Fountainhead, October 25, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSDE
Coffeep. 3
Bye Bye Birdiep. 9
Health threatp. 6
Globetrotters p. 12
Vd. 53, No. 18
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina.
Progress pleases Laupus
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Writer
The ECU Medical School has
made astonishing progress and
has moved along rather fast,
according to Dr. William E.
Laupus.
Dr. Laupus, dean of the Med
School, said the major thrust is
being directed towards the clin-
ical departments, such as, family
practice, internal medicine,
obstectrics, pediatrics, psychia-
try, and surgery.
All the departments have
full-time chairpersons and they
are adding new members to their
departments.
Dr. Laupus said he expects
the med school to have between
25 and 30 full-time faculty
members by June 30, 1978.
The faculty will also include a
number of practicing physicians
from this area who will be
employed on a part-time bas's.
Dr. Laupus said, concerning
construction, that major portions
of the additions to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital have been
completed, the clinical faculty is
being moved from Ragsdale to its
new offices there.
"The medical students are
now half way through their first
semester and the faculty has been
pleased with their progress
said Dr. Laupus.
"The curriculum is going well
and particularly, the early expos-
ure of students to dinical situa-
tions concerning primary care and
family practice, which is part of
every Friday afternoon's
activity
The med school expects to
secure permission from the Board
of Governors to continue the
pre-planning process for develop-
ment of the pre-doctoral prog-
rams here in anatomy, biochem-
istry, microbiology, pharmaco-
logy, and physiology, according
to Dr. Laupus.
He further said these pre-
doctoral programs will be the first
terminal degree programs of the
Phd. level at ECU.
"This is an accomplishment
which is extraordinarily impor-
tant to the continuing full deve-
lopment of ECU as a whole
Ten new faculty members will
be added to the medical school
faculty within the next few
months.
Dr. Laupus also said that the
animal care fadltiy behind Rags-
dale will be completed by Dec 1,
1977. He said that the construc-
tion of the medical education
building is at the planning stage
and isexpected togo up for bid in
either February or March of next
year.
The building will be nine
stories tall, 480,000 square feet,
and will cost approximately $24
million. Right now, the building is
being scheduled fa completion in
mid-summer of 1980, according to
Dr. Laupus.
The building will be built on
the Health Centa campus of ECU
north of the new Pitt County
Hospital.
DR. WILL!AM E. LAUPUS, dean of Medical School
Student fees help pay construction debt
By BILL HARRINGTON
Assistant News Editor
Of the $81 paid by each
student per semester fa "other
required fees $40.50 goes to
retire debts on various campus
buildings, according to figures
released by the ECU Business
Office.
Business Manager Julian
Vainright cited figures showing
that the old Student Union
building (Wright Auditaium) is
allocated $6 from each student's
fees per semester, Minges
$10.50, the stadium fund (light-
ing) $7.50and Mendenhall $16.50
According to Vainright, the
$16.50 figure fa Mendenhall also
finances the physical operation of
the building including mainten-
ance and utilities.
Of the remaining $40.50 per
student per semester, $12.75
goes to the SGA fa their
appropriations, $13.50 for
athletics, $8.25 fa special funds
and $6 fa the Student Union
Program, said Vainright.
According to Vainright, the
money earmarked fa "special
funds" goes largely to support
various intra-mural activities.
A relatively rnina amount
approximatelv -50 from this
special fund goes to support
campus cultural activities, said
Vainright.
Vainright said that student
fees are increased "when needs
arrive
He cited the improvement of
the intramural department as an
example of a needed program
funded by a recent fee increase.
Funding bills debated
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
Three organizational funding
bills were debated during the
Monday night legislative session.
Most debate concerned the
proposed budget fa FOUNTAIN-
HEAD. One proposed amend-
ment to the bill was to cut out
FOUNTAINHEAD Ad Managers'
commission on his ad sales. The
amendment was defeated. After a
one and a half hour debate, the
bill was sent back to the Appro-
priations Committee fa reconsid-
er at iai.
EBONY HERALD, minaity
newspaper, received its request-
ed $4,115. Legislata Phil Barbee
questioned whether the EBONY
HERALD had considered consoli-
dation with FOUNTAINHEAD fa
reasons of cost efficiency, and
also pointed out that funding fa
this minaity publication is drawn
from the SGA, which represents
all of the student body. The
funding bill passed, 24 to 15.
The BUCCANEER received
its approximate request of
$46,000. The proposed two dollar
student fee fa the yearbook was
deleted. The students may obtain
a yearbook free of charge, as was
called fa in previous years.
English professor sells novel;
to be published in spring
TERRY DAVIS. ASSISTANT English professor.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
By DOUG WHITE
Assistant NewsEdita
Terry Davis, Assistant Eng-
lish Professa at ECU, has sold
his first novel, Visionquest to
Bantam Publishers. The book is
expected to be released around
May, acoording to Davis.
"The book is about a high
school wrestler living in the
basement of his Dad's house with
his girlfriend, preparing fa the
biggest match of his high school
career said Davis.
"The wrestler. Loudon Swain,
is also trying to graduate a year
early in ader to stop being a child
and help his father, who lost his
job earlier in the book.
"The title comes from a rite
the Rains Indians used to per-
fam. A "visionquest" was a
ritual involving fasting and soli-
tude in ader to get your head
straight on whatever was bother-
ing you said Davis.
"I first started writing serious-
ly in 1973, when I decided to stop
trying to be Hemingway and try
to tell staies about people I knew
in my own way said Davis.
Davis said his main interest is
fiction, but that he is also very
interested in non-fiction.
"I am not interested in
interviewing famous people. I
have very selfish interests when it
comes to writing; I would rather
write an essay on a personal
experience or a story about
people I know said Davia
Davis, a native of Washington
state, has taught in Washington
Rio de Janiero, Brazil; Oakland,
Califania; Dijon, France; and
Iowa befae coming to ECU last
year.
The idea fa Visionquest came
from experiences Davis had had
with tough people and the aigin
of a tough person, along with
some memaiesof a girl he loved
and some friends who have died,
according to Davis.
"Even though the book was
rejected 14 times, several editas
wanted to buy it, but their
marketing departments said that
no one would buy a book that
positive about life said Davis.
Davis spent approximately a
year writing the book, including a
rewrite adered by his publisher.
"I wrote the first 50 pages
while I was in Rio and sent it to
Stanfad University. On the basis
of that start, I was awarded a
fellowship to finish the book
said Davis.
"After Bantam accepted it,
they asked me to rewrite certain
parts of the book, and I'm glad
they did, because it made the
book better said Davis.
Davis has previously publish-
ed in small college magazines and
Sports Illustrated magazine.
"I have another novel in the
waks, but I don't expect to finish
it befae I leave ECU year after
next said Davis.
"There are so many good
writers at this school, and I enjoy
teaching writing so much, that I
wouldn't be able to teach and
write still as much as I want to
said Davis.
Davis teaches Introduction to
Fiction and Introduction to Non-
Fiction Writing, Advanced Non-
Fiction Writing, and Major
American Writers, in addition to
occasional work as a semi-
professional actor in dinner
theatre productions.
-iqtgmwFg�





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAO 25 October 1977
CPR
Beta lota SCEC
Vaccine
Comic
ECU Comic Book Club. All
persons interested in the reading
and collecting of comic books,
science fiction, anda fantasy are
invited to join the ECU Comic
Book Club. The next meeting will
be held at Mendenhall, room 248
Tues Nov. 1 at 6:30 p.m.
through 9:30 p.m. For more
information call 752-0156 or 752-
6389.
Chi Beta
Now is the time to become a
part of the only national organiz-
ation on campus that brings all
honor science students together-
Chi Beta Phi. The last chance this
year to pledge our society is
Wed Oct. 26, at 730 p.m. in
biology N-102. Qualifications:
2.75 or better overall, at least
30qh in the sciences (includes
chem biology, physics, math,
psychology, geology), and a 3.0 or
better in these science courses.
Feel free to attend this meeting or
call Bob Dough at 756-5128 for
more information.
Full Gospel
Oct. 26, the Full Gospel
Student Fellowship will not have
its regular meeting at 730. We
will meet in the lobby of
Mendenhall Student Center at
630 and then go to the Ramada
Inn to hear a fellow worker of
Brother Andrew talk about his
experiences smuggling Bibles
across the Iron Curtain. Everyone
is invited to attend
SGA
The Student Health Service is
giving flu vaccine to full-time
students during the months of
October and November. It is
strongly recommended that
students with asthma, diabetes,
chronic bronchitis, emphysema,
heart disease, and paralytics
receive the vaccine at an early
date. The vaccine will be given
Monday through Friday from 8
a.m. to4 p.m. and the charge will
be $1.50.
Halloween
Come dressed as your favorite
monster for the Halloween Party
for underprivileged children.
There will be goblin games,
freaky food, and monster music.
It all happens at 4 p.m. Thurs. in
the Clement dorm lobby.
King Youth
The King Youth Fellowship is
a full Gospel campus organization
fa all ECU students. We enoou-
rage you to join us for fun,
fellowship, and enlightment con-
cerning God's Wad. Time: 7
p.m Oct. 25: place : 308
Flanagan: topic. 'The Roman
Road to Salvation centered
around chapters 6 & 10 of
Romans.
There will be SGA Executive
Council meeting Thurs, Oct. 27
3 ffl. All dass presidents and
persons who have signed up fa
the hona council must be pre-
sent. Hona council screenings
will be held. This meetino is
mandatay.
Phi Beta
A Phi Beta Lambda meeting
will be held Wed Oct. 26 at 4
p.m. in Rawl 130. If you have not
paid your dues, please do so at
this meeting. We're asking all
members to please be present!
DECA
The ECU Collegiate DECA
Chapter is sponsaing a Career
Orientation Workshop Thurs
Oct. 27 for all Distributive
Education high school students.
Featured speakers will speak on
the following topics: Apparel and
Accessories, Petroleum, Food
Services, Food Marketing and DE
Coadinata. The wakshop will
aient the high school students to
the many careers available in
these areas.
BSU
A well advertised secret series
of celebrations begins Tues. Oct.
25 at 5 p.m. at the Baptist Student
Union, 511 E. 10th St. If you know
what it is, whisper it everywhere.
PRC
There will be a RRC Club
meeting Tues Oct. 25 in room
221 Mendenhall at 7 p.m. All
members and potential members
are encouraged to bring their
membership fees of $2.50.
There will also be a PRC Club
Keg party Thurs Oct. 27 at
Barbara Hutts house. Fa direct-
ions to the party, look on the PRC
Club's bulletin board located in
the PRC building.
PeaceCorps
Graduate students who are
famer Peace Caps Volunteers
are requested to oontact Dr. Floyd
E. Mattheis in the Science
Education Department at ECU.
Phone him at 757-6736 as soon as
possible.
Cardiopulmonary Resuscita-
tion (CPR) is a combination of
artificial circulation and artificial
respiration, which should be
started immediately as an emer-
gency procedure when cardiac
arrest occurs, by those properly
trained to do so. It has been used
widely and successfully fa sane
time now recommended that as
many members of the general
public as possible be trained in
this technique.
If you are interested in
enrolling in the dass, call 757-
6280 and infam the seaetary
there of your interest. Also be
sure and give her your name and
your telephone number and lor
your address. The dass will be 12
hours long and will be conduded
on Nov. 2, 7, 9, and 14 between
the hours of 630 p.m. and 930
p.m. The dass will be taught in
Minges 144: please be prompt.
The instruda can oily accept 14
students but don't wary if you
can't make the first dass, there
will be ahers taught if there is a
demand.
This course is approved by the
American National Red Cross and
The American Heart Association.
If you have any questions con-
cerning the class, you may
contact the instructor, Chuch
Owens at 758-7948. The cost of
the text is only .50! See you in
dass!
Phi Sigma
Phi Sigma Pi will hold its
monthly dinner meeting at
Parker's Barbecue Wed. Od. 26
at 6 p.m.
Minority
There will be a Minaity Arts
meeting Wed Od. 26, at 4:30 in
room 236, Mendenhall. All
members are to be present.
Sabbath
Jewish students: Cong. Bayt
Shalom of Greenville invites you
to attend Sabbath services Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. at the
Methodist Student Center. Each
service is followed by an Oneg
Shabbat.
Hillel
There will be a LOX BAGEL
Brunch Sun Od. 30 at 1130
a.m. at the Den behind Menden-
hall fa HILLEL members.
The Beta lota chapter of
Gamma Theta Upsilon, the Na-
tional Geography Hona Sodety
is looking fa members to join
during the '7778 school year.
There are two categories of
membership: Associate, which
requires a minimum of one oourse
in Geography, and regular, which
requires a minimum of three
Geography courses with an over-
all B average in all Geography
courses.
Several adivities are being
planned, induding trips to Geo-
graphy conventiois. Anyone who
has ideas to share and would like
to apply fa membership should
see Dr. Birchard, Brewster A-232
fa an application fam.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU'S literary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fidion, es-
says, art work, and phdography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
office a mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each wak of literature fa
yourself, and indude your name,
address, and phone number on all
wak.
Faculty
All faculty-staff members are
invited to participate in the
faculty fitness program which is
being held Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 1200-1 00 p.m. in
Merrxxial Gym. All those interes-
ted in jogging, exercising, basket-
ball, swimming, etc. should re-
pat to the gymnastics room on
the first flax of Memaial Gym
any Monday, Wednesday, or
Friday at 12DO.
Concert
Tickets are now on sale fa the
FIREFALLcaicert in Mendenhall
Student Center. Ticket prices are:
$3 fa students and $5 fa the
public. The concert will be Sun
Nov. 6th at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum. FIREFALL is andher
in a series of oonoerts brought to
you by the Popular Entertainment
Committee of the Student Union.
Bridge
The Bridge Club meets each
Thursday evening at 730 p.m. in
Mendenhall Stude.it Center. All
persons interested in playing
bridge are invited to attend.
Help is a desperate wad
Intended fa desperate people
But few are able to use this
plea
And the pain mounts to an
awful degree
"HELP when screamed
draws a chill through every bone
But how many people will
answer a silent saeam?
They know something is
wrong
But there's nothing they can
do, it seems
YOU CAN HELP. There is an
organization on campus, the
Student Coundl Fa Exceptional
Children, (SCEC), that recognizes
this plea fa help fran retarded
children. Our goals are to suppat
and initiate programs and adivi-
ties fa retarded dtizens. All
students are invited to our
meetings the first Wednesday of
every month in Speight 129 at
7:30 p.m. Please show that you
care. Be an exceptional person;
support exceptional children!
Bowling
Red Pin Bowling is back! At
the Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center you can have a
chance to win one (1) free game
with every game bowled. If the
red pin is the head pin and you
make a strike, you win. Every
Thursday evening, from 8 p.m.
until 11 p.m could be your lucky
day.
Ski Trip
Vacation Ski Trip to Beech
Mountain Jan. 2-6. You may still
sign up to go: PHYE 1000, PHYE
1105, or Non-Credit. Call Jo
Saunders. 757-6000 Memorial
Gym First meeting is Nov. 1 in
room 108 at 4 p.m.
Karate
A Japanese Karate Club (JK A
style) is being famed. Those who
have trained JKA previously a
those who are interested in this
style call 756-3767 and leave
name and number.
Blimpie's
Halloween Party Wed Od.
26 7-12 midnight at Blimpies.
Sponsaed by the American So-
dety of Interia Design. At 10
p.m best carved pumpkin an-
nounced, 11 p.m. best costume
announoed. Cash prizes & fun!
Don't come "undressed Ad-
mission charge .25.
Fellowship Aerospace Interpersonal Research
Wednesday, Od. 21 at 730
p.m. in the Baptist Student
Union, there will be the fellow-
ship and praise service to the
Glory of Jesus. Everyone is
welcome, come and Praise the
Lad!
Freshmen
Saeening fa Freshman Class
Vice-President will be Wed Od.
26 at 4 p.m. Sign up at the SGA
office in Mendenhall immediate-
ly-
The Department of Aerospace
Studies will administer the Air
Force Officer Qualifying Test
(AFOOT) on the dates listed
below. See Captain Lane in roan
204 a Captain Tinkham in room
209 of Wright Annex a call
757-6597 to make an appointment
fa the test. This test must be
completed if you wish to apply fa
the two year AFROTC program.
Nov. 1
Nov. 16
Nov. 19
Unmarried undergracates between the ages of 18 and 24 are
invited to partidpate in a research projed oomparing several methods
intended to promote less self consciousness in heterosexual
interpersonal situations.
If one is bothered by self consdousness and lack of confidence
around members of the opposite sex, his partidpation will be greatly
appredated.
Partidpation will improve your understanding of the methods by
which college people might learn to be more natural, less tense jnd
less inhibited around members of the oppoarte sex
If interested in partidpating in this project, and will be in the
Greenville area this fall, please leave your name, address, and phone
ZoZ Mar�US' DePar,ment Psychdogy, ECU, Greenville,
ycSJ' �r Ph�ne i0 ,he above in,orma,i� to the department at
757-6800.
The project requires abour one hour oer week fa ax weeks





25 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD
IM.C. factory-lead danger? T�oforeignlang.
� profs attend meet
(LNS) � The federal gover-
nment's National Center for
Disease Control has reported that
54 children of employees at an
unidentified battery factory in
Raleigh, N.C. have excessive
levels of lead in their Wood.
Scientists believe such high
blood levels can lead to kidney
disease, diseases of the nervous
system and reproductive dysfun-
ction including increased risk of
spontaneous abortion and miscar-
riage.
Children are also known to
suffer from retardation. Approx-
imately 1.3 million workers in the
U.S. are exposed to lead in their
workplaces.
The Center said that this was the
third report in two years to
involve lead absorption in child-
ren of workers. Lead dust carried
home on contaminated work
clothing is the apparent source of
the exposure.
The United States Department
of Labor claims it is in the process
of revising its standards for
occupational lead exposure to
provide specific regulations pro-
hibiting the wearing of contamin-
ated clothing.
Two faculty members of the
ECU Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures part-
icipated in the program of the
recent Mountain Interstate
Foreign Language Conference
meeting at Johnson City, Tenn.
Helga N. Hill, assistant pro-
fessor of Spanish, spoke on
"Novelsof Protest by Magdalena
Mondragon Aguirre" before the
Spanish-American Literature IX
section.
Dr. Michae' F. Bassman
associate professor of French,
chaired the section on Eastern
European Langages and Litera-
tures of which he is organizer,
and presented a paper on �Char-
acteristics of Yiddish English"
before the Linguistics section of
the conference.
Mrs. Hill holds degrees from
the University of the Americas
and the University of South-
western Louisana and letught at
the Foreign Language Institute,
Gainesville, Fla before joining
the ECU faculty.
Dr. Bassman is an alumnus of
Brooklyn College and holds ad-
vanced degrees from Brown
University and the University of
Connecticut.
He has also studied at the
Universities of Toulouse and
Rouen in France and the Univer-
sity of Bucharest in Romania.
His studies m the Romanian
language have been supported by
the Fad Foundation. During the
summer of 1973, he was visiting
professor in Romance languages
and philology at the University of
Auckland, New Zealand.
Teacher plans Spain trip
AFTER LAST YEAR'S harsh winter, this coed gets prepared.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
By aNDY BROOKE
News Editor
A Washington High School
Spanish teacher is taking a group
of Spanish students to Spain this
summer, and any ECU student
interested in going is welcome.
The group will depart
Kennedy Airport June 23, accord-
ing to Mrs. Rachel Woodard,
Spanish teacher, and will return
July 1. The cost of the trip is $869,
which includes round-trip plane
fare, tours, meals, and room.
An application must be filled
out by November 2, said Mrs.
Woodard, and must be accomp-
anied by a $150 deposit. Students
may obtain applications from
Mrs. Woodard.
"There is an optional trip to
Tangiers, Africa said Woodard.
She said the cost would be
approximately $209.
Each student may take a
medium-sized suitcase, weighing
no more than 44 pounds.
"Don't take too much
advised Woodard, "because
prices are cheaper there and
you II need room to bring things
back
Applications for passports
must be filled out at the Pitt
County Courthouse. The students
need two passport pictures and
the original birth certificate.
Passports cost $13.
The trip is sponsored by the
American Institute fa Foreign
Study.
Anyone requesting further
information may call Mrs.
Woodard at 946-6666.
TWO DAYS ONLY
WEDS &THURS
Special Introductory Price On
Men's Traditional Siladium Ring
Only $59.95
Regularly $82.00
ORDER NOW FOR PRE-XMAS
DELIVERY - LAST RING DAYS
BEFORE GOLD PRICE INCREASE.
7IRK7IRVED
RING DAY FRIDAY
That's when the ArtCarved representative will be here to help you select your custom-
made college jewelry. It's also the day you can charge your ArtCarved college
jewelry on Master Charge or BankAmericard.
place: time:
WRIGHT UNION BUILDING LOBBY 10 AM UNTIL 3 PM
WEDNESDAY b THURSDAY





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 October 1977
Photo Lab needs 4
In last Monday's SGA Legislature meeting, the
request for a fourth photographer for the Photo Lab
was defeated for the most part because Legislator
Ricky Price pointed out that three or four years ago
there was only one SGA photographer, the following
year only two and last year three.
Yesterday Podeszwa asked the Legislature to
reconsider his request in light of the whole truth he
found behind Price's statement. He plans to present
this bill formally at the next meeting. His case is
sound and deserves another chance.
To begin with, Podeszwa said he could not
imagine one photographer being able to handle all
the work for which the Photo Lab is responsible after
he heard Price's argument. He then investigated
and found out that, yes, tnree or four years ago there
was only one photographer for the SGA. He also
discovered that this one photographer was getting
paid $400 per month, which would mean $3600 if he
only worked nine months. Besides that he found out
that the one photographer did not do all the work. In
fact, he had numerous "student helpers" whose
salaries put the SGA photography expenses on
salaries close to $4600 for nine months.
The following year, Podeszwa said, the SGA
okayed two photographers fa the yearbook, the
BUCCANEER, who were paid $100 per month. It also
okayed one FOUNTAINHEAD photographer at $160
per month. These three photographers had several
"student helpers" which, again, put the expenses
for photography over $4000.
Podeszwa added that these facts were difficult to
find since the appropriations for photography were
listed separately under SGA photography, the BUC,
FOUNTAINHEAD, the Publications Board and
Student Help.
After Podeszwa presented these new findings,
Price pointed out that the reason all photography was
recently reorganized under one head, SGA Photo
Lab, was because of this aoss-referendng and to
save the SGA money.
Nevertheless, the fact remains that Podeszwa
asked fa less maiey to spend on four photographers
than was spent on three last year, not to mention
even the one years ago. Last year, the SGA
appropriated approximately $3600 to the Photo Lab.
Podeszwa is asking fa approximately $3300 fa four
photographers.
It simply does not make sense fa the SGA to deny
Podeszwa and the student body of an additional
photographer when the salaries fa four photograph-
ers will be less than last year's with only three.
Podeszwa is merely trying to aganize a mae
productive and efficient Photo Lab fa serving ECU.
Fbuntainhead
Serving the Earn Carolina community tor over fifty years.
Senior Ed"� .Kim J. Devins
Production Manager Bob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert Swaim
News Editaandy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
EditorAnne Hogge
FOUNTAINHEAD it the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and ia distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and betas weekly during the school year.
MaJHng address: Old South Bidding, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offloss: 757-6386, 757-6367, 757-6300.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
���VflUfi IJ). 0fil�flS LICENSE NW8ER. L0LRL
RDDMS3 BLOQD 1VP�, Mb A 250 UDRD
ESSW ON UHV UE SHOULD G-UE VOU VQ? mi0.
Forum
WECU requests student support
To FOUNTAINHEAD: ,
For the past year, WECU-
Campus Radio has been on a
campaign to better serve the ECU
student body. Our campaign has
included playing various types of
music and providing alternative
programs. Since neither of these
methods has brought about any
student feedback, we feel that a
basic change in our programming
is necessary. Rather than use the
triaJ-and-error method as we have
in the past, WECU has decided to
poll the students to find out their
wants and needs. Since WECU is
operated by a student staff and is
funded by the SGA. our primary
interest is with the STUDENTS If
WECU can determine what the
students want, and program our
station accordingly, we feel that
we will be providing a much
needed service to the ECU
community.
Another problem that has
plagued WECU from the very
beginning is the one poor recep-
tion In the dorms. We now use a
close-circuit (Carrier-Current)
system of broadcasting. This
method is somewhat outdated
and relatively expensive to main-
tain. Also, it does not provide the
dear, crisp sound of a convention-
al radio signal. Overall, the
Carrier-Current system is ineffic-
ient and dees not provide good
reception to the dorms. An
alternative to the dosed-drcuit
method would be FM broadcast-
ing. If WECU converted to FM,
not only would the sound be much
much dearer, but Day Students
would also be able to pick up
0 mpus Radio. WECU is now
seriously considering the switch
to FM. It is well within our reach
IF we have the support of the
students and the SGA. We must
act quickly though if WECU is to
go FM, because the airwaves are
getting more crowded by the day.
Please support WECU-
Campus Radio by doing two
things: Let your SGA legislator
know how you feel about the
future of Campus Radio, and
complete the Student Survey
Form that appears in this issue of
the FOUNTAINHEAD.
WECU is your radio station
take an interest'
Sincerely,
Bob Bass
Promotions Dir.WECU
Send letters overseas
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
With Christmas again rapidly
approaching, we at Military Over-
seas Mail are concerned about the
many thousands of our military
personnel who will be away from
their homes and families during
the holiday season. Fa many of
these young men and women this
will be the first Christmas away
from home.
Readers of the FOUNTAIN-
HEAD can help make this holiday
season a little less lonely and a
little more enjoyable fa many of
these young people by joining in
the oolledion of Christmas mail
sponsored by Military Overseas
Mail. This is an ideal project fa
school dasses, dubs, and aha
groups as well as individuals and
families.
Fa mae infamatlai, please
send a stamped, self-addressed
envelope to Military Ova seas
Mail, Box 4330 Arlington,
Virginia 22204, and mention that
you read about MOM. in the
East Carolina University
Fountainbead. Thank You.
Sinoerely,
Lee Spencer
Coadinata
Against funding the BUC
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The funding of the BUC-
CANEER again this year at the
expenditure of $50-60,000 while
depriving students of access to
present and future channels of
growth and opportunity is appal-
ling!
The mae thought of shelving
all conventions, oonfaenoes, and
trips where students have the
oppotunity to meet top national
and international specialists, in
their fields, and receive input, as
well as give output, on a national
and intanational scale in ex-
change fa "full funding of the
BUCCANEER' lies somewhae
between irrespaisibility and nos-
talgic and sentimental regression.
The Legislature should stand fa
responsible progression.
indignantly yours,
Charles Love





- �
Forum
25 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Inmate questions amount of justice in federal prison system
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I am a federal prisoner at
the federal prison in Springfield
Mo. I am doing a six year Y.C.A.
sentence fa stealing a car. I see a
lot of people doing less than six
years for crimes such as murder
and bank robbery. What I am
getting at is this: what kind of
justice is there in the federal
system?
Just because a man is convic-
ted of a crime, he should not lose
all of his constitutional rights,
such as the right to call his
attorney, the right to exhaust his
appeals within the institution.
Just because a man is convic-
ted by a court does not make him
an animal or, does it?
BUC editor supports Pres. Sessoms
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The SGA is in quite a
financial bind this year, as is by
now common knowledge on this
campus. In order to ease the
strain, Pres. Sessoms met with
the SGA executives and some
legislators to discuss the prob-
lem. As I see it, their plan is
logical when you look into the
core and don't just glance around
the edge?
In essence, the plan is to fund
organizat ions and activities which
benefit ALL students, not just a
select group. Every student is
entitled to the FOUNTAINHEAD,
EBONY HERALD, REBEL, BUC-
CANEER, legal aid, bus service,
ECU Playhouse, etcFREE!
Reader
supports
funding trips
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I feel that the proposed
priority system of the Neil
Sessoms administration to be for
the most part fair and well
thought out, but I do take issue on
two priorities: (1) Departmental
Conferences and Conventions,
which Sessoms has proposed to
eliminate from SGA funding, and
(2) a yearbook.
I was really aghast at how an
individual in a real university
situation oould possibly think of
eliminating conferences and con-
ventions of an academic, instruc-
tional nature, and seemingly
substitute in their place a year-
book which, if published at all,
should be based on an ad and
subscription basis paying for
itself.
The logic loses me as to how
one oould justify discarding a
valuable tool for understanding
current trends and ideas to fund
with our student activity fees a
social carry-over from high
school, an annual. Personally, I
thought I was paying for student
activity and not student nostalgia.
One of the determining factors
in my choosing to oome to ECU in
the first place was my meeting
some ECU students at a confer-
ence at the University of Georgia,
Athens. Their enthusiasm and
what they said of ECU vividly
influenced my choice to further
my education here. Conferences
take up where textbooks and
teaching aids are usually at least
five years behind what is actually
happening in any field one would
care to study. With conferences
and field trips one is exposed to
what is happening right now in
one's chosen field.
Sincerely,
David A. Devine
These services are fa the student
body as a whole, unlike depart-
mental and assodational retreats
and conventions. I, too, would like
the oppatunity to become invol-
ved in these out-of-town trips.
However, funds do not permit
unnecessary travel even when
this travel offers much learning
experience.
Perhaps everyone should sit
down and try to find ways to raise
money fa these retreats. I' m sure
all of usdid it in high school and it
wouldn't hurt anyone to do it
again.
Don't be narrow-minded.
Look at the situation objectively.
You may see a distant light at the
end of the tunnel.
Sincerely,
Susan L. Rogerson, Edita
1978 BUCCANEER
I have been in the system fa
over two years and I do not see
any justice whatsoever. But may-
be I don't know what society calls
justice. I know I was wrong in
comitting a aime, but I also feel
there should be some kind of
justice in the system.
I also thought that when a
man is sentenced to prison it is
suppose to be to rehabilitate him
na treat him as a dog. But there
is no way a man can be rehabili-
tated by just being looked in a cell
and fagotten. That is not rehabi-
litating him. I know that all the
rehabilitating I have received is
what I have done fa myself. I
have about 22 more months left
and then I will be a free man
again. I know where I made my
wrong turn and I will not make it
again. But I learned it on my own
from being locked away from the
ones I love, and losing the ones
that I loved.
All I hope is that they get
some justioe in the future and
some rehabilitation that will
really help young people. I just
want to speak out to aher people
on the pnson soene.
I wish to write to any one who
is interested, o. any one who just
wants to get to know me and
become friends. If you are like me
and just dig people, please write.
I will answer all letters.
In Struggle
K urt Douglas Raymer 30093-120
P.O. Be 400010 c
Springfield Missouri 65802
YOU DESERVE SOME CREDIT
.YOU'VE EARNED IT.
4i
it i

���
in
Hiii
,
f i
r si
kJ
Once you've earned a college
degree, Ford Motor Credit
Company thinks you've earned
the opportunity to have credit
too. That's why we developed
a finance plan that gives
special consideration to college
graduates and seniors within
four months of graduating.
If you presently have a job
or cm supply proof of future
employment, you may be eligible
for financing on any new Ford
or Lincoln-Mercury product. And
this financing can be tailored to fit your
own personal budget�from delaying your
first payment for up to three months, to a plan where
your monthly payments start out small and gradually
increase each year�even 48 month financing, if needed.
If you don't have a job lined up just yet, keep Ford Credit in mind, because you
can still take advantage of this special plan for up to one year after you graduate.
Ford Credit wants to give you the credit you deserve. Ask for us at any Ford or
Lincoln-Mercury dealer.
Where permitted by law.
"For example, contract dated December 15, 1977, Cash Price $5,300.00; Total Down Payment
$800 00; Amount Financed $4,500.00; FINANCE CHARGE $1,806.09; ANNUAL PERCENTAGE
RATE 14.35; Deterred Payment Price $7,406 09
Payment schedule: first payment due March 15, 1978; 45 payments consisting ot: first 9 monthly
payments ot $117.40; next 9 monthly payments of $130.85; next 9 monthly payments of $145.84;
next 9 monthly payments ot $162.55; and 9 monthly payments ot $177.37.
���
Ford Motor
Credit
Company
�� " - - �





Ptm � FOUWTAMHEAD 25 Octotof 1977
N.C. plant poses health hazards to workers
Next time you open a bag of
Fritos or a pack of cigarettes,
think about Marvin Gaddy.
Marvin hat worked in Olin
Corporation's Film Division for
over 20 years making cellophane
wrapping He can't see as well as
he used to and still gets night-
mares onoe in a while.
He's watched the lives of
many men change after they
came off mat second floor. Some
got eaten up with tumors and
cancer.
For some, it became so bad
they took their own lives. Others
were luckier and got out with only
minor nerve problems to remind
them of what it was like.
The second floor is in the
Chemical Building at CMin's Film
Division near Brevard, N.C, on
the edge of the Pisgah National
Forest. The Film Division pro-
duces viscose which is extruded,
solidified and dried to form
cellophane.
Twelve masatve vats are kept
in constant rotation, each mixing
together 700-800 pounds of ripe-
ned alkali cellulose (raw wood
pulp and 16 per cent caustic acid).
Marvin used to add carbon
disutfide to the rotating vats, to
quicken the process of breaking
down raw wood pulp into a liquid
celioohane-like mixture.
Nobody ever told Marvin and
his fellow workers that the CS2
could harm them. But they finally
found out. Only then, it was too
late.
'A lot of people would leave,
says Marvin. "The younger ones
would come in there and work a
few days, and then they'd Invar-
iably get a big whiff of CSC.
"People would act real un-
usual, get headaches and think
they were getting the flu. After a
few overdoses the nightmares
would start ooming on them.
We' d go in and teH the oompany,
Damnit you'd better do some-
thing about this CSS stuff
"They'd tell us to get the hell
out - we don't need you. If you
don't enjoy your job, then go
home Course we didn't have a
union back then. And we didn't
have Jimmy Reese rummaging
through their trash cans and filing
all those grievances and comp-
laints
James Reese is a maintenance
man at the Olin plant and
chairman of the union safety
committee fa Load 1971 of the
United Paperworks Inter-
national Union (UPIU).
Olin workers had to stand up
and fight for more than 30 years
before they got the union in at
Olin. The battle left a trail of
beaten-up organizers, fired union
sympathizers, and heart-
breaking, one-vote Labor Board
election defeats.
Finally, in 1971, the union
won a contract which included a
safety committee of company and
union representatives.
Fa the past five years, the
oommittee has investigated num-
erous toxic substances: asbestos,
carbon disulfide, formaldehyde,
tetrahydrofuran, flax dust, noise,
radiation, methyl bromide.
"I had learned the OSHA
standards even before we got our
union aganized, til I almost had
them memaized recalls James
Reese.
" I was just kind of interested.
It represented a kind of challenge
to me because I've seen some of
the conditions up there and I've
been hurt on the job myself
" Im not sure what set me off.
I think it's just the fact that I'm
kind of a militant type character
and this way, fa once, I had
something that they had to listen
to. I finally had 3 law to back me
up
NEWS DESK meeting Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
All news writers and other interested persons
be there!
Brochure for women helps in
male dominated job markets
A new brochure with a special
intrcductay offa fa 12 self-
guidance and career publicatiais
fa undergraduate women has
been released to colleges and
universities by Catalyst.
The booklets enable young
women to oonslda fields that, at
managerial and professional
levels, have been traditionally
male-dominated.
The series includes two seJf-
guidance workbooks, "Planning
for Career Options" and
"Launching Your Career" and 10
in-depth career infamatioi book-
lets, "Have You Considered
government and politics, indust-
rial management, finance, engin-
eering, retail management, ac-
counting, sales, restaurant man-
agement, insurance and banking.
The self-guidance wakbooks
help undergraduate women
evaluate their abilities and inter-
ests in relation to the career and
lifestyle options open to them and
provides important pointas on
resume writing successful inter-
view techniques, on campus job
recruitment and job sources.
The career booklets cover the
spectrum of postiions within
specific professional fields, educ-
ational preparation, the employ-
ment outlook fa the next decade
and case histaies of successful
women.
The brochure was directed to
35,000 college and university
students and career counselas,
placement officers, presidents,
deans, administratas, "women's
studies" faculty, and managers to
libraries and bookstores. The
mailing was also sent to junia
and community colleges, and
public and capaate libraries.
Catalyst isanatirjnaJ noiprofit
aganization that helps women
choose, launch and advance their
careers.
Booklets are available to
students at $1.95 each.
Fa further infamatioi, write:
Catalyst, 14 East 60th Street,
New Yak, New Yak 10022.
EAST - WEST PRODUCTIONS
Presents
THE 2ND ANNUAL OUTDOOR
HALLOWEEN MUSIC FESTIVAL
and
CARNIVAL
SATURDAY - OCT. 29
PITT COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS
GREENVILLE, N.C.

FEA TURING
ZORRO and th� BLUE FOOTBALLS
10TH AVENUE
SUPERGRIT
TENNESSEE HAT BAND
SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS
GRINDERSWITCH
"MR. FIDDLE"
VASSAR CLEMMENTS
and
BAUD
In the event of rain: RAIN DATE � OCT. 30
JUDGING FOR BEST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
PRIZES AWARDED - $100, $60, $25
Cans and Plastic Containers Only - No Glass Bottles
ADMISSION; Advance $5.00 Gate $6.00 ��N rick i Beik Do� - �� �.hii studeni o�
Gates Open 11 A.M. - Until Slan ,2:0� Nwn - � Winute shuttle Trip
6:00 l�M and from 10:00 VM - 12:00 Midnight
ter
Ticket available at the Central Ticket Office, Mende nlinll.





25 Octobf 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 7
Boycotting coffee efforts may be in vain
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
Have you, the price-conscious
oonsumer, boycotted coffee at the
supermarket to help bring prices
down?
If so, your sacrifice may have
been in vain, says an ECU
economist; the coffee supply is
carefully controlled by producing
countries.
Dr. Oscar K. Moore, professor
of economics at ECU and noted
expert on world trends in coffee
production and pricing, has com-
pleted a detailed study of the
coffee market, and contends that
prices don't depend upon con-
sumption, production, govern-
ment control or any other single
factor.
World exportable coffee pro-
duction is highly variable from
year to year, mostly because the
coffee production rate of Brazil,
the largest supplier, fluctuates
sharply he said.
"Brazil's variable production
rates are due to heavy crops
followed by light and to periodic
droughts and frosts which harm
the coffee trees and make predict-
ing the Brazilian crop difficult
Brazil leads the world as a
producer of coffee, though other
Central and South American and
African rations-Colombia,
Mexico, El Salvador, Ecuador,
Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda and the
Malagasy Republic-are increas-
ing their production.
A short year for Brazilian
coffee still means a short year for
the world supply.
The recent record-high
coffee prices have followed the
most severe Brazilian freeze of
modern times, that of July,
1975 said Moore.
"As a consequence of that
freeze, 230 million coffee trees
were uprooted and removed
The Brazilian government's
policy of protectiveness toward its
coffee crop resulted in a signifi-
cant recovery program for coffee
Jerry Lewis speaks to campus
leaders about muscular illness
"I will never be satisfied until
we get the job done Jerry
Lewis, National chairman of the
Muscular Dystrophy Association
told more than 300 college and
high school leaders from across
the country attending MDA's
second National Youth Leader-
ship Conference October 15-16 at
the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood,
Florida.
The purpose of the biennial
youth meeting was to provide
participants with a forum fa the
exchange of ideas on ways in
which they can further their
involvement in the fight against
muscular dystrophy and related
neuromuscular diseases.
Conference workshops and
panel discussions were led by
members of MDA's National
Youth Committee, which included
MDA's patient and community
services program, neuromuscular
diseases and their effects on the
patient and the patient's family,
organizing dance marathons and
MDA fund raising events and
methods of informing the public
of MDA youth activities.
MDA national youth commit-
tee chairman Jay Dardene, who
presided over the two-day confer-
ence spoke for all of the campus
leaders who attended when he
said: "We're going home and
spread the word, we're going to
share what we learned with those
that share our concern for
Jerry's kids
Dardene, a law student and
Student Body President at Louis-
iana State University at Baton
Rouge, added that it is a "great
source of pride fa all of us to
know that we have been a part of
this meeting which will raise
youth participation in the fight
against Muscular Dystrophy to
At
BONANZA
i
520 W. Greenville Blvd 264 By Pass
We Care
Mon-Fri 11:00 am �3pm chops teak $1.49
all day Tues Ribeye $1.79
Fri Sat Sun 8oz . T-Bone $2.79
with this coupon, you can get a
Rib-eye dinner with texas toast,
large baked potato
can eat from our SUPER salad bar
and to top it off, a FREE dessert
of your choice.
$2.35
new heights
Representing 300 colleges and
high schools, students appeared
on the telethon to present Lewis
with over $1.3 million raised in
dance marathons during the
1976-77 school year.
MDA, the National Voluntary
Health Agency that funds a
worldwide research program
seeking the causes of and cures
for Muscular Dystrophy and
related neuromuscular disorders,
also provides a wide range of
medical services�free of charge-
to victims of 35 muscle diseases
through a nationwide network of
182 hospital-affiliated MDA
clinics.
growers, who received govern-
ment subsidies fa each new
coffee seedling they planted.
During the 1976-77,crop year,
the Brazilian Coffee Institute
financed the planting of 375
million new trees said Dr.
Moore.
"This program should bring
about an increase in numbers of
Brazilian coffee trees until they
total 3.1 billion by the end of the
1977-78 crop year.
"If this goal is reached, Brazil
would have a net gain of some 300
million trees since the frost-yield-
ing Caturra and Mundo Nova
types
Brazil does not limit its
intervention to frosting increased
crop yields, however.
"For more than 70 years the
Brazilian government has control-
led the flow of coffee to ports, a
policy now followed by other
coffee-producing nations.
"What this means is that if
the world coffee price is too low,
the coffee nations set quotas to
limit the supply to each port.
Supplies of coffee can be held for
years in warehouses at oool, dry,
high-altitude locations.
"So there is no such thing as
free market' coffee pricing
Moore explained that the
government of Brazil has gone so
far in its regulation of coffee
prices as to purchase vast quanti-
ties of coffee until a suitable price
increase occurs and then sell "at
a substantial profit
The United States is the
world's largest consumer of
coffee; about half the world's
exportable coffee is consumed in
this country.
The brew in its various
forms�perked and dripped,
freeze-dried and instant-has be-
come our national beverage.
But coffee consumption here
has gradually decreased in recent
years, with a sharp decline during
the past several months.
In 1960, the average American
consumed almost 23 pounds of
oof fee. This year, that per capita
figure has dropped to nearly half,
11.80 pounds, according to a U.S.
Dept. of Agriculture estimate.
However, coffee prices con-
tinued to trend upward, despite a
lessening of demand, until they
turned downward at wholesale
some six months ago.
Moore said he believes that
any further drop in consumption
would have little effect upon
wholesale or retail market prices,
so regulated is the supply.
Will coffee prices lower in the
future?
Moore seems optimistic that
they will ease downward, unless
Brazil suffers another frost-
induced catastrophic production
year.
However, there seems to be
little relation between production
and prices because of the tight
regulation exercised over coffee
supplies by the major producing
$$ CASH $$
FOR YOUR
TEXTBOOKS!
SELL EARLY
We now have Spring Semester Book
Information and are paying
top dollar for used Books.
UNIVERSITY
BOOK
EXCHANGE
Downtown in Greenville





Pf � FOWfTAMHEAD 25 Ortobf 1977
i

N.C. plant poses health hazards to workers
Nktvt lima u�i nm . tJ IIA I i Ji. . . �
Next timt you open a bag of
Fritos or a pack of cigarettes,
think about Marvin Qaddy.
Marvin has worked in Olin
Corporation's Film Division fa
over 20 years making cellophane
wrapping. He can't see as well as
he used to and still gets night-
mares once in a while.
He's watched the lives of
many men change after they
came off that second floor. Some
got eaten up with tumors and
cancer.
For some, it became so bad
they took their own lives. Others
were luckier and got out with only
minor nerve problems to remind
them of what it was like.
The second floor is in the
Chemical Building at CXin's Film
Division near Brevard, N.C, on
the edge of the Pisgah National
Forest. The Film Division pro-
duces viscose which is extruded,
solidified and dried to form
cellophane.
Twelve massive vats are kept
in constant rotation, each mixing
together 700-800 pounds of ripe-
ned alkali osllutose (raw wood
pulp and 16 per cent caustic acid).
Marvin used to add carbon
disuifide to the rotating vats, to
quicken the process of breaking
down raw wood pulp into a liquid
ceiloDhane-like mixture.
Nobody ever told Marvin and
his fellow workers that the CS2
oould harm them. But they finally
found out. Only then, it was too
late.
'A lot of people would leave,
says Marvin. "The younger ones
would oome in there and work a
few days, and then they'd invar
labiy get a big whiff of CS2
"People would act real un-
usual, get headaches and think
they were getting the flu. After a
few overdoses the nightmares
would start ooming on them.
We'd go in and tell the company,
'Damnit you'd better do some-
thing about this CS2 stuff
"They'd tell us to get the hell
out - 'we don't need you. If you
don't enjoy your job, then go
home 'Course we didn't have a
union back then. And we didn't
have Jimmy Reese rummaging
through their trash cans and filing
all those grievances and comp-
laints
James Reese is a maintenance
man at the Olin plant and
chairman of the union safety
committee for Load 1971 of the
United Paperworks Inter-
national Union (UPIU).
Olin workers had to stand up
and fight for more than 30 years
before they got the union in at
Olin. The battle left a trail of
beaten-up organizers, fired union
sympathizers, and heart-
breaking, one-vote Labor Board
election defeats.
Finally, in 1971, the union
won a contract which included a
safety committee of company and
union representatives.
For the past five years, the
committee has investigated num-
erous toxic substances: asbestos,
carbon disuifide, formaldehyde,
tetrahydrofuran, flax duet, noise,
radiation, methyl bromide.
"I had learned the OSHA
standards even before we got our
union organized, til I almost had
them memorized recalls James
Reese.
"I was just kind of interested
It represented a kind of challenge
to me because I've seen some of
the conditions up there and I've
been hurt on the job myself
"I'm not sure what set me off.
I think it's just the fact that I'm
kind of a militant type character
and this way, fa once, I had
something that they had to listen
to. I finally had a law to back me
up
NEWS DESK meeting Thursday
at 4:00 pan.
All news writers and other interested persons
be there!
Brochure for women helps in
male dominated job markets
A new brochure with a special
introductay of fa fa 12 self-
guidance and carea publications
fa unctergraduate wonen has
been released to colleges and
universities by Catalyst.
The booklets enable young
women to oonsicter fields that, at
managerial and professional
levels, have been traditionally
male-dominated.
The series includes two self-
guidance workbooks, "Planning
for Career Options" and
"Launching Your Career" and 10
in-depth carea infamatiai book-
lets, "Have You Considaed
govanment and politics, indust-
rial management, finance, engin-
eaing, retail management, ac-
counting, sales, restaurant man-
agement, insurance and banking.
The self-guidanoe wakbcoks
help undergraduate women
evaluate their abilities and inter-
ests in relation to the career and
lifestyle options open to them and
provides important pointas on
resume writing, successful inter-
view techniques, on campus job
reauitment and job sources.
The carea booklets oova the
spectrum of postiions within
specific professional fields, educ-
ational preparation, the employ-
ment outlook fa the next decade
and case histaies of successful
women.
The brochure was directed to
35,000 college and university
students and carea oounseias,
placement officers, presidents,
deans, administrators, "women's
studies" faculty, and managasto
libraries and bookstores. The
mailing was also sent to junia
and community colleges, and
public and oapaate libraries.
Catalyst is a national nonprofit
aganization that helps women
choose, launch and advance their
careas.
Booklets are available to
students at $1.95 each.
Fa furtha infamatiai, write:
Catalyst, 14 East 60th Street,
New Yak, New Yak 10022.
EAST - WEST PRODUCTIONS
Presents
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6:00 I'M and from 10:00 I'M - 12:00 Midnight
Ticket! available at the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall.





25 OcuJmt 1977 FOUMTAINHEAD
�Sli
Boycotting coffee efforts may be in vain
ByFRANCEINEPERRY
ECU News Bureau
Have you, the prioeoonscious
consumer, boycotted coffee at the
supermarket to help bring prices
down?
If so, your sacrifice may have
been in vain, says an ECU
economist; the coffee supply is
carefully controlled by producing
countries.
Dr. Oscar K. Moore, professor
of economics at ECU and noted
expert on world trends in ooffee
production and pricing, has com-
pleted a detailed study of the
ooffee market, and oontends that
prices don't depend upon con-
sumption, production, govern-
ment control or any other single
factor.
World exportable oo'fee pro-
duction is highly variable from
year to year, mostly because the
ooffee production rate of Brazil,
the largest supplier, fluctuates
sharply he said.
"Brazil's variable production
rates are due to heavy aops
followed by light and to periodic
droughts and frosts which harm
the coffee trees and make predict-
ing the Brazilian crop difficult
Brazil leads the world as a
producer of coffee, though other
Central and South American and
African rations-Colombia,
Mexioo, El Salvador, Ecuador,
Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda and the
Malagasy Republio-are increas-
ing their production.
A short year for Brazilian
ooffee still means a short year for
the world supply.
"The recent record-high
coffee prices have followed the
most severe Brazilian freeze of
modern times, that of July,
1975 said Moore.
"As a consequence of that
freeze, 230 million ooffee trees
were uprooted and removed
The Brazilian government's
policy of protectiveness toward its
coffee crop resulted in a signifi-
cant recovery program for ooffee
Jerry Lewis speaks to campus
leaders about muscular illness
"I will never be satisfied until
we get the job done Jerry
Lewis, National chairman of the
Muscular Dystrophy Association
told more than 300 college and
high school leaders from across
the country attending MDA's
second National Youth Leader-
ship Conference October 15-16 at
the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood,
Florida.
The purpose of the biennial
youth meeting was to provide
participants with a forum for the
exchange of ideas on ways in
which they can further their
involvement in the fight against
muscular dystrophy and related
neuromuscular diseases.
Conference workshops and
panel discussions were led by
members of MDA's National
Youth Committee, which included
MDA's patient and community
services program, neuromuscular
diseases and their effects on the
patient and the patient's family,
organizing dance marathons and
MDA fund raising events and
methods of informing the public
of MDA youth activities.
MDA national youth oommit-
tee chairman Jay Dardene, who
presided over the two-day confer-
ence spoke fa all of the campus
leaders who attended when he
said: "We're going home and
spread the wad, we're going to
share what we learned with those
that share our concern for
Jerry's kids
Dardene, a law student and
Student Body President at Louis-
iana State University at Baton
Rouge, added that it is a "great
source of pride fa all of us to
know that we have been a part of
this meeting which will raise
youth participation in the fight
against Muscular Dystrophy to
At
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new heights
Represent i ng 300 col I eges and
high schools, students appeared
on the telethon to present Lewis
with over $1.3 million raised in
dance marathons during the
1976-77 school year.
MDA, the National Vauntary
Health Agency that funds a
worldwide research program
seeking the causes of and cures
for Muscular Dystrophy and
related neuromuscular disaders,
also provides a wide range of
medical services�free of charge-
to victims of 35 muscle diseases
through a nationwide netwak of
182 hospital-affiliated MDA
clinics.
growers, who received govern-
ment subsidies fa each new
coffee seedling they planted.
During the 1976-77,aop year,
the Brazilian Coffee Institute
financed the planting of 375
million new trees said Dr.
Moae.
"This program should bring
about an inaease in numbers of
Brazilian ooffee trees until they
total 3.1 billion by the end of the
1977-78 aop year.
"If this goal is reached, Brazil
would have a net gain of sane 300
milliai trees since the frost-yield-
ing Caturra and Mundo Nova
types
Brazil does not limit its
intervention to frosting inaeased
aop yields, however.
"Fa more than 70 years the
Brazilian government has control-
led the flow of ooffee to pats, a
policy now followed by rther
ooffee-produang nations.
"What this means is that if
the wald ooffee prioe is too low,
the coffee nations set quaas to
limit the supply to each pat.
Supplies of ooffee can be held fa
years in warehouses at oool, dry,
high-altitude locations.
"So there is no such thing as
free market' ooffee pricing
Moore explained that the
government of Brazil has gone so
far in its regulation of ooffee
prices as to purchase vast quanti-
ties of ooffee until a suitable prioe
inaease occurs and then sell "at
a substantial profit
The United States is the
world's largest consumer of
ooffee; about half the wald's
expatable ooffee is consumed in
this oountry.
The brew in its various
forms-perked and dripped,
freeze-dned and instant-has be-
cone our national beverage.
But ooffee consumption here
has gradually deaeased in recent
years, with a sharp dedine during
the past several months.
In 1960, the average American
consumed almost 23 pounds of
ooffee. This year, that per capita
figure has dropped to nearly half,
11.80 pounds, accading to a U.S.
Dept. of Agriculture estimate.
However, ooffee prices con-
tinued to trend upward, despite a
lessening of demand, until they
turned downward at wholesale
some six months ago
Moae said he believes that
any further drop in consumption
would have little effect upon
whaesale a retail market prices,
so regulated is the supply.
Will ooffee prices lower in the
future?
Moae seems optimistic that
they will ease downward, unless
Brazil suffers another frost-
induced catastrophic production
year.
However, there seems to be
little relation between production
and prices because of the tight
regulation exercised over coffee
supplies by the maja producing
$$ CASH $$
FOR YOUR
TEXTBOOKS!
SELL EARLY
We now have Spring Semester Book
Information and are paying
top dollar for used Books.
UNIVERSITY
BOOK
EXCHANGE
Downtown in Greenville
i�S4�5i�jtf�,� I





�HBHHMMIIIHMBBi
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 October 1977
Cinema,
by Steve Bachner
Glossy ghetto
Sidney's Poitiers fifth film as a director is a giant stepin the
wrong direction.
After two huge box-office successes, "Uptown Saturday Night"
and "Let's Do It Again one would have thought that black film's first
real superstar was ready to tackle a more diversified vehicle than
A PIECE OF THE ACTJON, his current release which opened at the
Buccaneer Theatres here in Greenville Friday.
Whatever social commentary Charles Blackwell wrote into his
screenplay is lost on film. The movie vacillates from slick detective
thriller�and indeed one of Poitiers major strengths as a director is a
talent for choreographing action sequences-to overly sentimental
classroom drama.
REPETITION
Poitier has said, "I do not believe my life as a film artist should be
spent in repetition (See the October 17 issue of the Fountainhead).
But repetition is all Poitier has to offer. The corny classroom sequences
are a throwback to those "To Sir with Love" days when the critics
lambasted Poitier, calling him the ebony saint He resented this
treatment claiming that producers were type-casting him in these kinds
of roles. However, Poitier doesn't seem to mind the role as much today
as he has in the past In fact, he has a field day hamming it up in front
of the class, turning ghettothugsintocivilized membersof society (Oh.
does that ring familiar.).
His students in this movie are volunteers on a job training program
at a local youth center. He and sidekick Bill Cosby, who gives a fine
comic performance, are blackmailed into devoting their time to the
center by retired detective James Earl Jones who has learned of their
involvement in some rather original crimes. Denise Nicholas, who
costarred in television's "Room 22 and Tracy Reed play the
romantic interests.
UNCONVINCING
Where most movies suffer from the opposite problem, "A Piece of
the Action" has too big a budget. Street details are so carefully
arranged that even the garbage that makes up the background
composition of one scene looks expensive, well thought out, and
unreal. The students are too carefully dressed in ghetto garb;
impeccable in their sartorial splendor. The hip street dialogue is
contrived: "Hey momma what's happenin some turkey mess over
ya And the raw language spoken by the ghetto kids sounds like
poetry with some filthy wads thrown in fa good measure.
If you can stomach the pat answers provided, the shiny street
scenes, and the overall glossiness of this movie, then "A Piece of the
Action" may be your escapist cup of tea. If not, go to New Yak and see
what a real city is like.
JAMES EARL JONES listens while Sidney Poitier and Bill Cosby
pour their hearts out in a scene from "A Piece of the Action
Suspiria'
Could SUSPIRIA be one of the new wave of hara films aafted in
the Hitchcock tradition?
Jessica Harper, th� hauntingly attractive actress who is best
remembered fa her portrayal of the character Phoenix in De Palma's
Phantom of the Paradise plays Susan Banyon, a girl who will
experience the evil tremas of a coven of witches in a remote ballet
academy in Freiburg, Germany.
In the opening sequence, a young student is tortured; stabbed to
death in a series of brutal dose-ups, and then thrown through a
skylight in the roof. In ensuing scenes, thousands of warns invade the
dam rooms at the academy; the school's blind pianist is ripped to
shreds by his own dog; a friend of Susan's is chased through the
academy, falls into a giant Sinky, and is mutilated with a dagger;
finally, in the movie's denouement, our protagonist is chased by a dead
body that spurts blood from the mouth befae she can kill the haribly
See'SUSPIRIA p. 11)
Playhouse production
proves to be entertaining
N
By CINDY BROOME
NewsEdita
The ECU Playhouse produo
tion of "Bye Bye Birdie" which
ran last Wednesday through
Saturday was well produced,
although some of the ading was
less than professional.
Bill Vann did a good job
overall in his patraya! of Albert
Peterson, but the vitality of the
charader did not oome through to
the audience. Vann knew his lines
well, but did not seem to face
himself into the adual role of
Albert.
Janice Vertucct Schreiber did
an excellent job as Rosie Alvarez.
Her combined talent of singing
and ading made her an audience
favaite. It is seldom that an
audience is treated to this superb
combinatioi of ading and singing
ability.
Sally Nell Coldfelter and
Dave Massengill gave outstand-
ing perfamances as Unsula, and
Hugo Peabody. Coldfelter was
one of the few who managed to
maintain her charader not only
by her singing, movement, and
speech, but also by her fadal
expressions. Other adas seemed
to fade occasionally out of charao
ter.
Massengill played the charao
ter of the class drip superbly, and
through his timing, the comic
nature of-his charader was well
received by the audience.
A good ading perfamance by
Kim Woolen as Kim Macafee was
weakened by her inability of
being able to projed her vocal
seledions throughout the theatre.
The unconcerned ading of
Luden Hutcherson in his charao
terization as Conrad Birdie came
aaoss as a weak combination of
T
will
Nar
p.m.
CONRAD BIRDIE NOT only thrills
Mom and Dad.
the Fonz and Elvis.
The aew did an excellent job
of changing the sets quickly and
aderly.
The sets were realistic, and
the students who oonstruded and
painted them are to be oommen-
rted fa their long hours and hard
work.
young girls, but also turns on
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury
The lighting aew handled its
job with ease, due mainly to the
lighting designed by David Down-
ing. Theeffedsof lighting set the
overall mood fa the play.
Overall, the play was excel lent
and provided fa a entertaining
evening.
NOR
Trends
i)
Fonda stars in Zinnemann film
Lillian Hellman's book "Pen-
timento" was published in 1974
and contained an inddent detail-
ing a profound, lifelong friend-
ship between Lillian and Julia,
two young women who, after
drifting apart, were reunited by a
tense and dangerous journey
through Germany on the brink of
Wald War II.
This stay is now a motion
pidure, as Twentieth Century-
Fox presents "Julia a Richard
Roth presentation of a Fred
.Zinnemann Film starring Jane
Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave.
Also starring are Jason Robards,
Hal Holbrook, Rosemary Murphy
and Maximilian Schell as Johann.
"Julia" was direded by Fred
Zinnemann and produced by
Richard Roth.
Two Academy Awardsfor
From Here to Eternity and A
Man Fa All Seasonsacknow-
ledge Fred Zinnemann as an
outstandingly gifted filmmaker
whose work has i consistency
which few rthei diredas can
match. A master of the visual
expression, Zinnemann's wak is
always stimulating and provokes
O
JANE FONDA AND Vanessa Redgrave in a scene from -Julia
passion in the viewer: the aisis of
conscience patrayed in "A Man
Fa All Seasonsthe dilemma
of the hero in "High Noonthe
oonflid reflected in "The Nun's
Staythe tension of "The Day
of the Jackal
Jane Fonda, who plays the
Lillian Hellman charader, has
been assodated with the projed
since its early stages. When she
heard that the film rights had
been acquired, she approached
Roth and told him of her interest
in playing in the film. "She
agreed to do it without seeing a
saipt and was most suppative
during the period of putting it all
together says the producer.
After Fred Zinnemann and
Twentieth Century-Fox had seen
Alvin Sargent's first draft saeen-
play, Vanessa Redgrave was
See REDGRAVE, p. 11)





Norman Blake to perform
25 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD pag� 9
The Roxy to present bluegrass musician
ByMICHALLFUTCH
Trends Editor
The Roxy Fall Concert Series
will present bluegrass musician
Norman Blake on Oct. 29, at 8:30
p.m.
A reserved seating only per-
formance, the show will be held at
the Roxy, 629 Albemarle Ave
nue, Greenville.
"We're using advanoed seat-
ing to insure everyone a seat
said Bill "Shep" Shepherd, Roxy
coordinator. "We've got about
100 tickets left
The Norman Blake concert is
on a larger scale than the average
show held at the Roxy. But
according to Shepherd, if this
concert succeeds the Roxv oould
NORMAN AND NANCY Blake will appear at the Roxy, Oct. 29.
SENIORS, JUNIORS, SOPHOMORES
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ORIENTATION FLIGHTS available for those who qualify on
Officer Selection Test.
SEE THE NAVAL OFFICER SELECTION TEAM
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vail toll free 1-8000662-7568 for more information.
book more popular performers in
the line of Blake.
"We want to book, shows like
Norman Blake every month
said Shepherd. ' The Roxy is able
to provide a more personal
intimacy between the audience
and the performer
Blake's music is definitely in
tune with the smaller seating
arrangement at the Roxy (400
seat limit). Blake will appear with
his wife Nancy, on Saturday
night.
His music has been categor-
ized as "not oommercial country,
not quite bluegrass-simple, sour,
applejack sweet, mournful and
remote
Blake was born in Chatta-
nooga, Tenn on March 10, 1938.
At the age of 16 he quit school to
play mandolin in a band called the
Dixie Drifters.
After a lengthy musical
career. Blake moved to Nashville
in 1969 to do the Johnny Cash
television show, in which he
played guitar and dobro as a
member of Cash's group. Along
with country and western ses-
sions, Blake wound up recording
with Bob Dylan on "Nashville
Skyline
He was a member of Kris
Knstofferson's first road group,
playing guitar and dobro. and did
a seasonal tour with Joan Baez,
playing mandolin, guitar and
dobro. Blake also recorded with
both performers.
Blake left Knstofferson to join
and record with John Hartford s
Aeroplane band. After that band
dissolved, he toured with Hart-
fad as his accompanist for a year
and a half, during which time he
recorded his first solo album.
Home in Sulphur Springs He
also recorded with Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band on the "Will the Circle
be Unbroken album.
Since then Blake has toured
and recorded on his own. He has
recorded six more albums sinoe
his solo departure
Blake writes at least 50 of
the material that he performs on
the guitar, mandolin, and fiddle,
the rest adaptation of traditional
songs ana fiddle tunes.
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10 Diteotmt to Stvdmntt





r
10 FOUNTAINHEAO 25 October 1977
The Camera Never Blinks'
Quick witted Rather authors new book
By PA TSY PRIDGEN
Staff Writer
Most Americans know Dan
Rather as the co-editor of the
popular television "muckrake
news show, "60 Minutes
Thinking a little harder, many
may also remember that he was
the reporter who, in a 1974
presidential press conference,
answered Richard Nixon's quip,
"Are you running for
something?" with "No, sir, Mr.
r-esident, are you?"
This incident, daims Rather in
his chatty notes of his news
career, The Camera Never Blinks,
assured his place as the reporter
the White House hates a
reputation he daims he nuver
meant to earn.
Although Rather in his book
covers his entire journalistic
career-as well as bits and pieces
of his undergraduate days at the
unpretentious Sam Houston State
Teachers College-he spends a
great deal of time talking about
his journalistic encounters with
the Nixon White House. Perhaps
a flaw in his otherwise lively
autobiography results from his
subtle preoccupation with this
portion of his career, a preoccup-
ation which leads him, time and
again, to attempt to justify his
adions as a Nixon White House
ATTIC
Tues. Cct. 25
In Concert
Capital Recording Artist
WEpic Recording Artist
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reporter.
For example, speaking of his
famous answer to Nixon's "Are
you running for something?
Rather insists in the prologue of
his book, "I didn't feel then that
my words were disrespectful.
And I don't now
In his chapter, "The Unmak-
ing of a President he tells of
Bob Haldeman and John Ehrlich-
man accusing him of being
"inaccurate and unfair
Rather's response to the two (and
now to the reader): " Of course it
may be easy for you, being on the
inside, to spot things that are off
in terms of tone. Outright mis-
takes. And I accept my share of
the responsibility. But you have
to accept yours, Mr. Haldeman
and Mr. Ehrlichman, because you
don't tell us a great deal about
what goes on in here
And again, in his chapter
"Where Watergate Led he
attempts to vindicate his Nixon
White House adions: "I went to
my job every day determined to
be as fair and as accurate as
humanly possible. At the end of
each day I didn't ask myself, do
they like me, or do they like what
I did? I asked myself, did I meet
my own standards for this day?"
Despite Rather's somewhat
overbearing defense of his report-
ing during the traumatic Water-
gate years, The Camera Never
Blinks is still an intriguing piece
of work. In the book Rather
relates some very revealing
anecdotes concerning various
V.I.Ps whom he has encounter-
ed in the course of his career.
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Rather tells, for example, of a
Martin Luther King who "from
the outset believed himself to
be a target of the F.B.I He tells
of a Lyndon Johnson who flirted
too openly to be very adive
privately of a Richard Nixon
who "identified with the under-
dog winners of sports, coming
from behind, dinging to that
winners-never-quit doctrine of
the locker room
And then there are the
oomments on fellow newspeople.
Rather speaks reverently of such
CBS cohorts as Walter Cronkite
and Eric Sevareid-a little less
enthusiastically concerning
ABC's Barbara Walters.
Cronkite is hailed as the man
who "pradically invented the
Evening News a man who
"refuses to adorn a story
Sevareid ispiduredas "a man of
dass and inherent shyness
Walters, on the other hand,
receives so much laurels. Rather
implies (with perhaps a hint of
male chauvinism and "sour
grapes") that Barbara's million-
dollar bonanza was a matter of
"being the right person, in the
right place, at the right time,
doing the right thing, with the
right people watching
Woven throughout his
comments on personalities are
accounts of the "big" stories
covered by Rather during the
sixties and early seventies. From
Bull Connor's Birmingham to
Dallas, 1963, to Da Nang, late
1965, to Richard Nixon's White
House-the reader is carried
through a turbulent decade of
reporting, a decade which saw a
Texan reporter named Dan
Rather rise to national promin-
ence, although with a degree of
notoriety attached to his name.
Perhaps now Rather's notor-
iety is as last serving him well.
For The Camera Never Blinks:
Adventures of a TV Journalist will
attrad many buyers, no doubt,
simply because that naughty Dan
Rather is the author.
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Goings On
WEDNESDAY
Student Union film, "The Valachi Papers will be shown in the
Mendenhall Student Center Theater, 8 p.m. Adm. ECU ID and Activity
Card.
THURSDAY
A Senior Redtai, Karen Burke, piano, will be hekj in the A.J.
Fletcher Muaic Center Redtai Hall 7 30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Student Union film, "Bound for Glory with David Carradine, will
be shown in the Mendenhall Student Center Theater, 7 and 930 p.m.
Adm. ECU ID and Activity Card.
A Senior Redtai, Beth Smith, piano, will be held in the A.J.
Fletcher Music Center Redtai Hall, 815 p.m.
SATURDAY
Student Union film, "Bound for Glory will be shown in the
Mendenhall Student Center Theater, 2 p.m. Adm. ECU ID and Adivity
Card.
ECU-vs-Southwestern Louisiana at Ficklen Stadium, 7 p.m.
SUNDAY
There will be an ECU Wind Ensemble concert in Wright
Auditorium, 8:15 p.m.
MONDAY
Halloween
Student Union film, "Creature From the Black Lagoon will be
shown in 3-D in Wright Auditorium, 11 p.m.
'Suspiria' - New Wave?
Continued from p. 8
disfigured head witch who is responsible for all of this.
Diredor Ciaudio Argento, who has had a Id of pradice at this sort
of thing, claims he is a student of Hitchcock. He comes off as more of
an advocate of Brian DePalma, who has also had a Id of pradice at this
sort of thing. Argento lays the Wood on thick but lacks De Palma's
unique diredorial style and gift for ravishing imagery.
Nope, nothing new here.
THE WHITE BUFFALO (Plaza) Leftover sets from the new "King
Kong" are sprinkled with powdered sugar to simulate the great white
buffalo's stomping grounds. Charles Bronson and Will Sampson
compete for the huge paper mache monster's hide in this silly
horror-western from the dead dog files of Dino De Laurentiis. Is there
any doubt who'll win? Stuart Whitman, Kim Novak.
THE LINCOLN CONSPIRACY (Buccaneer) Conspiracy is right! This
attempt to jump on the band wagon with "Executive Ad ion" and "The
Passover Plot' is pure conjedure. Speculation on 100 -year dd lore is
clumsily strewn together and backed-up with vague sources. Are we
supposed to take this seriously? Bradford Dillman stars.
KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS (Park) One can of Raid and there would
have been no movie. The spiders aren' t very threatening-most of them
try to run away when they' re approached. William Shatner looks more
embarrassed then terrified. Tiffany Bdling co-stars.
THE STING (Pitt) Winner of the Best Pidure award in 1973, "The
Sting" is your best bet for entertainment this week in Greenville. Paul
Newman and Robert Rediord play a pair of daring con men in the
1930s. An excellent produdion and fine cast make this one worth
seeing over and over again. Robert Shaw, Charles Durning, Ray
Walston, et. al.
A PIECE OF THE ACTION (Buccaneer) Sidney Pdtier and Bill Cosby
star
SUSPIRIA (Plaza) Jessica Harper and Joan Bennett star.
Iron Horse Trading Co
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine Gold and Silver Jewelry
Scrimshaw Etched
on Ivory 20 Off.
Hours: MonThurs. 10-6
Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-6
Downtown on the Mall,
Top of First State Bank Bldg.
REDGRAVE
Contintued from p. 8
signed for the title rde.
Although the stay is set in
1937 Europe against the back-
ground of the rise of Naziism, it is
essentially a penetrating account
of the affinity between Lillian and
Julia, while induding Lillian's
close relationship with Dashiell
Hammett-the American author
and- scriptwriter, played in the
film by Jason Robards.
The story-an excellent vehide
for the outstanding talents of two
of the screen's most gifted
adresses-spans a period of over
forty years in its telling: from
when the girls first meet at schod
in 1918 to when Lillian reminisces
in 1962 about bdh Julia and
Hammed.
This time gap created several
problems for diredor Zinnemann
and his crew during the prepara-
tion period of the produdion.
Fashions and hairstyles changed
radically during those four de-
cades and there are at least four
distind variations of fashion
throughout the film.
It also necessitated the casting
of two young adesses to play
Lillian and Julia as achodgirls.
Zinnemann was fortunate, during
one d his preparatory trips to
America, to find Susan Jones to
play the young Lillian, and Lisa
Pelikan was chosen to play the
young Julia.
25 Qctofaf 1977 FOUNTMHHEAD Page 11
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Sat at The
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.





ftge 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 October 1977
Pirates squeak by The Citadel
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
In what turned out to be a
tougher game than the score
indicated, East Carolina defeated
The Citadel, 34-16. The game,
played before a crowd of 13,520,
was won by a fourth quarter
Pirate comeback lead by quarter-
back Jimmy Southerland. South-
erland was not expected to play
due to a stomach ailment but did
log some time throughout the
game.
The game at first looked like it
was going to be a rout by East
Carolina during the first quarter
as the Pirates piled up a 15-0
score. On the first ECU posses-
sion the Pirates moved 77 yards in
seven plays with a Leander Green
39-yard run scoring the touch-
down. Green bobbled the snap on
the extra point attempt and
decided to try for two points,
which he got on a pass to Barry
Johnson.
After a minute more of play
Fayetteville freshman Chuck
Jackson blocked a Kenny Cald-
well punt. Defensive tackle
Woodrow Stephenson chased the
ball, grabbed it and ran eight
yards for the score. This made the
score 1S0 ECU.
In the second quarter The
Citadel came to life after ECU
WOODROW STEVENSON
fullback Vince Kolanko fumbled
the ball at the Pirate 23 yard line.
After an 18-yard pass from
Citadel quarterback Marty Cros-
by to Mike Riley put the Bulldogs
on the five, The Citadel got a five
yard penalty for illegal procedure.
From here The Citadel scored off
a 10tyard run by fullback Sam
Scadlock. The PAT was good
making the score 15-7 ECU.
Later inr the second quarter
Kenny Caldwell made up for his
blocked puht� by punting the
Pirates back to their one foot line.
After the backs were almost
thrown for safeties, Rodney Allen
hit a booming punt. The Citadel
returned the punt all the way to
the Pirate 37. The Citadel's drive
bogged down and the Bulldogs
kicked a 24-yard field goal. That
made the score 15-10 ECU.
In the third quarter the fumble
monster hit the Pirates once
again. Willie Holley fumbled a
punt and The Citadel recovered at
the ECU 27. Quarterback Marty
Crosby then took The Citadel
downfield on an eight-play drive
for the score. The touchdown was
made on a one-yard run by
Lyvonia Mitchell. An attempted
two point conversion failed, but
the score put the Bulldogs on top
16-15.
Meadowark Lemon
Trotters visit ECU
How does it feel to be the
world's most popular American
athlete?
If you want the answer, don't
go to Tom Seaver, Lou Brock,
O.J. Simpson or Phil Esposito.
Don't go to them, because
their popularity on the streets of
New York. Los Angeles or
Chicago. wouldn't draw a
crowd in Munich, London, Tokyo
or Geneva.
But Meadowlark Lemon
would.
Lemon, the famed star of the
Harlem Globetrotters and known
as the "Clown Prince of Basket-
ball will lead the Magicians of
Basketball when they come to
ECU on November 3rd.
Lemon, who was born in South
Carolina, is often considered the
world's most popular basketball
player. He was all-state in
basketball and football while
attending Williston High in Wil-
mington.
Lemon is popular in the 94
foreign countries he has played as
he is in the more than 1,500 North
American cities he and the
Trotters have visited.
"When we play in Europe, I
can't even walk out of the hotel
without being mobbed by kids
and adults says Lemon. "But
don't get me wrong, I love the
crowd reaction
Last season the Trotters play-
ed more games before more
people in Europe than ever in
their history, but one game
almost didn't get played.
We were catching a plane on
our way to Switzerland, and the
crowd was so heavy they wouldn' t
let me a the team get out of the
airport says Lemon who is also
the Trotter s player-coach.
"Luckily, they held up the
plane for us
The Harlem Globetrotters, who will be coming to ECU on
November 3rd, have a following which spans three generations of
Americans.
The Harlem Globetrotters are an American institution. Yet, at a
time when it is in vogue to knock tradition, the Harlem Globetrotters
continue to grow in popularity and appeal. It is as if they possess a
secret formula which enables them to transcend the generation gap,
the energy crisis, or time itself.
This is not to say that things have not changed since those early
days in the late 1920's. The Trotters have grown with the times. But
the smiles and iaughter are the same today as they were fifty years
ago. This is the Trotter's undying formula. For what is more timeless
than the laughter of a child?
Known as "The World's Greatest Family Entertainment the
Harlem Globetrotters have maintained a "G" rating in what is fast
becoming an "R" rated world. There are no gimmicks. Just a universal
appeal that has endeared the Magicians of Basketball to millions, for
ovei half a century.
In the fourth quarter the
Pirates, lead by Jimmy Souther-
land, came alive once again. On
first and 10 from The Citadel 35,
Southerland faked to a running
back, then hit Terry Gallaher,
TERRY GALLA HER
who made a driving catch in the
end zone. The catch by Gallaher
tied a school record for touch-
down catches with eleven. A two
point conversion failed, the score
now ECU 21-Citadel 16.
A few minutes later, ECU
defensive back Charlie Carter
picked a Crosby pass. Once again
Southerland hit Gallaher with a
pass, this time fa 29 yards. Two
plays later the Pirates scored on a
two-yard run by Willie Hawkins.
Near the end of the game
linebacker Harold Randolph pick-
ed off another Crosby pass.
Leander Green then came in and
made another great run fa 32
yards. The Pirates scored two
plays later on a one-yard dive by
junia Sam Harrell. The Creech
kick was good and the final soae
was ECU 34-Citadel 16.
Coach Pat Dye was very proud
of his Pirates after the game
despite the three fumbles and
allowing The Citadel to oome
back;
"I'm just as proud as if we
had won by 100 points Dye said
after the game. "We were clearly
outplayed in the first half, and I
was very ooncerned about our
people at the half. They showed
some class in the second half.
After we got those two quick
soores, some of the pressure was
off
See FOOTBALL, p. 15
Sports
Cotton Bunnies
top Tyler mites
MEADOWLARK LEMON
ByJOHNEVAtyS-
Special to the Fountainhead
The Cotten Bunnies met the
Tylermites fa the third time this
season. This time it was fa the
women's intramural football
championship and, fa the third
fime this season, the Bunnies won
30-12.
The two teams had met dur.ng
the regular season and in the
damitay title game, which was
wco by the Bunnies 28-14.
Leading the way for the
Bunnies was the talented Lillian
Barnes. Barnes quarterbacked
the Bunnies' offense and scaed
28 of her side's pointa Fa her
effats she was named the Most
Valuable Player of the playoffs.
During the season, Barnes scaed
all of her team's points except
four, including two points in the
finals.
And although the final scae
made the game seem like a
one-sided affair, the contest was
actually much closer. Tyler led
twice in the first half, 6-0 and
12-8, befae Cotten reeled off the
rest of the scaing.
The scaing was only half the
action. There were several cont-
roversial plays in the game, which
resulted in four players being
thrown out of the game. Th� Tyler
ooach was also banished from the
sidelines.
Tyler took the game's early
lead when Minnie McPatter took
a scoring pass from Lori
Washington threw to Mary Bryan
Carlyle fa another touchdown.
The Tylermites missadon this
conversion attempt, toq, and led
12-8. Barnes brought Cotton back
in a matter of seconds when she
took off on a flashy 45-yard jaunt
through the Tyler team fa the
soae that put her club ahead to
stay at 14-12.
The half want over as Tyler
came all the way down the field
and moved to the one-yard line on
a reverse run by Donna
LaVictoire, who passes to
McPhatter at the one. Tyler failed
to soae as a fourth down pass fell
incomplete.
It was still an even game at
the half, but Cotten quickly
changed all that in the second
half. But two controversial penal-
ties palyed a big part in both of
Cotten's second half soae. The
same plays seemed to spell the
turning point in the game as two
Tyler players and a coach were
banished from the field in ensu-
ing altercations. The Tylermites
seemed set to stop the Bunnies at
the 25 when Barnes rolled out on
fourth down and scaed on a great
run fa a 20-12 lead. On the extra
point try there was a penalty and
that caused a great deal of
displeasure from the Tyler ooach,
who was booted out by the
referees. On the aeoond extra
point try Cotten oonverted fa a
22-12 lead.
That wasn't anything oompar-
ed to what happened the next
time the Bunnies got the ball.
With nine minutes left, Cottan
See BUNNIES, p. 14)





25 October 1977 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 13
Button adds to running game
By STEVE BYERS
Staff Writa
A flash through the offensive
line and would-be tacklers
sprawled all over the defensive
back field are sure signs that
Theodore Sutton has run the
football for East Carolina.
The 5'9 200-pound
sophomore is from Kinston, N.C.
"I like to think I have helped the
inside game here said Sutton.
And help he has. In this years
first seven games Sutton has
gained nearly 500 yaroa to add a
new dimension to the Pirate
offensive backfield, "Toad" as he
is called by the coaches, surprised
the 49,000 at N.C. State early in
the season with his quick bursts
up the middle. Sutton just
recently introduced himself to the
University of Richmond defensive
backfield to the tune of 100 yards
on just seven carries.
Booters lose to
UNC, NC Wesleyan
The Pirate booters lowered
their overall record to 2-9 with
two losses last week. ECU lost 2-0
to N.C. Wesleyan Thursday and
was defeated 5-0 by UNC Satur-
day.
Wesleyan scored their first
point on a fluke when ECU'S
goalie, after blocking Wesleyan's
shot, dropped the ball in the net.
Their second point was scored on
a penalty kick.
Commenting on ECfJ's first-
ever loss to Wesleyan, coach Brad
Smith felt his team wasn't playing
up to par. "Our seniors were just
completely out of play said
Smith. "We just aren't getting
any senior leadership, we're play-
ing more aggressively, but still
getting beat physically
ECU started out good in the
first half of the UNC match,
playing what coach Smith felt was
the best soccer his team has
played during the season. The
Pirates suffered some bad defen-
sive breakdowns in the second
half, with UNC scoring on two
easy goals. After that, it was
downhill all the way, as senior
fullback Tom Long suffered a
shoulder separation. Long will be
out for the rest of the season.
W. Forest
defeats
netters
Wake Forest swept all six
singles matches along with the
doubles to post an impressive 9-0
victory over East Carolina here
Thursday afternoon.
The Deacons, one of the top
ranked teams in the south,
allowed the Pirates to win only
one set in the entire match.
The loss dropped the Pirates
to 2-6 fa the season. ECU hosts
Peace College today at 220.
RESULTS
Singles: Cindy Corey def. Louise
Snyder, 6-2, 6-4; Jeannie El-
dridge def. Debbie Spinazzoia,
6-3, 6-2; Ann Phefps def. Dorcas
Sunkei, 6-2, 60; Donna Snipes
def. Diance Keough, 6-1, 6-0;
Mary Chapman def. Susan Hel-
mer 6-1, 6-0; Julie Darracott def.
Claire Baker, 6-0, 6-1. Doubles:
Chapman, Eldridge del. Spinaz-
zoia, Sunkei, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2; Corey,
Phelpsdef. Snyder, Keough, 6-4,
6-3; Snipes, Ketcham def. Hel-
met, Gainey, 6-1, 6-1.
The Pirates will be at Pem-
broke Wednesday, a team ECU
has never lost to.
THEO SUTTON
When asked about the low
production of Pirate half-backs,
Sutton replied, "We just take
what the defense will give us
"They can't atop one area without
opening another
One of the fastest members of
the team (running a 4.4 forty),
Sutton has praise for his offensive
line, especially guard Wayne Bolt
and roommate Joe Godette. "All I
have to do is look for the holes
and keep my legs moving
Roommate Godette thinks
"Toad" oould have even more
energy if he didn' t snore so much.
"He snores so loud he almost
chokes said Godette.
"T came here to ECU because
:he system here is very similar to
he one I had in high school. I
talked to some of the ooaches up
here and I liked the school
stated Sutton. Obviously, the
coaching staff and fans are happy
for the decision.
As Sutton the football player
matures, so does Sutton the
student. A member of the
Dean's list last spring quarter,
Theodore has great respect fa his
motha, who encouraged him to
walk-on his freshman year.
"She'sgroat he replied.
A vay team-aiented player,
Sutton shares the TEAM goal of
going 10-1 and receiving a bowl
bid Pasonal goals are nioe, but
useless unless the team wins
said Sutton.
A flash of purrle, a muscular
fullback. Pirate fans will surely
hear more from 36, Theodae
Sutton.
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Pitt Plaza
10-9 Monday-Saturday





pay 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 2S Octafcer 1977
Barnes leads Bunnies to win
Continued from p. 12
drove deep into Tyler's territory,
where Barnes missed on a fourth
down pass. But the officials' rules
the play as interference on Tyler
and all hell broke loose. The
penalty was called on Minnie
McPhatter and it gave the
Bunniesa first down at the one. It
didn't sit too well with the Mites
and Washington was ejected from
the game after saying a few words
the official didn't like. On the
next play Barnes scored. She also
added the conversion fa a 30-12
Gotten lead.
Now it was obvious tempers
were getting out of hand and
when Eason and Barnes inter-
cepted passes on Tyler's next two
drives, the Tyler representatives
became more and more frustrat-
ed.
The real fireworks came at the
very end, though. With time
running out and the ball at Tyler's
10. Barnes took the ball and
began running around to run
down the time and perhaps trying
to add insult to injury. Tired of
chasing after Barnes, Tyler's
IILLIAS 3ARNES ($11) soared 26 of Cottons 30 points in their
victory o r Tyler. Barnes was named the game's MVP.
ULUAN BA RNES(tcp row, 3rd from left) led the Cotton Bunnies to
their 30-12 win over the Tyler Mites.
Carlyle f oily grabbed the
Gotten sta and wrestled her to
the grounc, clearing the benches
and sending both players to the
sideline to cool off their tempers.
Soon after that the game ended.
The win ended Cotten's
season with an unblemished 12-0
mark. The Bunnies reached the
finals with a 22-8 win over
Hypertension. Tyler finished with
a 9-3 mark, all three losses
coming to the Bunnies. The
Tylermites reached the playoffs
with a 24-0 win over the Pent-
house Players.
Field hockey win third victory
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
A teilar defensive effort by
goalie Leigh Summer along with
the rest of the Pirates propelled
the East Carolina field hockey
team to a 3-1 victory over Wake
Forest Friday afternoon.
Summer was credited with
four saves against the Deacons
and held Wake Forest scoreless in
the second half as the Pirates
captured its third victory of the
season. It was also ECU'S seoond
win of the season against an
Atlantic Coast Conference foe and
gave the Pirates a 4-5 overall
record.
"It was a total team effort
both offensively and defensive-
ly said ECU head coach Laurie
Arrants. "We only allowed them
nine shots on goal in the game.
Linda Christian played very well
on defense while Leigh Summer
made some great saves against
some real tough shots"
Once again freshman sensa-
tion Sue Jones paced the Pirates
offensive attack, scoring two
goals, one in the first half and one
in the second period. Kathy
Zwigard was credited with two
assists while Linda Christian
scored the Pirates other goal.
The Deacons got on the
scoreboard with 10O0 remaining
in the first half, but with 803 left
Sue Jonee came right back with a
goal fa the Pirates to knot the
score at 1-1 at the end of the half.
Sue Jones put the Pirates
ahead to stay just 3Vi minutes
into the second half with her
second goal of the game on an
assist from Kathy Zwigard.
Linda Christian concluded the
scoring on a goal with 1512
minutes left in the game on
another assist from Zwigard.
"We had a lot of good shots
on goal and didn't waste as many
as we have in previous games
noted Arrants "We changed our
defensive scheme against Wake
Forest and apparently it worked.
We just played a perfect game
With her two goals against
Wake Forest, Sue Jones now has
nine goals for the season while
Kathy Zwigard has five assists
along with three goals
East Carolina travels to Nor-
folk, Va. Friday to face ad
Dominion in a rescheduled con-
test
SCORE BY HALVES
ECU
WFU
1
�1
2
0
-3
-1
Scoring-ECU-Jones 2, Christian.
Assists-ECU-Zwigard 2, Holmes.
Records: ECU 4-5, Wake Forest
3-6.
Volleyball vs. Duke tonight
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3172
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The Bionic Arm will make a
personal appearance on the ECU
campus this evening when East
Carolina volleyball team squares
off against Duke University in
Minges Coliseum. The match will
start at 7:00.
Leslie Lewis, otherwise known
as the "Bionic Arm is recogniz-
ed as one of the top volleyball
players in the oountry, primarily
for her incredible spiking ability.
She stands 5' 10" and played on a
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United States national touring
team last summer.
"She's definitely of the All
American type caliber said
ECU head coach Alitia Dillon.
"It's extremely tough to block her
shots. All we can do is keep the
ball away from her all the time,
especially when she'son the front
line
Unfortunately, when the rest
of the Blue Devil team has a
subpar performance, Duke
usually loses. The Blue Devils
carry a 20-7 record into tonights
oontest.
East Carolina has already
topped the Blue Devils once this
season and have an impressive
See VOLLEYBALL, p. 15
Dnfi
Tues. " LOTUS"
Thurs.
"UP FRONT
QUARTET"
BYOL





tto
, The
layoffs
Pent-
) Nor-
j ad
1 con-
istian.
jlmes.
corest
if
luring
e All
said
lillon.
:k her
p the
time,
front
s rest
las a
Duke
evils
ights
eady
! this
ssive
o. 15
25 Odotar 1977 FOUNTAINHEAO Pip 15
Spark Plug Road Racing Classic
Oct. 28, 29, and 30 are three
action packed days at Road
Atlanta. For the eighth consecu-
tive year, this nationally acclaim-
ed circuit hosts the Champion
Spark Rug Road Radng Classic.
500 of the nation's best sports
car drivers will converge on this
twisting 2.52 mile course with a
singular purpose. Each one will
come seeking a national daas title
and will have only one chance to
win it this year. The run for
honors will last 18 laps for each of
24 dasses of cars, and the winner
of each is crowned as Sports Car
Club of America National Class
Champion.
Of the 500 plus raae-drivers
that will meet at Road Atlanta at
contest 24 national daas titles,
their makeup is as diverse as the
cars they drive. It's a commonly
known fad that driving a race car
requires skill, nerve, and keen
judgement. It is also an establish-
ed fact that to earn an invitation
to the prestigious Champion
Spark Rug Road Radng Classic,
one must be accompanied in the
art of handling 1500-3500 pounds
of vehide at top speeds of 120-185
m.p.h.
VOLLEYBALL
Continued from p. 14
13-7 record going into tonight's
game.
Last week, the Pirates split a
couple of matches, defeating
Lenoir Rhyne 2-0 while losing to
High Point College 2-0.
"We were pitiful against High
Point explained Dillon. We lost
the first game 15-1 and the
second game 15-5, so there's
really not too much you can say.
We just piddled around in the
FOOTBALL
Continued from p. 12
The leading rusher in the
game was Leander Green with 77
yards on 7 carries. Jimmy South-
erland was 3-6-1 in passing for 89
yards. Terry Gallaher caught four
passes for 89 yards in another
great effort. The defense held
The Citadel to just 100 yards
rushing.
The Pirates will play their
final home game of the season as
they take on the powerful Rajun
Cajunsof Southwestern Louisiana
Saturday night.
next two games against High
Point. We did a lot of switching
around but we still won, although
the second game was rather
dose The Pirates won the first
game 15-6 and the second game
15-13.
In the first meeting this
season between the Pirates and
Duke, the Blue Devils took the
first game 15-10, but East
Carolina came back in the second
game to win 15-6 and dinched the
match in the third game with a
dose 15-13 dedsion.
"They're not that strong a
team said Dillon. "But when
the rest of the team plays well and
sets up Lewis they re really tough
to beat. We've just togoout there
and play tough
After the match against Duke,
the Rrates travel to Bcone to
participate in the Appalachian
State Invitational this Friday and
Saturday. Wake Forest, Peace,
Guilford, Western Carolina,
Louisburg, and Winthrop among
the teams which will compete in
the two day tournament.
GALLEY
ROOM
OPEN DAILY
�. MON-FRI
BREAKFAST, LUNCH,
DINNER
Daily Specials 8:a.m. - 7:00p.m.
1) Fill out the survey &, slogan contest
2) Drop both in WECU Survey Box at one of these places:
1. Lobby of the Old C.U.
2. Apple Records, 5th StDowntown
3. Information desk-Mendenhall
4. Mam entrance of Croatan
Note: Survey answers will not be used to judge slogan entries
1. Have you listened-Do you listen to WECU? Y�s No
2. What hours do you listen to the radio?
6-10A 10A-2P 2-6P 6P-12M 12M-6A
3. Is reception of WECU reasonably dear, in your dam room? (57 am)
Yes No
4. What kind of music would you like to hear on Campus Radio?
( )Rcck Albums
( )TofM0 Disco
OSoul
OJazz
( Easy Listening
( )CountryWeatern
( )Othw
5. WECU would like to change to FM in the near future. When the
funds are obtained, WECU could secure an FM license and begin
broadcasting off-campus as wail as providing FM dorm reception.
Would you like to have WECU-FM funded by Student SQA Funds?
Yea No
SLOGAN CONTEST
Give 57am, WECU an original slogan in seven (7) words or k
Winner of Slogan Contest Wins a 25.00 gift certificate to Apple
Records in Downtown Greenville.
Note: "WECU "ECU "57 & "AM" will count as one slogan
word.
No limit to number of entries.
NAME
LOCAL ADDRESS-
SLOGAN
ID.
�Ph-
Sports Car Club's of America
annual championship races gives
the top competitors from across
the oountry one - only one -
chance to prove just who is the
best.
This year's edition will see
some of the best road radng
action in the world, and will
provide more of it than any other
radng event in history. Forty-two
states and two Canadian prov-
inces will be represented during
the 3 day program of 24 races.
TICKET INFORMATION:
General admission (All Week)
$150.00 (Sun only) $10.00
Paddock (All Week) $20.00 (Sun
only) $15.00 Grandstand Seating
$25.00
RIGCAN
SHOESHOP
REPAIR A!l
LEATHER OOOOS
Downtown Greenville
111W�SL�ha.
Tuesday Nite is Tuesday Nite
At PANTANA BOB'S
It's A Jungle Out There!
Open Daily At 4:00
DAMSEL REDFORD MORRISE
GABRIEL RAGALIA
YZMtfC
SYMBOLS OF LOVE
A Keepsake diamond ring
says it all, reflecting your love
in its brilliance and beauty.
The Keepsake guarantee
assures a perfect diamond of
fine white color and precise cut.
There is no finer diamond ring.
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FREE! Beautiful 20-page booklet for planning your engagement and
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styles. Special bonus coupon saves you SO on Keepsake Bride's Book,
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J2e
M FOUNTAINHEAO 25 Octctar 1�77
Classifieds
sote �
FOR .SALE. AMPEQ
rocket II amp. 90 W. rev. and
trem. Exc. oond. 90.00 Mike,
756-9874 or ext. 9390.
dtli OR TRADE: '66 Volvo 122s.
Would trade for pickup truck. Car
needs some repair. Call 752-1026
after 6 XX) p.m.
FOR SALE: 1977 Chevy Van. Leas
than 9,000 mitos. Coat new 99535.
Power steering, AMFM radio.
Will swiftot for $5,000. CHI
752-0412.
FOR SALE: 1973 Audi IDOLS
Air, AM FM. Good Oond. British
Raring Green.
FOR SALE :Nikormat SCR 35mm
camera and lens, Vivitar exten-
sion tubes, leather carrying case,
other accessories. Must sell $250.
7580619 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: '77 Beige Chev.
Monza sports ooupe. 4 speed.
Just take over payments. $900
already paid off. Has 9000 miles,
only driven for 3 months. 29 miles
hwy, 26 city. Must sell. Student
returning to school. Call Met
757-6462.
FOR SALE: 75 Toyota Csiica, 5
apssd, AMFM Stereo. Air, two
new steei betted radial tires. Call
759-1024 after 9 p.m.
FOR SALE: '69 VW bus. Shag
carpet, new brakes, points and
plugs, turn signals $200 worth of
work just to get "Van-Ilia ready
to sell. Low mileage $900 firm!
Call till you get me. 752-5214.
FOR SALE: SX737 Receiver 35
watts per channel B.I.C. 920
turntable with little use. Both in
excellent oond. Must sell before
leaving this month. 758-7670.
FOR SALE73 Honda 3b0. Good
Cond. $360.00. Call 7580693.
FOR SALE: Everything in my
doset at real good bargain prices.
Every piece is in wearable shape
now. Winter and summer dothes,
(babies) and shoes. Sizes: 9 and
11 junior 10 and 12 misses shoes:
7V2-8 med. Village Green Apt.
laundry room 800 Heath St.
Fri-Sun 10-5. Help me get rid of
this stuff so I can start over
FOR SALE: Texas Instruments
SR-62. 224 step gogramabto
Also card programabie Complete
with math, stat games, and
basic Libraries. Over $300 new,
15 mos. old. Beat offer. Contact
Tony Bennett Room 401 Jonas.
SELL OR TRADE: 1996 Volvo.
Needs some repair. Write Ted
P.O. Box 404 Bsil Arthur, 27811.
FOR SALE: 3 wheeler VW
powered motorcycle 40 h.p.
Chromed forks (1976). AaWng
1200.00. Call 7483271 late tUv-
.loon and evenings ask for Danny.
FOR SALE: Leather jacket, excel-
lent oond must be seen to be
appreciated. Call Lea at 7586985
or corns by 308 C Snott. ARE
YOU TIRED OF THE HIGH
PRICE OF CLOTHES? Have
them made at less than Vi the
coat of what you would buy them
at. For all your sawing needs call
7588393 after 200.
FCH SALE: 12 string guitar
whard shell case, excellent copy
of a Martin. New cost 285.00
Need money bad so will sail for
125.00 Call 752-5892.
FOR SALE: Tascam Modal 3
recording mixer. Four months
old. 8 Chanel sub mixer. In and 4
bus. lines out wfth Peak reading
meters690. Must sail, 752-5892.
FOR SALE: New ladies ios
skates, atasfc nsasnnahla prices.
If interested caH 750411 �
FOR SALE: '71 VW convertible
bug. 80,000 miles, mostly hi-way.
Needs some work. Must sell.
758-7670.
FOR SALE: Peugot 10 spd. men's
bike 24 Inch with rack. 1 month
dd. Must sell. Call 758-7670.
FOR SALE: 1988 VW Van 3 yr.
dd. Rebuilt engine. Good oond.
FOR SALE: '72 Honda CB175 -
Good oond. $250 946-1230.
FOR SALE: Texas Instruments
SR-52. 224 step programmable.
Also card programmable. Comp-
lete with math, stat games, and
basic libraries. Over $300 new, 5,
mos. dd. Best offer. Contad
Tony Bennet Room 401 Jones.
FOR SALE: 83 inch long sofa,
brown with dark green throw
cover. Good price - 50.00. Call
946-7404 after 6:00 p.m. Will
deliver in the Greenville area.
FOR SALE: 99 Chev. Van
Paneled and carpet. 307 V8
engine 8 3 apeedeuto. 1900.00a
bast reasonable offer may trade.
FOR SALE:25 watt JVC reosfver-
amplifier' with turntable,
aesstte deck. Magnate
Call 7980148.
Offer,
by
FOR SALE: Epiphone
gutter. Good Oond
Call Mike 799-1993 or
805-Eaat 3rd St.
FOR SALE: Used Bundy clarinet.
Excellent oond. 100.00 a best
offer. 759365.
FOR SALE: 1973 390 Honda.
Excellent oond. 380.00 Call
7580893.
FOR SALE: Registered Pointer
pups. White Knights Button
Blood lines. 7588396 after 6fl0
p.m.
BUY NOW: 1997 V.W. Statton-
vwgon. 300.00. Art student needs
to sell car for food money. See at
510 E. 1st St. Apt. 9, after 5p.m.
FOR SALE: Mdntosh C-28 pre-
amp, 8 mon. old. Need money
fast II! Beet offer over 350.00. Call
752-6892 anytime after 700-until
W11WWW.
FOR SALE72 Opel GT. Contact
Steve at 752-3287.
FOR SALE: 'tx VW Classic with
sun roof, carpet, excellent trans-
axle, body not rusty, partially
restored , Cdlectors item. Call
758-7434 Sorone Cosecan.
FOR SALE: 10 piece silver
sparkling set of Ludwig drums.
Good oond. CaJI 752-8687 or come
by room 212-C Scott.
RjH SALE: 5 piece drum set
3ingerlandLudwig combination.
Call 758-7434.
FOR SALE: Brand new blue
Raleigh Grand Prix. Perfed oond.
Willing to sell fa $140 or highest
offer before 28 Od. Call 758-5275.
MUST SELL: Kenwood Reoeiva
120 watts pa channel. Best offa.
Call Mike 758-1693.
FOR SALE: Conn F-20 acoustic
guita and strap $150. Excellent
oond. CaJI 758-8493.
FOR SALE: Nice-oontempaary
red laughahyde sofa. Seats three.
Very good cond. Paid $250.00 will
sell fa $125.00. Call 758-0956
afta 6:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: '67 Chevy Impala
4-dcor. Air cond heat, radio,
only 51,000 miles on it. Great
intaia cond good engine $250.
Call Addie 752-6146
LOST: Blue cowhide leather
wallet with the letters B.B.D. on
the odn purse has disappeared
from my room. If found please
return it-no questions-reward.
Lynn Martin rm 291 Fleming
dorm.
WANTED TO RENT: House
within walking distance of
campus a married couple wfth
no kids. No later then Dec Must
have wofkshop a garage (around
100.00) Call Mel at 757-6482.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
to share 2 bedroom apt. in
taaiaooK. rreia someone wta-
ested in study-oriented snviro-
ment. Rent is $48.25 plus 14
utilities. Cell 7520954.
FOR RENT: Room, Private bath
for rent at 19T6 E. Eighth a.
Linen included 999. 752-8985.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 1 female
roommate wanted to share new 2
bedroom traitor, wfth washa,
Ova, central heat, and air, also
completely furnished. Fa more
info, call 752-9265 between 10
and 630 p.m afta 630 call
7520872.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 2 bedroom apt. Univer-
sity Cond. Fully furnished CaJI
7584005 aoome by Apt. 27.
WANTED TO RENT: Grad
student needs co-renter fa apart-
ment. Only 1 block from campus -
furnished, two baths, fully carpet-
ed, cda TV and central air and
heat. $100 pa month and 12
utilities. CaJI 7588096.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share 2 bedroom apt. at
Greenway Apts. Call 756-2486.
BLACK FEMALE ROOMMATE:
needed to share 2 bedroom apt. at
2321 Cdlege View Apts. Rent is
$50 plus 112 utilities. Call 758-
1076 ask fa Joyce Gibbs a
contad at above address.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: at
Geagetown Apts. Call 758-7715.
TYPING: .75 to $1.00.
service. Call Pern at 757-8992
(day), and 7980211 (night).
perconoKS)
ALTERATIONS: Fall things too
big, too long? Csll Kathy
752-8444 or 752-8842.
HELP WANTED: Uniquer�
ant and tavern opening soon on
the waterfront in Beaufort. Em-
ployment positions open. Attitude
and willingness to work valued
ova expaience. Contad Mr. a
Mrs. Rogersat 1-728-2133a P.O.
Box 149, Beeufat, N.C.
me. 752-5214 (4p.m7p.m.)
FOUND: 2 ma dd black female
puppy in the vldnlty d Jones Si
CaJI 752-7032.
LOST: Eyeglasses (bifocal) in
brown case with Dr. Sam White,
Optometrist on outside of case.
Please contad William N. Still,
Dept. of History (757-6587).
FOUND: Sat of car keys found in
back parking tot d BsJk Btdg. last
week. Can be daJmed at Rm. 300
Balk
FOUND: One tan tabby cat in
vicinity of Mendenhall and
McDonalds on Sun Od. 16. CaJI
Cindi a Susan, 752-9713.
CRAFTS: ceramics, candles,
weaving, leather, batik, sawing,
etc. all at Banyan Orafta-1016
Myrtle Ave
FREE RESEARCH SERVICE:
wfth Britannia 3. Ova 20
discount fa students. Finandng
fa employed upperdass and
graduate students. For free des-
criptive booklet, eel! 7580417.
NEED A RIDE; to Boone, N.C.
This weekend. Will share expen-
ses. CaJI David 758-1312 a if no
answa, 752-8538.
REWARD: $25 offered for
infamatiai leading to the recov-
ery of aman'slight blue suit of
ddhing taken from the 3rd floa
of the music big. Thurs. night,
Oct. 6th. Contact Michael
McDonald 758-3334.
GREG MOLLIcPORTRAITS:
finished drawings: $10 if pose,
$15 from photo. Patrait painting
is $50. CaJI 752-2604. I'm an
exdting realist.
Deadlines for Flashes and Classified Ads: For
Tuesday Editions, Flashes and Classifieds must be
in the FOUNT'A IN HEAD office by the preceeding
Friday. For Thursday editions, they must be in on
the preceeding Tuesday.





Title
Fountainhead, October 25, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 1977
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.610
Location of Original
University Archives

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