinders for Leakage.
3. Clean, Inspect and Repack Front Wheel Bearings.
4. Adjust Brakes on All Four Wheels for Full Pedal
Braking.
Reg. Price 9.30 - With Cert. Service Only S3.50
Most U.S. Cars, Toyotas & Datsuns
call for appointment
WRECKER SERVICE AVAILABLE IN CITY,
STUDENT PRICE $8.50 WITH STUDENT ID
Master Charge. BankAmericard, American Express,
Offers as shown at B.F.Goodrich stores. Competitively priced at B.F Goodrich dealers.
iFGoodrich Coggins Car Care
:TIRE CENTER
SALES & SERVICE
Phone 754-5244
320 W. HWY. 24 BY-PASS
GREENVILLE. N.C.
'4, �o
Stuff a pizza
QMew Qjcii ()cm x&ak
Weekend Special Thurs Fri Sat Ail Day
6" mini cheese & small drink
Phone 752-6130
Stuff a pizza phone in orders for pick-up
521 OOTANCHE STREET
IN GEORGETOWN SHOPf FS
�fli
3SK�B'�S�isK . �- .uii�ar '





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 26 January 1978
Duke beats Lady gymnasts
ByDAIVDMERRIAM
Staff Writer
This past Saturday the Lady
Pirate gymnastic team lost to
m-state rival Duke, here at
Minges.
The Pirates seemed to suffer
mainly from a lack of depth in the
squad, as Duke led the meet with
first, second, and fourth places
overall.
Mary Hubbard was the
Pirates main scorer, placing third
overall, only one tenth of a point
behind second place. Mary did
win the uneven bars, and receiv-
ed second place in the vault and
floor excercises. Unfortunately
she fell off the balance beam
twice, hurting only her chances at
an overall victory.
Karen Stramn for Duke won
the overall first place, but that
was expected of her, since she
was invited to try out fa the
Olympics last year. A loss to
Karen is not really a disgrace at
all, as a matter fact, Mary kept
the score close throughout the
meet, certainly a pat on the back
to Mary fa her fine effat.
Susan McKnight placed fifth
overall afta taking third on the
uneven bars, fourth on the floa,
and sixth in the vault. Like Mary,
Susan had trouble staying on the
balance beam. She fell off three
Intramurals
rice Ball Has Recad Field-
A recad number of 31 teams have signed up fa Ice Ball
intramurals, making it the most popular co-reo event ever.
Conpetition starts Maiday at 4 p.m. and extends through
Thursday with games each day. The schedules are posted on the
Intramural bulletin board. Teams should try and be at the Twin Rinks
Reaeation Center at least 15 minutes befae their game is to start.
Only 14 teams played last year, and the inaease in team's this year
promises such an exciting field that we will feature a top ten each week
this winter.
With the defending champion I.M.S. team disbanded, there is no
clearcut favaite this time around.
times and just couldn't maintain a
grip on the beam.
Ruth Kearns, a strong beam
and floa specialist was pulled
from oompetitioi Friday night
befae the meet with two stressed
fractures in her leg.
"Ruth's injury hurt the team
aia said Coach Chepko, "we
needed her on the beam, she' II be
out fa at least two weeks and we
will definitely miss ha
A large aowd was nrt disa-
ppointed with the meet. The
teams perfamed well and specta-
tas saw a couple of the best
gymnasts on the East Coast.
"We have plenty of season
left ooncluded Chepko,
John Evans
Continued trow p. 10 piRATE PERFORMS AGAINS1 DuKe. Photo by �ete Pooeszwa)
division and Mammothe Nathaniel Wigfall in the unlimited class.
Finals will be held on Wednesday, January 25 at 9 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Twenty-eight men and 12 women have signed up fa intramural
arm wrestling, which begins today.
The women's intaest surprised us so much that we won t have
pairing up fa them until Maiday, but the pairings in the four mens
weight classes are posted in the lobby of Memaial Gym.
Two of last year's defending champions are back in Paul Osman
and Phil Mueller. Osman has won the 150-under division twice befae
and will be afta an unprecedented third title this season. M ueller won
in the 151-175 division the past two years, but he will be in the 176-200
division this year.
Favaites in the aha two divisions are Jeff Kincaid in the 151-175
-Bowling Started Last Week-
Bowling began last week with a great field in both men's and
women's oon petition.
In the men's league, the top Dam orjntendas all won. The
Headhunters beat their toughest rivals in the Scat Studs, 3-1, as Bill
Phyne bowled a 210 game and the Headhunters had a three-game team
total of 1983 pins. The Jones Zack Attack and the Aycock Night Reelas
also won big the first week.
In club and independent play, the TKE Gutterballs and the
Hatchets each won four points each, White the Kappa Sigs, Pi Lambda
traterntity league with four wins each.
In women's damitay play last year's winners, the Miller Killers,
ga off to a big start by winning all four points in their first match.
Jeannie Williams led the landslide with a168game. In saa it y action
the A O Pis and Alpha X is started out with 4-0 matches.
-New Pool Hours-
New pool hours are as follows:
Memaial 12-1, 4-6 Maiday thru Friday
Minges: 2-8 p.m Saturday and Sunday
GrayFTs
sink
Georgia
Southern
The Hard Luck Pirate-Basket-
ball team of Coach Larry Gillman
finally had some luck go their way
last night with a big 86-85 victay
over the Eagles of Geagia
Southan.
Herb Gray hit 2 pressure free
throws with 45 seconds left to
play after the Eagles had taken a
85-84 lead.
The Pirates 'ed by as many as
11 and had to hold a frivolous
second half oomeback.
Greg Canelius had a team
high 19 points followed by Krusen
with 18. Oliver Mack, nagged by
the flu, added 16 points.
t a
Classifieds
tort 9k
FOR SALE: One TEAC Saies
2300 reel-to-reel playarecader,
2 months old with vay seldom
use. Retails at $575 will sell fa
$450 a best offa; also one pair of
Tempest speakas with 65 watt
maximum output and automatic
overload shut-off. $300 a best
offer. Call Joe at 758-1813 a
David at 758-7628.
FOR SALE: Fad Pickup, 1963,
Carolina blue, fresh paint, tires; 2
good 2 poa, mechanically in good
ooidition. Looks real good. Must
sell! Come by and see at Apt. 34
Univasity Condominiums. Phone
752-5692.
FOR SALE:Lafayette LA-950
amp. (100 watts) and RK-84
8-track playa. Call Brian 752-
2326.
FOR SALE: Dam size refrigaa-
ta, 3.5 cu. ft good oondition.
Call 756-3351 afta 500.
FOR SALE: Classical guitar in
vay good condition $30. Electric
guitar with case $20. Phone
758-0869 afta 5.
FOR SALE: AMFM 8-Track
Staeo with two Realistic Optimus
2B 60 watt speakers. $95. 758-
8491, call late.
FOR SALE: 1969 Dodge Canet
Brown 4-dr. good oondition! Only
76,000 miles, $595.00 a best
offer. Call 758-5814.
FOR SALE: 1970 VW Campa
Bus, like new with rebuilt engine
and stainless steel block, 4 new
radial tires, refrigerata closets,
fold-out bed, 115110 volt outlet.
Great fa traveling. Need small
car to oommute, best offer.
792-3747.
FOR SALE: Used Electrophonic
Staeo. $50.00 Call 756-6307.
MUST SALE: Yamaha Cr-620
B.I.C. 980, Tecc 23005, Bose
5015. Call John Marcus, 752-
7692.
FOR SALE: J.C. Penny Staeo
Phonograph System. BSR turn-
table. Speakas included. Cost
new $65. Will sell fa $35.
Excellent condition Call 758-7965
a come by 113-A Scat Dam.
Ask fa Ed.
XH
?orient (qpl
FOR RENT: Private room also
kitchen privileges near college.
ECU student (girl). Call 758-2201,
305 S. Eastan St Mrs. Mildred
C. Gibbs.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Willow
St. Apts. 5 blocks from campus.
Call Dave, 758-1744, from 100-
3O0p.m.
NEEDED: To rent a share apt.
or house in Greenville with male.
Call 752-4805.
ROOMMATE Nl'EDED: Male.
One half rent and utilities.
407-409 Holly St. 752-3447.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: One
female roommate to share a
house near ECU. $56.00a month
plus share of utilities. Private
room-partially funished. Call
anytime soon, 758-2840.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 505 W. 4th
St 758-6890, giant house.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: desired
to share 2-bdrm. traila located 4
mi. fron campus. Rent 75.00
including utilities, phoie, wash-
er, and drya. Call Carole at
752-7616.
tOOMMATE NEEDED: 2 sa-
ious students looking to share
remodelaJ 8 rm. country house.
$40 mo. 6 mi. from campus. Call
752-2926 afta 530 p.m.
MALE ROOMMATE: nteov
35.00 mo. plus utilities. Close to
campus. Prefa reasonable dean,
quiet pason. Call 752-4043 be-
tweoi 10-11 p.m.
LOST: Cardboard back naebook,
has N.C. State oova. Vay
impatant papers inside. Contact
Bill Vann, 758-1504. $5.00 re-
ward.
FOUND: Man's Timex,watch in
lower day student parking la.
Call 756-2855 after 9 p.m.
RIDE WANTED: To any city
betweoi Greenville and Asheville
fa this waakend! (Jan. 27-29)
Asheville, Chapel Hill, Rocky
Mt Chariate, etc will be glad
to pay fa expaises and gas. Join
Weyler, 458 Aycock. 752-8525.





Title
Fountainhead, January 26, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.485
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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