Fountainhead, October 27, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
0NTHEIN9DE
M.A. programs cutp. 6
Epilepsyp. 3
Drama directorp. 8
Freemanp. 14
Volume 53, No. 17
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
27 October 1977
Maiolo urges SGA debate
on retreat funding issue
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
Dr. John Maiolo, chairperson
of the Sociology and Anthropo-
logy Department, said Tuesday
he would like to see the issue
concerning the elimination of
retreats and speakers programs
debated in the SGA legislature.
"I want this to go before the
legislature and the appropriations
committee said Maiolo. "These
are two fine programs that
shouldn't be eliminated
Many faculty members and
students find these programs
extremely rewarding because the
faculty members and students
relate to one another.
"I don't think the decision
should be made by one person
said Maiolo. "We're going to
challenge the way the decision
was made to I eliminate
retreats
The retreat held last year at
Atlantic Beach for sociology-
anthropology students and faculty
members cost approximately
$500. The SGA appropriated
money to cover costs for the bus,
bus driver, and rooms.
Maiolo introduced a resolution
which was passed to the Graduate
Council October 17. The Socio-
logy and Anthropology Depart-
ment has endorsed the resolution.
The resoiution states: The
Graduate Council recommends
that the SGA president reconsider
his decision to eliminate the
student retreats and sponsored
speaker's programs. Further, it is
recommended that the total mem-
bership of the SGA consider these
issues along with the designated
official of the SGA for academic
affairs. The Graduate Council
heartily endorses these programs
as significant contributions to the
ECU academic community and
expresses its support fa their
continuation.
The resolution will be present-
ed at the next Faculty Senate
meeting.
Maiolo said that at one socio-
logyanthropology retreat the
students presented a list of 25
recommendations to the depart-
ment fa improvement of the
departmental programs. Eight-
een of these recommendations
were implemented in the depart-
ment within two months, said
Maiolo.
The officers of the sociology
See RETREAT, p. 6
DR. JOHN MAIOLO, chairperson of the SociologyAnthropology
department.
SLAP prof wins Outstanding Professor award
By MARENA WRIGHT
Staff Writer
Hair pulled back neatly, se-
cured by a rubberband, wearing a
comfortable faded pair of jeans,
he enters the classroom. A typical
ECU student? No. An atypical
ECU professa.
He sets his Budweiser mug
(his coffee cup) on the podium
and proceeds to empty his
pockets onto the desk - wallet,
pocket knife, keys. Bending down
to tie his shoes, he says in his
most scholarly voice, "I have to
tie my shoes to talk The class
laughs affably and the lecture
begins.
He is Dr. Hal Jefferson Daniel
of the (SLAP) Department.
Speech, Language and Auditay
Pathology. Dr. Daniel was one of
the recipients of the 1977 Teach-
ing Excellence Award of the
Alumni Association of ECU which
carries a $500 stipend with it.
With an impressive list of
honas and citations to clarify the
fact, Dr. Daniel received his B.A.
and M.A. from the Univasity of
Tennessee and his Ph. D. from the
University of Southern Mississ-
ippi.
"It's right hae in this bull-
shit he explains, indicating his
notes. "Language is changing
and it's going to change what we
are. "I mean, say (pd) to a
grandmother and to a college
student - well of course, grand-
mothers these days The com-
munication is dear as the stu-
dents, grinning, quickly grasp the
point.
Perhaps it is this lecture
technique which influenced the
voting of the students on the
survey which helped to eled him
as an outstanding professa. He is
relevant but demanding, making
thedassthink and respond. Most
students interviewed find him to
be an excellent lecturer and
extremely demanding. ,
"Dr. Daniel is a great lectur-
er, but his tests are super hard
said one.
"I'd never miss his tests
unless I was so dose to death I
couldn't walk. His make-ups
are
" I think he really deserved the
award. He is an outstanding
professa
Apparently, that part of his
personality accomplishes a lot
mae than students consdously
realize. A tempa and intimida-
tion seem to be a part of the basic
scheme of things of this outstan-
ding professa. Accading to Dr.
Daniel, it can promote learning.
"I do want a slight aura of
intimidation about me. The best
perfamance cones when there is
a little frustration - nd too much -
but a modoate amount. If I can
provoke a student to get a little
angry at me and to say, 'I'll show
that son-of-a-bitch that I'll think
about it then that's fine. I feel
like I've done my job.
"The best professa I eva
had, when he talked to me, I only
understood about 50 per cent of
what he said within a ledure, but
I was furious when I left the
ledure, just furious. I went home
ever night and would do every-
thing I oould to either try to prove
him wrong o to make sure that
the next day when I got in there,
that I knew exadly whoe he was
coming from. This accounts fa a
little bit of my intimidation
The aware1 shows that Dr.
Daniel has influenced the stu-
dents, faculty and administratos
as an outstanding professa. But,
what about the university's influ-
ence on him? How does ECU
influence him professionally?
How does he think it should
I See PROFESSOR, p. 5
ECU band earns money
DR. HAL DANIEL, Outstanding Professor . Photo by Jeff Robb)
By CINDY BROOME
News Edita
The Marching Pirates are
sponsaing a high school band
day this Saturday at Ficklen
Stadium which will begin at 9:30
a.m. Contributionsfo the March-
ing Pirates will be accepted at the
gate.
SGA President Neil Sessoms
said in a recent legislative session
that the Marching Pirates, cheer-
leaders and summer baseball
programs cannd be funded by
the SGA due to a tighter budget
this year.
Geoge Naff, band diredo,
said he wasn't particularly upset
when he heard that Sessons
wants to cut the Marching Pirates
from SGA funding.
"I thought I'd wait to see what
the legislature will do said
Naff. "I have a id of faith in the
students
The Marching Pirates have
received approximately $15,000
from the Athletic Department this
year, accading to Naff. The SGA
last year appropriated the band
approximately $8,000, but may
r�a fund the band this year,
accading to Sessoms.
"I think it's an example fa
rther aganizatiats to get out and
make their own money said
SGA President Neil Sessoms of
the band's attempt to make
money at the band day Saturday.
"It's been too easy in the past.
"This finandal aunch has
brought on cutbacks in several
areas. I hope the affeded areas
will follow the lead of the band
Naff said the Marching Pi-
rates are asking fa contributions
in ada to pay fa spaisaing
band day. Most of the money will
go to the judges.
"Bandmembas wak 90 to
100 hours a week, during the
fall said Naff. "That's enough
wak without going out selling
candy
Downtown bars close
The Greenville Nightclub A ssociation agreed in a recent meeting
to dose all downtown nightclubs Sunday and Monday nights,
according to Tom Haines. association president. The association
announced its plans to the Greenville City Council, Mayor Percy
Cox, and the police department. The pians were made in order to
avoid any possible problems Halloween weekend.





I
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
Phi Sigma CPR
Bands
High School Bands will be
given the opportunity to compete
among themselves in marching
and music. Bands involved in-
clude: J.H. Rose, Williamston,
Smithfield-Selma, Jacksonville,
Green Central, Cary, Southern
Nash, Havelock, Plymouth, and
many others from Eastern North
Carolina, Tidewater Virginia, and
as far away as Salisbury, Mary-
land.
The Marching Pirates will
perform in exhibition after the
high school competition. Contri-
butions are needed and will be
appreciated by the Marching
Pirate Band Fund. The public is
cordially invited and concessions
will be open.
Comics
ECU Comic Book Club. All
persons interested in the reading
and collecting of comic books,
science fiction, andor fantasy are
invited to join the ECU Comic
Book Club. The next meeting will
be held at Mendenhall, room 248
Tues Nov. 1 at 6:30 p.m.
through 9:30 p.m. For more
information call 752-0156 or 752-
6389
Car Wash
Angel Flight is having a car
wash, Sat Oct. 29 from 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pitt Plaza
Shell Service Center. Cost is only
$1, so come on out and get your
car washed. Cheap
Movie
Bound fa Glory Oct. 28 at 7'
and 9 p.m. and Oct. 29 at 2 p.m.
at Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.
David Carradine stars as
legendary folk singer and comp-
oser Woody Guthne. David
Carradine's portrayal of Guthrie' s
gentleness and dedication as
contrasted with his independent
spirit won an Oscar nomination
for Carradine. Guthrie's 1943
autobiography is the basis of the
film. The film is stylistically
influenced by "The Grapes of
Wrath
Pig-Pickin
The Psychology Club and
Honor Society invite all psycho-
logy students to a pig-pickin'
Sat Oct. 29 at Cherry Court
Apts. Party Facility (next to
Eastbrook Apts.). The cost is $2
per person. There will be pork,
chicken, slaw, hushpuppies and
volleyball - don't be late! Pick a
pig and go to the game (ECU vs.
Louisana) at 7 p.m. Tickets on
sale in Psyc library or from
Psi-Chi offices.
y3 off
Don't miss Happy Hour at
Mendenhall Student Center,
prices are Vz off on billiards,
table tennis, and bowling. The
time is3 until 6 every Mon. Don't
miss it!
Party
After the Southeastern
LouisanaECU game this Sat.
night (Oct. 29) come on out to the
Afro-American Cultural Center
and party with the nupes of the
Eta Psi Chapter of Kappa Alpha
Psi from 10 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission will be .50 for all ECU
students with a valid I.D. and $1
fa all non-affiliates.
Bridge
The Bridge Club meets each
Thurs. evening at 7:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. All
persons interested in playing
bridge are invited to attend.
Poetry
A $1000 grand prize will be
awarded in the Poetry Competi-
tion sponsaed by the Wald of
Poetry, a monthly newsletter fa
poets. Poems of all styles and on
any subject are eligible to com-
pete fa the grand prize a fa 49
other cash or merchandise
awards.
Rules and official entry forms
are available by writing to Wald
of Poetry, 2431 Stockton Blvd.
Dept. A Saaamento, Califania.
Happy Hour Relax
Pi Lambda Phi Happy Hour.
Doa prizes, oontest and slave
auction. Nov. 1 at 8:30 at Chapter
X. Everybody welcome.
Fashions
All persons interested in
being in the fashion show spon-
saed by S.O.U.L.S. should con-
tact Arah Venable, 302 Clement
Hall, 758-8120.
Surfing
There will be a Surfing Club
oontest this weekend if there are
waves. To find out, go by the
bookstae bulletin board and look
fa a notice Fri.
Billy Miller, Quinn & Tart will
delight the public with some
sensational singing, guitar pick-
ing, and good old lyrics. Thurs. &
Fri. Oct. 27&28. 50 cents admis-
sion, free refreshments. Rm. 15
Mendenhall.
Bowling
Red Pin Bowling is back! At
the Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center you can have a
chance to win one (1) free game
with every game bowled. If the
red pin is the head pin and you
make a strike, you win. Every
Thursday evening, from 8 until 11
could be your lucky day.
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Phi
Hona Fraternity will hold a car
wash Sat Oct. 29 from 9 until 3
at Pitt Plaza Exxon Statioi. The
price will be $1.50 per car. All
proceeds will go to the Todd
Scholarship Fund.
Roxy
The Roxy Music Arts & Crafts
Center will celebrate its Third
Annual Halloween Masquerade
Ball Monday night at 9 p.m.
Costume judging will begin the
witching hour. Fa infamatiai
call 758-0620.
SGA
Saeening fa SGA Review
Board will be held Mon Oct. 31
in Mendenhall Student Center.
Anyone interested in being
screened should file in the SGA
offioe by 12 noon Monday.
I.V.
I.V. will meet this Sun. at the
Afro-American Cultural Center,
at 8 p.m. Do na faget the prayer
meeting this Thurs. at 4 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center.
Creature
Creature from the Black La-
goon, Oct. 31 at 11 p.m. in Wright
Auditaium.
The Creature, an amphibious,
prehistoric man-monster, in-
habits the primadial depths of a
tropical lagoon, undisturbed until
a team of scientists intrude upon
his domain. Variously interpreted
as a monster from Hell and a
primitive innocent provoked to
violence, the Creature belongs to
the long tradition of mistreated,
misunderstood monsters.
Talent
The Eta Psi Chapter of the
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity is
sponsaing an All-Campus Talent
Show. The event is scheduled to
be held Tues Nov. 15 from 7
p.m. until 10 p.m. in the
Multi-purpose room at Menden-
hall Student Center. Participants
will be rewarded by a panel of
judges on a point system with 30
pts. being the most any partici-
pant can be awarded. Prizes
ranging from $25 first place,
a plaque of recognition to the
second runner up, as well as
certificates fa all those participa-
ting will be presented. A dress
rehearsal will take place Mai.
Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. in the
Multi-purpose room and if neces-
sary, an audition date will be set.
If interested in participating,
contact Kirk Holston at 209-A
Scat Dam (phone 752-6766), a
Zack Smith at 251 Joies Dam
(phaie 752-9882) a Willie Battle
at 304-C Scott Dorm (phone
752-5942) fa an application
blank. All entries must be submit-
ted befae Mai Nov. 7. Admis-
sion will be .50. Proceeds will go
to the Kappa Alpha Psi Student
Revolving Loan.
Cardiopulmonary Resuscita-
tion (CPR) is a combination of
artificial circulation and artificial
respiration, which should be
started immediately as an emer-
gency procedure when cardiac
arrest occurs, by those properly
trained to do so. It has been used
widely and successfully fa sane
time now recommended that as
many members of the general
public as possible be trained in
this technique.
If you are interested in
enrolling in the class, call 757-
6280 and infam the secretary
there of your interest. Also be
sure and give her your name and
your telephone number and lor
your address. The class will be 12
hours long and will be coiducted
on Nov. 2, 7, 9, and 14 between
the hours of 6:30 p.m. and 930
p.m. The class will be taught in
Minges 144: please be prompt.
The instructa can only accept 14
students but don't wary if you
can't make the first dass, there
will be ahers taught if there is a
demand.
This course is approved by the
American National Red Cross and
The American Heart Association.
If you have any questions con-
cerning the class, you may
contact the instructor, Chuch
Owens at 758-7948. The cost of
the text is only .50! See you in
dass!
DECA
The ECU Collegiate DECA
Chapter is sponsaing a Career
Orientation Workshop Thurs
Oct. 27 for all Distributive
Education high school students.
Featured speakers will speak on
the following topics: Apparel and
Accessories, Petroleum, Food
Services, Food Marketing and DE
Coadinata. The wakshop will
aient the high school students to
the many careers available in
these areas.
Vaccine
The Student Health Service is
giving flu vaccine to full-time
students during the months of
October and November. It is
strongly recommended that
students with asthma, diabetes,
chronic bronchitis, emphysema,
heart disease, and paralytics
receive the vacdne at an early
date. The vacdne will be given
Monday through Friday from 8
a.m. to4 p.m. and the charge will
be $1.50.
PeaceCorps
Graduate students who are
famer Peace Caps Volunteers
are requested to contad Dr. Floyd
E. Mattheis in the Science
Education Department at ECU.
Phone him at 757-6736 as soon as
possible.
Sabbath
Jewish students: Gang. Bayt
Shalom of Greenville invites you
to attend Sabbath services Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. at the
Methodist Student Center. Each
service is followed by an Oneg
Shabbat.
Beta lota
The Beta lota chapter of
Gamma Theta Upsilon, the Na-
tional Geography Hona Sodety,
is looking fa members to join
during the '7778 school year.
There are two categories of
membership: Associate, which
requires a minimum of one oourse
in Geography, and regular, which
requires a minimum of three
Geography courses with an over-
all B average in all Geography
oourses.
Several adivities are being
planned, induding trips to Geo-
graphy conventions. Anyone who
has ideas to share and would like
to apply fa membership should
see Dr. Birchard, Brewster A-232
fa an application fam.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU'S literary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fidion, es-
says, art wak, and phaography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
offioe a mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each wak of literature fa
yourself, and indude your name,
address, and phone number on all
wak.
Concert
Tickets are now on sale fa the
FIRE FALL concert in Mendenhall
Student Center. Ticket prices are:
$3 fa students and $5 fa the
public. The caicert will be Sun
Nov. 6th at 8 p.m. in Minges
Caiseum. FIREFALL is anaher
in a series of concerts brought to
you by the Po ular Entertainment
Committee of the Student Union.
Swing Band
The Swing Kings, a swing
band from ECU will give a free
concert of music from the Glenn
Miller, Tommy Dasey era, Hallo-
ween Night at 7:30 in the A.J.
Fletcher recital hall.
SCEC
Help is a desperate wad
Intended fa desperate people
But few are able to use this
plea
And the pain mounts to an
awful degree
"HELP when screamed
draws a chill through every bone
But how many people will
answer a silent saeam?
They know something is
wrong
But there's nahing they can
do, it seems
YOU CAN HELP. There is an
organization on campus, the
Student Council Fa Exceptional
Children, (SCEC), that recognizes
this plea fa help fran retarded
children. Our goals are to suppat
and initiate programs and adivi-
ties fa retarded dtizens. All
students' are invited to our
meetings the first Wednesday of
every month in Speight 129 at
7:30 p.m. Please show that you
care. Be an exceptional person,
support exceptional children'





27 October 1977 FOUHTAINHEAD Pag 3
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Epilepsy a nervous system disorder - not disease
ByDENNISKAHN
Staff Writer
Vioki Rowan is part of a large
group of people whom many
people oonsider invalids. She is
an epileptic.
Rowan works at the Vocational
Rehabilitation Center.
People have a tendancy to
think that epilepsy is a disease,
which it is not, according to
Rowan.
"Epilepsy is a disorder of the
nervous system centered in the
brain, and it is not totally
hereditary she said.
Rowan, and ECU graduate,
Dormitory room
situation improved
By JOYCE EVANS
Staff Writer
The dormitory situation at
ECU has improved tremendously,
according to Dan K. Wooten,
Director cf Housing.
All third-person rooming sit-
uations were changed three
weeks after the fall semester
began. The waiting list no longer
exists, said Wooten.
Wooten said vacancies oome
through withdrawals and failure
to show up.
"A lot of "no shows" don't
tell us they're not coming to
school. These are vacancies we
don't know about he said.
Private rooms are available to
women students only, according
to Wooten.
We are allowing women
students to pay extra tor guaran-
teed private rooms he said.
Wooten said men are not
allowed because they don't have
that many vacancies, but there is
a waiting list fa private rooms for
them.
At present, Wooten said there
are 5539 beds total in the dorms.
He said 50 to 75 of these
probably came about through no
shows and withdrawals.
Official enrollment and with-
drawal figures were not available
from the Registrar's office.
just recently helped from the Pitt
County Epilepsy Association, a
chapter of the Epileptic Associa-
tion of North Carolina.
She started this chapter not
only to help the epileptics and
their families of this community,
but also to help the public to
understand better what it's like to
be an epileptic.
Services include education of
epileptics and the public, low cost
drugs and insurance through the
Epilepsy Foundation of America,
and also the sharing and support
for epileptics and their families
she said.
"North Carolina actually had
a state law forbidding epileptics
to marry until this law was
repealed in 1967
"A rough estimate of at least
100 to 300 people here at ECU
have epilepsy or have had epilep-
tic seizures earlier in their life
she said.
Rowan also said that after her
medicine was regulated, she has
not had a seizure.
"The epileptics biggest prob-
lem is their seaecy she told a
Daily Reflector reporter. "Ima-
gine having a condition society
makes you feel is shameful. You
can't talk about it, so you don't.
But you worry constantly you'll
have a seizure, that you'll expose
your shame to the world
Rowan said she hopes those
interested will oome to the next
meeting which will be Thurs
Oct. 27 at 730 p.m. at the Willis
Building at First and Reade
Streets.
This program will be presen-
ted by a group of senior nursing
students from the University.
For more information contact
Rowan at 756-7231.
Tlw, IY1I
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will meet on
Tuesday. Nov. 1 in the multi-purpose room
at Mendenhall.
Guest speaker will he Milton C. Williamson,
prominent loeal attorney.
Mr. Williamson will discuss the practice
of criminal law and law school, and will
answer questions from students.
the
factory
for blue bell apparel r
13 GREENVILLE BLVD. � WtENVILLE. N.C 27834
919) 756-0337
Misses Long sleeve
Plaid Western Blouses
(limited supply) $4.88
Men's Flanel Shirts
$7.48
&&�gtiM&





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
����������������������������������������
Priorities wrong
for activity fees
The Oct. 25 edition of FOUNTAINHEAD featured a
story about how the ECU students' activity fees are
spent and allocated. Of the $81 fees, only a
"relatively minor amount" goes to campus cultural
activities according to Julian Vainright, ECU
business manager.
If this university is supposed to be a liberal arts
institution, the priorities for student activity fees
Distribution is obviously warped.
According to Vainright, only about .50 out of the
activity fees goes to ECU cultural programs. This .50
is taken out of a category called "special funds The
rest of these special funds is earmarked for various
intramural activities, he said.
The Webster New World Dictionary defines a
liberal education as "an education mainly in the
liberal arts providing the student with a broad
cultural background In light of this definition,
something is certainly awry with the priorities set by
the administrators in deciding where the activity fees
will go.
But salt to the wound of liberal arts at ECU is that
approximately 50 per cent of the entire $81 goes to
one or another form of athletics. According to
Vainright, $10.50 goes to Minges Coliseum, $7.50
goes to the stadium fund (lighting), $13.50 goes
simply to athletics proper and about $7.55 of the
$8.25 "special funds" is given to intramural
activities and programs. Consequently approx-
imately $39.05 of the $81 fees is directed to athletics,
which is close to 50 per cent!
If a student at ECU is supposed to be receiving an
education geared towards a "broad cultural
background" the activity fees should be spent on
more refined and culturally oriented programs
instead of on mere physical games. At the very least
more than a "relatively minor amount" of the
activity fees should be directed towards the purpose
of this so-called liberal arts university: a liberal
education.
Athletics are a definite aspect of any university
and should be. But the problem with this university
lies in the over-emphasis placed on this one area.
The student body as a whole is being slighted by
having almost 50 per cent of its activity fees used for
something not oriented towards the idea behind
attending a liberal arts school in the first place.
Unless ECU is going to change its direction and find
a new definition for its academic intentions, the
distribution of activity fees needs to be revamped.
Fountainhcad
Serving the East Carolina community tor over titty years.
Senior EditorKim J. Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert Swaim
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevino
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address. Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial off loss: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6306.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
TO BE OR MOT TO BE
DEPENDS 0M THE ATHLETIC BUD&ET!
f
Forum
Legislator backs Pres. Sessoms' veto
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Where does Neil Sessoms
get off saying he'll veto trips? He
gets off at Article IV, Section 1,
Part C, Number 3, which states,
in part, that the president shall
enjoy the power to veto acts of the
legislature within ten days of
receiving the bill.
Everybody loves to travel, and
I agree there are many educa-
tional benefits to be derived from
attending a convention, but when
there's no money, there's no
money.
The SGA has a duty to fund
those things which benefit the
student body as a whole, such as
FOUNTAINHEAD, the BUC, the
REBEL, and the transit system. If
this were the best of all possible
worlds, there would be plenty of
money for every student to be
sent to every conference or
convention. Needless to say, that
is not the case.
The time has come fa stu-
dents to go out and hustle their
own funds, just like high school,
just like the Greeks. We can no
longer cluster around the SGA
with outstretched alms cups
crying fa mae, because the
moiey is simply not there.
To quote an ad in last year's
"Buglenead" lampoon edition,
"Maybe we'il cure the SGA
budget without your help, but
don't bet your life on it
Yes, I'll vaeno,
Doug White, SGA Legislata
Reader makes 'greatest decision'
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I would like to tell you
about the GREATEST, decision
I've ever made in my life.
If you had known me, you
would say I grew up in a happy
atmosphere, but I desired this life,
through my own eftats. As a
Forum policy
Forum letters
should be typed or
printed, signed and
include the writer's
address or telephone
number. Letters are
subject to editing for
taste and brevity and
may be sent to FOUN-
TAINHEAD a left at
the Information Desk
in Mendenhail Stu-
dent Center.
result my parents had less
influence oi me. I searched fa a
meaningful life in things like
friends, love relationships, good
grades and drugs. Drugs began
playing a dominant part in my
life. I began paying less attention
to my friends. That's what I
thought life boiled down to.
Looking at my life, I knew I
needed improvements.
When I came to ECU I really
thought I had myself together. I
knew I was going to get a Masters
in Business, hit the wald, and
make my first million befae I was
30. About six months befae I
came to oollege, I had become
interested in the Bible and began
reading it. One night at school,
while reading the Bible, I saw the
need fa Christ in my life.
When I was 12 a friend
explained to me that in ader to
receive Christ I could personally
ask Him into my life. It was that
night, reading the Bible, I asked
Jesus into my life. Later, I asked
God to take full control of my life.
Now that I have a personal
relationship with Christ, I have
begun taking on characteristics of
Him, like when you have a
relationship with a guy a girl,
you take on habits a traits that
they have.
One of the first areas of my life
I saw change was my attitude
towards my parents.
My love fa my parents began
inaeasing. I cant remember a
time befae I met Jesus that I
told my parents I loved thorn. I'm
still human and have problems,
but now I know God will use my
conflicts to better me.
In summary, with Christ guid-
ing my life, I'm gaining control of
all areas of my life. A verse that
applies to my life is in Proverbs
169, (NASZ): which states: "The
mind of man plans his way, But
the Lad directs his steps
Warmly in Christ
MarkFranke





27 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 5
NCSL discusses governor's succession amendment
ByMARCADLER
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) in an interim-
council at UNC Chapel Hill
Sunday discussed the controver-
sial Gubernatorial Succession
amendment.
Tom Lambeth , a member of
the Committee to Re-elect and
Phil Kirk, an aid to former
Governor Jim Holshouser, spoke
in favor of the Gubernatorial
Succession amendment.
There are 23 states in which
governors are allowed to run fa
an unlimited number of terms,
according to Lambeth and Kirk.
They said that there is evi-
denoe that the states restricting a
governor to one term have low
standards of living oompared to
the states that do not restrict the
governor to one term in offioe.
PROFESSOR
Continued from p. 1
influence students in the future?
"I think ECU is ready for a
change. I think that we need to
have a definite improvement in
the quality of not only the
students, but also the faculty. The
University should proceed to take
on an atmosphere of being a
scholarly institution rather than
one that has as its main purpose
that of teaching someone how to
get a job.
"The major function of the
University should be to teach the
students how to think and how to
think in terms of the traditional
liberal arts type background. If
you learn how to reason and how
to be stimulated to just think
about thinking, then the world is
yours. Knowledge for know-
ledge's sake is the real reason to
go to the University
Obviously, with an award in
teaching excellence, Dr. Daniel
is an avid academia supporter.
So, how does he feel about the
recent academics-vs-athletics
rivalry?
There needs to be system of
checks and balances. I find it
deplorable that monies are taken
away from scholarships to provide
fa the various types of athletic
enterprises. I think this is outra-
geous. The University teaches a
student how to think, and if
you're a football player, you need
to learn how to think too. You
shouldn't be hae fa a ride
simply because you're a good
football player.
"The University should be a
place fa inspiratiai. Both stu
dents and faculty should engage
in serious, contemplative, medi-
tative type, intellectual, scholas-
tic pursuits.
"My whole desire in.oommun-
icating to FOUNTAINHEAD is to
use' the student newspaper, if it
should be a newspaper fa the
students. It's about time both
students and faculty wake up at
The facts also show that the
standard of living tends to rise
when a governa is permitted
more than a one year term,
aocadinq to Lambeth and Kirk.
Lambeth and Kirk said that
there is no more caruptioi if a
govana is permitted to hold
mae than one tarn.
Lambeth said he thinks that
Governa Hunt should be permit-
ted to run fa a second term, but
ECU and say, 'Hey, wait a
minute. We've gone through our
growing pains from a teacher's
oollege to being a University in
name only. Let's really be a
Univasity now and make this a
place of scholasticism and the
pursuit of intellectual endea-
vcrs
So the Teaching Excellence,
Outstanding Professa Award has
gone to a man who does believe
deeply in the beauty of teaching
and knowledge.
And the $500? Dr. Daniel, on
the basis of winning the award,
would like to throw a party in the
spirit of the academicians and the
professas. He invites anybody
who has ever learned anything
from him a taught anything to
him, to a party where an attempt
will be made to reaeate that
University spirit. VIVA ACA-
DEMIA, VIVA PROFESSORAS!
Watch FOUNTAINHEAD fa
further details caicerning the
party.
Kirk said he is not in fava of the
governa succeeding himself.
The ECU Delegation present-
ed a second reading on the
"Resolution fa Safety Require-
ments of Motorized Bicycles
(otherwise known as Mopeds),
and the UNC Delegation present-
ed a second reading on the
" Resolution on the Panama Canal
Treaty Brth resolutions were
submitted to the Resolution Com-
mittee.
Writers
Call 757-6366
WRBK-101
lays
HELLO ECU & GREENVILLE
at our Disco and Keg Hallv :
Sat. Oct. 29, 1:30 p.m. at the
Phi Kappa Tail Fraternity house,
III fU Elizabeth St.
FREE DRAFT
AS LONG AS
IT LASTS!
Get Down with the
Best Disco Sounds around.
DONT MISS IT - KEEP IT ON THE "K"
FOOD
DIUJG
Kroger Savon
Kroger Chicken-Noodle Soup 5 cans
for $1.00
6oz. pkg Redi-Mix biscuits, o pkgS
cornbread, pancakes , for $1.00
corn muffins, blueberry muffins
Kroger Onion Patch Dips
2 for 89c
V gallon " Polar Pack �Ice Cream 69'
Banquet Frozen Buffet Dinners
99
600 Greenville Blvd. Open Mon-Sat 7am -12 midnight pm
Sun 9am-8pm
MfSii





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
Greek forum
Three teacher
programs dropped
The Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity
is also making its name well
known on campus this year. I n the
past year they have made exten-
sive improvements to the house
and on the grounds. They began
by installing a totally new plumb-
ing system and rewiring the
house. This summer, the brothers
got together and buil -a brick
patio, sand-blasted the house,
and placed new shrubbery around
the premises.
In the past few weeks, the Phi
Taus have made themselves
known by capturing first place in
the Homecoming float competi-
tion with a 14-foot statue of Dr.
Jenkins in honor of his service to
the University.
As for upcoming events con-
cerning the Phi Taus, they plan to
have a Key and Disco party
sponsored by the WRBR 101 FM
radio station out of New Bern.
The date will be Oct. 29 from 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. at the house just
before the last home football
game against the University of
Southwestern Louisiana. They are
extending an open invitation to all
ECU and Greenville area resi-
dents. Plenty of free beer will be
available as long as it lasts and it
should be a great time for all.
Also, the Phi Taus have set a
tentative date for the "little
sister" rush for Tues Nov. 1. As
in years past, the Phi Kappa Tau
Fraternity will have another big
year.
Events and activities concern-
ing other greek organirtions for
the ECU campus will be announ-
ced in the upcoming greek
Iron Horse Trading Co
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine Gold and Silver Jewelry
Scrimshaw Etched
on Ivory 20 Off.
Hours: MonThurs. 10-6
Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-6
301 S. Evans St. Mall,
First State Bank Bldg.
columns.
The Lambda Chis have just
completed several activities con-
cerning the community and the
school. Just recently, they coJIeo-
ted almost three vanloads of old
clothes from each sorority on
campus, which are being donated
to the Salvation Army.
At the last home game against
Richmond, they presented a
plaque to Dr. Jenkins on behalf of
the entire Greek system here at
ECU, thanking him for his
generous leadership and dedica-
tion during his 30 years here.
They also donated a check to the
stadium drive for the amount of
$250 raised in a shopping spree at
Overtoil's Supermarket and
Apple Records. They thank all
who contributed to the project.
Upcoming events include the
annual Lambda Chi Field Day
Oct. 30, involving all Greeks in
activities and events ranging from
a Tricycle race to a Banana Eating
Contest. It should be a good time
for all.
ByALMAGINNES
Staff Writer
Master of Arts programs fa
teachersare being dropped in the
physics, sociology, and education
departments, according to Dr.
John Howe! I, Vice Chancel la fa
Academic Affairs.
The programs in physics and
sociology do not have any stu-
dents enrolled in them, said
Howell, and no student would be
affected by this change.
The maja change will be in
the school of education, where the
educational administration devel-
opment program will be offered
as part of another program.
A study of every state supper -
ted school with teacher programs
was headed by Dr. Donald
Stedman of UNCChapel Hill, said
Howell.
Howell said that ECU may
eventually be authaized to offer
mae programs in teachers educa-
tion.
DR. JOHN HOWELL, Vice
Chancellor for A cademic
Affairs.
RETREAT
Continued from p. 1
anthropology club are looking at
other alternatives of funding.
Now At Pantana Bob's
Big T.V. Screen
For your Viewing Convenience Catch �'
Open Daily Tne Tnre� Stooges
at 4:00 Saturday Night Live
� Monday Night Football
Open Sundays at 1:00 For NFL Football
"We'll do whatever it takes
he said. "All we want is a chance
to present our side.
We're not making any
demands. All we're asking fa is
con si deration
Maiolo said those supporting
the elimination of retreats and
speakers programs will have to
contend with the academic com-
munity.
"We're not going to sit still
fa this he said. "This depart-
ment will have a retreat if I have
to pay fa it myself
EAST - WEST PRODUCTIONS
Presents
THE 2ND ANNUAL OUTDOOR
HALLOWEEN MUSIC FESTIVAL
and
CARNIVAL
SATURDAY - OCT. 29
PITT COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS
GREENVILLE, N. C.
FEA TURING
ZORRO and the BLUE FOOTBALLS
10TH AVENUE
SUPERGRIT
TENNESSEE HAT BAND
SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS
GRINDERSWITCH
"MR. FIDDLE"
ASSAR CLEMMENTS
BAND
In the event of rain: RAIN DATE - OCT. 30
JUDGING FOR BEST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
PRIZES AWARDED - $100, $50, $25
Cans and Plastic Containers Only - No Glass Bottles
ADMISSION; Advance $5.00 Gate $6.00 b.m Pick upJ Berk ���� . i,��, ���,� s�v�. �.
Gates Open 11 A.M. - Until Wl l2:0� No - �' Minute shuttle Trip
Ticketi available at the Central Ticket Office, Mcmlfiihall.
6:00 PIM and from 10:00 IVV1 - 12:00 Midnight





27 October 1977 FOUNT AtNHEAP Pay 7
HOWDY PIRATE FANS
Take Roy's Famous
Western Fried Chicken
With You To The Game!

The best
of the fresh
waitin' in convenient carry-
out pake of 8 and 12. There's
a big 20pc. pak too for under
$10.00. The whole gang can
enjoy it�.�
8pc. pak-$3.90
12pc. pak-$5.75
20pc. pak- $8.95
10 discount
on any chicken
purchase
of $10.00
or more.
"You've got my word
on it, perdner
Don't forget to include some
helpin's hi our crisp, Texas
Tatars an' fresh cole slaw, too.
So, c'mon in and carry-out
our famous fried chicken to
the ballgame or wherever
you go!
Save TimeCall Ahead Now
To Reserve Your Order,
For Saturdays Game.
752-1401
ALSO
CELEBRATE AT ROY'S AFTER THE GAME
Bring your game ticket for 50 off
the purchase of any platter.
GOOD LUCK PIRATES, ROY'S RANCH HANDS WILL BE
PULLING FOR YOU.
(Yes Pirates. We Now Have Breakfast, Also!)
Breakfast Hours: MonSat. 6:30a.m10:30a.m.





r
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
Distinguished director joins drama faculty
BySUEELLENMcLEOD
Staff Writer
Ella Gerber, advanced acting
instructor for the East Carolina
Drama Department, is a woman
with an impressive background
and a positive attitude. A native
of New York, she has studied at
the Shakespeare Institute in
Stratford-on-Avon, England; New
Yak City and Columbia Univer-
sities; Directors Urvt-Actors
Studio; Robert Lewis Workshop;
PlaywrightsDirectors Work
shop-Actors Studio; and, among
.numerous other credits, has
studied .under Michael Checkov
and Lee St raster g.
��-While she has directed in
theatresafl over the world, Ella
Gerber did not begin her career.
with the intention of becoming a
director. At the age of six, she
had already decided to become ah
actress. She began her career as
an actress, appearing in U.S.O.
tours, Off-Broadway productions,
and various theatre groups, and
drifted into directing only as a
means of supporting her acting
career when times were lean. Her
interest in direction and teaching
grew and as a result she has
directed, both on and off Broad-
ways, such stars as Charlton
Heston, Anna Maria Allberghetti,
Howard Keel, Ginger Rogers,
'Ellen Burstyn. and James
-Garner. Ella Gerber has directed
�doperamusicaJsand plays such as
2$ (&d's Chitturv Got Wings,
Work-in-Progress
DarM of the Moon, Streetcar
Named Desire, 'The Glass
Menagerie and has directed
Porgy and Bess in theatres too
numerous to mention as well asJn
tours and festivals.
She has taught privately and
also lectured and taught at
"various institutions, a few of
Miierr include the London Opera
Centre, Stage Studio in Washing-
ton? DC and New York's
American Academy of Dramatic
Art.
Accomplished not only as an
actress and as a director, Ella
Gerber has also written several
plays. A Threat of Scarlet, which
��he co-authored with Howard
Richardson, opened for its
jgremter performance in April of
this year in Juoeau, Alaska. Ella
Gerber hopes to direct one of her
own plays in a workshop pro-
duction while she is teaching at
East Carolina. She has already
directed one workshop production
of four Tennessee Williams'
ojW-act plays in the Studio
iTfieatre.
El fa Gerber has chosen to
teach theatre for" many re�s�ns.
She feels that the future of the
theatre lies within the youth. Her
desire is to imbue young actors
and actresses with a sense of the
love and concern for the theatre
vtfrtch she herself possesses. She
fflels she has enjoyed so much in
theatfe that- she must share my
knowledge and experiences with
the youth and wake them up to
the possibilities their futures
hold She impresses her motto,
Dare to Do upon her students,
feeling that if you do not try, you
cannot succeed. Ella Gerber
befteves in this motto vehement-
ELLA GERBER DARES to do .
ly,isayjng that painting it in
blood on the ceiling" could not
stress its importance more than
she does. She also hopes to find
time to continue with her writing
while teaching at East Carolina.
She feels her schedule will allow
"more time for writing as the year
progresses.
Ella Gerber conducts
rehersals strictly, constantly in-
sisting that the principals write
down every move. When she
says, "If I don't tell you to
move-stay put there is no
chance of misunderstanding. At
the same; time, however, she
insures fhaj the actor is aware of
his responsibility when she says,
"I can p&attjor you
Ella SertjeV will direct the
next majorfjjcoduction of the East
Carolina Playhouse, The Skin of
Our Teeth by Thorton Wilder.
She feels the play lends itself to
modernization despite the fact
that it first appeared 35 years
ago. The-play explores the
survival crfjjfankind by tracing the
lives of a fctffaljjUrom the ice-age
to the last world war. Ella Gerber
plans to produce the play in a
multi-media style, using aspects
of film, sound, and stage to create
a total effect. Running December
1-3 and 5-6, the play will begin at
815 each tiiflht in MoGinnis
AuditoriuTi
A wonmn of vitality,
enthusiasm, and great talent, Ella
See GERBER p. 9)
Ovid Pierce discusses his upcoming novel
ByJEFPRQLkiivS
Staff Wfler
Ovid Pierce, East Carolina's
former writer-in-residence for
almost a decade iscurrently in the
midst of writing his fifth novel.
Set in a small university com-
munity, Judge Buell' Legacy' (as
it most likely will be called) is the
saga of the intermingled and
contrasting lives of the town's two
most powerful families.
Talking about his work-in-
progress, Pierce reveals himself
to be an engaging and per-
spicacious autha. His accent is
that of the Southern .gentry and
OVID PIERCE LOCAL novelist.
his voice is a sonorous baritone. A
Japanese mask grazes "enigma-
tically from the wall. A philoden-
dron leans toward the sunny
window. Outside it is an Indian
Summer afternoon.
"In this book I'vetred to get
across the idea that the dividing
line between human values can
be very nebulous he begins,
and, pausing to light a long
"More continues, "right is not
always totally right, nor wrong
totally wrong
In Legacy a domineering
patriarch eventually comes to
learn that he has spoiled the life
of his wife and almost that of his
daughter by recognizing them
only as necessary ingredients for
his life. Judge Buell, though,
eventually reaches a maturity and
a selflessness which allows him to
realize the consequences of his
actions. This self-recognition is
one of the main themes of the
novel.
"Waking on this book is an
emotionally demanding experi-
ence fa me. You put so much of
yourself in a book. Each character
comes from the deep well of your
experience And Legacy is peo-
pled with striking characters.
Old Crazy an ancient black
man whose life has dwindled to
sitting beside a fruit stand all day
and reminicing about earlier
times, and Dr. John Bynum
Whittaker, emminent and ac-
claimed sohoJar, share an ob-
solescence despite the superficial
differences of their lives. Mae
than a glimpse of Pierce himself
may be seen in the respected old
academe who realizes that he and
the particular type of life that he
knows are on the wing. Age'and
the changing wald is a theme
that affects us all and it is one that
is excellently embellished in
Legacy.
As to literary influences,
3ierce says that "When A came
along we were reading the typical
Southern Writers. Ellen Glasgow,
.who taught me at Harvard, once
explained to me that she thought
the Southern writers came into
'their own only when they were no
longer afraid to offend. Befae,
they had always ronanticised the
South and they only became great
when they learned toaiticize it'as
well
" Fa a period of about twenty
years, from Wald War I almost
to Wald War II, the South was
the main subject in American
literature. When it ended, Harold
Ross, who was then edita of the
"New Yaker left the memo to
drop the curtain on all Southern
perfamancesa in rther wads to
stop accepting wak by Southern
writers. It's a small thing but it is
indicative of the trend toward
New York writers He
elabaatesthat after Wald War II
natiotal attention turned toward
mae urban and ethnic subjects.
"New groups rise with new
voices, and the topics of literature
change, even though the themes
remain the same
In speaking of his own writ-
ing, Pieroe illuminates something
of the nature of the enigmatic
South. "I've had my 'basic
themes' pointed out fa me he
smiles. "One astute aitic made
the observation that my char-
acters had a sat of noblesse
oblige, that they were compelled
to live up to expectations of them.
They lived by an imposed code
which sustains and provides them
with somethingsomething mae
than simply the means for
survival Judge Buell and his
daughter eventually know them-
selves mae deeply than befae,
and in this sense, their lives are
mae than simply survival.
Pierce was born at
Weldon, N.C. oiOct.1,1910, the
grandsoi of a country docta and
the son of a Halifax Country
farming family. "I knew farming
only from a distance he says,
"fa most farming families after
the Civil War deserter" the
Gee PIERCE p. 9)
Trends
& r-)-y�: If





MSC Artist Series
27 October 1977 FOUNTA1NHEAD Pag 9
Suzuki's Talent Education Tour 'astounding'
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Shinichi Suzuki's Talent
Education Tour performed at
Mendenhall Theatre Monday
night. The ten Japanese children
delighted the over capacity aud-
ience with their astounding
achievements on violin and piano.
Using mostly half-size violins,
and even one quarter-size to
match their sizes, the eight
violinists as well as the two
pianists performed entirely by
memory.
The program opened with the
eight small violinists, accompan-
ied on piano by Mrs. Shizuko
Suzuki, performing the Fiooco
"Allegro" in unison ensemble.
The Mozart-Kriesler 'Rondo" in
G Major" followed, with a
spirited cadenza by 12 year old
Haruo Goto.
Playing in unison can be much
more difficult than playing alone
or in parts. Interpretation must be
exactly the same, with precision
of phrasing, bowing and tempo,
with sensitivity to each nuance,
with perfect intonation, and with
a tone quality that will blend to
create a rich, homogenous en-
semble sound.
In achieving those musical
goals, the eight young musicians
proved themselves to be much
more than "cute kids They are
serious musicians whose music
has value in its own right.
Suzuki's teaching method is
connected mainly with the violin,
but he Suzuli piano method is
also introduced on Monday's
program. Eight year old Nao
Huase performed Choplin's
Fantasie Impromptu in C-sharp
minor, Op. 66" with technical
imperfections, but a good feel for
the melodic contour.
Later in the program 9 year
old Shizuka Kasai performed the
Mozart "6 Variations on 'Salve
tu, Domine K 396 Both girls
revealed an understanding of the
music beyond the ability to play
the notes. They also shared a
problem charcteristic of all the
children: a tendency to run away
with tempos and rush interpreta-
tions.
Also on the first half of the
program were the Veracini
"Allegro con fucco" from the
Concert Sonata in E minor,
performed by 9 year old
Francoeur performed by 10
Gerber
Continued from p. 8
Gerber can provide impetus,
emotion, and technique for the
students of acting, which are
rarely available on this level. A
valuable asset to the Drama
Department, Ella Gerber com-
bines the elements of talent,
spirit, and committment which
can result in quality theatre at
feast Carolina University.
Army-Navy Surplus
1501 S. Evans
Military Surplus
Camping and backpacking
equipment. Peacoats and Jeans.
1130-5:30
year old Hiroaki Matsuno; and
the"Zigeunerweisen, Op. 20" by
Sarate, performed by 11 year old
Yumi Higuchi.
The older children played
pieces progressively more
delicate and musically challeng-
ing. For example, the Sarasate
required great sensitivity as well
as technical prowness, and Yumi
Higuchi met both demands with a
musical tastefulness and remark-
able sound that highlighted the
entire concert.
The second half of the concert
features 11 year old Tomoko
Kurita on the "Chaconne in G
minor" by Vitali-Charlier and the
familiar Paganini "Allegro
maestoso" from the Concert No.
1 in A minor. Paganini was a
violinist himself, composed for
the virtuoso, and 12 year old
Akiko Ueda stunned the audience
by meeting his challenge with
spirit.
The concluding set demon-
strated the whole ensemble per-
forming selections from the
(See SUZUKI p. 11)
YOUNG VIOLINISTS "Astounded" audience.
Pierce happy with work
Continued from p. 8
country for the town Yet he
inherited land near Pierce's
Crossroads, and since 1956 has
waked on the restaatiai of a
plantation home. He has been
close to his soil and its people. He
graduated from Weldon High
School in 1928, and went to Duke
University, where he won his
degree in English in 1932. While
at Duke, he was edita of "The
Archive the oldest college
magazine in continuous existence
in the South. Work on this
magazine helped to shape his
interests toward literature and
writing.
After his graduation from
Duke, Pierce returned to Weldon.
In 1934 he entered Harvard
University. Influenced and en-
couraged at Harvard by Pulitzer
prize-winner Robert Hillyer,
Pierce saw his earlier interest in
writing mature at Cambridge,
where he wrote his first staies.
He won his master's degree at
Harvard in 1936.
Soon after Pearl Harbor in
1941 he entered , e Army, in
which he served fa four years in
the Counterintelligence Caps.
He became a member of the
English Department of Southern
Methodist University, where he
taught aeative writing and wrote
several short stories for the
"Southwest Review all ot which
were republishedin 1945 by the
UNC Press under the title Old
Man's Gold and Other Stories. In
1949 he accepted a similar
academic assignment at Tulane
University, where he stayed until
1953.
In 1953 he saw the publication
of his first novel, The Plantation,
a novel which received a national
press. In this same year, Pierce
returned to Southern Methodist
University, where he taught
writing classes until 1956, but by
then he felt it time to return home
to eastern Nath Carolina. In the
fall of 1976 he joined the English
Department at East Carolina,
where he served until year befae
last as writer-in-residence.
During his stay at East
Carolina, Pierce had three ad-
ditional novels published - On a
Lonesome Porch in 1960, The
Devil's Half in 1968, and The
Wedding Guest in 1974. In
addition, he has written feature
articles fa "Holiday" magazine,
the "New York Times Book
Review and many Southern
Journals.
When not writing Mr. Pierce
fills his time with rennovating his
family's plantation home in En-
field, N.C. Also, he spends much
time with the Kappa Alpha
fraternity which he joined while at
the University of North Carolina.
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAP 27 October 1977
Student describes Halloween combat in 75
By SF TH DAVID LA THA M
Staff Writer
Halloween is the evening
before the day of All Hallows or
All Saint's Day as it is better
known. Halloween can be thought
of as a time for joyous festivities
because of the feast oocuring on
All Hallows, November first, but
most of us think quite differently
about Halloween. When October
31 is mentioned, our minds flood
with images of kids all costumed
and knocking at our doors crying
the immortal "Trick or Treat
Still, ask any student at East
Carolina what they picture when
Halloween is mentioned and nine
our of ten will relate the exper-
ience of being downtown in
Greenville on the last day of
October.
I was there in 1975. I was
PfchPoy
SHOESfT
FOUNDER'S!
SALE
As
Advertised
on TV.
Boots, Boots, Boots!
A Women i
19 SAVE S7 09
B Girls : tilted Boot. Sizes 9-4
99 SAVE $4.09
Fashion Stitched Clutch Handbag
Regularly $6 99 SAVE $2 22
4.77
Girls Knee-hi Sock
88c
For the Guys-
Boys' Western Boot Sizes 8
Regularly $9 97 SAVE S3.07
Men's Suedf Casual Action Sole
Regularly15 99. SAVE $6.09
Nobody � but nobody � saves you more.
HWY. 264 BY-PASS
Prices Good thru Saturday
Open F v"i.ngs � MaslerCharge Visa or Ask About Our Layaway Plan
dressed as a soldier that night;
my lack of experience at these
"wide-open" parties kept me
from wearing more flamboyant
costume, arid I was to crazy to
care what I had on anyway.
About 9:00 I left one of the
stuffy bars and got back in the
cool night air. After finding a
spot by where the most people
flowed, I leaned on a brick wall
and become enraptured in view-
ing the parade of people as they
migrated to different bars. A few
costumes looked quite insipid (I
classified my own drab uniform
with these), but the majority of
people were attired in original
and well prepared outfits. I'll
never know where two girls
dressed as cats found leopard-
skin leotards.
When I glanced up from
staring at the passers-by, I
couldn't help but notice the police
barricading an entire street-thus
blocking traffic from driving past
, where most of the bars are
Jocated. That made me feel good.
That made everybody feel good.
People pounced into the
street. An Indian and a witch
began to dance in the middle of
the street and throngs of people
circled and cheered them. The
witch moved with solemn hand
gestures, her face full of confi-
dence as she set fire to her
broom, swirled it in a circle over
her head and began to sing! The
two lane street a block long was
now filled with people.
From the north it came. At
first I called it my imagination or
gave credit to someone's bag of
-tricks. But it was real. An
ever-increasing cloud of thick,
pale, green smoke engulfed half
the people in the street. My feet
were moving faster than my
thoughts. I was headed south.
Only a few yards and I was at the
curb. Checking traffic both ways,
I started crossing the apparently
vacant street. Middle way across,
I jumped with fright when I
looked up into the grill of an old
grey school bus, lights off. This
was strange. I stepped back
further to gain a better view and
saw POLICE lettered across the
hood. I then decided to get the
hell out fast. I took one step and a
running cop knocked me flat.
Another cop, every inch of
six-foot-six, picked me completely
off the pavement.
"What are you doin ?" I
demanded.
"Come on, into the bus was
all I received as an answer.
The cop half carried me to the
rear of the bus and hurled me in.
My hands kept me from breaking
my jaw on the heavy wire
partition within, but my left
knee suffered against the floor. I
stood up; brushed off my fa-
tigues; gave the cop a few kind
words; and surveyed my cage.
Of all people! There was the
dancing Indian, alone. The only
thing I couldn't understand, since
he had been deep in the middle of
the crowd, was how he was
arrested first. The Indian and I
saw itall. We saw guys as well as
girls cast into the bus. We saw
one man with a bleeding forehead
pushed into the bus while resis-
ting furiously. We watched the
population of our part of the bus
(measuring no more than eight by
eight feet) increase to nearly
twenty.
It was now almost 11 00 and
the bus started moving. Everyone
howled at this as we had expected
relief from our unpleasant en-
vironment. We told every police-
man that came near the bus about
the wire separation which separ-
ated us from the larger section of
the bus, which had enough room
for all of us to sit comfortably.
None of the police listened. The
bus, instead moving away from
the scene moved slowly (in first
gear) into the remaining fumes.
Before, we were choking fa-
air, now we were choking on it.
Matters only became worse. The
bus had stopped dead in the
middle of the gas.
As I was about to rub my
stinging eyes, my hand was
slapped clear of my face. "Don't
rub your eyes with anything; the
gassticksoneverything I heard
a companion warn.
My eyes itched and I oouldn't
touch them! I thought I'd never
known what misery was. But I
didn't have it as bad as some of
the others. I wasn't the one to yell
out one of the broken lower rear
windows and have mace sprayed
in both eyes.
Sightly after 11 30 we began
to move again. This time we were
leaving the gas. Everyone near a
window breathed deeply. We
worked together. Those in the
center traded places with those at
the windows thus allowing every-
one to get fresh air.
It wasn't long before we
stopped and waited ar, her half
hour. When we were finally called
out, we stepped into a long
curving aisle of very large law
i
At The Book Barn
T: T7i
�X
Frightfully Good
Selection of:
OOK
arn
Hello ween Mesk
Beerds end Wigs
Costume Accessories
Perty Goods
Greenville, 5th St.
enforcement types, each with a
nightstick held across his chest.
We were slow to get out of the
bus but there was no physical
abuse, only words urging us on.
They gave us a hallway thirty
feet long by four feet wide in the
jail section of the courthouse,
trapped from the outside by a
sealed door operated by remote
control.
We waited. The police
wouldn't let us sit down so we
leaned exhaustedly against the
walls.
They gave us no bathroom
facilities. Someone discovered a
utility room where mops and
mop-buckets were kept toward
the rear of the line, and it was
quickly converted to a men's
room. We were caught in the act
of abusing the utility room, and
shortly thereafter a restroom was
unlocked for us. I went to use the
regular bathroom only to observe
the "pull down, tear off" paper
towel dispenser pulled down and
torn off the wall.
And still we waited. The
police present told us the "brass"
had to arrive and decide what to
do with us. After three hours we
were taken, one by one and our
pictures were taken.
Someone must have had a big
laugh after the pictures were
developed. Nearly everyone pho-
tographed was costumed and
caked in makeup.
As the procedure was comple-
ted we were sent, under escort, to
the magistrates office. Here we
had to swear and sign a recogni-
zance bond to be released. No one
refused.
It was a Halloween not to be
forgotten. I had a court date
scheduled to help me remember
All Hallow's Eve, 1975.
123 E. 5tfc
The hours
are long,
but that's
O.K
the pay is
lousy.
But as a volunteer
you'll get to help America
stand a little taller. And you'll
stand a little taller yourself.
America needs your help or
we wouldn't be asking. Your
community needs your help.
People 18 or 80: we don't care
as long as you do. VISTA is
coming alive again. Come alive
with us. VISTA. Call toll free:
H0O-424-858O. 11 OTA
A Pubic Serve ol
Thn Newspaper
The AoVertang Count'





MSC Chess
27 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Paoe 11
STAFF REPORT
Competition to determine
which two students will represent
ECU in the chess competition of
the Regional Association of
College Unions Tournament in
Balcksburg, Virginia began last
night in Mendenhall Student
Center. In addition to last night's
initial round, two more will be
played before the tournament
winners are dedded.
Round Two will begin tonight
at 7XX) p.m. in the multi-purpose
Room in Mendenhall. The final
round will be played Tuesday,
November 1, beginning at 5:30.
Suzuki
(Continued from p. 9)
standard Suzuki literature in
unison. The Tour responded to a
standing ovation with "America,
the Beautiful first played by the
Japanese children and Mrs.
Suzuli, then sung by the audience
as a moving reminder of the
universality of music and the
sincere good will of the Japanese
Tour members.
The repercussions of the Tour
will extend beyond the joy of the
performance. The side benefits
indude a cultural exchange and
encouragement of the local
Suzuli program, which presently
indudes 200 violin students.
Mrs, Charles Bath, local
Suzuki teacher, arranged fa the
Talent Education to partidpate in
a banquet Sunday night and a
workshop Monday afternoon, as
well as to stay in the homes of
Greenville families on Sunday
and Monday nights. Through her
efforts, and those of the Artists
Series Committee, the entire visit
of the Japanese children and their
teachers was a success.
They now move on to comp-
lete their month long tour of the
United States. This marks the
thirteenth year of the Talent
Education Tour, which has travel-
ed to an average of twenty dties
a year in every area of the United
States, Great Britain and Sweden.
Rather than leaving a cold
impression of unattainable talent,
the Tour charmed the audience
with such human traits as giggl-
ing, unabashed uncertainty on
stage, and the difficulty of the
pianists in reaching the piano
pedals. The most exdting mes-
sage communicated throughout
the performance was the simple
pride and joy of the children in
the music itself.
As expressed by Dr. Masaaki
Honda, Tour Director, these
children are not prodigies, but
ordinary children from ordinary
families who have developed their
natural talents. "Every human
can achieve a very high goal of
performing art but the perform-
ance goal is not centra) to the
Suzuki program.
Aooording to Mrs. Bath, the
Suzuli philosophy itself is of
supreme importance, far beyond
the actual mechanics of the
teaching method. The children
learn through praise and positive
critidsm. Rather than engulfing
them, the music enriches the
children's lives. It becomes a
source of happiness.
Thank you, Talent Education
Tour, for sharing that happiness
with us, fa leaving some of your
joybehi J.
Restrained spedatas are enoour-
aged to attend and view the
competition.
Blake Noah and Rodney Bell,
two members of the ECU Chess
Club partidpating in the MSC
Tournament, are both ranked ac
Tournament, are both ranked as'
States Chess Federation. To
achieve this ranking, Noah and
Bell each had to accumulate over
1400 points in officially sanction-
ed Chess competition, Noah is
also serving as the tournament
directa.
Aocading to Noah, the tour-
nament is the result of the
oombined effats of the ECU
Chess Club and Mendenhall
Student Center. Of the ten
students registered for last
night's first round, half are
members of the Chess Club.
The ECU Chess Club was
damant fa many years until it
was reactivated two years ago
with five members. Although the
membership rose as high as 25 in
Senior r
The hCU School of Music has
scheduled two
senia recUais fa the end of this
week and a concert to be
presented by the Symphonic
Wind Ensemble Sunday evening.
All three of these events are free
and open to the public.
Tonight at 730 p.m. in the
A.J. Fletcher Redtal Hall Karen
Marie Burke of Fairfax, Virginia
will perform in redtal. Her
program will indude waks by
Comic B
STAFF REPORT
The ECU Conic Book Club is
in the process of becoming an
SGA-approvedaganization. Only
famed in the last few weeks, the
ECU Comic Book Club is primar-
ily fa those people seriously
reading and collecting comic
books, but others interested in
nostalgia a collecting in general
are urged to attend the next
meeting.
the middle of last year, partidpa-
tion is less than what it once was
on theddC.U.
With twelve members pre-
sently, the Chess Club has
remained small. They meet each
week on Tuesday at 730 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Student Center
Coffee House. Adivities are not
limited to games between mem-
bers, but indude programs ex-
plaing such aspeds of chess
theay as comaprision of defense
styles or studies in opening
theay.
Past years have seen the ECU
Chess Club play community
colleges and the 1976 North
Carolina High School Chess
Champions from Rose High
School in Greenville.
The ECU Chess Club induces
players of all levels of ability and
interest. Anyone interested in
getting together once a week to
play a talk about ojess should
drop by the next 730 Tuesday
meeting in the Coffeehouse at the
Student Center
Mozart, Beethoven, De bussy and
Rachmaninoff. Miss Burke is a
candidate fa a degree in piano
pedagogy and is a student of Dr.
Paul Tardiff.
On Friday evening at 815
Beth Smith of Audubon, Penn-
sylvania will also perfam in
redtal in the A.J. Fletcher Redtal
Hall. Miss Smith is seeking a
Bachela of Music degree in
music therapy and is a student of
Eleana Toll of the ECU keyboard
RODNEY BELL MOVES against Jeff Seidenstein.
faculty. She also belongs to the
Phi Eta Sigma hoKr society.The
program tomarow will indude
Beethoven's "Six Bagatelles
Opus 126; the Schumann "Fant-
asiestucke Opus 111, and
Naman Delle Joio's Suite fa
Piano.
"Music fron many lands" is
the program title of the Sunday,
Odober 30, concert to be present-
ed by the East Carolina Univer-
sity Symphonic Wind Ensemble.
The concert will begin at 815 in
Wright Auditaium.
Conduded by Herbert Carter
of the School of M usic faculty, the
55-piece Ensemble will be per-
faming a varied program of
music from England, France,
Spain and the United States
which will indude many trad-
itional as well as oontempaary
compositions.
� II
k Club seeks approval
That meeting will take place
next Tuesday, November 1. at
6:30 PM in Room 248 of the
Mendenhall Student Center. In
addition to a scheduled program
on ' comic book fandom offf ice-
rs will be eleded and a constitu-
tioi adopted.
Another project in which
many of the dub's members have
already begun wak ai is the
publication of a magazine devoted
to comic books and showcasing
the original work of campus
artists and writers. Carol
Strickland, the acting president,
says that many of the dub's
members belong to the Amateur
Press Association and she pre-
dids publication of a magazine
within the next few months.
Programs to be delivered
be'oe future meetings of the
ECU Comic Book Club are to
indude research and bibliograph-
ical projects conduded by dub
members. Topics fa such pro
jects indude the role of the
woman as patrayed in conic
book fid ion and art a develop-
ment of subjed matter over the
years.
The next meeting on Nov. 1
will be the last befoe campus-
approval is required. Additional
mfamation can be obtained by
calling either 752-0156 o 752-
6389.
"Bernice Aims to Please"
The Galley Room is pleased
to have the many students finding
out about ECU's newest dining
facility. We extend an invitation
to all of you to come by and
check out our daily specials.
open 8:00 am-2:30 pm
4:30 pm-7:00 pm
Located south end of Jones Dorm
(
T )
FREE :�FAST
DELIVERY
758-6500
215 East 4th St.
Use This Coupon
2 FREE 16 Cokes
oz.
When You Order Any Size
Pizza Pickup or Delivery
iJ
v





Page 12 FOUNTAWHEAD 27 October 1977
Intramurals
tmm
by JOHN EVANS
Bunnies win
Cotten Dorm, represented by the Cotten Bunnies, can stake claim
to the Intramural flag football title for women. The Bunnies defeated
the Tylermites on Thursday for the title. The final score was 30-12.
Lillian Barnes of the Cotten Bunnies was voted the Most Valuable
Player.
Another championship was decided last week. Time-In defeated
Who Knows 8-3 for the intramural Co-Rec softbaJI championship. The
Time-Ins scored six of their eight runs in the first two innings and then
held on for the win. Among the team members for the Time-Ins were
Keven Thomas and Billy Bass, who were also members of the
intramural football championship team, the Time Outs. Roger Horton
was named the Most Valuable Player.
Two new records were set in the Intramural Track and Field meet
held Wednesday. Chuck Hester of Kappa Alpha won the 220 yard dash
in a record time of 23.53 and teammate Jay White set a school
intramural record of six feet in the high jump. A third competitor, Mike
Hodge of Belk Dorm, just missed breaking Terry Gallaher's intramural
record in the 100 yard dash. Gallaher is currently a star receiver for
ECU's football team.
Hodge was the only double winner in the men's meet. He also won
the long jump with a leap of 20 feet, 10 inches. White was second in the
event, measuring 19 feet, six inches.
Other individual winners were Dennis Joffe in the mile run, Worth
Gurley in the 440 run, Jeff Mitchell in the Two Mile, Stewart Mann in
the discus, Bill Elcock in the shotput, James Wolfe in the 880 run, and
Hodge in both the 100 dash,and long jump.
The team title was won by Aycock Dorm. Jones Dorm was second
and Kappa Alphs finished third. Belk Dam finished fourth and Lamda
Chi Alpha was fifth.
In the women's meet Fleming Dorm breezed to an easy team
victory, with Alpha Phi second and Alpha Xi Delta finishing in third
plaoe. Donna Daggsof Fleming won three events, winning the 220, 440
and 880 events. Sylvia Jones of Fleming won both the 50 and 100 yard
dashes. Other winners were Diane Gray in the long jump, Cristy
Williams in the Softball, Throw and Donna Hicks in the high jump.
With flag football over Volleyball takes center stage as the premier
team sport on campus now in action. The play is into its fifth week now
and some teams are really stretching their muscles.
In the fraternity league it is as it has been for the last four years.
Everyone is chasing Pi Kappa Phi. Pi Kappa Phi, the fraternity and
campus champion the last three years, rost its first game in four years to
Kappa Alpha, but is still on top of the fraternity division with a 5-1
mark. In second place are the Kappa Sigmas with a 4-1 record. The
Kappa Sigs have already played the Pi Kapps, though, losing in three
sets last week. Tau Kappa Epsilon is third with a 3-1 mark.
The independent leaders are the Spikes and the Hatchets with 4-1
records. The Teke Skykings and the Spatial Specials lead the dub
division with 3-0 marks. The dormitory league leaders are the Jones
Spikers (6-0), the Scott Kids (4-0), and the Aycock Giants and Scott
Scamps (5-1). Eight dormitory teams have already forfeited out of play.
In women'splay Hypertension and the Green Machine hold the top
marks with 7-0 records. Also unbeaten are the Fleming Floozies (6-0),
Kappa Delta (6-1) and Alpha Xi Delta (6-0). Other top teams are the
Garrett Yardapes (4-1), the Fleming Foxes (7-1), Umstead Second
Floor (5-1) and Chi Omega (4-1).
The men's championships in the tennis singles competition was
decided last week with Thomas Cunningham defeating Mike Joyner,
7-5, 6-3.
Thirteen teams started play in Co-Rec Twoon-Two Basketball last
week.
In one of the exciting 2-on-2 games, Jim Kevil and Danny Devleny
were defeated in a tough loss to Joan Black and Joey McNeil. Black
carriedher team to a 20-15 win with 16 points in the first game and to a
21-9 win in the second game with 14 points.
E CU vs. USL

ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Spats Edita
This weekend the Pirates of
East Carolina faoe one of the fin-
est teams that they will play this
year, the Ragin Cajuns-of South-
western Louisiana. The Cajuns
will come into Ficklen Stadium
with a 5-2-1 recad. The Cajuns
have tied Louisiana Tech and lost
to both Hawaii and Temple.
Many people feel that just
because they havent heard of
Southwestern Louisiana that they
will be easy prey fa the Pirates.
Unfatunately this is just not so.
Probably the biggest reason fa
this is quarterback Roy Henry.
Henry's statistics are truly remar-
kable. During the ?7Vind '76
Jfcotball seasons RWiry was
'responsible fa 32 touchdowns by
running a passing, including
eighteen TD throws last year. An
example of his excellent playing
ability was last year's game with
Louisiana Tech. With the Cajuns
behind 26-10, Henry, completed
seven of nine passes fa 120 yards
to spur a 31-26 victory. He
oompleted 18 of 34 passes fa 237
yards and two touchdowns and
was named Southland Conference
"Offensive Player of the Week
This year Henry has already
passed fa 1,525 yards in; oily
seven games. Last year, the6'1
177 pound senia was named
"Hoiaable Mentioi All-Ameri-
ca" and was ranked 16th in the
nation in passing. Roy Henry was
at Nare Dame but transfered
after the first year. Many -say
that, had he not tranter;ed,
Henry would be starting Tor the
Fighting Irish.
Henry isn't the only player
that the Cajuns depend on,
however. Don Irving is another of
theCajun standouts. His position
is caner and his speciality is
stealing errant enemy passes. In
1976, Irving was the third best at
his aaft in America accading to
NCAA stats. He stole eight
passes last season to lead the
Southland Conference and ranked
fourth in the nation in intercep-
tions, and even had one fa a
touchdown to win the "U of
Texas-Arlington game. He was
voted USL's "Most Valuable
Back He also landed a spot on
the second team All-Southland
Conference squad, and was hon-
aable mention All-Louisiana Col-
legiate.
Anaher standout on USL's
defense, which was 40 turnovers
to its credit already this year, is
Cajun noaeguard Keith Walker.
In the USL press booklet it notes
that the 6'0 245 pound senia
was cut from his seventh grade
team because he was tot bulky
and slow. He played tackle as a
sophomore after transferring
from the University of Washing-
ton and then moved to noseguard
last year. He was the team's
third-leading tackier last year
with 55 solos and 26 assists.
Against Arkansas State, -he had
10 tackles, an assist and three
sacks for 13 yards. Against
Nathwestern Louisiana Walker
had eight tackles, four assists,
caused two fumbles and recover-
ed one.
See SOUTHWESTERN, p. 15
East Carolina-vs-Southwestern Louisiana
DATE Saturday, October 29, 1977
TIME: 7:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Ficklen Stadium Greenville, N.C.
ESTIMATED ATTENDANCE : 20,000 plus
SERIES: First meeting.
ECU CAPTAINS: All senias.
PROBABLE STARTING LINEUPS
East Carolina Univasity
DEFENSE
LE Ken Chenier (Jr 240) -
LT Andy Harrison (Sr 266)
NG Keith Walker (Sr 250).
RT Bill Meeks(Jr 236)
RE Brady Muth (Sr 224) . .
LLB Randy Champagne (So213)
RLB Mike Pentecost (Sr 191)
LCB Ed Davis (Sr 185) . .
SSAI Kennedy (Jr 189) . .
FS Sidney Venable (Jr 165).
a Gaald Joseph (Jr 193).
RCB Ron Irving (Jr 199) -
OFFENSE
SE Terry Gallaher (Sr 174)
LT Mitchell Smith (Jr 236)
LG Mitchell Johnston (Jr 245)
CRickieHolliday(Sr193)
RG Wayne Bdt(Sr 257)
RTJoeGodette(So224)
TE Barry Johnson (Sr 225)
QB Jimmy Southerland (Sr 170)
FB Theodae Sutton (So 200)
RB Willie Hawkins(Sr 188)
RB Eddie Hicks(Jr 201)
Southwestern Louisiana
OFFENSE
SE David Gray (So 175) .
LT Mark Capriotti (Jr 234)
LG Mike Langston (Sr 237)
CRoyMurry(So228)
RG Matt Brooks (So 222)
RT Lemuel Pitts (Jr 263)
TE Calvin James (Fr 210)
ZBToy Henry (Sr 210)
FB Allen Strambla (Sr 195)
TB Booker Price (So 190) . .
WBNatDurant(Jr155) .
DEFENSE
SE Fred Chavis(Jr 200)
LT Woodrow Stevenson (So 230)
NG Oliver Felton(Jr 207)
RT Noah Clark (So 225)
WE Zack Valentine (Jr 218)
SLB Harold Randolph (Sr 195)
WLB Harold Fat (Sr 193)
LCB Charl ie Carter (So 173)
SSGerald Hall (Jr 184)
FS Steve Hale (Sr 177)
RCB Willie Holley (So 176)
THE
mag
Neai
Neai
Lnv
D
Sports
A
toget
anti-t
asLe:
Duke
�vcta
�Sfe"
m
v

Jei
SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA HEAD Coach Augie Tammarieilo.





����BHHHin
UHMHBBIHHHBI
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
Freeman ECU senior standout
By STEVE BYERS
Staff Writer
Eying the upcoming women's
basketball season with particular
interest is senior standout Debbie
Freeman.
Participating in volleyball,
basketball and track and excelling
in all is truly outstanding for any
athlete male or female, yet
Freeman takes it all in stride.
"The team comes first. I don't
even think about personal goals
except to win
Last year Debbie led her
entire division in scoring and
rebounding while holding her
team honors in blocked shots and
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER QOOOS
Downtown Greenville
steals. All this while being named
to the Greensboro Daily News
All-State team. These accomp-
lishments are even more aston-
ishing considering the high school
she attended did not even have
girl's basketball team.
Freeman first became inter-
ested in East Carolina through a
basketball camp here while play-
ing on a recreation team in
Jacksonville, N.C. her hometown.
Between her sophomore and
junior years Freeman upped her
rec-ball scoring average to 38
points a game after attending the
camp. "Coach Bdton helped me
alot at the camp and I became
interested in the school
Freeman would like to gain an
assistantship here at East
Carolina in athletics after grad-
uation, but for now she is excited
about the coming year. "We have
some experience returning and
have recruited more height and
Art & Camera Shop
526 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET GREENVILLE. N C 27834
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526 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET GREENVILLE, N C 27834
quickness
When listening to the praise
she gives fellow players, it is
evident a NBA championship
team could be in the making. Gale
Kerbaugh joined Freeman on the
All-Division team last year and
returns as the 1st ECU player to
be named to the all-tournament
team. High school All-American
Lydia Roundtree begins her
career at East Carolina and Rosie
Thompson returns from an injury.
Before that injury last year she
was averaging 20 points a game.
As for personal goals,
Freeman would like to make
All-American, but cites winning
with the team as her foremost
objective.
After being named the Green-
ville Sports Club's Female
Athlete-of-the-year for two
straight years, it is hard for others
to imagine future goals. But
Freeman sees other achievements
in the making. Sinoe starting
school three years ago there have
been five more women's basket-
ball scholarships added to the
athletic budget, and this alone
cites great strides in women's
athletics here at ECU.
One certain fact is that
athletes the caliber of Debbie
Freeman can do nothing but
enhance the growth of a sports
department and a university by
opening new avenues of achieve-
ment and encouraging success.
PIRATES
Continued from p. 13
"lead, but ECU came back in the
second game with a relatively
easy 15-8 win.
In the third game, East
Carolina came from behind to
knot the score at 13-13 with some
�excellent teamwork from Gail
Kerbaugh and Debbie Freeman.
'But the Pirates lost serve at that
point and Duke managed the final
two points to wrap up their
second game 15-13.
In the third, and final game, it
was nip and tuck from the
�beginning with neither team able
to grab a sizeable advantage. The
Pirates finally assumed a com-
manding 12-8 lead and were
apparently in control.
But the Blue Devils, behind
Lewis, narrowed the gap to 12-11
and regained the momentum.
After ECU lost the serve again,
Duke reeled off four straight
unanswered points to win the
game 15-12 and the match.
"We played entirely too much
defensive against them ex-
plained Dillon. "We didn't do as
much spiking as we should have
and we gave them too many easy
points. Against a team like Duke,
you have to ooncentrate more on
offense than defense
"Sandy Sampson did a good
job spiking and blocking noted
Dillon. "Joe Forbes did a good
job on defense while Gail Ker-
baugh and Debbie Freeman set
the ball up well and had some
good spikes fa us
The loss dropped the Pirates
to 13-8 for the season with a 2-2
record at home. The Blue Devils
improved their record to 21-8 for
the year.
I
i a
ste
m
6'3
big
av�
Las
def(
Chi
and
is t
stin
tirrx
Auc
one
NO
the
2-9
(
DEBBIE FREEMAN
East Carolina travels to
Boone, N.C. Friday and Saturday
'or the Appalachian State Invita-
tional Tournament. The Pirates
next home match will be next
Tuesday, November 1st against
Chowan College.
ifi
WeATWER
J
"Kill the: emu
WITH -OAJS SAJAPPV
SEUEC-ToM o SVECTRS.
TV VE�5AmLEL COUU- K)EZK 'S
fetoreo i ao Borvt ueAy aajd lg�T-
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(vweve m ?)
ALSO
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STfePED PULLOIESS. C��W-
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LOCArED ON TME &KtENVIuL MALL
$8
1





3lS tO
iturday
Invita-
Pirates
s next
jgainst
27 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Papa 15
Ragin Cajun monsters will trick not treat
Continued from p. 12
One of Southwestern's mon-
sters on the defensive front is
98, Andy Harrison. Harrison a
6'3 266 pound senior is the
biggest of a front five that has an
average weight of 243 pounds.
Last year against McNeese State,
defending Southland Conference
Champs, Andy had six tackles
and five assists. Even though he
is big he is fast and hits with a
sting that will be felt fa a long
time.
The Cajuns are coached by
Augie Tammariello, who may be
one of the shortest ooaches in the
NCAA at 5'9 He has brought
the Cajun program from a dismal
2-9 record in his first year in 1974
to last year's9-2 mark, the best in
55 years at USL. He coached
with Joe Paterno, head coach at
Penn State and had nothing but
good things to say about his
former assistant.
"He is extremely strong on
fundamentals, and he's also a
great motivator of players
Paterno said.
Since East Carolina and
Southwestern Louisiana have
never met in football, the only
way to oompare them is by their
common opponents. This year
there was only one common foe
between the two teams, even
though there was almost two.
Both teams played Southern
Illinois, East Carolina winning
33-0 and USL winning 24-0. By
scores, East Carolina would rate
as a nine-point favorite, but last
week both Temple and USL had
also played SIU and by compara-
tive scores the Cajuns were a 28
point favorite. The Cajuns ended
up losing that game 27-20. The
other common opponent might
have been U of Texas at Arling-
ton, but the Pirates dropped them
to play against Duke.
Last year both teams played
Furman and USL won 27-16 while
the Pirates lost 17-10. The
Pirates, however, return more
starters than the Cajuns, so the
advantage there rests with East
Carolina.
This weekend's game with
Southwestern Louisiana rates as
one which could make or break
the Pirates. Their talent is
top-notch and Roy Henry is one of
the few quarterbacks in the
oountry that can pass whether he
is running backwards or to the
right or the left.
This game will also be ECU's
last home game this year and the
last home game for the seniors
who brought ECU football to its
greatest moments thus far. The
game also marks the last time
East Carolina will play in Ficklen
Stadium the way it now stands. If
things go aocording to plan, a new
addition is scheduled to be built
to expand the current stadium to
35,000 plus. The game, then, will
be an emotional one both from the
senior standpoint and the team as
a whole.
For USL coach Dwight Flana-
gan it will be a homecoming of
sorts. Flanagan played football at
East Carolina in the late 60' s, so
he will have no trouble getting the
team up for the game. A win this
weekend would strengthen the
Pirate bowl picture but the fans
must turn out if the bowl people
are to be impressed. Coach Dye is
hoping that this weekend the
Pirates can end the home season
at Ficklen Stadium with a packed
house and a win over a tough
Southwestern Louisiana team.
Sports writers needed !
Call 757-6367
Classifieds
for sale
FOR SALE: Kodak EK4 instant
print camera with electronic flash
and carrying case. Used three
times. $85.00 Call 757-6135.
FOR SALE: Women's 10-speed
bike in very good oond. Extra seat
and handlebars included $50.00
Call 756-5632 after 4.00 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1977 Chevy Van.
than 6.000 miles. Coat new S8535.
Power steering. AMFM radio.
Will sacrifice for $5,000 CaJI
752-0412
FOR SALE: 1973 Audi IDOLS.
Air, AMFM. Good Cond. British
Racing Green.
FOR SALE: Olympus OM-1
35mm camera. Hottest 35mm on
the mkt. With 50mm lens, case.
Used only 3 times $250.00 or best
offer. Call Ed Midgett 758-4764.
FOR SALE: '77 Beige Chev.
Morua sports aoupe. 4 speed.
JusJ take over payments $900
already paid off. Has 6000 miles,
only driven for 3 months 29 mites
nwy, 26 city. Must sell. Student
returning to school CsJI Met
T57-6462.
FOR SALE: Sherwood S7110B
receiver 20 watts per channel.
Perfect cond. 3 months old. Must
sell. Call Ricky 758-6890.
FOR SALE: Hi-Fidelity speakers
2 Fisher Royal 6A. 3-way speak-
ers. 2 Infinity 3000J speakers.
Both $200 plus when new.
Excellent cond. Will take best
offer. Call Dave at 758-5008.
FOR SALE: Hondaline motor-
cycle helmet with faceshield and
visor. Less than 2 months old.
Maroon color $35.00. Call 757-
6135.
FOR SALE73 Honda 3b0. Good
Cond. $360.00. Call 758-0893.
FOR SALE: Everything in my
closet at real good bargain prices
Every piece is in wearable shape
now Winter and summer clothes,
(oabies) and shoes. Sizes: 9 and
11 junior 10 and 12 misses shoes:
7V2-8 med. Village Green Apt.
laundry room 800 Heath St.
Fri-Sun 10-5. Help me get rid of
this stuff so I can start over
FOR SALE: Texas Instruments
SR-52 224 step programabie
Also card programabie Complete
with math, star, games, and
basic Libraries Over $300 new,
15 mos o�d. Best offer. Contact
Tony Bennett Room 401 Jones
SELL OR TRADE: 1986 Volvo.
Needs some repair. Write Ted
PO. Box 494 Bell Arthur, 27811.
FOR SALE: 3 wheeler VW
powered motorcycle 40 h.p.
Chromed forks (1976). Asking
1200.00. Call 746-3271 late after-
noon and evenings ask for Danny.
FOR SALE: Leather jacket, excel-
lent oond must be seen to be
appreciated. Call Lee at 758-5985
or come by 308 C. Scott. ARE
YOU TIRED OF THE HIGH
PRICE OF CLOTHES? Have
them made at less than yh the
cost of what you would buy them
at. For all your sewing needs call
756-6393 after 200.
FOrt SALE: 12 string guitar
whard shell case, excellent copy
of a Martin. New oost 286.00
Need money bad so will sell fa
125.00 Call 752-6892.
FOR SALE: 69 Chev. Van
Paneled and carpet. 307 V8
engine & 3 speed auto. 1500.00 or
best reasonable offer may trade.
7564909.
FOR SALE: 1965 Fender Super-
reverb amp. 4 JBL 10" speakers.
Great oond. Must sell, best offer
Call Ed Midgett, 758-4764.
FOR SALE: King trombone 3b
with F trigger and case. Excellent
oond. Must sell! Call 752-9679.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 1 or 2
roommates to share $175.00 apt.
at Riverbluff. Call 758-6690.
FOR SALE: Registered Pointer
pups. White Knights Button
Blood lines 756-53BB after 600
p.m.
BUY NOW: 1967 V.W. Station-
wagon. 300.00. Art student needs
to sell car for food money. See at
510 E. 1st a. Apt. 6, after 5p.m.
FOR SALE 25 watt JVC receiver -
amplifier with turntable.
Pioneer cassette deck. Magnatex
speakers Call 756-0146.
FOR SALE: Mdntoah C-26 pre-
amp, 8 man. old. Need money
fasti Best offer over 350.00. Call
752-5692 anytime after 700-until
whenever.
FOR SALE: Hart freest ilt FOR SALE72 Opel GT. Contad
skis. 185cm super cond. Perfect Steve at 752-3267.
for southern slopes with or
without bindings. Call, 752-2708
ask for Greg.
FOR SALE: Nashiki boys bike
10-speed. Excellent cond. Call
752-0478 after 3 p.m. $95.00
FOR SALE: '71 VW convertible
bug. 80,000 miles, mostly hi-way.
Needs some work. Must sell.
758-7670.
FOR SALE: PeuQOt 10 spd. men's
bike 24 Inch with rack. 1 month
old. Must sell. Call 758-7670.
FOR SALE: Butterfly chair. 752-
1702.
FOR SALE: to VW Classic with
sun roof, carpet, excellent trans-
axle, body not rusty, partially
restored , Collectors Item. Call
758-7434 Sorone Cceecan
FOR SALE: 10 piece silver
sparkling set of Ludwig drums
Good oond. Call 752-8687 or come
by room 212-CSoctt.
huh SALE: 5 place drum set
9ingerlandLudwig combination
Call 756-7434.
FOR SALE: Fad Ranger XLT
1974 390 engine. New tires, all
extras. 43,000 miles. Excellent
cond. Call 756-6967. Keep trying.
FOR SALE: Bell star full coverage MUST SELL: Kenwood Receiver
motacyde helmet. $30 758-0445 120 watts per channel. Beat offer.
after 2 p.m. Call Mike 758-1893.
FOR SALE: Shure Vocalmaster FOR SALE: Fisher Quad Stereo; 4
PA. 17 months old, indudes; P.A. s
head, columns plus 2 nan
tape deck. Excellent
cond. Must sell. 758-0812.
FOR SALE: Nice-ccntempaary
sectiais fa added highs, also by
Shure. All cablesinduded want to doon(j Paid $250.00 will
sell fast. Call 752-5692 anytimejj call 750956
after7Pm- after 600 p.m.
WANTED TO RENT: House
within walking distance of
campus or married couple with
no kids No later than Dec Must
have workshop or garage (around
100.00) CHI Mel at 757-6462.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
to share 2 bedroom apt. in
Eastbrook. Prefer someone inter-
ested in study-oriented enviro-
ment. Rent is $46.25 plus 14
utilities Call 752-0354.
FOR RENT: Room, Private bath
for rent at 19P6 E. Eighth a.
Linen induded $66 752-6965.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 1 female
roommate wanted to share new 2
bedroom trailer, with washer,
dryer, central heat, and air, also
completely furnished. Fa more
info, call 752-9265 between 10
and 6:30 p.m after 630 call
7520872.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share 2 bedrm. apt. $65 a
month plus utilities. Call 752-
1702.
WANTED TO RENT: Grad
student needs co-renter fa apart-
ment. Only 1 block from campus -
furnished, two baths fully carpet-
ed, cola TV and central air and
heat. $100 per month and 12
utilities Call 758-6096.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share 2 bedroom apt. at
Greenway Apts. Call 756-2486.
BLACK FEMALE ROOMMATE:
needed to share 2 bedroom apt. at
2321 College View Apts Rent is
$50 plus 12 utilities. Call 758-
1076 ask fa Joyce Gibbs a
contad at above address.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: at
red laughahyde sofa. Seats three. Qeagetown Apts. Call 758-7715.
FOR SALE: 83 inch long sofa,
brown with dark green throw
cover. Good price - 50.00. Call
946-7404 afta 600 p.m. Will
deliver in the Greenville area.
FOR SALE: '67 Chevy Impala
4-doa. Air cond heat, radio,
only 51,000 miles on it. Great
intaia cond good engine $250.
Call Addie 75-6146.
pgrsonalfXl
ALTERATIONS: Fall things too
big. too long? Call Kathy
7524444 9 752-8642.
LOST: Blue cowhide leather
wallet wtth the letters B.B.D. on
the can purse has disappeared,
from my room. If found please
rtiurn it-no questions-reward.
Lynn Martin rm 291 Fleming
dorm.
TYPING: .75 to $1.00. Excellent
service Call Pam at 757-6862
(day), and 7564211 (night).
HELP WANTED: Unique restaur-
ant and tavern opening soon on
the waterfront in Beaufort. Em-
ployment positions open Attitude
and willingness to work valued
ova experience. Contact Mr. a
Mrs Rogasat 1-728-2133 a P.O.
Box 149. Beaufort. N.C.
me. 752-5Z14 (4p.m7p.m.)
FOUND: 2 ma old black female
puppy in the vidnrty of Jones a
Call 752-7032.
LOST. Eyeglasses (bifocal) in
brown case with Dr. Sam White,
Optometrist on outaicle of case.
Please contad William n. Still,
Dept. of Histay (757-6587).
FOUND: Set of car keys found in
back parking lot of Balk Btdg. last
week. Can bedaJmed at Rm. 300
Balk
FOUND: One tan tabby cat in
vicinity of Mendenhall and
McDonalds on Sun Od. 16. Call
Cindi a Susan, 752-9713.
CRAFTS: ceramics, candles,
weaving, leather, batik, sewing,
etc all at Banyan Crafts-1016
Myrtle Ave
FREE RESEARCH SERVICE:
with Britannica 3. Over 20
discount for students Finandng
fa employed upperdass and
graduate students Fa free des-
criptive booklet, call 756-0417.
NEED A RIDE; to Boons, N.C.
This weekend. Will share expen-
ses OJI David 758-1312 a if no
answer, 752-8638.
REWARD: $25 offered fa
information leading to the recov-
ery of a man slight blue suit of
dothing taken from the 3rd floor
of the music big. Thurs. night,
Oct. 6th. Contact Michael
McDonald 758-3334.
PERSONAL: Hobbit: Please
contad the Student Union about
booking at the Coffeehouse and
give your address as so&n as
possible.
mmmmMaaammum
MMM �.��"W&M iW
iM
EBfli





16 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 October 1977
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
Treat your
tosaving
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. OCTOBER 29 AT A4P IN
Greenville
Oscar Mayer Brand A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
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A&P QUALITY CORN FED PORK
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RED RIPE
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ITEMS OFFEREO FOB SALE NOT AVAIL ,BLE TOOTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS





Gl
27 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Rage 13
ft
etrotters scout for talent
While thousands marvel at the
skill of the Harlem Globetrotters,
who will be at Minges Coliseum
on Thursday, Nov. 3, few realize
that this superb team istheresjlt
of one of the most sophisticated
scouting systems in professional
sports.
More than four decadesago,
the Globetrotters realized that
full-time scouting operation jsr
required to find superior players-
yvho can adapt to the TroUs1
intricate style of play and riqorous
schedule.
Heading up the search Jor
.special talent is Phil Brown at eiJ
Fa twenty-five years, 8roWristefrf
produced top high "School teams
Ort of Chicago. He has scottoft
opposing teams for many of the
nation's best oollege teams, antf
coached the ABA's ChicajjS
Stags.
Brownstein travels more than
�1tX),000 miles every year scouring
the country for potential Trette
talent. "In addition to the GJofeeP
trotters' efficient scouting sa
Brownstein, "I rely on recom-
mendations sent to our office
from top college coaches coast-to-
coast. This talent network is the
result of the goodwill the Harlem
Globetrotters have developed in
their 50 years of travel
Of the thousands of basketball
players that are observed, per-
haps thirty are then invited to a
second camp held before the
Trotters begin their annual tour.
After the final cut, only one or two
rookies are lucky enough to make
the Globetrotter squad.
This successful scouting sys-
tem is one reason why the
Trotters have maintained their
incredible level of basketball skill
over the past 50 years. As a
result, the Harlem Globetrotters
continue to be the world's most
famous team and No. 1 sports
attraction year in and year out.
Nealplays for the kids
tr,
230)
5

THE HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS' Curly Neal will display his
magic in Minges Coliseum on Thursday night, November 3rd.
Neal is completing his 24th year with the Globetrotters this season.
Neal is a Greensboro native and attended Johnson C. Smith
University in Charlotte.
Every professional athlete has
something to motivate him. For
some it's the money, for others
the fame. And fa some, the thrill
of victay.
Fa Harlem Globetrotters star
Curly Neal, it's the kids. The
Globetrotters will visit ECU on
Nov. 3rd.
"Whenever I don't feel like
playing oi a particular night, all I
have to do is think of the kids
waiting in the audience says
Neal. You' d be amazed how the
bumps and bruises disappear as
scon as I see those kids react
when I come on the court
Neal, a standout perfamer, is
a Greensboro native, where he
was an all-state high school
player at Dudley High. He turned
down numerous scholarship
offers to attend Johnson C. Smith
in Charlotte, where he was an
all-league guard fa two years.
Neal has always been some-
thing special fa the millions of
kids who enjoy the Globetrotters
each year. A tremendous play-
maker and passer, his specialty is
dribbling.
"I think my attraction to kids
may have something to do with
my size says Curly. "They
figure that I'm little like they are.
and here I am making it in a wald
of giants
It may also have something to
do with Curly's infectious smile.
"Kids always respond to a
smilesays Neal. "It doesn't
matter where you are, a in what
country. I've never seen a young-
ster who didn't smile when you
smiled at him
Kids and smiles. Two things
that never fail to motivate the
Harlem Globetrotters.
Duke do wns Pirates 3- f
j
-
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Alita Dillon oould not put
together a sufficient dossage of
anti-bionics here Tuesday night,
as Leslie Lewi sand the rest .of the
Duke volleyball team took a 3-T
�victory over East Carolina.
Lewis, known around colle-
giate volleyball circles as the
"Bionic Arm" used her brilliant
spiking ability and an effective
serve to down the Pirates which
avenged a defeat earlier inthe
season.
"We played just about as well
as we could against Leslie said
Dillon after the game. "She
played well, but you have to give
credit to their whole team. We
just didn't soae enough points
while she was on the back row.
Duke won the first game
15-13 after the Pirates blew a 7-0
See PIRATES, p. 14
Thurs. & Fri.
UP FROM
QIARTET
wADELEPOST
Sat. SAT. NIGHT
BYOL
LIVE
Thursday Nite is Thursday Nite
at Pantana Bob's
Be Somebody!
Open 4:00 Daily
I'RO SHOP
ILl E, INC.

e.
Tk j. M Easthrook Drive
� M. C. 27834
� Sperry Top Sider Rain Slickers and
Shoes
� Complete Assortment of Izod and Difini
Sweaters for Men & Ladies
� Casual Slaeks for Men by T.K.G.
� Fantastic Assortment of Faded Glory:
Jeans, Corduroy, khakis and Coordinates.
Hours Mon -Fr�. 10 AM -8 P M.
Sat 10 A W6P.M
ECU CIRCLE K CLUB
Reactivation of ECU circle K
Club will be sponsored and financially
supported by the Kiwanis Club of
Greenville. This is an international
service club for college level students
throughout the U.S Canada and other
foreign countries.
For all former high school Key Club
members or any other students interested
in participating, there will be an
organizational meeting at 7.30 p.m Wed
Nov. 2 in 214 Wright Annex.
For further information contact
Dr. David B. Stevens
p. o. box 1621 at 757-6940
GREENVILLE, NORTIi CAROLINA 27834 r come J
214 Wright Annex.
wmm





Title
Fountainhead, October 27, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.611
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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