Fountainhead, September 20, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSIDE
BUCS win third, p. 13
Legislature forum p. 3
Class officers, p. 7
BUFFETTp. 8
Vol. 53 No. 6
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
20 September 1977
Student leaders organize
to promote 'Honest SG A'
ByKENTYNDALL
Assistant News Editor
Student Union President Den-
nis Ramsey announced Monday
the formation of a new organiza-
tion that will promote honesty and
fairness in student government.
Buccaneer Editor Susan
Regerson is the co-chairperson of
the organization, Students for
Honest SGA, with Ramsey.
Our goal this fall is to help
elect people to the legislature who
will work for the student body
said Ramsey.
The Students For Honest SGA
organization plans to study the
�ate of Candida, 38, according to
Ramsey, and determine who will
oest serve the student body.
Then the organization will
work to familiarize the student
.xjdy with the candidates and
issues and see that the students
know the various positions of the
candidates on the issues.
Ramsey feels that the biggest
jssjje facing the upcoming elec-
tion oDjectivity in student govern-
ment, "something which we
cneYiit have last year he said.
The reason for organizing this
group is because many of the
people who created some of the
controversies of last year are
running again, according to Ram-
sey.
Ramsey said the organization
was formed in response to dirty
politics and corruption which
characterized last years SGA
Ramsey said he hopes Stu-
dents For Honest SGA will help
elect honest people to the legisla-
tive positions.
Anyone interested in this
organization should contact Den-
nis Ramsey at 757-6611, or Susan
Roger son at 757-6501.
JIMMY BUFFETT, FAMED musician, will appear
in Mmges Coliseum at 8 p.m. Wed Oct. 5, with
Jessie Winchester. Tickets for ECU students are $4.
public $6.
Freshmen gain parking space
ByJAYNEBURKETT
Staff Writer
There were no freshmen park-
ing lots two years ago, according
to Joe Calder, Director of Traffic
and Security.
No freshmen-owned vehicles
wire allowed on campus until a
lot on the oorner of Eighth and
Cotanche was converted to a
freshmen parking lot last year.
;jy�fs lot is currently under
construction by the City of The
Greenville which is taking 13 feet parking
of it to widen Cotanche Street, Calder
according to Calder Five
Freshmen parking lots are bear the "F'
now located t'tween Second and m these lots
Thiro Streets off East Reade
Street and on Fourteenth Street
between Elm and Berkeley
Streets.
combined number of
spaces total 525, safrj
hundred thirteen cars
decal and may park
DENNIS RAMSEY, STUDENT Union President
New cites precincts,
SGA election rules
By JOE BALLANCE
Staff Writer
Candidates were briefed last
Thursday night on the ground
rules of the SGA fall elections.
Approximately 150 candidates
arKMbeir representatives atten-
ded the meeting which was
presided by Elections Committee
Q-tfU-person Chuck New.
New announced that preancts
wptftd remain basically the same
�wits, each dorm having a polling
place that would remain open
frorn'9 a.m. til 5 p.m.
allots may a.so be marked at
the Croatan. Mendenhall Center
and tfce Student Supply Store.
froma.m. til 7 p.m.
The bus route preancts were
ehmjhated by the Elections Com-
mittee. The number of polling
places aM over campus served to
maKe the bus route preancts
unnecessary
Any candidate wishing to
one baitot boxes must be at the
SGA office at 7 p.m. The counting
of the baJJots will begin at 7 30
p.m.
l&e ELECTIONS, pg.
Homecoming schedule
The schedule of everts icr tne
1977 Homecoming was announ-
ced this week by Student Unior
President Dennis Ramsey.
The theme of this year's
Homecoming is "Milestones of
ECU-A Tribute to Dr. Leo
Jenkins
Major events include the
Jimmy Buffett concert and the
ECU vs Southern Illinois football
game. Student tickets to the
Buffett concert are available at
Mendenhall Student Center and
public tickets are available at
Apple Records, School Kids Re-
cords, The Music Shop, and
Mendenhall Student Center.
Other activities include the
Homecoming Parade and the
aowning of Homecoming Pirate
Schedule of Events
Tues October 4thFree concert featuring Razzmatazz
800PM University Mall
(rain site-Wright Auditorium)
Wed. October 5thJimmy Buffett in concert with
speaal guest. Jesse Winchester
8O0P.M MingesColiseum
Students-$4.00
Pub!ic$6.00
Fri October 7th"Silent Movie
Student Union Free Film
600PM & 10O0P M.
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre
Sat October 8thHomecoming Parade
10:00A.M.
The parade will beginon Elm St. running down Fifth and will
disassemble at Reade St
Homecoming Football Game
ECU vs Southern Illinois .
1 30 P. M Ficklen Stadium
Free Conoert
800 P.M University Mall
Band to be announced
(rain site-Wright Auditorium)
Sun, October 9thJames Bond Film Festival
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre.





�BHBHBffinnDMPIHM
Flashes
W FOUNTAINHEAD gjgjjjjtg W77
Bridge
Democrats Parking
NORML
National Organization fa the
Reform of Marijuana Laws
(NORML) is the first presentation
of the Student Union Lecture
Committee. The program is Sept.
29, 1977 in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre. ECU
students are admitted by I.D. and
activity card. This program has
received raving reviews from
college campuses across the
nation. Highlights from the film
Reefer Madness are included
in the lecture.
minority Arts
Minority Arts Committee will
meet Tues. Sept. 20, at 5 p.m.
rm. 238 Mendenhall. All mem-
bers are asked to be present along
with any other students who
might have suggestions for this
year's program.
WECU
WECU Presents LP Expo with
Mac McKee each week night at
11 p.m. This weeks featured
albums are: Tuesday, Celebrate
Me Home, Kenny Loggins; Wed-
nesday, Come Back Romance. All
Is Forgiven, Andy Brown; Thurs-
day, Electric Savage, Colosseum
II. LP Expo is heard exclusively
on 57 WECU.
King Youth
There will be an organiza-
tional meeting of the King Youth
Fellowship Tues Sept. 20, 1977,
in rm. 305 Flanagan. The meeting
will begin at 7 p.m. and everyone
is invited to attend.
Car Wash
The Lambda Chi Alpha Frat-
ernity will be having a car wash
Sat. Sept. 24 from 12 noon to 5
p.m. at Po-Boys Auto Parts, 1008
Dickinson Ave. and 264 Shell,
across from Greenville Square.
The entire car (including wind-
ows, bumpers, wheels, side-view
mirrors, and roof) can be cleaned
fa the low, low price of $1.25. Be
sure to come by and get your car
ready fa the first Pirate hone
game, GO PIRATES KILL THE
KEYDETS
NCSL
The Noth Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) will meet
Sept. 21, at 8 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall. This will be the last
meeting befae the Sept. I.C. to
be held hae Sept. 25.
Communion
All Episcopal students and
friends are invited to a service of
Holy Communion this Wed
Sept. 21 at 530 p.m in the small
chapel of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th Street, Rev. Bill
Hadden, Episcopal Chaplain.
Scholars
League of Scholars meeting
Wed Sept. 28, 7-830 p.m. at
Mendenhall rm. 221. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
Laredo
Ruth Laredo, pianist, per-
farru Wednesday night in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre. She is the first perfam-
er in the 1977-78 Artists Series.
Tickets are $1.50 fa ECU stu-
dents and $4 fa the public.
Season tickets are still available
at $5 fa students, $10 fa faculty
and staff, and $15 fa the public.
Season tickets are your best buy if
you plan to see even two events in
the series. All perfamances are
by maja artists, as is the case
with Ruth Laredo who has been
called ftws generation's first
maja female pianist by the New
York Times.
SOULS
Cast your vae fa tfje SOULS
homecoming representative
Wed Sept. 21, 1977 at �the
Afro-American Cultural Center
during the hours of 9a.m5p.m.
Also, take advantage of the
oppatunity to meet the candi-
dates Tues Sept. 20,1977 at the
Mendenhall Student Center from
7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Phi Alpha
Phi Alpha Theta, international
hona society in histay, will be
meeting Tues. Sept. 27, at 730 in
Brewsjer D-110 (Richard C. Tcdd
Room). Any undergrad who ful-
fills the following requirements is
eligible fa membership: a) 20
quarter hours in histay b) 3.1
average in all histay courses
taken c) 2.67 overall grade point
average Cone and join us!
Refreshments will be served.
Last Day
Last day to drop oourse tx
withdraw from school is Oct. 6.
Pre-registration is Oct. 10-14.
Crafts
Regista now fa aie of the
aafts wakshops which are being
offaed by the Crafts Centa at
Mendenhall Student Center. Sign
up for Beginning Darkroom,
Basic Patery, Flea Loan Weav-
ing, Leatha Craft, Batik, Ename-
ling, Contemporary Basketry,
Maaame, or Beginning Jewelry.
Upoi payment of $10 a semesta.
Wakshopsayailafcfle without addi-
tional charges, excluding costs of
personal supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Center during the hours of
3 p.m. until 10 p.m Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
3 p.m. Saturday. Class space is
limited and the registration dead-
line fa all wakshops is Sat
Sept. 24
All students interested In
faming a bridge dub should
attend an aganizational meeting
Tues Sept. 27, at 730 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Student Center
Coffeehouse.
Bowling
Red Pin Bowling is back! At
the Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center you can have a
chance to win one (1) free game
with every game bowled. If the
red pin is the head pin and you
make a strike, you win. Every
Thursday evening, from 8 p.m.
until 11 p.m could be your lucky
day.
Homecoming
All girls participating in the
Homecoming Queen contest are
urged to ride in the parade.
However, transportation will oily
be furnished fa the top eight
girls. If you plan to have your girl
participate in the parade, contact
Chuck Freedman.
Travel
The first travel-adventure film
of the year is Wed Sept. 27.
Ralph Franklin presents this film,
"The Canyon The time is 8
p.m. in the Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre.
Mixer
Mendenhall Student Center
reminds all campus leaders and
their aganizatioi's spoisas that
tonight is the night of the
Mendenhall Mixa. The time is
630 to 830 in the Multi-purpose
room.
FG
The Resurrection of Jesus is
either fact a fiction. One a the
other! We encourage you to
examine the facts and decide fa
yourself. The seminar "The Re-
surrection: Fact or Fiction?"
deals with histaical evidence of
the Resurrection account. The
Faever Generatiai is spaisaing
this seminar this Thursday night
at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall 244.
Guest lectura is FG Staff Evan-
gelist Rich Kerns. We challenge
you to attend this thought-provo-
king seminara seminar no
honest, thinking person can
affad to miss.
ECU Young Democrats wirH�
meeting fa the first time of this
year Wed Sept. 21, at 730 in
room 244, Mendenhall Student
Center. The Young Democrats
has always been a club of
activities, fun and enjoyment
Come to the meeting and see
Phi Sigma Pi
Phi Sigma Pi Hona Fraternity
will hold a dinner meeting, Wed
Sept. 21, at 6 p.m. at Bonanza
�teak Pit. All members are urged
to attend.
Billiards
Students interested in faming
a billiards league are invited to
attend an aganizatioial meeting
scheduled fa Tues Sept. 27, at 7
p.m. in the Billiards Center,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Happy Hour
Doi't miss "HAPPY HOUR"
at Mendenhall Student Center.
Prices are V3 off on billiards, table
tennis, and bowling. The time is 3
p.m. until 6 p.m. every Monday.
Don't miss it!
Ski Club
The Ski Club is planning,
among ahers, a trip to Snowshoe,
West Virginia over Thanksgiving
break. The Christmas trip fa
credit a nai-aedit will take place
again this year also. All those
interested in snowskiing this
winta at lower prices please
attend the club meeting Thur
Sept. 22, at 4 p.m. downstairs in
Mernaiaf Gymffbom 109.
Archery
Interested? The archery cl6b
will have its first meeting of the
year Wed. Sept. 21 at 5 p.m. in
room 105 of Memaial Gym.
Bring anyoie you think might be
interested, contact Mrs. Gay
Blocker at Memaial Gym (office
200, phone 757-6000) a Barbara
Stanley (phone 758-6445).
Crusade
Campus Crusade fa Christ
weloomesall students fa fellow-
ship and practical insights into
the exciting Christian life! Come
by Brewsta B-202 every Thurs. 7
p.m.
College Bel
Registration is now open fa
COLLEGE BOWL teams partici-
pating in intramural conpetition.
Four team members, an aJter-
nate, and a sponsa are all one
needs fa a team. Teams may
come from aganizatiois a a
.group of friends. Register in the
Program Office in Mendenhall
Student Center fran now until
October 6. If there are any
questions, phone 757-6611, ext.
213.
HELLO Jewish students
Anyone wishing to attend YOM
KIPPUR Services at Tempi!
Israel Wednesday, September 21
and Thursday, September 22
please contact Caey Duber at'
756-1518, or Dr. Resnik at
756-5640 fa a ride. There will be
a free breakfast and dinner after
Yon Kippur at 630 p.m. at the
Heanika Call for more infama-
tioi.
Attentioi is drawn to the fact
that freshmen are prohibited from
having or operating a motor
vehicle on the ECU campus
between midnight Sunday night
and 5 p.m. Friday, acoading to
Joe Calder.
Freshmen vehicles violating
this policy are vay likely to be
towed. The towing fee charged by
local towing companies is $20.
A Freshmen parking la is
located on the south side of 14th
street between Berkley road and
Elm street. This la will hold
approximately 100 to 125 vehi-
cles. Anrther Freshman parking
la is located two (2) blocks nath
of Fletcher Dam between second
and third streets on the east side
of Reade street.
This la will hold approxima-
tely 400 cars. These are the only
two parking lots available to
Freshmen between midnight Sun-
day night and 5 p.m. Friday
night.
Freshmen parking their cars
on city streets must comply with
city parking adinances affecting
the area. The Greenville Polioe
Department strictly enfaces the
city's parking adinances and will
tow illegally parked vehicles.
DinnerTheater
Auditions fa the first Men-
denhall Student Center Dinner
Theatre Production; MARY,
MARY, will be held Thurs Sept.
22, from 7 pm until 10pmandFri.
Sept. 23, from 3 pm until 5 pm in
Mendenhall Student Center Rm.
212. Scripts will be available at
the auditions.
Bible Study
Come and join in fa sane
spirited bible study and soigs.
Christian Fellowship meets every
Wednesday at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-203.
Psychology
The Psychology Dept. will
hold an open house Wed. eve-
ning, Sept. 21st at 7 p.m. Areas
will include the Psi-Chi library,
Clinical Suite A, Experimental
Suite, Animal Room, shop- and
statistical lab. Everyone interest-
ed is invited to come. Free
refreshments.
Alpha Belta Pi
Come join the Alpha Delta
Pi's fa a super happy hour at
Blimpies Sept. 22, from 6-9 p.m.
Doa prizes will be given away.
Then, Sat Sept. 24, bring
your car to Pitt Plaza Gulf from 9
a.m3p.m. and let the Alpha-
Delta Pi's wash your car. Don't-
miss out on all the good dean fun.
Baptist
The Baptist Student Union,
511 E. 10th St. is sponsaing a
Coffeehouse, Fri, Sept. 23, at 8
p.m. Admission is free. Refresh-
ments will be at a minimal
charge. Carl Hunt, banjoist and
visiting artist, will be the featured
entertainment. Come join the fun
and fellowship'





SGA Legislature
20 September 1977 FGjJMTAINHEAD Pay 3
Day, dorm candidates opt for positions
MARGIE UHLIG
Some ECU policies need
change:
1. Rules which aren't enforced
should be changed or eliminated.
Example: visitation policy.
2. Let students use staff
parking on weekends.
3. Don't just talk about the
10th Street Overpass; get it built!
LYNN BELL
Contrary to what seems to be
popular belief, last years SGA
Legislature was not unproductive.
I am Lynn Bell. I represented
Clement Dorm last year and I
hope to be a Legislator again this
year. I served in the Legislature
in several capacities. I want to be
a working voice for the people of
Clement Dorm.
JOHN WALTERS
First of all, I would like to
say that I am an art major with a
major in sculpture, and have
never run fa election fa any-
thing befae now-which I caisi-
der in my fava. I hope that my
election will encourage others in
the fine arts fields at ECU to get
mae involved in SGA. the "10th
St. overpass and "extended
drop-add periods" are two issues
that I would look favaably upoi.
STEVE KINNEY
On Septemb 26, elections
fa SGA legislative positions will
be held. I am running fa Aycock
dam representative so that I can
wak fa all of you in voicing your
opinions, gripes, and desires in
the SGA. Because of space
limitation I do not have room to
give my views on student and
university affairs, but I will be
happy to answer any questions
you have, just drop by 115 Aycock
anytime. On September 26, vote
Steve "Doc" Kinney fa Aycock
dam representative.
MARCADLER
I have thrown my name into
consideration fa election to the
SGA Legislature. I do Qot intend
to rehash old issues, because I am
not a rehashed candidate.
Vice-President Reed Warren
has an excellent idea of a 24-hour
library service, but only during
final exams. I would seriously
propose a study on the matter of
having a two-or three-level super-
structure parking lot at the
bottom of College Hill, and
examine if the funds can be made
available and how this would
month. This faum would enable
the student to make the sugges-
tions on what he a she would like
to have proposed.
RANDY INGRAM
Our student government
exists fa the sole purpose of
benefiting our students. We
cannot reap these benefits when
our executive branch and legisla-
tive branch will not compromise.
By bringing harmony to these two
branches, we can direct our
attention to the needs of the
students such as the high prices
of books and independence fa
campus publications. I will wak
toward such harmony to make our
SGA productive fa its students.
KENT JOHNSON
First priaity fa SGA money
should be student run programs
and activities. All SGA money will
be spent this year anyway, let me
help you get your moneys wath.
In my two years at ECU, I have
waked with just about every
Jarge campus group, including
SGA in a cabinet position, helping
to aeate mae and better aca-
demic and socia' opportunities fa
students. Let me wak fa you.
Vote for Kent Johnson, Day
Student Legislata.
Vote
Sept. 26!
BERTHA PHILLIPS
I am a junia fran Ayden,
N.C graduated fran Ayden-
Grifton High School where I was
active in the Student Govanment
each year. Asasenia, I was class
Vice-President, President of Na-
tional Hona Society and active in
other dubs. I am a well-experien-
ced leader. At ECU I would like to
see such things as improved
parking conditions, extended
drop-add periods, and 24-hr.
study halls during exams. With
your vrte, we can make such
things, andahers, ntf hopes, but
realities.
WAYNE STEPHENSON
I feel, asa legislata fran Belk
Dam, I can bring to the SGA
Legislature a combination of
experience and freshness. Last
year, I was the only freshman
member in the SGA Judidary. I
was not held in high regard by the
past executive branch in this
position because of my stances on
some of its "off-colaed" proce-
dures. This year, I will again
stand up fa what I feel is right,
even if some may be offended.
This is the only way the student
can oome out ahead; by ading
justly, instead of politically, the
situation of last year can be
oared ed.
GREGG BOYKIN
While serving as a dorm
legislata last year, I never
missed a meeting of the legisla-
ture a of my assigned committee.
The experienced legislata al-
ready knows how the procedure
waks and is aware of problems in
student government. As an active
member of this years' legislature
I can use the advantage of
experience to better represent the
men and women of slay dam.
MARK SNYDER
Being a vtf ing member in the
legislature makes this office an
important oie. I strotgly suppot
theartsand I will suppat the arts
in SGA. WECU-FM is an exdting
possibility of which I am in fava.
This station could transmit
throughout the Greenville area
providing all students with an
invaluable servios.
MIKE CUNNINGHAM
The Transit system, free legal
advice fa students, and a tre-
mendous increase in departmen-
tal retreats are a result of hard
wak on the part of the legisla-
ture. To assure continued hard
wak fa the students, vote fa
Mike Cunningham as a Day
See LEGISLATURE pg. 6)
TWbeuA
BGGS DRUG STORE
300 EVANS- ON- THE-MALL
DOWNTOWN
PHONE: 752-2136
FREE PRESCRIPTION PICKUP
AND DELIVERY
OLD FASHION SODA FOUNTAIN
DRINKS MADE THE WA Y YOU
LIKE THEM: FRESHL Y SQUEEZED
LEMONADES AND ORANGEADES-
MILKSHAKES MADE WITH ICE CREAM!
PRESCRIPTION DEPT WITH MEDICA TION
PROFILES: VOVR PRESCRIPTION ALWAYS
AT OUR FINGERTIPS, EVEN THOUGH YOU
MAY LOSE YOUR Rx BOTTLE.
COSMETICS-
SUNDRIES-
TOILETRIES-
DELIVERED TO
YOUR DOOR
GREETING CARDS-
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
TIMEX WATCHES
COSTUME JEWELRY
ATHLETIC SUPPORTS,
CONVALESCENT SUPPLIES.
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
Student Appreciation Week Sept. 19 - 24
SUNGLASSES BY FOSTER
GRANT AND COOL RAY
10 Discount to Students





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Editorials
Pege4 FOUNTAINHEAO 20 Sapterrtoer 1977
Sullivan regime
attempts take-over
A conspiracy is amuck at ECU. The ring leaders
and staunch supporters of Tim Sullivan, former SGA
president, as well as Sullivan himself, are attempting
to take complete control of this year's SGA Executive
Council by running for class officer positions as well
as for positions as day student legislators. These
people must be stopped before power-hungry
politicians destroyeverythingthe SGA is supposed to
represent for the ECU students.
The issue is critical because the class officers sit
on the Executive Council and the Executive Council
chooses members for the Honor Council and the
Review Board. In other words,the Executive Council
indirectly controls the entire judiciary function of the
SGA. Therefore, these Sullivanites plan to gain
control of the judiciary branch of the SGA as well as
the legislature itself since they are running for both
class officer positions and legislature positions.
These people-among who are Tim Sullivan, Ricky
Price, Chris Cheatham, Randy Bailey and Chip
Mayo-not only led the way to no BUCCANEER last
year, but they represent a faction that would like to
see the university newpaper tucked neatly under
their political thumbs, who attempted to twist the
SGA constitution into knots so that they could re-call
the legally elected present SGA president Neil
Sessoms, and who eventually, made the legislature
into such a mockery that the ECU administration had
to step in.
These "servants of the students" also indirectly
spearheaded physical threats towards supporters of
Neil Sessoms and phoned FOUNTAINHEAD's
former editor, Jim Elliott, with the condition that if
he took his reporters off their backs, then he would
get money for the supplies FOUNTAINHEAD
needed. Actually, the phone call came directly from
the King of them all, Tim Sullivan, (who denied it
when Elliott mentioned this in an editorial).
One of the main controlling forces in this
conspiracy, besides Sullivan himself, has been and is
this year the Sigma Nu fraternity, which fraternity
managed to control most of the major positions of the
SGA last year.Now it is even running a new member
this year fa freshman class president, Chic Cariaga.
It is frightening as well as totally ridiculous that
these people and this "faction" insist upon carrying
their petty politics and power-hunger so far as to try
to trick the ECU student body into giving them
complete control of the SGA and the Executive
Council. These people must be stooped if ECU is to
have an honest, working and serviceable Student
Government Association.
A new organization, known as the "ECU Students
For Honest SGA" will soon be passing out copies of a
list of which candidates are above such absurdities
and who want to serve the student body. The ECU
student body would be wise to consider this list and,
by all means, avoid electing into office those people
who have proven themselves to be blind to the
welfare of the students in their reach for pure power.
r
Be sure to vote
Sept. 26 for the
SGA Legislature
It does matter
FNshed ProqraniNq qour Last CdNdidah?
Forum
A chance for an honest SGA
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Last school year the stu-
dents at this university fell victim
to a narrow minded, corrupt and
dictatorial SGA.
Tim Sullivan administration,
with the help of the "rubber
stamp" legislature that was
manipulated by Ricky Price and
various other die-hard Sul'van
followers, deprived the entire
student body of our school
annual, the BUC
Our student activity fee,
which is paid with tuition, is
supposed to be divided up by the
legislature and appropriated to
fund the BUC, FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, WECU, and other cam-
pus organizations. We paid for a
yearbook we never got. In es-
sence, last years' crooked SGA
robbed the students.
With the upooming election
we have a chance to toss to the
wayside all those political power
mongers like Tim Sullivan, Ricky
Price, Chris Cheatum and all the
Forum letters should
be typed or printed,
signed and include the
writer's address or tele-
phone number. Letters
are subject to editing fa-
taste and brevity and
may be sent to FOUN-
TAINHEAD or left at the
Information Desk in
Mendenhall Student
Center.
rest of those who last year chose
to serve themselves rather than
the students.
We have a good slate of day
students running for the legisla-
ture this year. I encourage
everybody to vote fa: Tommy
Joe Payne, Hal Sharpe, Robert
M. Swaim, Randy Ingram, Mark
Snyder, David Cartwright, Bill
Hammond, Bill Bennett, John
Epperson, and anybody else who
will work for the good of ECU'S
students rather than themselves.
Sincerely
Bill Martin
Student endorses R.M. Swaim
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I encourage all day stu-
dents to vote fa ROBERT M.
SWAIM day student legislata.
Rcjert has waked hard to
root out and eliminate corruption
in student government (fa exam-
ple. Tim Sullivan). As a repater
last year Robert dug fa the facts
and the truth and when he found
SeeSH MM, p. 5
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over titty years.
Sen" EditorKimJ.Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert saim
Hem Edjt0rCindy Broome
Trends EditorMjchae, Futch
Sports Editor
.Anne Hogge
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newpaper of East Carolina
ECU and ,s distributed each Wednesday during the suVnmeT
and twice weekly during the schoc year '
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C 27834
Editor.al off.ces: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.





Forum
20 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Payne regrets past, sees better SGA
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
With the fall session of the
SGA coming up, I would like to
clear up some misconceptions
about myself and this year in the
SGA.
Looking back on what took
place last spring after the SGA
electionsjl now totally regret
having taken part in any of the
post-election activities. I know
they were without a doubt
uncalled for and wrong. My past
involvements I have to live with,
but the present and future
involvements can and have been
changed.
The SGA is now in a position
and atmosphere in which it
flourishes in and where it should
have been along time ago. Good,
constructive, new ideas have
been implemented over the sum-
mer such as the new lights around
the girl's dorms and the addition
of a night bus route. This
condition cannot and will not be
destroyed merely because of
petty politics or a few persona)
vendetta's. Neil Sessoms and
Reed Warren are very capable
leaders as they have proven and
will continue to do so. I do, and
will oontinue to support both Neil
and Reed during their administra-
tion ihis year and hope to share
some of their enthusiasm for the
SGA.
Respectfully,
Tommy Joe Payne
Reader applaudes editorials
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Fountainhead editorials
have been particularly good late-
ly. Thank you for pointing out and
bringing to attention issues that
at least a few students have been
talking about but may not have
had nerve or interest enough to
comment on. In particular I agree
with two editorials recently print-
ed : the one on deaeasing acade-
mic scholarships (to put that
money toward Ficklen expan-
ison), and the one entitled "Beer
& Bucks: The College Dream
Using scholarship money for
its own ends is merely another
example of this university's atti-
tude of contempt fa its students,
their means of suppat. This is
alsoanaitaial trend, not just here
at ECU, although this is the best
example because it's right here.
"Bigger and Better" attitudes
may make this school look good,
but it's academics, not athletics,
that make it be good.
Yet another example of athle-
tics over academics are your
recent comments on lighting fa
playing fields while it still re-
mains a hazard, at best, to aoss
Tenth Street. Rather than re-
iterate your comments, just know
I suppat the stances you've
taken.
A further oomment on FOUN-
TAINHEAD copy: Mistakes
Galae! Sane of these erras
undoubtedly cane in layout &
typesetting, but there is often
SU missed the credit
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
This letter concerns the
article which appeared in the
Sept. 13th edition of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, repating ai the Home-
coming Steering Committee's
pians fa this year.
Point -The article gave the
impression that the Homecoming
Steering Conmittee is presenting
the entertainment offered during
Homeaxning week. This is not
true. All entertainment (i.e.
Jimmy Buffett, Razz Ma Tazz,
James Bond Film Festival, etc) is
are under the sole spoisaship of
the ECU Student Union.
Point 2-The article also gave
the impression that the total
budget fa Haneoaning is $4,115
and that $3,675 of it comes from
the SGA. Altogether, Homeoom-
ing will cost well over $25,000
(including the concerts & films).
Of this, over $20,000 is funded by
the Student Union. The SGA's
money is used only fa the parade
and the half-time ceremonies.
The Student Union foots the bill
fa all the entertainment offered
during Homecoming.
Point 3-The Student Union
already has a hell of a time
getting aedit fa what it does on
this campus. There are over 75
students waking without pay in
the Student Union. Many of them
put in 10 hours a week a mae.
The least they deserve is aedit
fa the services they provide this
campus.
I would hope that in the future
FOUNTAINHEAD will be mae
thaough and judicious in its
repating of the Student Union
and all aher aganizatiois on
campus.
Dennis Ramsey
Student Union President and
Homecoming Steering Committee
Co-Chairperson
SWAIM
Continued from p. 4
it he repated it to the students
through the campus paper. Those
.eiforts wfere a great service to the
student txxiy. His reporting ex-
posed the aooked, back stabbing
corruptness of the old Sullivan-
Price political machine.
I was glad someone had the
guts to go after the aooks that
had stolen student government
from the students.
We need an honest govern-
ment this year to carect the sad
situation that the Sullivan regime
aeated, the best example of
lltiefrfe'f)Tea ffiat last yea fa
the first time in over 50 years
ECU did not have a school
annual.
So let's avoid the situation we
had last year, and elect good
legisiatas like Robert Swaim. We
need people who will wak fa the
good of the students instead of a
oarupt political machine.
Sincerely,
MarkCalder
misuse of wads and poa gram-
mar. I suggest someone dean up
hisher act and rs'iew writing.
This point harks ack to your
"Beer & Bucks" e taial in that
the copy in FOUN"i INHEAD in
some ways refle Js the lax
attitude of students toward their
studies.
Lastly, in the last issue, on
page 10, Phil Arrington or
someone committed a fact erra
in his article on the directa
Scacese. The man's name is
Martin, na Michael.
Again, Kim, keep up the fine
wak.
JoeYaeger
asenia
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(Join Us. Please.)
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what you can. A pint of your blood.
And your gift has never been more im-
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who freely donate their
blood, is 10 times less likely
to cause infectious hepa-
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blood from many commer-
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that.
The need is urgent,
and continuous.
Help us. Join us.
Today.
The American
Red Cross.
The Good
Neighbor.
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sanforized white drill waist sizes 26 to 34





P�Q� 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 Sten m77
LEGISLATURE
�continued from pg. 3
Student Representative.
We all know the value of
experience, and I eel my exper-
ience with the legislature and the
entire SGA system in recent years
qualifies me again this year for a
Day Student Legislative position.
DAVID CARTWRIGHT
If elected to the Legislature, I
will do my best to maintain a
peaceful and productive relation-
ship between the Legislature and
the Executive Branch in order to
benefit all students. I'm also
oonoerned about the prices stu-
dents are foroed to pay- especially
for textbooks. I realize the SGAhas
no absolute power to build
parking lots, but I will do my best
to see what our options are in
order to ease this bad situation.
Since a free press has served
our nation well, I see no reason
why it wouldn't work for ECU to
I IKUSTWHAT
YOU KNOW
"Just learning about
something isn't really �
enough. You have to trust
yourself to use the knowl
edge. That's having
confidence How else could
1 do something as com
plicated as this7"
And if you haven't used
tampons yet, knowing more
about Tampax tampons'
protection can give you
another kind of confidence.
That's why you'll find instruc
tions.and answers to the
questions young women ask
most often in every package.
Tampax tampons. The
more you know about them,
the more you trust them.
internal protection more women trust
have a non-government control-
led newspaper as well. Therefore,
I will do my best to make the
Fountainhead free and indepen-
dent of the SGA. Since space is
limited, let me dose by saying
that if elected, I will always listen
to anyone who has a problem a a
different idea about how to make
our SGA work better.
ROBERT SWAIM
l have decided to run for day
student legislator in hopes that I
-al-cYig with some other good
legislators can provide the stu-
Jdrrfs with a school annual this
year, something we did not have
lasfyear.
We definitely need some new �
laces in the SGA because most of
the old crowd is dedicated not to
the service of students but rather
tatheir own political power
cTrdes. The problem with last
years SGA was that it was not at
all representative of the student
body.
.1 plan to work towards freeing
the ECU student publications
ffom the politically oriented SGA.
Legislators are not journalists,
Djs, a broadcasters.
. It will take a lot of good people
t? operate the SGA efficiently and
to push for good legislation that
.Will benefit the students rather
than a self-centered, old line
political machine that serves no
tme except itself.
DOUG WHITE
The SGA is in a position now
to make innovative changes that
will benefit both students and
faculty. With a budget in excess
of $300,00, the second largest
SGA budget in the nation, SGA
has the necessary influence and
economic resources to implement
whatever programs the legisla-
ture may approve.
If elected, I will work to make
our campus media-Fountain-
head, Rebel, Buccaneer, Ebony
Herald, and WECU-free from
any governmental control. A free
press is vital to any democracy.
I am also in favor of contin-
uing the progress made in getting
an overpass at the intersection or
10th St. and College Hill Dr
Other goals the legislature
should strive to achieve this year
are an extended drop period and
constitutional amendment limit-
ing the SGA president to a single
term.
See LEGISLATURE, pg. 7
DOfflttOWl
fiUKMUt
LOU
Student Appreciation
WEEK!
SEPT. 27 THROUGH OCT. 2
Ui ,A" ECU students Are In-
SreliiFEE Ce,fbra,e w� Us, And Get
M�r.h � scoonts And Specially Priced
Merchandise All This Week" Wa'ui rv
ParrtPc?DVery"1oin9 V0� N-�� TGh�e
PartK.paf.ng Business Firms Lister!
&,
Zd-
.SV
Art & Camera Shop
Belk-Tyler
Bigg's Drug Store
Bissett's
Book Barn
Brody's
Carolina Office Equipment
Carolina Gems
Central News & Card Shop
C. Herber Forbes
Cer, iin Things
College Shop
Crego' s
DAK's
Gazebo
Giant Discount
Globe Hardware
Harmony House South
Headstrong
H.L. Hodges & Co.
Happily Every After
STUDENT IDCARDS REQUIRED
House of Hats
Jewel Box
Julienne's Florist & Gift Shop
Larry's Show Store
Lord's Jewelers
Markay Rings and Things1
Mushroom
Proctor's
Pugh'sTire Service
Riggan Shoe Shop
Robinson's Jewelers
Steinbeck's
Saslow's
Scrap's
Smith Electric
Snooty Fox
The Man's Room
University Book Exchange
V.A. Merritt & Sons
Whites
Wise Fashions
?-
C
'?'� (T
INC
Downtown Greenville Association, Inc.
Post Office Box 333
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
Ride the bus, it's GREAT!
Parking tokens available ar participatino
downtown merchants.






7
LEGISLATURE
Continued from pg. 6
RICKY PRICE
I favor, as I have in the past,
continued SGA support of the
Fine Arts!
We are fortunate to have the
best schools of Music and Art in
the state. I support continued and
increased funding for the Arts!
Our Playhouse presents the
best in entertainment and I would
vote to continue funding them. I
will also continue to support the
Transit System.
CHARLESSUNE
I'm the person with a few
different ideas, with the different
last name-Sune. Slay is hardly a
typical dorm, and has nothing
less than non-typical problems.
The present visitation regula-
tions, written for the entire
campus, just don't fit Slay. I think
I can update the archaic regula-
tions, and I intend to.
A unique situation which
always occurs at 730, Monday
through Friday, is the noise from
the "Garbage Collection Ritual
I want to sleep late too, and will
work to make the necessary
changes to that we can.
It is ridiculous to assume that
experience necessarily makes a
good Legislator; it is more
important to judge a candidate on
his (her) willingness to work for
change.
jOStpfrmbtr 1977 RXWTAINHEAD Pm7
Lecture Series sponsors
marijuana law lecture
Students proclaim platforms
CHARLES SUNE
Sophomore Presidents have
typically contributed little to
ECU, SGA,and even less to
Sophomores. This situation can
be changed.
There are several problems
which affect sophomores. One of
these problems has to be the
visitation regulations. Since most
of us are forced to live on campus,
the regulations are nothing more
than a nuisance. The University
can not legislate (or regulate) our
morals, nor can they control our
habits with regard to visitation.
The Victorian era ended long
ago-so should these archaic
regulations.
ELECTIONS
Continued from pg. 1
All candidates fa SGA office
must present to the Elections
Committee a list of expenses for
the campaign. Also, anyone who
aids a candidate in any manner
must be included in the list.
Failure to report by 5 p.m.
Fri Sept. 23, will result in
disqualification.
It is not unrealistic to suggest
change without previous exper-
ience; however, it is ridiculous to
believe that a person is qualified
just because of previous exper-
ience.
I would like to see "Tomor-
row's Changes Now Vote
Charles Sune for Sophomore
Class President on Sept. 26.
I will skip the political redun-
dancy of campaign promises, and
spare you from the boring
sermon-like speeches. But as a
veteran of two SGA legislatures
and the Attorney General's off ioe,
the main theme behind my
Sophomore Class President can-
didacy is unity.
SGA President Neil Sesaoms
noted several, issues which he
says he hopes will receive cover-
age in the 'campaign. These
mdude: 1) additional parking; 2)
the overpass on Tenth Street; 3)
extended library hours; 4) making
WECU an FM station; 5) extend-
ing, drop period for all courses- 6)
limiting SGA "president to one
term; 7) re-establishing the Buc-
caneer.
Election day is Monday, Sep-
tember 26.
- MsU
rr
(rrrnrille. (
Happy Times at the Rathskeller
Weds. 5-7 pm
Thurs. ladies night 9-11 pm
Fri. 4-6 pm
Discount Beverage
air condition comfort
Every Tuesday Night 9 - 12 pm
is ' Ladies Night' at
THE TREE HOUSE
Most candidates are promis-
ing the world while forgetting
-that before.the legislature can act
� an issue, it has to be united.
We went through, a tough
period this past spring, and the
clout of the legislature was
heavily damaged. Before we can
premise the world, we should be
able to command our consti-
tuent's respect.
JODYFINE
I am Jody Fine, running fa
Freshman Class Vice-President.
As a Freshman, I enjoy East
Carolina and feel there are issues
such as the possible overpass on
10th Street and parking condi-
tions that we can help with.
Please give me your support on
election day, Jody Fine Freshman
Class Vice-President.
GREGG BOYK IN
Actually rip the sides off of
the box with an explosion of a
ballot. Grab your ballot and
literally scratch a gaping hole
next to the letters that spell my
name. Stuff one fa me one time.
You will feel better and so will I.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
"Marijuana: The New Prohib-
ition a film-lecture presented
by the National Organization fa
the Refam of Marijuana Laws
The presentation will begin at
8 p.m.
Enough people were arrest-
ed fa marijuana in 1973 to empty
the whole city of St. Paul,
Minn sail N.O.R.M.L Directa
Keith Stroup. "Don't you think
it's time we stopped?"
Stroup says despite liberaliza-
tion of many state laws regarding
the possession and sale of mari-
juana, refam is still needed. He
cites the recent sentencing of an
individual fa selling 11 grams of
marijuana; the individual was
given a 12-year prison sentence.
The N.O.R.M.L. campus lec-
ture examples in detail the
histaical, medical, social and
legal aspects of marijuana use,
and features a comprehensive
review of progress towards de-
criminal ization. Two short films,
"Marijuana: Assassin of Youth"
and "Reefer Madnessare used
as highlights.
N.O.R.M.L. is a non-profit
lobby seeking "a non-aiminal
respoise to the private use of
marijuana Its current activities
include waking fa the refam of
state and federal marijuana laws,
sponsaing educational programs
and providing legal help to those
arrested.
Among its members are Dr.
Benjamin Spook and famer gov-
ernment official Ramsey Clark.
Students will be admitted free
with ID and Activity card.
Public tickets for
N.O.R.M.L.s ECU appearance
are $2 each and are available at the
campus Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Tickets fa persais in groups of
20 a more are $1.50 each.
BefkTyfer
tr trw Hot it tGrtftf
'�� Parking T�m
CAP'N BOB'S
SEAFOOD
Specials Mon. - Thurs.
All you can eat perch or shrimp
mix or match french fries,
hush puppies cole slaw & ice tea
Shrimp Hawaiian with fried rice
& tossed salad
Fried shrimp & cole slaw &.
french fries
Perch special
Shrimp Creole over rice
& tossed salad
$4.95
$2.25
$2.25
$1.25
$2.25
corner of 5th & Cotanche
Luncheon Specials good from 11:30 - 2:00
WITH THIS COUPON ONLY
$1.00 off on our all you can eat dinner
free salad with any dinner
sandwiches salads & specials not included





r
PMQ�8 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 Ssptsmbar 1977
Cinemascope
by Steve Bachner
'Between the Lines'
With "Between the lines a crisp look at a Boston underground
newspaper and its staff of liberaJ-cum-lovable journalists, director Joan
Mioklin Silver should establish herself as a movie personage and an
auteur.
Ms. Silver's second .feature-length film is an important one for at
least two reasons. First, even if the film fails commercially, for it is
offbeat, the critical acdaim accumulated thus far will hopefully pave
the way for other women directors. The field is a predominately male
one. And second, the Silver's, Joan Micklin and her husband Raphael
(he produced both of her films) funded this feature independent I y-
without the help of a major studio. If the film suooeeds financially, it
will also be helping to destroy an old myth: In Joan's own wads,
"never invest in yourself
Silver's "Hester Street made in 1975, displayed quiet feminism
in its portrayal of Jewish immigrants adjusting to life in more liberal
America. That feminist voice is not so audible in Between the Lines
but a study of that liberal lifestyle is expanded and updated.
The Back Bay Mainline, one of Boston's many underground
publications, is on the brink of prominence after seven years
Businessman Roy Walsh (Lane Smith) is out to buy the Mainline to add
to his string of small newspapers. His motives are purely selfish.
The move to change publishers is sure to destroy the harmony of a
staff of lightheaded inoompetents whose optimism and sheer
determination provided the foundation fa eloquent coverage of the
crisis at Kent State, Jackson State, and the counterculture movement
of the 1960' s. Silver introduces us to each staffer in turn as we explae
the different ways this inevitable "loss of innocence" effects the
individual and his interplay with those around him.
An excellent cast of relatively unknown players heretofae this
picture (and it is doubtful that they will be any better known now) turn
in top-notch perfamances. Probably the most easily recognized of the
lot is Michael J. Pollard, the dedicated sidekick in "Bonnie and
Clyde who has a bit role hawking newspapers in downtown Boston.
Lindsay Crouse, Paul Newman's wife in "Slap Shot is the
protagonist's girlfriend and staff photographer. The protagonist, John
Heard, plays Harry, an intelligent investigative repater whose lack of
ambition overrides his talent-he is the least static character in the film
Stephen Collins, Hugh 9oan in "All the President's Men, is the hard
driving young novelist replete with looks, charm and enamous ego.
Gwen Welles, the stripper in "Nashville is uncertain about
boyfriend Collins with whom she is shacked-up-Career girl a
housewife? Newcomer Jeff Goldblum, as the paper's undependable
rock expert, is given some great comic lines ("They tell me rock and
roll is here to stay. So where is it staying? Not at my place! I don't have
the room) and almost runs away with the movie.
Di recta Silver has a keen eye fa detail. In many cases, a collage of
background paraphenalia structured in a character's domain either,
neatly a in disarray indicating degree of post-oounterculture maturity.
Silver, as in "Hester Street is adept at the high angle tracking
sha. So "Hester Street" concluded with a bird's-eye-view of New
Yak, "Between the Lines" begins with a panaama establishing shot
of Boston; this time in oola thanks to a slightly bigger budget.
Some aiginai rock music, a fusion of early 70's and middle 70s
pre-disoo, depicting the era, makes up the film's background soae.
Silver paces the film, like her rock music, at thirty-three and a third, so
the overall feeling instilled in movie's oourse is as tranquil and
layed-back as that of the 60s flower child.
On almost every level "Between the Lines" is a relaxed romp
through that period in time when "tuning in, turning on" and
"dropping out" meant pretending there was a lot less to wary about.
If coming of age means taking on responsibility than this movie is a
bitter reminder of that fact. Like the Steve Zandt song at the end of the
movie implaes, you may not want to go home.
Special Concerts presen
Jimmy Buffett on Oct. 5
After much brain-wracking
and discussion, the ECU Student
Union Special Concerts Commit-
tee decided on Jimmy Buffett as
qne of the maja oonoart attrac-
tions fa the 1977-78 season.
As anyote who knows oollege
audiences can vaify, it is probab-
ly impossible to find any act that
everyone will like.
Onoe an artist is labelled, his
audience is automatically narrow-
ed. Buffett then, should appeal to
the widest possible audience, fa
attempts to classify him have
failed
Reviewers have tried fa the
past five years to find a label to
fasten neatly on Jimmy Buffett
Some of their attempts have
indicated that he is "unique-
colloquial-easy going-intellectual-
charismatio-progressive-oountry-
rock-f ol k-songwr ita-perfamer
What this divase nomencla-
ture means is that it is much
easier and mae fun to listen to
Buffett's music than to describe
him a it.
Buffett calls himself a "Pro-
fessional Misfit Holding a
degree in journalism from Au-
burn and the University of
Southern Mississippi, Buffett
says, "I try not to let my
education get in the way of my
JIMMY BUFFETT WILL appear in Minges Coliseum on Oct. 5.
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury
Adventure films
take you there
writing
Though Buffett claims that he
tuned out enough oountry and
westan music while growing up
in Mobile, Alabama, naming the
Mills Brothers and Mitch Miller
as his early influences, Buffett's
first album was cut in Nashville.
Unfortunately, the masta tapes
were "misplaced" and Buffett's
career as a oountry artist jaked to
a halt.
Traveling to Flaida, Buffett
met fellow drifter Jerry Jeff
Walker, who inspired him "to
follow his own weird
Things began to dick fa
Buffett after Flaida and Walker.
His first release "A White Sport
Coat and a Pink Crustacean
was a aitical success, as was his
next album Livin and Dyin in 3A
Time
These two albums established
him as a maja artist whose
humaous crowd pleasers were
balanced with melodic ballads.
One such ballad which won him
wide acclaim was "Come Mon-
day" which was a hit as a single
release.
Many critics feel that Buffett's
ongoing goal, to make each album
better than the last, was fulfilled
by his most recent release
"Changes in Latitudes, Changes
in Attitudes The album fea-
tures seven Buffett originals,
including the song it seems
everyone knows, "Margarita-
ville
Buffett will appear in Minges
Coliseum on October 5, 1977 at
8.00 p.m. doing what he does
best-singing songs that poke fun
at the absurdities of life, espe-
cially h:s own, without becoming
bitter and maudlin. This is what
helps make Jimmy Buffett one of
a kind. See BUFFETTpg. 10
Trends
Travel-Adventure films are
dull, unintaesting movies fa
dull, unintaesting people.
This may be what you think
about the Travel-Adventure films
offaed by Mendenhall Student
Centa. If so, you're missing a
fine program only because you
aren't aware of what it's really
like.
Travel-Adventure films are
not just films; they are aooom-
panied by a lecturer. The lectura
may have actually shot the film
himself. In other cases, the
pason who oonoeived the idea fa
the film, an expert in the place a
area explaed, narrates the film
and answers questions after-
wards.
Although Travel-Adventure
films are handled pasonaily by
the explaatravela, they are
not home movies but highly
professional productions. Many
of the films oontain scenes one
oould ixrt view anywhere else.
In one of the Travel-Adven-
ture films of the 1977-78 season,
"Sailing Adventures oie can
see the only pictures ever taken
on a square-rigga off the Cape of
Good Hope in 60 mile-per-hour
winds. Captain Irvin Johnson took
these pictures himself and will be
at the showing of the movie.
Most Travel-Adventure films
oontain scenes which the genaal
public will not visit, even when
visiting the same oountry. Some
Travel-Adventure films are na
about places at all. Dr. John
Paling, biologist, will bring a film
which uses advanced phaogra-
phy techniques to produoe a view
of "The Wald That The Eye
CannaSee
Travel-Adventure films are
na what most people believe they
are. Only a small segment of the
film viewing public is aware of
what the films are really like.
The first Travel-Adventure
film of the 1977-78 season is "The
Canyon" an excursion led by
Ralph Franklin.
The Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter staff invites and enoourages
you to attend the Travel-Adven-
ture films. ECU students are
admitted by I.D. and activity
card, faculty and staff by M.S.C.
cards, and the public fa $1.50.
Seasai tickets are available fa
$6.00 fa all six films a at a group
rate (twenty a mae) fa $5.00.
Best
Setters
Fiction
"The Than Birds" by Colleen
McCullough
"Illusions" by Richard Bach
"Dynasty" by Robert S. Elegant
"The Crash of '79" by Paul E.
Erdman
"Full Disclosure" by William
Satire
"Delta of Venus" by Anais Nin
"Coma" by Robin Cook
"CHiva's Stay" by Erich Segal
Non-Fiction
"All Things Wise and Wonder-
ful" by James Mariot
"Looking Out Fa Numba One"
by Robert J. Minga
"Your Erroneous Zones" by
Wayne W. Dya
"The Book of Lists" by David
Wallechinsky
"The Dragons of Eden" by Carl
Sagen
"The Camaa Never Blinks" by
Dan Ratha
"It Didn't Start With Watagate"
by Victa Lasky
"Vivien Leigh" by Anne Edwards
Fron the New Yak Times Book
1 Review





Tobacco-based economy beware
20 Saptembr 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Synthetic materials could affect market
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
The recent appearance in
Europe of several brands of
cigarettes which include synthetic
tobacco materials has "serious
implications" for North
Carolina's tobacco-baaed econo-
my, says an East Carolina
University eoonomist.
Oscar K. Moore, professor of
economics at ECU and author of a
1974 study of North Carolina's
position in the world tobacco
eoonomy, was in London in June
when the first advertisements fa
Gallaher's "Silk Cut" cigarettes
appeared in the Sunday news-
papers.
"Produoed with 40 percent
tobacco substitutes, 'Silk Cuts'
Ultra Mild is expected to take
over a considerable part of the
British cigarette market, along
with similar producrs manufact-
ured by Imperial Tobaoco Ltd.
and W.D. and H.O. Wills he
noted.
SAAD'S
SHOE
SHOP
Across from
She rw in-Williams
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
The several brands currently
being introduced contain from 25
to 40 peroent tobaoco substitute.
"Great Britain's 19 million
smokers who wish to try the new
low-tar and low-niootine synthetic
cigarettes can choose from among
ten types, ranging from the very
mild 'Silk Cuts' to the moderately
strong 'Players' and 'Wills's
'President King Size- highest in
tar and niootine among the new
cigarettes.
"And from Switzerland are
marketed Rothman's Interna-
tional ' Peer' cigarettes made with
the material'NSM' (new smoking
material).
Sale of cigarettes containing
NSM in other European nations is
expected shortly.
The advent of cigarettes made
with synthetic tobaoco has been
made possible by the recent
lifting of the British government's
ban on the inclusion of anything
in cigarettes other than natural
tobaoco, Or. Moore said.
During his stay in London,
Moore noticed se eral effects of
the British cigarette manufact-
urers' attempt to sell the public
on the new cigarettes.
Based upon estimates that as
many as 17 million Britons would
at least try the NSM cigarettes,
tobaoco firms were spending five
million pounds( about $9 million)
on promotion and advertising.
Moore quoted the managing
director of Gallaher's tobacco
division as saying the 1st six
months of 1977 would reveal
whether or not the new cigarettes
Vfould bpja marketing success.
"These new cigarette
products have serious implica-
tions for our state's growers and
marketersof flue-cured tobaoco
Dr. Moore said.
"In recent years, as much as
40 peroent of tobacco grown in
North Carolina has been export-
ed, and Great Britain has been
the second major foreign market
fa it, after West Germany.
"There is just not enough
demand for it among U.S. man-
ufacturers. Since our economy
depends so heavily upon the
tobaoco export, the success or
failure of the new European
synthetic cigarette matters a
great deal to North Carolina
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THE ABSOLUTE HOTTEST FUNK
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Don't Forget Fri. 3 to 7
Sun. is Ladies Nite.
Pass the word
about the good old
fashion prices at th
GALLEY ROOM.
ECU's newest eating facility.
Tues - 2 Chili Dogs
with potato chips, pickle wedge,
and medium drink. All for $1 25
Wed. - Cheeseburger
with potato chips, pickle wedge,
medium drink and ice cream bar of
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HHHHHMHHiBHHHBSHHllBHBBHHiHHHflHMBHHNHraHHBMHHMKSHMRHHiHHHiHHlBiHNBBIWI
Page 10 fountainhead 20 Septemby 1977
Findings based on four-year research
Couples should consider single-child family
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
True or false: sinale children
are lonely, spdiled or malajusted
and parents who choose to have
only one child are selfish or
unfulfilled.
"False say social scientists
Sharryl Hawke and David Knox,
oo-authorsof a new Prentioe-Hall
book, "One Child by Choice
The book shows why, in these
times of changing life-styles,
inflation and overpopulation, the
single-child family is an option
every oouple should consider.
Ms. Hawke, staff associate of
the Social Science Education
RIGCAIS
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
Downtown Greenville
111
&
Consortium, Boulder, Colo and
Dr. Knox, associate professor of
sociology at East Carolina
University, based their findings
on research conducted through
surveys of hundreds of parents
and children over a four-year
period, representing a wide var-
iety of geographic locations and
socio-economic backgrounds.
The authors concede that
some oft-cited negative aspects of
having single children are pro-
bably true: your child will miss
the unique experience of a sibling
relationship and will grow up in
an adult world of high expecta-
tions, he or she will place
demands on you fa companion-
ship, and if the mother of a single
child does not pursue independ-
ent interests, rearing one child
may be unsatisfying.
But the expected positive
oonsequenoesof having one child
by choioe are considerable:
Your child's intellectual,
emotional and social development
will be equal to, if not better than,
that of children from larger
families.
Your marriage will be as
happy asthe marriages of oouples
with more children, and maybe
happier.
Your family life-style will be
more affluent than that of other
families in the same income class.
Your parent-child relationship
will be dose and intense.
The Hawke-Knox research
disclosed several other benefits of
the single-child family: the house-
hold is likely to be orderly and
quiet, as well as free from the
typical feelings of jealousy and
sibling rivalry among two or more
children, and the parents' own
careers and interests are pursued
more independently if they
choose to have only one child.
"Because the one-child
family has some obvious advant-
ages, its lack of popularity is
curious sail Dr. Knox. "With
one child, parents can enjoy the
rewards of parenthood without
feeling overwhelmed by parental
responsibilities.
'They can experience the
pleasures of watching a child
develop and share the special
parent-child love relationship that
the multichild parent enjoys.
One child costs parents less,
restricts them less (and for fewer
years), minimizes the work load
of child rearing and holds the
parents' impact on population
growth below replacement
level
The book devotes consider-
able space to the problems
inherent in raising a single child
from infancy through adole
ATTIC
Tues. & Wed
SUGARCANE'
Thurs SUITERS'
Fri. & Sat
SUPER GRIT
Sun
JESSE BOLT
Wed. Night
� FREE for all
ECU Students �
Every Wednesday Night is
customer appreciation night
9pm to 12pm at the
TREE HOUSE
corner of 5th & Cotanche
10 OFF
To All ECU
Students.
LAZY ACRES
NURSERY
Out Stantonburg
Road to Pop.
Nichols Store
And Turn Right.
1 Mile on Right.
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in your hand, even after hours of writing Its sturdy plastic point, surrounded
by a unique Pilot metal "collar" writes a distinctly smooth, sharp line.
In fact, it's the thinnest tipped pen you can buy And that makes it just
great for pages of notes or that one important love letter Best of all. it's
only 69c and is now available at your college book store
So it your Pilot pen makes you lovesick, don't be
ashamed to admit it. After all, it'll
PILOT jflnelne marker pens.
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Leotards and tights for sale.
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Bern and Wilson
UNITED I
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name
. . tele,
address
scence, with advice about how to
deal with the child who becomes
too dependent upon his parents
for companionship and suggest-
ions to parents on how to curb the
desire to overprotect their child.
In the course of researching
material for "One child by
Choice authors Hawke and
Knox met many parents of single
children who, they report, ex-
pressed an interest in joining an
organization dedicated to the
one-child family
As a result they are principal
founders of the Association fa
the One-Child Family, a national
non-profit organization which will
attempt to stimulate public in-
terest in the one-child family,
encourage research on single
children, offer psychological sup-
port to couples who have one
child, and challenge "prejudicial
ideas about the personalities of
'only children' and the motiva-
tions of one-child parents
Persons who join the AOCF
will receive its newsletter and
assistance in forming local chap-
ters. Membership is available by
sending a tax-deductable contri-
bution to Ms. Hawke at the
Educational Resources Center,
855 Broadway, Boulder, Colo.
80302
"For years the large family
was revered in America she
noted. "Now the two-child family
has become our ideal, and
non-parenting has gained a
certain acceptance.
"But the one-child family -
the obvious compromise between
no children and two children - is
still an option not seriously
considered by most prospective
parents.
Yet such social and economic
trends as overpopulation, infla-
tion, dual-career marriages and
changing life-styles call for a
fresh look at the one-child
family
She and Dr. Knox believe the
pressure on parents to have two
children derives in large part
from the mass-media image of the
"ideal" family, which usually
includes two children and is used
"to sell everything from tooth-
paste to station wagons
Both research authors are
themselves parents of single
children, with extensive research
experience in the sociology of the
family. Sharryl Hawke has contr-
ibuted numerous articles to ed-
ucational publications and to
such magazines as "Family
Health" and "Parents'
Magazine
BUFFETT
Continued from pg. 8
Appearing with Buffett will be
Jesse Winchester, described in
the Washington Post as a "mas-
ter of the simple lyric, a senti-
mental view tempered with a
sense of humor (See Thurs-
day's Fountainhead for full
story.)
Tickets are now on sale for the
Jimmy Buffett ooncert in the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center. Tickets are
$4.00 for ECU students and $6.00
fa the public. All tickets at the
doa are $6.00.
4





Season ticket purchases
save students money
20Septembei 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD JMlll
By purchasing season tickets,
two students can see all of the
Artists Series Performances for
the price of one student seeing
the series.
Purchased singly, tickets for
the whole Artists Series have a
total cost of 10.00. By purchasing
season tickets, which are 5.00
each, two people can see the
performances at the same ex-
pense as one person.
This "two for one" deal is
excellent for either dating or
entertaining visitors. If a student
is tired of spending 5.00 to see
"The Eggplant that Ate Phila-
rdfelphia (s)he can now treat a
guest to a variety of fine
performances. Six evenings out
for two people for only $10.00
is hard to beat.
One would also be hard-pres-
sed to beat the quality and variety
of the Artists Series events. The
line-up includes pianist Ruth
Laredo, educator-violinist
Sohinichi Rampal, the Buffalo
Philharmonic Orchestra, the
Norman Luboff Choir, and the
Canadian Brass. Each event is
culturally rewarding in itself, but
all the events together provide
intellectual stimulation as well.
Interest in a single event may
lead to pleasure in other areas.
Season tickets al� provide the
advantages of convenience and
seat-priority. By purchasing a
season ticket, the hassle of six
special purchases is avoided.
Time and effort, as well as
money, are saved.
The season ticket holder is
always assured of a seat. Anyone
who tried to purchase a ticket for
OLD TOWN INN
RESTAURANT
Features:
0� e
29 ITEM SALAD BAR
for only
1.50 plus tax.
THE BEST IN TOWN
GORDONFULP
PROSHOP
SALE �
� GOLF BALLS Topflite, Pro-class
$11.00 Dz.
�TENNIS BALLS $2.25 Can Limit 2
� LINED ECU JACKETS WITH LOGO
$14.50
� ECU UMBRELLAS Reg. $26.00
Now $19.00
� ALL TENNIS SHOES 25 OFF
� BIG CLOSEOUT SALE ON ALL GOLF
SHOES FROM 15
50 OFF
� ALL TENNIS RACKETS 30 OFF
� ALL SLACKS 30 OFF
ii i NVILI I
i rj t i
the Virgil Fox performance in
1971 knows that this is certainly
an advantage. 2000 tickets were
sold in a single day, and many
people were turned away.
If the Artists Series isn't your
idea of a good time no matter
what the prioe, Theatre Arts
might be nore to your liking.
Where but the Student Union
Theatre Arts Series could one see
two Broadway plays ("Cabaret"
and Grease), an Emmy Award-
winning actor (William Windom),
and a mime (Keith Berger) called
"the greatest" by, Marcel
Marceau spend only 4.00? By
purchasing season tickets, a
student saves 40 per cent off the
regular rate. One pays only 1.00
per show.
The Mendenhall staff believes
the Artist Series and Theatre Arts
Series are the best they have ever
been. The entertainment is of
high calibre and tremendous
variety, and the events are priced
to suit a student price-range. The
Mendenhall staff invites every-
one to join them for a season of
fine entertainment.
ECU STUDENT DAN Unum probably lives for the weekends, at
least for this one-ECU plays its first home game against VMI.
Photo by Brian Stotler.
LANDLUBBER
encourages togetherness
with funtime separates
of Cone corduroy that's
84 cotton16 polyester.
Her vest and jeans of
luxurious Ve I sheen ribless
corduroy in wine, black
or brown, sizes 3 to 13.
His trouser jeans of
stay-neat Stacord
midwale corduroy in
black, beige, navy,
wine or brown, sizes
26 to 38, M,L,XL
At fine stores
everywhere.
Gone
corauroy
Cone makes fabrics people live in.
i .Mi mm I 11 '440 Broadway nfw rone. N Y 100U





mptw
Pag 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 20 September 1977
'Going For the One'
Reformation of Yes results in ninth album
ByDOUGWHiTE
?Assistant NevVslEd'rtor
Trje decision three vears ago
to temDorariiy dishand Yes in
order Jor therpembers of the
biftd to pursu� solo projects
seems to have paid off with the
release of'Going for theVne, their
rrtnfh albumtifscountirtg live and
anthology releases) 4n as.many
ydars.
SEIKO
No. FB001M-S25O.0O.
Chronograph Alarm
features electronic alarm
bell. Records hours, minutes
and seconds up to 12 hours.
Stainless steel, black
dial frame
No. DY001M-$195.00.
Alarm features continuous
readout in hours, minutes,
seconds and date.
Features electronic alarm
bell Stainless steel,
black dial frame.
NEW FROM SEIKO.
THE SEIKO LC DIGITAL
QUARTZ COLLECTION.
See the incredible line of new Multi-Mode
Seiko LC Digital Quartz watches. Like the new
Chronograph, Alarm, or the Perpetual
Calendar watch, pre-programmed until the
year 2009. Or the World-Timer which
tells time in over 20 cities. You'll have to see
them all to believe them. Come do so today.
If It Don't TickTock To Us.
Ptione: 758-2452
Floyd G. Robinaon Jewelers
Downtown Greenville
on the moll
Formerly of Downtown Greenvflle
haw moved to its new location.
We Feature;
GIBSON FENDER
MARTIN AMPEti
GUITARS & AMPS.
Plu8 all the other, musical instrument.
The Music Shop
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(Next to K-mart)
(Thurn. & Fri. nightx until 9 p.m.)
Following Fragile, their fifth
album, vocalist Jon Anderson
began to exert more influence on
the band's musical direction,
eventually locking tire band into a
format of twenty minute'concept
songs usually deaUog with
some sort of search lor meaning
orator me creator of all. things or
fine's'inner being, 'etc.
this trend reached ,rt zenith
with Tales from. Topographical
Oomqs their"seventh album, a
lush, well -stflactu'recC double
ajburadealfag Withy o.course, the
bourse of knowledge. vThfs was
mrnectfately followed in T974 with
lb disasterous Ftelayer, the nadir
ot'Yes' work both musically and
lyricaiiy.
Correction
In the Crafts Center-article
printed on Thursday, Sept. 15, a
mistake was made in layout. The
correct information is as follows:
MACRAME
Basic techniques used in the
art of creative knotting. Hanging
planters, wall hangings, belts, or
handbags are just a few of the
project possibilities. 6:00 p.m
9:00 p.m. Mondays Sept. 26, Oct.
3, 10 & 17.
LEATHERCRAFT
Learn to make you own leather
items for personal use or for gifts.
Belts, wallets, handbags, key
chains; the possibilities are end-
less. 6XX) p.m9.00 p.m. Wed-
nesdays, Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12 &
19.
! -The title track of Going for the
One, however, reasserts Yes'
position as a top knotch band.
This song is "Totally unlike any-
thing Yes has .done intne last five
years. Guitarist. Steve Howe's
frenzied slide guitar, "along with
Andereon' s fast-paced fyrics com-
:bfne to create a song that grabs
Jthe listener mercilessly, Tefusing
r$oJet go until the last couplet,
with- its stop-action ending, has
been sung. By anyone's stan-
dard, this is the best song Yes
has ever written.
Keyboardist Rick Wakeman,
reunited with the 'band after a
four-year absence, has at last
learned to control his substantial
tafent- The listener ts spared his
self-indulgent solos and bastar-
dized bits of Bach and Brahms
which littered his earlier works.
Here he uses his instruments to
good advantage, providing per-
fect fillsand tasteful solos, never
eclipsing the other band members
with his former "look at me! Ain't
I got talent?" flash.
This domestication is best
displayed on "Turn of the Cen-
tury a delicate acoustic song
about a sculptor who transforms
his deceased lover into clay and
both are re-incarnated (you can't
keep it down to Earth, can you
Anderson?), she as a statue; he as
a rock singer.
Most disappointing is the
rhythm section composed of
bassist Chris Squire and percus-
sionist Alan White. In the past, it,
was often the combination of
Squire's inventive basswork
coupled with White's jazz influ-
enced drumming which saved a
song weighed by Anderson's
pretentious lyrics or Wakeman's
overbearing keyboards. On this
album, however, they are content
to merely keep time. Squire even
lets Wakemanfil1 tne b388 line o
some songs.
Anderson's voice is less
squeaky than before, but is
beginning to show its age a bit.
Notes he once hit with ease now
come across more as shouts than
phrases. Although his lyrics are
�as incomprehensible as ever,
cluttered with useless outer-space
imagery, Anderson seems to have
matured to the point where he can
write a song about a normal
activity (witness the title track,
which is ostensibly about shoot-
ing the rapids in a kayak, but one
can never be sure with Yes)
instead of having to resort to the
Fourth Quadrant of Star System
No-Nox.
The album's other two songs,
"Wonderous Stories" and
"Awaken are more like the old
Yes, and they suffer from all the
old Yes problems, though the
cathedral organ almost saves
"Awaken Musically, "Awa-
ken" ranks with the best of Yes,
but again the lyrics ruin the song.
Another case of heavy cargo
sinking a luxury liner.
The title track and Parallels
are alone worth the Greenville
price of $4.99, but anyone who
shells out the manufacturer's
suggested price of $7.98 deserves
what they get.
Album courtesy of Apple
Records.
The Great Haircut Look
For men and women at
SUPER EGO HAIR SALON
222E. 5th Street
Precision styling by Jennis , Jeanne, Lola, Olivia
Located over the College Shop
PH. 7582455 Redken Hair Products available
Hem
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20 Sapfrmbf 1977 FOUWTAINHEAO Pay
Pirates rout Toledo for third road victory
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina's victory over
Toledo Saturday night brought
forth many of the fears that Coach
Pat Dye had before entering the
game. The Pirates, after victories
over in-state rivals Duke and N.C.
State, were not very enthusiastic
about playing the Rockets. This
showed throughout the game as
East Carolina struggled to a 22-9
victory over Toledo.
An estimated 350 Pirate Fans
attended the out-of-state dash.
After stopping Toledo on its
first possession, the Pirates fum-
bled the ball the first time they
touched it. This gave Toledo the
ball at the ECU 10-yard line.
From here the Rockets lost 2
yards in three plays before David
Ridgeway kicked a 29-yard field
goal to give Toledo the lead 3-0.
The Pirates then proceeded to
drive the ball down the soggy
astro-turf for a touchdown. The
scoring drive took nine plays and
covered 66 yards. Key plays in
the drive inducted a 36-yard pass
from Jimmy Southerland to senior
split end Terry Gallaher which he
carried to Toledo's 10-yard line.
Southerland then kept around the
right end for the touchdown.
Junior Creech hit on the extra
point to make the score ECU
7-Tdedo 3.
From here into the second
quarter East Carolina was unable
to do anything due to mistakes
and the punting of Rocket Roch
Wurst. Wurst, a 6'4 210 pound
junior, boomed punts for a game
average of 44 yards on 10 punts.
This kept the Pirates backed up
near their goal line for the rest of
the first half.
While the East Carolina of-
fense was having it's problems,
the Pirate defense, lead once
again by Harold Randolph, play-
ed well. Toledo's two quarter-
backs were sacked time and time
again by the Pirate defense.
The first half ended with the
score ECU 7-Toledo 3.
In the third quarter East
Carolina received the kickoff and
marched down the field for a
touchdown. The big gain in the 11
play, 43-yard drive was a pass to
Eddie Hicks for 11 yards. South-
erland then kept for 4 more. A
handoff to Willie Hawkins result-
ed in a 5-yard gain. Four p'ays
later the Pirates scored off a
Hawkins 1 -yard ran up the middle
The Creech placekick was good
and the score was ECU 14-Toledo
Sports
ECUTOLEDO
First Downs1911
Rushes-yards57-20858-98
Passing yards10749 .
Return yards4856
Passes7-15-05-13-1
Punts10-38410-441
Fumbles-lost4-26-1.
Penalties-yards5-611-15
East Carolina 70 78
Toledo 30 60
Toledo-Ridgeway 29 FG
ECU-Southerland 5 run (Creech kick)
ECU-Hawkind 1 run (Creech kick)
Toledo-2 run (run failed)
ECU-Green 16 pass to Washington (Hawkins run)
A-12, 127
3.
After a few punts were
exchanged the Rockets drove
down the field from their 48 to
paydirt in eight plays. Driving all
over the Pirate defense the
Rockets were able to score their
first touchdown of the year on a
two-yard plunge by freshman
runningback Scott Alexander.
Toledo then tried for a two point
conversion, but quarterback
Frank Luketich was hit behind the
line by tackle Wayne Poole. This
made the score ECU 14-Toledo 9.
It wasn't until the fourth
quarter that the Pirate offense
was able to move again. The
Pirates drove 70 yards fa a
touchdown, but not until quarter-
back Leander Green had done
some fancy footwork behind the
line of scrimmage. As Green, a
sophomore from Jacksonville,
went back to pass he was chased
by the Toledo defense who, in the
process, tore off his jersy. Green
was able to scramble around long
enough to get off a pass to split
end Billy Ray Washington who
fell into the end zone. The Pirates
then ran the "waterbucket" play
with Willie Hawkins going in to
finish the Pirate's scoring fa the
day. The final soae, ECU 22-To-
ledo9.
The Pirate offense was able to
manage only 208 yards rushing
fa the game, which is far below
the average so far this year. The
passing game was not bad,
however, as the East Carolina
quarterbacks combined fa 107
yards through the air.
See TOLEDO, pg. 14
ECU DEFENDERS STOPPED the Rockets to win the game, 22-9.
Photo by Jack Acker man of the Blade (Toledo)
Booters lose two matches
in Campbell Soccer Classic
Pirate Athletics This Week
September 20th-Women's Volleyball-vs. Louisburg College
September 22nd-Women's Tennis-vsMethodist-2:30
September 23rd-Women's Volleyball-vsAppalachian, UNC-CH
at Chapel Hill-700.
September 24th-Women's Field Hockey-vsClemson-10.00
Soccer-vsGoldsbao-2 O0
Foot ball-vsVM 1-7:00
ByANNEHOGGE
Spats Edita
With a virtually all new team,
the Pirates opened their '77
soccer season last week, compe-
ting in the two-day Campbell
Classic at Buie's Creek. ECU
placed fourth in the event.
Erskine College finished first
in the tournament, which was
hampered by rain. Guilfad Col-
lege plc-ced second and Campbell
took third.
The Classic was Brad Smith's
first match as Pirate coach.
"Naturally I'm disappointed that
we lost said Smith, "but I think
we did much better than the scae
indicates
The Pirates faced Guilfad in
their first match, which Guilfad
won. 4-1. ECU'S only .goal was
scaed by senia faward Jay
High. Phil Martin was credited
with an assist. Sophomae Hal
Bullock was the game's starting
goalie.
Commenting on the game,
Coach Smith felt this team "play-
well, but we made the mistakes of
a youthful team
The Pirates' second match
pitted them against rival Camp-
bell. Campbell won the match 2-1
after going into sudden death
overtime. Martin scaed fa the
Pirates in a losing effat. Fresh-
man Mike Lawrence started as
goalie.
The match was a dose one
said Coach Smith. "Itoould've
gone either way, it was a
fast-moving game. We missed
some easy scaing oppatunities,
See SOCCER, pg 14
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 1977 SOCCER ROSTER
Hal Bullock Goalie
Raymond Fodrie Goalie
Michael Lawrence Goalie
Curt Winbane
Darryl High
Charles Hardy
Thanas Quails
Faward,
Halfback
Halfback
Fullback
Halfback
Soph.
Jr.
Fr.
Jr.
Fr.
Sr.
Jr.
Michael Hitchcock Halfback Fr.
Malcolm McLean
Halfback
Fr.
Timothy Harrison Halfback Jr.
Tom Long
Jay High
Phil Martin
Richard Browning
Stephen Eddings
David Young
Scott Whitlock
John Meering
David Wasidek
Michael Fetchko
Peter Amato
Richard Maris
Jeffrey Kluger
Sung-uk Park
John Tomlinson
Edward French
Fullback
Faward
Faward
Faward,
Halfback
Fullback
Halfback
Fullback
Fullback
Halfback
Halfback
Fullback
Fullback
Fullback
Fullback
Halfback
Fullback
Sr.
Sr.
Soph.
Fr.
Soph
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Sr.
Fr.
Soph.
Jr.
Fr.
Soph.
6-2
60
5-11
6-2
5-10
53
5-8
5-7
5-7
6-0
5-10
5-11
5-9
5-11
6-1
5-10
6-2
6-2
5-11
5-11
6-0
6-0
5-9
5-9
frO
6-4
187
150
150
.185
150
140
150
140
140
174
180
160
150
140
182
175
165
180
173
140
170
160
195
185
180
240





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAP 20 September 1977
Soccer team loses despite winning effort
Continued from pgv 73
but overall I think we played an
excellent game
Pirates Phil Martin and Curt
Winborne, a defensive player,
were narned' to the All-Tourna-
ment team an honor the ooaches
of the tcor learns vote for.
A cosifinjury for the Pirates
ocurred dugng the tournament.
Jay High suffered a hyper-exten-
ECU 5tud�Avtb
' 10 df ew.oll
$tao youA, ID i So
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Casual Wear
New Fall Lines Arriving Daily
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New Hours Sun-Friday 11 30-2 4 30-9 Sat. 4-9
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CSp this coupon?
And got three games for only $1.25.
Bring three friends along. We'll let
them in on the deal, too. f"s
vWshiWW mum
Expires Oct. 1,1977 Phone 758-1820
ded knee aneW-is uncertain when
he'H be reactyltd play again. "I
hope he'H bjEack in shape by
the time we meet Appalachian
(October 2nd)f said Smith, "but
it will.be up teethe doctas. His
injury will definitely hurt the
team '
Coach Smith cited 4wo Pirate
booters as having good games.
"Mike Hitchcock, a freshman
halfback, played twq, excellent
games said Smith, "and Jeff
Kluger, a junior-fallback, played
a good tournament.
"Overall, I think we played
well. No one person is responsible
for the losses, it is a team effort. I
think the defense played .well in
both games, even though the
soore doesn't show it. It was the
first game for many of the team,
and I think we all learned alot
ECU'S next match will be this
Saturday afternoon. The' Pirates
first home match, they meet the
Goldsboro Soccer Club. The
match will begin at 2�X
Smith hopes that in this match
the Pirates will correct some of
the mistakes they made in .the
opener. "I expect a good game
from everyone said Smith.
"Our main problem right now is
to find a replacement for Jay
High
Smith also hopes to see some
crowd support. During the Camp-
y
CLIFF'S
Seafood House
and Oyster Bar
SPECIAL
MON - TIES - WEI)
FISH 99
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
LB. HAMBURGER99
French Fries, Slaw and Rolls
CRAB CAKES1.50
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
WASHINGTON HIGHWAY (N.C. 33 Ext.)
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
PHONE 752-3172
dfifc
10 Discount
to all ECU students with ID
All name brand merchandise
Emily Just Emily E.S. Dean
John Myer Susan Bristol
222 E FIFTH ST
GREENVILLE, N C 27834
fflJHRWf
Good Things
For Gentle People
318 Evans St. Mall
752-3815
Limited Supply of Jewelry 12 Price
New Shipment of US. Bongs
Just Arrived
Dutch & Swiss Chocolates
Also Health Food Snack Available.
bell Classic, all teams had large
aowdsexcept ECU. If the soccer
program is expected to succeed,
then support will have to be given
in the form of attendance.
TOLEDO
Continued from pg. 13
During the game East Caro-
lina fumbled the ball 4 times and
lost 2 of those. Both fumbles were
behind the 21-yard line.
The Pirate defense, except for
the Toledo scoring march in the
third quarter, played very well,
limiting the Rockets to 98 yards
rushing and 49 through the air.
The defensive leaders were Har-
old Randolph with 15 tackles and
three sacks, John Morris with 10
tackles and three sacks and Noah
Clark with nine tackles and two
sacks. Other standouts for the
East Carolina defense were Tom-
my Summer and Oliver Felton.
Physical
fitness
The University of North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill will host.the
1977 Mid-Atlantic Regional Clinic
on Physical Fitness and Sports on
Oct. 28-29.
The clinic, sponsored by the
President'sCounciI on fitness, is
'held annually for educators,
athletes and sports and fitness
enthusiasts.
The two-day event will begin
at 9 a-m. Friday with a general
session in which a panet of
speakers will discuss sporfs and
fitness topics. Concurrent dinics
on specific sports areas will run
through the afternoons.
Prevregistration or further in-
fer mat ion may be obtained by
Siting .Fred Mueller, 314 Wool-
len Gym, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill,
N:c. 27514. (919) 933-2022. The
clinic fee is 15 fa adults and
professionals and $3 for students
and senior citizens.
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Classifieds
20 September 1977 FOUWTAINHEAD Page 16
FOR SALE: 72 CB-350 Honda
customized completely, extended
front forks, custom paint, head-
ers, ootra seat, Aris headlight,
Harley wheel, high rise handlebar
and sissy bar. 68 mpg. with oover
and stock parts $450.00 Come by
Lawsons Trailer Park Lot 52
anytime after 5XX).
FOR SALE: 66 Chevy Station
wagon great engine, AMFM
stereo with 8 track, good tires,
and air shocks. $400.00 or make
offer. Call Kevin 752-1190.
FOR SALE: 10 piece Drum Set,
natural wood finish, excellent
oond for more info, call Ray-
mond Brown, 758-7434.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Teac 2505 cassette
tape deck bought in April 75. Is
now in excellent oond must sell,
best offer accepted. Original price
$250.00 Call 758-2073 after 530.
FOR SALE: 35 mm Camera
Outfit. Camera body with namal
lens, 135 mm and 28 mm lens.
Hand held light meter, electronic
flash, extension rings $400.00
Bundy trumpet excellent Cond.
$130.00 Call 752-1068.
FOR SALE: Wardrobe and stor-
age cabinets of metal, both
standard size, good oond cheap.
756-4681.
FOR SALE: '76 Mazda RX-4
Stationwagon fa sale. Excellent
oond great gas mileage, $200.00
equity and take over payments.
Also diamond engagement ring,
retail $515.00 will well fa $400.00
appraisal available. Call Nartzat
756O680.
FOR SALE: 55 V.W. Classic Sun
roof, refinished interia, excellent
transaxle, body in good oond
great car. Call Raymond Brown,
758-7434.
FOR SALE: 1972 Fiat Spyder 850
Blue Convertible AMFM radio.
Not a swatch on it-asking $2,000.
00 will negotiate. Call evenings
756-1518.
FOR SALE: Monte Carlo Landau,
olack with white landau top. Air
Cond. power steering, AMFM
stereo. Must sell immediately,
best offer.
MUST SELL: 66 V.W. Fastback.
sunroof, radio, new tires, battery,
muffler, and brakes all under
warranty. Great Cond. Call 752-
1068.
FOR SALE: Patable Zenith ster-
eo. Good oond only $25.00. Call
Julie at 758-6714.
FOR SALE: 5 cubic ft. refrigera-
ta (perfect fa dams) with large
freezer capacity, veg. bins, etc.
Good oond $125.00 (was $225.00
new) Call 758-3559 after 6:00.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: At
Shady Knoll Trailer Pk. $125.00 a
month plus utilities. Contact
Larry at lot 180 Shady Knoll.
(washer, cooking facilities, etc.)
to� � personal ($
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed immediately to share 2
bedroom apt. located off of 1 st St.
Must furnish own bedroom furni-
ture. $50.00 monthly plus Vi of
utilities. Call 758-3559 after 600.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
Shady Knoll trailer $55.00 plus
telephone bill. 758-2853 (female
preferred).
WANTED: 2 male rcomates to
share a townhouse Apt. at 37
Riverbluff. Call 758-2650 ask fa
Donald.
PART TIME HELP WANTED:
Position available immediately fa
person seeking approximately 20
hrs. per week and flexible sche-
dule. Person with electronics and
oomputer background is desira-
ble. Drafting and typing exper-
ience is a plus. Call 758-9505.
PORTRAITS: and other photog-
graphic wak. Call Mark 752-
1068.
LEAD GUITARIST NEEDED:
immediately. We are looking fa
someone with either, a back-
ground in soul a rock music. Call
L.B. 758-8310 after 6 p.m.
Listen to 57 Music Radio
Progressive
WECU
Top 40
24 hours of Music
Student Appreciation Week
Free 98' Plant With
Purchase of Special Group of Planters
Other Sale Items Throughout Store
Phone
(919) 752 9384
Caner of 5th & Cotanche
Downtown Greenville
Every Tuesday from 5-8pm
you can enjoy your health and
our new Salad Bar for only 99'
with 16 i
THE TREE HOUfE
corner of 5th & Cotanche
Iron Horse Trading Co.
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine
Gold and Silver Jewelry
Downtown on Mall,
Top of First State Bank Bldg.
Hours: Mon. - Thur. 10 - 6 �&X
Sat 10-6 Fri. 10-6 Xjl
25 OFF Stone Candles smeCm
from California While they Last
SCHOOL KID
RECORDS
IS HERE
Originators Of the $3.99 L.P.
THAT'S RIGHT, All $6.98 LP.s
are ALWAYS $3.99. Specializing in
Rock, Jazz, Country, and Soul.
These Prices Are Here
To Stay.
Located at 218 E. Fifth a. in the
University Arcade
Phone 752-0647
Other Locations
Raletgh
Chapel Hilt
Greensboro
Boone
Atlanta, Ga.
Columbus, Ohio





16 FOUHTAINHEAD 20
1977
Howdy Pardner's
loger's Family Restaui
now in Pirate Country
Come on in and try
our delicious Western
Fried Chicken. It's
great to carry out to
the ballgame!
. "The best
of the fresh
waiiiif in convenient carry-
out paksof 8 and 12. There's
a big 20pc. pak too for under
$10.00. The whole gang can
enjoy it�
8pc. pak-$3.90
12pc. pak-$5.75
20pc. pak- $8.95
10 discount
on any chicken
purchase
of $10.00
or more.
You've got my word
on it, pardner
Don't forget to include some
helpin's of our crisp, Texas
Tatars an' fresh cole slaw, too.
So, c'mon in and carry-out
our famous fried chicken to
the ballgame or wherever
you go!
e TimeCall Ahead and Keserve Your win-
Yes Pirates, We Now Have Breakfast, Also!
Breakfast Hours: MonSat. 6:30a.m10:30a.m.
Blueberry and Golden
Brown Waffles
Scrambled Eggs
and Grits
Creamed
d66i
over butter toasted roll
Early
Sandwich
egg and cheese with sausage or
ham on butter toasted roll.
Side Orders of Smoked Ham and Sausage
Pastries - Tatars - Juices
Have a "Bottomless"
cup of Coke FREE
with coupon
ENJOY A FREE COCA-COLA WITH THE
PURCHASE OF ANY PLATTER, QUARTER
CHICKEN OR SANDWICH
R0YROGERS FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Greenville
Come on in and join the ranch hands for breakfast
Located at the Corner of 10th and Cotanche






Title
Fountainhead, September 20, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 20, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.600
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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