Fountainhead, September 15, 1977







Serving the campus com-
munity for ever 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,oOu,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSIDE
College Queensp. 3
NYC tripp. 3
Laredop. 8
Soccer's backp. 12
Vd. 53 No. 5 East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
15 Saptombr 1877
dorms
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
and
DOUG WHITE
Assistant News Editor
Fire broke out in Greene dam
yesterday as a result of an
unattended pot of beans.
The occupants of the room
were gone and the door was
locked. A neighbor smelled the
burning food and notified Sara
Lee, Residence Hall Administra-
tor.
The call was received approxi-
mately 12 noon, according to a
Greenville fireman. Two pumper
trucks and a ladder truck arrived
on the scene.
The pot was a "fireball
according to Campus Polioe Lt.
Bill Barnes.
"The electrical cords were
overloaded said Barnes. "The
water had boiled out of the pot
and the beans were burning
Barnes blistered his hand
when he yanked the over-heated
oord from the wall socket.
Barnes said the fire could
have easily spread.
"If there had been grease in
Black
minority
the pot, it would have been
disastrous said Barnes.
The dam was quickly evacua-
ted and no injuries were reported.
COTTENFIRE
A fire occurred in Cdten dam
approximately 1115 a.m. yester-
day, also.
Food was heating on a hot
plate, which was in the window-
sill , in room 442 on the third f loa
of the nath wing.
The occupant was called to the
lobby, aocading to Jennie Ste-
vens, Residence Hall Administra-
ta.
Apparently fagetting the ha
plate, she left without returning
to turn off the heat.
"It was just carelessness
said Stevens.
It was na a grease fire.
A neighba put out the fire
befae anyone really knew any-
thing about it, according to
Stevens.
The ha plate is unusable, said
Stevens, and the mattress and the
shade have io be replaced.
The entire rcom may have to
be repainted, aocading to Ste-
vens. The electrical socket will
have to be replaced.
WHITE DORM
A fire Tuesday night about
615 in room 701 White dam was
caused by a short in the wiring of
a fan.
The fire was reported by a
student on the fifth floa, who saw
smoke ooming from the window
and pulled the alarm.
The incident resulted in mina
smoke damage to the room.
Anaher fire occurred on the
fourth floa of Greene dam
August 23 approximately 515
a.m according to Joe Calder,
Directa of Security and Traffic.
The entire floa was filled with
smoke from a mattress fire in
room 416. The occupant had
apparently fallen asleep with a lit
cigarette.
CaJder said the third flea
reported some water damage.
The estimate of damages to
the room and pasonal belongings
was approximately $1,000. The
Offioe of the Dean of Women
stated the damage to the room
(bookshelves and walls) to be
$703.
active
ByKENTYNDALL
Assistant NewsEdita
The black minaity ai the
ECU campus is becoming more
involved than ever this year,
aocading to SGA Secretary of
Minaity Affairs, Banard Smith.
Fran the beginning of fall
semesta, Smith has been wak-
ing to get blacks more involved.
Black freshmen and transfer
students were given a special
welcome to the campus during
aientation.
Smith encourages blacks to
participate in extra-curricular ac-
tivities, such as publications,
communications, and especially
emphasizes participation in the
SGA.
As secretary of minaity
affairs, Smith helps minority
organizations achieve funds.
Also, he keeps minaities infam-
ed ai current legislation that
oonoerns the lives of minaity
people.
Smith serves on the advisay
board of the Afro-American Cul-
tural Center, enabling him to stay
in close contact with the oenta.
The latest change at the center is
that the three black fraternities
and three black saaities are
taking one month each to provide
a cultural event fa the cultural
center, such as a lecture, a play.
Smith also waks closely with
SOULS, and the Ebony Herald, as
a "middle man" between these
groups and the SGA.
THREE FIRETRUCKS RUSHED to the scene of a fire in Greene dorm. Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
REBEL starts twentieth year
LUKE WHISNANT IS the
editor of ECU'S award-
winning literary-arts magazine
THE REBEL.
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
By BOB GLOVER
Production Manager
The Rebel, ECU'S litaary-art
magazine, began accepting litaa-
ture submissions last week. The
magazine publishes poetry, short
staies, essays, and plays, as well
as artwak and phaography.
"We've already looked at six
shat staies and almost a hun-
dred poems said Edita Luke
Whisnant. "I think we'll get a la
of literature this year because of
the new writing program
The writing program, offaed
by ECU's English dept includes
courses in fiction, nonfiction,
poetry and editing. However,
Whisnant emphasized that stu-
dents did rxx have to be in the
program to submit to the maga-
zine.
"We want to represent the
whole university community, na
just the English department
said Whisnant.
The Rebel is one of the few
college litaary magazines which
pays its contributas fa their
wak. The magazine also awards
cash prizes in its annual aeative
writing contest.
"Last year sevaal Greenville
businesses contributed money fa
the contest said Whisnant.
"This year I've applied to the
North Carolina Arts Council fa a
$500 grant. This nrcney would be
used fa prizes and contest
publicity
In addition to the writing
contest, The Rebel usually
sponsas an Art Show which is
open to all ECU students. Last
year's show included ova 120
drawings, prints, paintings,
phaographs and sculptures. Art-
wak included in the magazine is
selected from the show.
"Many art students felt that
thae was too much phaography
in last year's issue, and I agree
said Whisnant. "This year we'll
attempt to concentrate more on
theothaart fams
Artists and writers interested
in submitting their wak to The
Rebel should call the office at
757-6501, a drop by any weekday
afternoon.
Photo by Kirk Kingsoury oems aiu ik ikw � � k�
City council. SGA work on bikeway plan
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writa
The Greenville City Council
and SGA Seaetary of Extanal
Affairs Jary Cox are waking ai
a city-wide bikeway plan and an
improved parking situation.
"Right now, we're function-
ing as the Greenville Bikeway
Committee said Cox.
It's a oommittee designed to
develop a bike mastaplan in
Greenville. We're waking to
connect strategic points in the city
so we can develop a safe bike
route throughout the whole city
Cox said the masterplan
would be oompleted within a
month and a half and submitted
to a council sub-committee fa
approval.
SGA president Neil Sessons
aeated to position on his cabinet
last spring to alleviate problems
which may develop between
Greenville citizens and ECU
students, aocading to Cox.
Community relations between
Greenville citizens and the
students have improved,
"The downtown Halloween
riots created a tremendous
amount of tension between the
citizens and students said Cox.
"During that time, the Green-
ville machants and citizens were
extremely upset ova those in-
cidents. It's taken time, but right
now thae's more ooopaation
between SGA and Greenville than
, there seva been
Cox is the student represent-
ative to the Greenville City
Council. He has no vaing powa,
but may attend ail council meet-
ings which are held monthly.
"Anything that comes up
between the citizens of Greenville
and students, I'm thae to help.
We want to solve our problems
and plan fa the future
NCSL delegation
to host council
ByMARCADLER
Staff Writa
The ECU Delegation of the
North Carolina Student Legisla-
ture (NCbL) will host the state-
wide Intaim Council Sept. 25,
aocading to NCSL Chairpason
JoeTanahey.
A resolution was drafted by an
NCSL member which deals with
the safety precautions of mrta-
ized bicycles. The resolutiai is
aimed at the safety of youths who
utilize these machines
Frank Saubers, the Govana
of the State Organizatiat, discus-
sed the many offaings on the
state level, expressing the oppa-
tunities a memba has on the
state office level.
Saubas reminded membas
of the most impatant aspect cf
the NCSL-that it is made up of
only the students' voice on
slate-wide mattas





IBHHHWnnHHIIMH
Flashes
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 2
Grafts
Crusade
NTE
Hawaii
The NationaJ Teacher Exam-
inations will be offered at ECU
Nov. 12,1977; Feb. 18,1978; and
July 15, 1978.
The NTE is the national
standardized test for persons
preparing to teach, and is admin-
istered by the Educational Test-
ing Servioe of Princeton, N.J.
su
The Student Union has open-
ings on the following oommittees:
Travel-3 openings
"Entertainer" -1 opening
Artist Series-2 openings
Anyone interested in applying
for these openings should pick up
an application at the Student
Union office or the Information
Desk in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Flying
INTERESTED IN FLYING? Are
you a pilot? Do you want to be?
Sept. 20, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 248, we will explore the
possibilities of a flying dub. If
you need a ride, or more
information, call Mr. Naff,
757-6982. We also would like to
apologize for any inconvience to
anyone concerning the mix up in
the last flash of this nature.
Calendar
Attention Deans, Department
Heads, please submit your sche-
dule of events for the UNIVER-
SITY-WIDE CALENDAR for the
period Oct. 1-Dec. 31,1977 to the
News bureau off ice not later than
Mon Sept. 19.
An earlier memorandum from
this office stated that the deadline
was Sept. 21. We have since
learned that we must have all
items by Mon Sept. 19.
Bowling
Whether you'd like to polish
up your game with some steady
practice or invite three friends
along for some friendly compet-
ition, you can rent a bowling lane
to use fa one hour and it only
costs 2.50. Lane rentals are
available at Mendenhall every
Saturday from 12 until 6. Stop by
and try it out; it's a great way to
spend an hour.
DinnerTheater
Auditions for the first Men-
denhall Student Center Dinner
Theatre Production; MARY,
MARY, will be held Thurs Sept.
22, from 7 pm until 10 pm and Fri.
Sept. 23, from 3 pm until 5 pm in
Mendenhall Student Center Rm.
212. Scripts will be available at
the auditions.
The Student Union Travel
Committee is taking reservations
for it's fantastic Hawaii trip.
Leave the cold winter behind and
spend it in a Pacific paradise. The
trip participants will fly on United
Airlines to Honolulu and spend a
week on Wakiki Beach at the Reef
Towers Hotel. Watch the surfers
at surfing's peak season. There's
much to do in Hawaii. Transport-
ation, lodging and inflight meals
$489.00. The perfect Christmas
gift fa yourself. December 27-
January 3.
Veterans
The Vetaans Administration
Representative for ECU, Ron
Brown, announces that, effective
immediately, his office in
Whichard 206 will be open Tues,
and Thurs. only until Oct. 1st,
1977, and Tues. and Thurs and
Fri. thereafter. This change is
due to the addition of Lenoir
Community College to Mr.
Brown's area of responsibility.
The office regrets any inoon-
venience this may cause.
Ski Club
The Ski Club is planning,
among others, a trip to Snowshoe,
West Virginia ova Thanksgiving
break. The Christmas trip fa
credit a non-aedit will take place
again this year also. All those
interested in snowskiing this
winter at Iowa prices please
attend the dub meeting Thur
Sept. 22, at 4 p.m. downstairs in
Memaial Gym room 109.
SociAnth
The SodologyAnthropology
Club will hold an aganizatioial
meeting Wed. Sept. 21 at 730
p.m. in Brewsta D-302. Evay-
one intaested is urged to attend!
The agenda will indude business
as well as topics fa future events
and adivities. Bring a friend!
Food and drink provided.
Manager
Anyone intaested in becom-
ing a managa fa the ECU men's
basketball team is urged to come
by Coach Larry Gillman'soffice in
Minges Coliseum as soon as
possible. Thae are sevaal open-
ings.
Car Wash
Get your car sparkling dean at
the car wash Sat. Sept. 17,
starting at 10 a.m. at Carrow's
Exxon beside Pitt Plaza. Spon-
saed by Gamma Sigma Sigma
Service Sorority t
Regista now fa one of the
aafts wakshops which are being
offaed by the Crafts Centa at
Mendenhall. Sign up fa begin-
ning Darkroom, Basic Pottay,
Floa Loom Weaving, Leatha
Craft, Batik, Enamel ing.Con-
tonpaary Basketry, Maaame, a
beginning Jewelry. Upai pay-
ment of a 10.00 semesta Crafts
Centa membaship fee, an indiv-
idual may regista fa any of the
available wakshops without ad-
ditional charges, exduding costs
of personal supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Coita during the hours of
3 until 10, Mon. through Fri and
10 until 3, Sat. Class space is
limited and the registration dead-
line fa all wakshops is Sat
Sept, 24.
Dance-A-Thon
Coming soonyour chance to
"Dance the Night Away" again!
Remember: You Can't Stop
Dandng Just because the Music
stoppedSecond Annual Dance-
a-thon fa Eastan Lung Assoda-
tion, Odoba 14-15.
Chi -Eta Sigma
Thae will be a meeting of
Chi-Eta Sigma, Freshman Honor
Society, Mon. Sept. 19, in room
244 Mendenhall, beginning at 7
p.m. This will be an important
meeting, and all membas are
urged to attend.
N.Y.
The Student Unioi Travel Com-
mittee is taking reservation now
for the New York trip over
Thanksgiving holidays. Spend
four days in the Big Apple seeing
the sights. The inaedibJe prioe of
65.00 indudes transportation and
lodging at the Hotel Taft. See
Macy's Parade, Broadway shows,
Radio City Music Hall, Central
Park, the Empire State Building,
the Village and the grand old
lady, the Statue of Liberty. Make
your reservations now in the
Central Ticket Office.
Unity
Come to Room 238
Mendenhall evay Thursday at
730 if you want to hear mae
about world unity. Bahais will be
thae to chat with you.
SOULS
There will be a SOULS
meeting Thurs Sept. 15 at 830
p.m. All SOULS Homeconing
candidates should be filed by that
time.
Musicians
Guitarists, singers, musidans
of all sats needed fa campus
Mass at 1230 Sundays in the
Biology Auditorium Pradice is at
1030 Sunday maning. Fa fur-
tha infamatiai call 752-4043.
You don't have to be Catholic to
IqyerjTUsic
Campus Crusade fa Christ
weloomes all students fa fellow-
ship and practical insights into
the exdting Christian life! Come
by Brewsta B-202 evay Thurs. 7
p.m.
Lacrosse
The Lacrosse Club is seeking
any grad student, faculty a staff
monba who would be intaested
in being an advisa. Anyaie
intaested in this position, a
wishing to play, should contact
Mike at 752-9583.
Model-UN
Are you intaested in wald
affairs? Faeign policy? Get invol-
ved with the Model United
Nations(Model UN) dub. Contad
Wiley Betts at 758-6936 a Sheila
Wilson at 752-6044.
SGA
Absentee ballrtsfa upcoming
SGA eledions Sept. 26, fa dass
officers and dorm and day
representatives may be obtained
in the SGA office. Be sure to vote!
AVA
Amaican Vocational Assoda-
tion will hold a meeting Sept. 19
at 7 p.m. in the Hone Ec.
building in the Vanlandingham
Room. Guest speaka will be Dr.
Wilbur Ball; his topic will be jobs
in vocational education. All per-
sois are invited to attend.
Inter-Varsity
Do not forget that Inter-
Varsity will not meet this Sunday
night.
Psychology
The Psychology Dept. will
hold an open house Wed. even-
ing, Sept. 21st at 7 p.m. Areas
will indude the Psi-Chi library,
Clinical Suite A, Expaimental
Suite, Animal Rccm, shop - and
statistical lab. Evayote intaest-
ed is invited to come. Free
refreshments.
FG
Does history suppat the
Resurredion account? Did Jesus
really rise from the dead? We
challenge you to examine the
fads fa yourself. The Faeva
Generation is sponsaing the
seminar "The Resurredioi: Fad
a Fidiai? which deals with
histaical evidence fa the Resur-
ediai of Jesus. Guest ledura is
FG Staff Evangelist Righ Kans.
The time is 7 p.m Thurs Sept.
22, and the place is Mendenhall
244. This is a thought-provoking
seminar that no honest, thinking
person can affad to miss.
Computers
Thae will be an Organiza-
tional meeting of all interested
persons ;n Hobby Computers in
Flanagan-201 Thur Sept. 15, at
730. Anyone, regardless of back-
ground, is invited to attend.
SGA Posts
The filing deadline fa SGA
day and dam legislative and
dass officer positions has been
extended to Sept. 15. The mandi-
tay candidates meeting will be
held in the Mendenhall Student
Centa Multipurpose room at 7
p.m. Sept. 15. Elediois will be
held Sept. 26.
LSA
The Luthaan Student Assoc-
iation will meet Sun. at 6 p.m. Fa
suppa and program. Evayoie is
invited and anyaie who has a film
catalogue is reminded to bring it
to the meeting. Call the church
fa rides-756-2058.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU'slitaary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fidion, es-
says, art wak, and phdography.
Submit your mataial to the Rebel
office a mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a oopy
of each wak of litaature fa
yourself, and indude your name,
address, and phone numba ai all
wak.
WECU
Tune in to WECU fa your
chance to win a $25 gift
certificate to APPLE RECORDS
in downtown Greenville.It's
gonna be so simple you're gonna
wonda why we hadn't thought of
it before. WECU, 57 am, whae
we want YOU to WIN!
Archery
Intaested? The achay dub
will have its first meeting of the
year Wed. Sept. 21 at 4 p.m. in
room 105 of Monaial Gym.
Bring anyaie you think might be
interested, contact Mrs. Gay
Blocka at Memaial Gym (offioe
200, phone 757-6000) a Barbara
Stanley (phote 758-6445).
Republicans
Thae will be a meeting of the
College Republicans in Brewsta
B-104 Wed Sept. 21 at 730 p.m.
A discussion will be held of this
year's upcoming adivities. Fa
furtha infamatiai, call Scott
Bright at 752-5408 a Bill Bamett
at 758-7724.





Page 3 FOUNTAINHEAO 15 September 1977
Homecoming queens star in Orange Bowl
MIAMI-North Carolina's out-
standing college homecoming
queen, together with homecom-
ing queens from the other 49
states and the District of Colum-
bia, will be watching the famous
moon over Miami this New Year's
Eve as they star in the Orange
Bowl Parade, according to Tho-
mas B. Martin, vice-president,
public affairs for the Johnson
Wax Company of Racine, Wis.
The 51 homecoming queens
will join in Orange Bowl activities
spread over six days, including a
ride on the largest float ever to
appear in the traditional parade, a
special introduction during pre-
game festivities and honored
seats on the 50-yard line.
"This panorama of Orange
Bowl homecoming queens Mar-
tin said is designed to highlight
an integral part of life on the
American campus, the tradition
of the annual selection and
presentation of homecoming
queens on college and university
campuses from, literally, Maine
to Hawaii and Alaska and back.
From the local campus selec-
tions, this program will choose 51
Ail-American Homecoming
Queens, who wi bring national
recognition to themselves, their
schools and their respective
states by taking an active part in
many of the glamorous activities
of the 1977-78 Orange Bowl
Football Classic and Festival
Selection of the winners will
be conducted by the Associated
Collegiate Press, of Minneapolis,
Minn a non-profit organization
established in 1933 and devoted
to improving the standards of
college journalism, an on-going
effort that includes the annual
judging of college yearbooks,
magazines and newspapers and
the publishing of Scholastic Edi-
tor Magazine.
"Martin said that "this well-
deserved recognition of the great
American tradition of college
homecoming queens is being
sponsored by Agree, the new
creme rinse and hair conditioner
from Johnson Wax
James S. Billings, president of
the Orange Bowl Committe, said
that the "51 homecoming queens
will be part of NBC-TV's coverage
of the colorful Orange Bowl
Parade on New Year's Eve and
the exciting pre-game pageantry
before the kickoff of the big game
on Jan. 2
Billings said the theme of this
year" s Parade is "Of The World's
Treasures" and predicted that
the Queens will highlight that
theme in a most appropriate
manner.
"We think that the appear-
ance in the Parade will be simply
spectacular he said.
Certainly the float they will be
riding on will be spectacular, as
it will becver110feetlongand22
feet wide-the largest float ever
Martin said all duly desig-
nated college and university
homecoming queens are automa-
tically eligible. Entry blanks have
been provided to all college and
universities, he said, and an
official of each school should
simply nominate its homecoming
queen by contacting the Associa-
ted Collegiate Press at 726
Washington Ave S.E Suite
205, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455
Martin said the selection of
the Agree All-American Home-
coming Queens "will be based on
appearance, academic standing,
extracurricular activities and per-
sonal interests. While good
grooming and other appearance
factors, as indicated by the
photographs to be submitted, will
be part of thejudging criteria, this
unique competition will empha-
size those other attributes that go
to make up an attractive person in
the ful'est sense of that term
In addition to selecting the
queen to represent each state, the
Associated Collegiate Press also
will select two standby represen-
tatives per state in the event
illness or other commitments
might prevent any of the origi-
nally selected queens from mak-
ing the trip to Miami.
Upon arrival, the Agree All-
American Queen contingent will
be presented to Orange Bowl and
city officials and national media
representatives covering the
Football Classic, Parade and
other activities.
"The folks back home Mar-
tin said, "will have the opportu-
nity to watch their respective
queens in the Orange Bowl
Parade on New Year's Eve, to be
oovered by NBC-TV. Two days
later, they can again tune to that
network to see their home state
queen honored during the pre-
game festivities before the start
of the 1978 Orange Bowl Game
Living-together
trend increases
Are there more 20 to 24 year
old couples "living-together"
than married on on college
campuses as some statistics sug-
gest? Non-married couples "liv-
ing-together" is a growing trend
on American university campuses
as well as in the general society.
A recent study at Michigan
State University last spring re-
vealed that over 25 per cent of
the respondents have engaged in
a "living-together" relationship.
The State News survey, based
on a random selection of the same
university focused on by Geraldo
Rivera as a typical American
university, is statistically accurate
to 95V2.
This phenonmenon is more
evidence of the emergence of
differene sociaJ values in our
society.
"Meanwhile, it certainly does
seem that living-together without
the old-fashioned legal stamp of
approval is here to stay says
Dr. Joyce Brothers in a March
1976 Harpers Bazaar article.
Today non-marrieds feel less
pressure to please the old-line
social standardists.
According to Barbara Hirsch
(an attorney and author of Living
Together: A guide to the law for
unmarried couples, Houghton-
Mifflin Co 3.95) non-married
couples fare better with the IRS
than married couples when both
partners are working because
they are entitles to two standard
deductions.
What moves a couple to
commit themselves in a non-
married way? One recent Phil
Donahue Program features a
couple (Carol and Seven) who
view their relationship as more
private than marriage but one
which required constant renewal.
They believe many people
marry to please mom and dad or
to avoid criticism from others
See LIVINGpg. 6
WESTERN SIZZLIN
.�JOL
HOURS:
SUN THRU THUR
11:00 TO 10:00
FRI &SAT
11:00 TO 11:00
Western Sizzlin will feature
special each day of the week
beginning Sept. 19th-22nd
STEAK HOUSE
U.S. DA choice beef cut fresh daily
For the full month of September





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Editorials
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 4
Apathetic voting
is future trouble
On September 26, ECU students will once again
go to the polls and elect an SGA legislature. If
tradition rules, they'll choose randomly among the
names on the ballot, selecting those they've merely
seen the most on posters or those whose names
soundpleasant. This is a grave mistake, as the
1976-77 legislature demonstrated.
If nothing else, last year's legislature taught ECU
that this student assembly is a powerful, important
entity on campus. From its ivory bowels spewed the
acceptance of an .attorney general who twisted the
SGA constitution,to meet the needs of her trivial
political power-hunger, regardless of the students'
best interest. From this same legislature also came
the near robbery of office from President Neil
Sessoms after he was elected fairly and squarely by
the student body. Because of so much absent-minded
voting, a legislature was elected that chose to wrap
itself in petty politics, ignoring its obligation to serve
the students.
This year, things can be different. But the
difference will only come about if the voting students
will bother to look into their candidates before filling
out ballots.
Dorm students have the best opportunity for this
since they live with the man or woman running to
represent them. Before voting, they should seek out
their candidates and find out exactly how he or she
really feels about the issues that are important to
them beyond the worn-out rhetoric and slogans
plastered on campaign posters.
For day students, the names, addresses and
phone numbers of day student candidates are
available through the elections oommittee. Any
student interested in his or her own well-being as a
student in this university should contact these people
and pose questions to them concerning their honest
interest in student welfare before voting.
Apathy toward the SGA elections does nothing
but hurt the ones who are apathetic. SGA legislators
make up the various oommittees that affect every
ECU student. They hold the purse strings on an
enormous chunk of every student's activity fees. By
ignoring the importance of these elections, the
students ignore the thousands of precious dollars
they pay each semester in activity fees.
It only takes seconds' to vote haphazardly for
those few who so weightily affect each student's
welfare. But those few have eight months to
retaliate.
Sports or safety?
A new lighting system for two intramural playing
fields was recently installed at ECU, the money for
which came from the state. But this superficially
generous act is actually a direct kick in the faces of all
ECU students as the state has not yet sent one penny
for the construction of a critically needed overpass fa
Tenth Street.
ECU cringed in horror last year after two people
were struck, and one killed, from the pedestrian-auto
chaos at the intersection of College Hill Drive and
Tenth Street. But the state legislature has swept this
problem under the rug, preferring instead to
alleviate the problem of no night softball.
This gross negligence should not be ignored. Now
is the time for all ECU students to write their district
representatives and contact this school's administra-
tion demanding an explanation.
EENlE-fraiE-niNEY-TO
Forum
Schiltz Co. thanked for serving ECU
(An indepth article concerning this issue wil
appear in FOUNTAINHEAD).
soon
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Many times in the past the
merchants of Greenville have
stood behind the students and
faculty of East Carolina suppor-
tively and financially. I speak for
myself and many other students
when I say that we appreciate
everything these kind persons
and organizations have done for
the causes of our university.
One particular company has
proven to be an asset to the
student population on campus so
far this year. I am speaking of
"Taylor Beverage Company of
Goldsboro, N.C the Schlitz
distributor for Greenville. Mr.
Bill Taylor, owner, and Mr. Blue
Martin, plant manager, have
devoted many hours of planning
and finances toward the pleasure
Forum letters
should be typed or
printed, signed and
include the writer's
address or tele-
phone number. Let-
ters are subject to
editing for taste and
brevity and may be
sent to FOUNTAIN-
HEAD or left at the
Information Desk in
Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
areas of interest and helping the
ECU cheerleaders whenever call-
ed upon. Taylor Beverage dona-
ted 840 Pi rat e-Schlitz, 100 leather
footballs to be given away at a
oost well over $2,000, and to
assure pirate cheering represen-
tation at the Toledo, Ohio foot-
ball game, the company footed
the bill for 3 extra cheerleaders to
fly to the game Saturday, Sep-
tember 17. But Taylor doosn' t stop
here! The future holds in store fa
the E.C.U. students more sur-
prises and fun from the distribu-
tors of Schlitz. So may we all raise
to the sky an ice cold oool-one and
givethankstothemen, company,
and beer that made old East
Carolina famous
Thanks Bill Taylor and all
other businesses that support us
so gratefully!
A very appreciative student,
Kim Waters
ECU Junior
Fbuntainhead
Serving the Eest Caroline community tor over titty yeers.
EdltorKim J. Devins
Production Manager Bob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert 9waim
Hews Ed"�Cindy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
SportsEdltorAnneHogge
FOUNTAINHEAD ittht �un nempeper of Ea Carolina
Prn8 th " ���m Association
ECU and i. distributed each Wadnaaday during the eurnmer
and twice weekly during the school yeer �KB,
cJf n�5re: 2 S�Ulh "D' Gre�nvl�, N.C. 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6396, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
. .iii; , ;�; SMS ��� ����� M&Sfa&iXm
ff5fflBffftftal3BB�.i





VAF elects '7778 officers
Pag 5 FOUNTAINHEAD 15
1�77
By JULIE EVERETTE
Staff Writer
The newly elected officers of
the Visual Arts Forum (VAF) are:
president Biff Bream; correspon-
ding secretary-Amy Leggett; re-
cording secretary-Laura Jackson;
treasurer-Page Rutledge, and
gallery advisory committee re-
presentative-David Chrisman.
The vice-presidents for each
department in the School of Arts
will be elected at a later date.
"We got a lot accomplished at
this meeting said outgoing
President Cliff Page.
"This isthe first time we have
come together and tried to get a
budget out
VAF was formed last spring to
provide Art school representation
totheSGA.
"We are hoping to bring
outside speakers in this year and
to have a symposium that will
bring more excitement in the
School of Art Page said.
"I think we have the best Art
school and gallery in the state
According to Page, the art
exhibitions are open to everyone.
"I think we are going to have
a very successful year and
existence in the SGA he said.
During Thanksgiving holidays
SU sponsors New York trip
The Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a trip to
New York City during the Thanks-
giving holidays, November 23-27,
1977.
The four-day trip costs $65, which
includes transportation and lod-
ging at the Hotel Taft.
Manhattan, with its theatre
marquees, shops and nightclubs,
is so large even the natives will
never know all the territory; so,
visitor and resident alike are
exposed to the unique New York
mirades.
Although the Statue of Liberty
and the Empire State Building
will always be famous landmarks,
students are invited to look
beyond this type of attraction and
explore such places as Little Italy
markets, Chinatown streets,
Yorkville beer halls, and Village
jazz clubs.
New York is more than the
Metropolitan of the Modern. It is
the Museum of the American
Indian or the International Center
of Photography. Students will get
a chance to see such sites as
Times Square, Rockefeller Plaza,
Student awarded
1st prize in contest
John Jones of Alpha Gamma
Chapter of Chi Beta Phi at ECU
was recently awarded first prize
in the Scientific Article Contest
which is open to all members of
the society's 29 chapters.
His research, completed
under the supervision of Dr.
Linus Dohm of the ECU School of
Medicine, was entitled The Effect
of Training and Detraining on
Food Consumption. Animal
Weight and Activity of the Lipo-
genic Enzymes in the Adipose
and Liver Tissues of the Female
Rat.
Last year's winner, Joe Chan,
was also a member of Alpha
Gamma Chapter.
Chi Beta Phi is a multidisd-
plinary society of honor science
students concerned with the
promotion and recognition of
scientific achievement. Other ac-
tivities include social events and
community projects.
An organizational meeting
will be held Wed Sept. 14, at
730 p.m. in the Biology Depart-
ment reading room (second floor).
Information concerning this meet-
ing may be obtained from Bob
Dough (756-5128) or ECU faculty
advisors Dr. Wendall Allen (Bio-
logy) and Dr. Tom Sayetta
(Physics).
THIS ECU CO-ED enjoys the rainy season as she splashes home.
Photo by Kirk Ktngsbury
Lincoln Center, and many others.
Broadway Musicals and the
Radio City M usic Hall can be seen
as well as the wall-to-wall sky
scrapers.
New York, a trip to be
remembered, is available to all
students merely by making reser-
vations at the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall Student
Center.
FRISBEE LOVERS ENJOY afternoon on the mall.
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
??-S
1
II?
i
m
:�:�
m
&M
�:�
m-
m
&3
J:�:S$:vS-S?S'�
Cina 2
Starts
PITT-PLAZA CENTER � 756-0088
Friday
It ain't 'Soap '
But it's a lot more fun
HERE COMES THE COMEDY
ROMANCE OF THE YEAR!
1 i A
Loose,
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Engaging
"A 70s
American Graffiti
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Young adult comedy fun in color
Love anJ laugh shows daily jUJg
3:15 5:15 7:15 9:15
?x�:





! SSI -���
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 6
Carter defends OMB Director Bert Lance
(LNS)A liberal overdraft
policy iscommon in small country
banks, explained President Car-
ter in defense of his chief
financial advisor, Bert Lance, who
is Director of the Office of
Management and Budget.
Perhaps, but few people could
recall when they last overdrew
checks in the amounts that an
investigation by the U.S. Comp-
troller of the Currency in the
Lance case.
According to the report, re-
leased on August 18, Lance's
campaign account during an
unsuccessful bid for governor of
Georgia was overdrawn by
$152,161 in December 1974.
Lance's wife. LaBelle, over-
drew her personal account by as
much as $110,000 in thj last four
months of 1974.
Nine Lance relatives amassed
overdrafts totalling $450,000. As
late as May 1977 Lance's personal
account was overdrawn by
$3,745
Although interest was charg-
ed on some of the later over-
drafts, the earlier ones, including
one involving Lanoe's campaign
account, were, in effect, interest-
free loans by his bank.
For Lanoe's financial prac-
tices, it obviously helped to be
wealthy and chief officer in two
banks where he did business.
Lance headed the National Bank
of Georgia and the Calhoun First
National Bank before moving to
his White House position.
Lance's Calhoun bank was
criticized by Federal bank exami-
ners in April 1975 for allowing the
overdrafts.
But in October 1976, a federal
bank examiner was directed by a
regional administrator to give
Lanoe's bank a "clean bill of
health
The next month, one day
before Lance's nomination as
Director of the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget, the regional
banking administrator rescinded
an order to the Calhoun bank that
would have made public banking
practices embarrassing to Lance.
On December 2, 1976, one day
after Lance's nomination was
announced, the U.S. Attorney in
Atlanta terminated the criminal
investigation growing out of the
bank overdrafts, concluding that
the investigation had "limited
potential
In at least one case, the report
said, "there is some documentary
and circumstantial evidence" that
Lance broke the law while secur-
ing loans for correspondant
banks.
The bank involved was New
York's Manufacturers Hanover
Trust Co the nation's fourth
largest bank. After discussing a
request fa a $2.6 million loan
request with bank officials in New
York City on April 16, 1975 Lance
remarked to a Manufacturers vice
president that the National Bank
of Georgia (NBG) would "need a
good correspondent in New
York
Later that day, a .Manufac-
turers executive wrote in a memo:
although it was not promised to
us today, one would assume that
should we make this loan, we
would undoubtedly be receiving
significant business from the
bam
So far President Carter has
given Lance, his closest financial
advisor, his unfailing support.
After the recent Comptroller's
report concluded that there were
some questionable practices but
no violations of law in Lanoe's
business activities, Carter ex-
claimed to a hastily called Wash-
ington news conference: "My
faith in the character and compe-
tence of Bert Lance has been
reconfirmedHis services to this
country can and should con-
tinueBert, I'm proud of you
If Carter has the choice, "few
Carterologists doubt where the
President's heart would lie,
"Newsweek explained.
"Lance, during their decad s
comradeship, has been his first
money man in politics; his banker
food for a $1 million loan and a
$3.9 million line of credit fa the
Carter peanut business; hiscoun-
sela in politics and tuta in
conservatism; his missiaiary to
the infidels scattered from Capitol
Hill to Wall Street the maga-
zine wrote in its August 29 issue.
Nevertheless, others in Wash-
ington are ready to leap on the
Administration's inability to
chaise a chief financial manager
above business improprieties.
As admittedly partisan famer
Republican Party chairman Sena-
ta Robert Dole pointedly asked:
Would you buy a used bank
from this man?"
Lance will be facing at least
three Congressional hearings
the Senate's Government Affairs
Committee and two banking
committees�on his part business
practices when Congress recon-
venes this fall.
ECU STUDENT NANCY DenBleyker of MUM lie.
N.J. interprets for a deaf student in Dr. Donald
Stella's geography das:
Photo by ECU News Bureau
factory
for blue bell apparel
jeans and sportswear
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
Open 10-9 Mon. - Fri.
10 - 6 Sat.
All ECU students and staff
20 off on total purchase,
with this coupon
Sat. Sept. 17th, only
I.D. card required
LIVING
Continued from pg 3
about living-together How-
ever, Carol's parents prefer ner
"living-together happily to
being unhappily married
The U.S. Census Bureau
repated that over 1.3 million
people arr "living-together"
since 1976-up from oily 650,000
in 1970.
The natioial numbers game
also suppats the trend.
In the under 45-age group
"hving-together" increased five-
fold from 1970-1976.
However, the sixties was not a
slow period of growth. The
"living-together" movement was
gaining momentum at a fast pace
Eight-hundred peroent mae non-
married couples were living-
together by 1970 as were in
1960.
SHOP
Formerly of Downtown Greenville
han moved to its new location.
We Feature;
GIBSON FENDER
MARTIN 4MPFt!
GUITARS & AMPS.
Plus all the other, muHieal instruments.
The Music Shop
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(Next to k-mart)
(Thurs. & Frt nights until p�.)





Banned contraceptive
now promoted abroad
Page 7 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 SefXfnbsr 1977
(LNS)An injectable "oontra-
oeptive" banned in the U.S.
because of its cancer-causing
effects is now being widely
promoted abroad, according to
the Manchester Guardian. Over
500,(XX) women in Asia, espe-
cially in Thailand, are being
administered the drug, Depo-
Provera.
In addition, thedrug'scontra-
ceptive effects are often perma-
nent, making sterile many women
who take it.
Noting that the incidence of
cervical cancer going undetected
has been reduced somewhat by
increased monitoring in the Uni-
ted States, Johnson added that
"the chances of (women in those
countries) getting periodic and
careful care are far less
Depo-Provera can no longer
be marketed in the U.S. as a
contraceptive because its use
increases a woman's susceptibil-
ity to cancer of the cervix and the
breast.
In addition, according to Dr.
Ken Rosenberg of the Health
Policy Advisory Center in New
York, "You can't be sure it's
reversible
Rosenberg ates the standard
textbook of the medical establish-
ment, Goodman and Gilman's
The Pharmacological Basis of
Therapeutics: "The dose is 150
miligrams every three months,
but should be used only if the
possibility of permanent infertil-
ity is acceptable to the patient
According to the Manchester
Guardian, there is widespread
experimental use in the Third
World of dangerous or substan-
dard drugs that are produced by
Western Pharmaceutical compan-
ies, but are not legally allowed in
the country of origin.
THISJPU coED mixBS studying with sunshine as fall approaches
N
f ill
VMN
n-
!V
3
The Great Haircut Look
For men and women at
SUPER EGO HAIR SALON
222E. 5th Street
-�u
Precision styling by Jennis , Jeanne, Lola, Olivia
Located over the College Shop
PH. 7582455
Redken Hair Products available
I
Mar �Kay
Rings & Things
112 E. 5th St.
Open 10-00 - 6:00
Mon Sat.
A Tandv Leather Dealer
TURQUOISE &
CORAL JEWELRY AT
REASONABLE PRICES
Tonight At The
ELBO ROOM:
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Featuring
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Sunday:
Ladies Nite with 10th AVENUE
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- RESEARCH
v PAPERS
We also provide original
research - all fields
Thesis and dissertation
assistance also available
RESEARCH
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ALL SUBJECTS
Choose from our library of 7.000 topics
All papers have been prepared by our
staff of professional writers to insure
excellence Send $1 00 (air mail
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EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS
P O Box 25916-E.
Los Angeles Calif 90025
Name
Address
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I
The NEW PIZZA MIKE'S
in Greenville needs: Phone
girls to work inside and drivers
with their own cars. If you'd like
to be a part of this rising new
store come down to PIZZA MIKE'S,
215 E. FOURTH ST. We'll
be taking applications
beginning Monday Sept. 12
between 12 and 4 p.m.





nnnHimH
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 September 1977
Communique'
By JEFF ROLLINS
Staff Writer
RED SKY IN THE NIGHT, by Gerda Nischan. Vaugh Press $5.00
and $3.00.
But the pain of hunger I remember very vividly, for I was hungry,
hungry, all the time
Ms. Gerda Nischan, poet and wife of ECU History professor Dr.
Bodo Nischan, has recently published a slender volume of poems, Red
Sky in the Night, which deals with her early memories of living in
war-racked Germany.
Nischan was born in Frankenthal, Germany, and had many vivid
experiences as a small girl growing up among bombed-out buildings,
air-raids and the ubiquitious presence of death. She tells of her mother
risking punishment by the Gestapo to feed POW's working near her
house.
"I remember the hospital burned fa three days and later, playing
in the ruins, we found skulls and bones she relates.
Most of the poems in the book allow the reader to see the holocaust
as if through the eyes of a child and in these poems the innocence of the
speaker is contrash'd with the horror of her experiences.
The poems range in nature from the overly sentimental to the
lyrically poignant. An example of the latter is "Christmas Eve, 1944"
in which a young girl and her family's Christmas worship has been
halted by the sound of bombs exploding nearby. The family walks
through the burning streets and upon arriving home they find that:
Our tree I ies on the floor;
some ornaments are broken.
But mother says
it oould have been worse.
Ms. Nischan is a woman of rich Germanic personality and is a very
industrious writer. She has nearly oompleted a second collection.
"I already have plans for a third poetry collection said Nischan.
"The last thing on my mind is sitting back and looking back. I really do
live in the future
She has had 60 poems published in various international magazines
and enjoins writers to "send poems out if you want to get published
"I never thought they would get accepted when I first started, but I
wrote them anyway Nischan said.
She has lectured on How to Find a Publisher at the Spring Poetry
Festival held through theauspioesof ECU Poetry Faum, and has been
chosen fa the haia of reading at the Folger Shakespeare Library in
Washington on December 1 of this year.
She has lectured on "How to Find a Publisher" at the Spring
Poetry Festival held through the auspices of ECU Poetry Faum, and
has been chosen fa the haia of reading at the Folger Shakespeare
Library in Washington oi December 1 of this year Nischan has also
read at many colleges in as well as out of N.C.
The poems in this remarkably unified volume are written in a
fastidious verse libre. Nischan has a subtle ear fa English phrasing
which she is unfaithful to only rarely. The short lines and phrases as
well as the simplistic language employed by the poems suggest well
the naivete of the child-speaker.
Naice in Boom the sucdnt style and the careful understatement
with which Death's mercenary side is presented:
The grave diggers
work in shifts.
Business
is booming.
The cabinet maker
specializes
in caskets lately;
he waks around the dock.
The priest
shatens his burial sermois
to catch up
with the load.
Red Sky is comprised of five sections of which tha two longest are
those dealing with the war and the time of occupation after Germany
had been overrun.
From the section After the War oome some of the finest pieces
presented including the poem "A Popular Lady" in which a German
prostitute is described by a child to an American soldier. This is
Nischan's first book and it indicatesa poet able to recognize and handle
her subject.
The book, in paperback and hardcover, may presently be found
at The Mushroom, The Bookbarn, and Central News and Card Shop.
Pianist Ruth Laredo
to perform Sept. 21
By RENEE DIXON
Staff Writer
Widely acclaimed pianist Ruth
Laredo opens the 1977-78 East
Carolina Artists Series with a
perfamance at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center on Wednesday Sept.
21, at 8.00 pm.
A native of Detroit, Michigan,
Miss Laredo was influenced in
her youth by the inspiring recitals
of Vladmimir Haowitz. Tremen-
dous determination and desire to
play led her to study with
Rudolph Serkin at the Curtis
Institute in Philadelphia. Follow-
ing her studies, Laredo made her
New Yak Orchestra debut with
the American Symphony under
the direction of Leopold Stokow-
ski.
Miss Laredo was first recog-
nized as an aocompanist to her
husband, Jaime Laredo, as
accomplished New Yak violinist
from whom she was separated in
1974. Since then, Miss Laredo has
emerged as an outstanding Amer-
ican solo pianist. Her debut in the
1974-75 season with the New Yak
Philharmonic, playing Ravel's
"Piano Concerto in G maja"
under the direction of Pierre
Boulez, brought optimistic pre-
dictions of Miss Laredo's success
as a solo artist.
Performances with major
American Orchestras including
the New Yak Philharmonic, the
Cleveland Orchestra, the Boston
Symphony, the Philadelphia
Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony,
the National Symphony, the St.
Louis Symphony, Indianapolis
Symphony, Baltimae Symphaiy,
and the Buffalo Philharmonic
have established Laredo as a
distinguished musician. Laredo
ACCLAIMED PIANIST RUTH Laredo to appear Wednesday.
has also appeared at the Aspen,
Marlboro, Spdeto, Israel, Chau-
tauqua, and Caramoor Music
Festivals.
Recently Laredo was pro-
claimed "as the greatest of
American pianists" by Japanese
aitics during her tour to Japan
with the Amsterdam Philhar-
monic. A return engagement has
already been scheduled fa the
1978-79 season. Her recital tours
regularly include perfamances at
renowned conoert halls in Wash-
ington , D.C Chicago, Houston,
Baltimae, Los Angeles, Milwau-
kee, St. Paul, Boston, and
Taoito. and at maja universities
such as Purdue, the University of
Michigan, Universityof Missouri,
and Harvard. She has also
appeared at the White House.
Laredo is also a prominent
recording artist. She stunned
critics with her early recadingsof
Ravel's "La Valse" and "Valses
Nobles et Sentimentales" under
the Connoisseur Society label.
Also under the Connoisseur label,
she has recorded the entire
collection of Scriabin's piano
sonatas. Her perfamanoes of the
Scriabin waks brought ecstatic
reviews and eventually led her to
a recading contract with Colum-
See LAREDO, pg. 9.
Faculty turnover occurs
in Speech and Drama Dept
Trends
EDGAR LOESSN, ECU chair-
man of Speech and Drama.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
A rare chance to replace ten
instructasat the same time has
produoed a faculty with distingu-
ished backgrounds in the profes-
sional theatre fa East Carolina
University's Department of
Drama and Speech.
"It's a fulfillment of a
dream said Chairman Edgar R.
Loessin. "These people have
without exception, held maja
roles and staff positions in the
theatres of Broadway, netwak
televisiai and elsewhere. And
they have equally impressive
teaching aedentials as well
Taking over the administra-
tive responsibility for ECU'S
dance program is Frank Wagner,
whose Broadway credits include
staging dances and musical num-
bersa productions ranging from
"Ziegfeld Follies" with Beatrice
Lillie and Bille De Wolfe to
"Hallelujah Baby" with Leslie
Uggams.
Hehasalsochaeographed fa
televisiai shows, naably Shari
Lewis' Saturday maning show
and the Ed Sullivan Show.
Waking with him will be
Marsha Wagner, whose
Broadway credits as actress-sin-
ger-dancer include "Pajama
Game "Most Happy Fella
and "Wildcat" with Lucille Ball.
A permanent member of the
dance company on the Ed
Sullivan Show fa five years, she
has also appeared oi various TV
specials in the US and Europe.
As a veteran dance instructa,
she has taught John Davidsoi,
Tammy Grimes, Chita Rivera,
Tom Poston, Gene Rayburn,
Marlon Brando, Rita Gam, Jean
Stapleton and Shirley Jones.
The third new member of the
dance faculty is the versatile
Mark Rose, whose perfamance
aedits include engageroents with
national touring oompanies in
such musicals as "West Side
Stay" and "The Music Man
In addition to having danced
and choreographed from
Minneapolis to Madrid and hav-
ing acted professionally in a
dozen maja U.S. cities, Rose has
two degrees in speech, and will
double as a voioe and diction
instructa at ECU. He is finishing
his PhD at the University of
Califania at Davis with a dissert-
atioi oi the acting theay of
Antonin Artaud.
Rounding out the program in
dance is teaching fellow Sara
Berman, who has danced and
choreographed for outdoor
dramas in Flaida, Texas and
Nath Carolina, toured with mos-
See DRAMA, pg 9





Registration ends Sept. 24
Page 9 FOUNTAINHEAO 15 September 1977
Crafts Center to promote workshops
If you've ever wanted to
develop and print your own film,
make some jewelry, a throw a
pot, here's your chance to do j ust
that. Set aside a few hours each
week and have some fun by
learning a craft which can be
practical as well as enjoyable.
Remember, Christmas is just
around the corner. Sign up today
for a short workshop in darkroom
techniques, beginning jewelry or
ceramics. These are just a few of
the beginner's-level workshops
which the Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Center is now
offering.
The workshops are available
to all full-time students, faculty
and staff. Dependents, eighteen
or over, of faculty and staff are
also eligible to participate. Upon
payment of $10.00 semester
Crafts Center membership fee, an
individual may register for any of
the available workshops without
additional charges, excluding
costs of personal supplies.
All interested persons must
register at the Crafts Center
during regular operating hours,
3:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m
Monday through Friday, and
10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m
Saturday. The final day to regis-
ter is Saturday, September 24 and
dass space is limited.
The following workshops are
now available:
BEGINNING DARKROOM
Basic instrudion in darkroom
techniques. Students will develop
and print their own black and
white film.
Section A 6pm-9pm Tues-
days September 27, October 4,
11, 18, & 25
Section B 6pm-9pm Thurs-
days September 29, October 6,
13, 20, & 27
BASIC POTTERY
Basic instruction in wheel-
throwing techniques, glazing,
and firing of day.
Section A 6pm-9pm Mondays
September 26, October 3, 10, 17,
& 24
Section B 6pm-9pm Wednes-
days September 28, October 5,
12, 19, & 26
FLOOR LOOM WEA VING
Learn to use a four-harness
floor loom. Making a warp,
warping the loom and techniques
of weaving will be inducted.
Section A 6pm-9pm Septem-
ber 27, 29, & Odober 6
Section B 6pm-9pm Odober
11, 13, & 20
MACRAME
Learn to make your own
leather items for personal use or
for gifts. Belts, wallets, hand-
bags, key chains; the possibilities
are endless.
6pm-9pm Mondays Septem-
ber 26, Odober 3, 10, & 17
BATIK
Basic steps to resist dye
techniques fa produdng designs
on fabric. Possibilities indude:
hangings, yardage, pillows,
scarves.
6pm-9pm Mondays Septem-
ber 26, Odober 3, 10, & 17
ENAMELING
A very old and simple art,
enameling can be beautifully
applied to create a variety of
items from ashtrays to wall
plaques and is very often used in
crafting jewelry.
6pm-9pm Tuesdays Septem-
ber 27, Odober 4, 11, & 18
CONTEMPORARY BASKETRY
Create beautiful baskets and
other items by using a variety of
techniques and materials.
10am-1pm Saturdays Odober
1,8, & 15.
LEATHER CRAFT
Basic techniques used in the
art of creative knotting. Hanging
planters, wall hangings, belts, a
handbags are just a few of the
project possibilities.
6pm-9pm Wednesdays Sep-
tember 28, Odober 5, 12, & 19.
BEGINNING JEWELRY
Make and design your own
jewelry. Possibilities indude sil-
ver rings, bracelets, key chains,
necklaces, pendents and ear-
rings. Techniques used will allow
for a number of project possibili-
ties.
6pm-9pm Thursdays Septem-
ber 29, Odober 6, 13, 20 & 27.
LAREDO
Continued from pg. 9
bia Records.
Laredo is currently recording
the entire Rachimaninoff solo
piano literature with Columbia
Records, and will be displaying
her undeniable mastery of these
works next Wednesday evening.
The program indudes selections
from Rachmaninoff's "Etudes
Tableaux" and "Moments Musi-
co the Rachmaninoff-Kreisler
transcriptions Liebesfreud"
and "Liebeslied and various
works by Chopin and Scriabin.
Tickets are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center. Prices are
$1.50 for ECU students and $4.00
for the public. All tickets at the
door will be $4.00. Season tickets
to the Artists Series may also be
purchased.
Careful planning establishes new drama staff
ical comedies on the New
England drcuit, and danced with
the Pearl Lang Company in New
Yak and Universal Studios in
Hollywood.
Joining ECU's voice and
speech faculty is Dr. Richard T.
Keenan, who holds degrees from
the Universities of Michigan and
Illinois and City University of Los
Angeles. His experience indudes
teaching on the high school and
oollege levels, as well as wak in
industry and independent cov
sulting.
New advanced ading instruo-
ta Ella Gerber is a direda with
an internatioial reputatioi. In
additioi to a number of Broadway
and off-Broadway produdions,
she has directed at theatres in
Portugal, New Zealand,
Australia, Israel, South Africa,
Italy and Japan with stars as Ann
Sothern, Vivian Blaine, James
Garner, Jane Russell, William
Bendix, Buster Keaton, Ginger
Rogers, John Raitt, Howard Keel
and Pat O'Brien. Ms. Gerber will
ACADEMIC
RESEARCH
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quality Choose trom our library of
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direct several productions at the
Playhouse.
Another ading instructa, Del
Lewis, canes to ECU after three
years as artistic director of
Madison, Wisconsin's Civic Re-
pertay Theatre. Lewis' credits
indude Broadway roles in "The
Rothschilds" and "Fiddler on the
Roof film ading in "Diary of a
Mad Housewife as well as roles
in touring companies, off-Broad-
way shows, summer stock and
regional theatres. In addition to
teaching duties, he will direct fa
the ECU Playhouse.
Edward Haynes has been a
scenic artist with the Metropoli-
tan Opera fa the past eleven
seasons. His designs have graced
stages on and off Broadway, as
well as some of the United States'
faemost opera theatres and the
outstanding Minneapolis Child-
ren' s Theatre. He holds a Master
of Fine Arts degree in scenic
design from the University of
Texas, and has studied at the
Yale School of Drama and Polakov
Studio of Stage Design. Haynes
will teach scenic design and will
design sets fa Playhouse pro-
dudions.
David Downing, who will wak
dosely with Haynes as lighting
designer and executed lighting
fa outdoa dramas in Texas and
Nath Carolina, and holds an
MFA degree from UNC-Chapel
Hill. He will teach courses in
stage lighting and voioe and
didion.
Princeton University' s
McCarter Theatre lost the ser-
JFratnc - 3t
Hours elf
�toppt
D
MTZT.
WELCOMES BACK E�U STUDENTS. AND TO CELEBRATE
YOUR ARRIVAL AND OUR SUCCESSFUL SUMMER, WE
ARE HAVING A 10 OFFSALE FROM SEPT. 14 TO
SEPT. 24 ON ML MERCHANDISE IN OUR SHOPPE,
INCLU-DNG:
MATTING IN OVER 120 COLORS 3 DIFFERENT STYLES
LARGE GALLERY OF FRAMED PRINTS, POSTERS,
AND MAPS -OVER 150 DIFFERENT STYLES
OF IN STOCK MOULDING DRY MOUNTING AND
LAMINATION - A WIDE VARIETY OF PRINTS,
INCLUDING LIMITED EDITIONS
PLUS Da IT-YOURSELF FRAMING- THE MOST
ECONOMICAL WAY TO FRAME-UNDER EXPERT
SUPERVISION-WITH EVERYTHING PREPARED FOR YOU
-JUST ASSEMBLE-HAVE FUN-AND SAVE
STORE HOURS
MON. & WED 10-9 pm
TUES. THRUS-SAT 10-5
PHONE 756-7454
106 TRADE STREET, ACROSS
FROM "i ARHEEL TOYOTA
GREENVILLE
vioss of Preston Sisk when he left
to become General Manager of
the ECU Playhouse. A dodaal
candidate at the University of
Kansas, Sisk has extensive prac-
tical experience as a manager and
is an experienced teacher in this
field as well.
Loessin introduoed the new
faculty to ECU theatre students
this week.
"This faculty is the result of
fourteen years of careful planning
on our part and that of the
university he said. "It is
composed of a truly outstanding
group of experienced theatre
artists and teachers, making it
one of the first in the nation
ATTIC
Fri. thru Sunj
May son
Tues: Sugarcane
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(3? in �� tsK 5SwiiBiai ssar
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 10
'New York, New York'
Scorsese's latest � nostalgia sans purpose
By PHILLIP A RRINGTON
Staff Writer
It is difficult to understand
why Michael Scorsese chose to
make a film like "New York, New
York It isnot difficult, however,
to view the film as indicative of
the director's oontinued absorp-
tion with the Myhtos of the City.
The City is Scorseses prin-
ciple metaphor. As "Mean
Streets" and Taxi Driver" turn-
ed over the metropolitan stone so
that we could see the rot and
sediment that clings to it, so
New York, New York" leaves
the stone in place, washes it over
m the plae amber hues of
memory's half-light.
Scorsese's protagonists meet
on V-J Day. Jimmy Doyle (Robert
De Niro) is a young veteran
returned home, in Hawaiian shirt
and pleated trousers, impatient
and in heat. Frandne Evans (Liza
Mmnelli) is a young wac, in
scarlet lipstick and uniform,
inpatient but aloof.
They are brought together,
after Doyle's clownish pestering,
in a musical audition. She sings,
he blows tenor sax. Teaming up,
they jcxn a road band, marry, are
on the brink of suocess, when
Franane becomes pregnant.
This is Scorsese's pallid cli-
max Frandne returns to New
Program Series
unveils agenda
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Light dassics, jazz and folk
music are featured on the 1977-78
Mendenhall Student Center Pro-
gramming Series at ECU. The
series supplements solo, choral
anc' orchestral performances in-
duded on ECU's annual Artist's
Series.
The Programming Series will
consist of the following: The
Regimental Band of Her
Majesty's Grenadier Guards and
the Pipes, Drums and Dancers of
her Majesty s Scots Guards (Nov.
20): Thad JonesMel Lewis
Orchestra (Dec. 1), Carlos
Passion
THE LINE
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Joey George &
Sat. Night Live
Mon.
Monday night
Football
Montoya, flamenco guitarist (Jan.
30): Heavy Organ and Virgil Fox
with Revelation Lights (Feb.6);
and the reservation Hall Jazz
Band (Feb. 14).
The Virgil Fox "Heavy
Organ" program, with accom-
panying light show, and the
Preservation Hall Jazz Bank, and
old-fashioned New Orleans Dixie-
land group, have been favorites
with Greenville area audiences in
previous years. Fox will appear in
Wright Auditorium, and the
Preservation Hall band, in the
Student Center Theatre.
All programs will begin at 8
p.m except the Regimental
Band and Scots Guards perform-
ance, which is set fa 4 p.m.
Public tickets are 4.00 each per
event, with special discounts
offered to students and persons in
groups of 20 or more.
Tickets for all Programming
Series concerts are available at
the ECU Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. Mail
orders for tickets should be sent
with a stamped, addressed en-
velope
THURSDAY'S
PRESENTS
CLOCKWORK
Top 40, rock
free admission until 9:30
Wet-T-Shirt contest
$50.00 prize
York to have the baby. Doyle
continues on the road with a
substitute singera near walk-on
for Mary Kay Place, "Mary
Hartman, Mary Hartman's
Loretta). Doyle's band flounders,
Frandne begins cutting demo's
for a record company. Thus two
careers diverge: Frandne is an
overnight sensation with her
recording of "The World Goes
Round and her film, "Happy
Endings Doyle finds his true
niche with a blues sestet, remains
the musical pursuit of the two,
but does find time to write the
film's title song, "The New York,
New York Theme
Mmnelli belts this song out in
the dosing minutes of the film.
Doyle sees in this performance
another chance for his and
Frandnes relationship. But we're
being set up. Doyle makes a date,
Frandne stands him up. The film
ends.
One wants to believe that the
music bears some thematic sign-
ificance, but it doesn't, though
it's raw enough to please. One
expeds to find Scorsese s acute
eye lingering on the neon and
ambiance of Post-War New Yak (
and, at times, he does give us the
typically Scorsese shot of cars
floating through the phantas-
magoria of neon flickering on
rain-washed streets), but aJI too
often the film glosses over with
the now diched technique
soft f(�;us)hotograpy and amber-
tinted lenses.
Now York, New York"
abandons realismScorsese's
usual stance-fpr nostalgia. But it
is nostalgia without purpose
De Niro and Mmnelli are
energetic but awkwar 1, and this
is inevitably the diredor's fault
One can only hope that Scorsese
will realize that memory exists
for the sake of knowledge We
remember so that we may under-
stand, but "New York, New
York as its title suggests, offers
nothing to the understanding
except repetition and hyperbole.
SUMMER MEMORIES LIKE these are quickly fading as cooler weather approaches
New York Times Best Sellers list
Fiction
The Thorn Birds by Colleen
McCullough
Illusions by Richard Bach
The Crash of 79 by Paul E.
Erdman
Full Disclosure by William Satire
Delata of Venus by Anais Nin
Coma by Robin Cook
Dynasty by Robert S. Elegant
Oliver s story by Erich Segal
Condominium by John, D. Mao-
Donald
The Rich Are Different by Susan
Howatch
The Chancellor Muscript by
Robert Ludlum
Trinity by Leon Uris
Falconer by John Cheever
The Dark Lady by Louis Auchin-
doss
How to Save Your Own Life by
Erica Jong
Non- Fiction
All Things Wise and Wonderful
by James Hernot
Looking Out For Number One by
Robert J. Ringer
The Book of Lists by David
Wallechinsky
The Dragons of Eden by Carl
Sagan
Your Erroneous Zones by Wayne
W. Dyer
The Camera Never Blinks by Dan
Rather
Didnt Start With Watergate by
Vidor Lasky
The Grass is Always Greener
Over the Septic Tank by Erma
Bom beck
Viven Leigh by Anne Edwards
The Path Between the Seas by
David McCullough
The Possible Dream by Charles
Paul Conn
WORLD BOOK
ENCYCLOPEDIA
Many times teachers are interes-
ted in getting an encydopedia for
personal use either in school or at
home. Because of the difference
in home and school prices, many
teachers have put off purchasing.
However, for the period of
September 7 through September
30. 1977. Field Enterprises Edu-
cational Corporation is offering to
all teachers the opportunity to
purchase the famous WORLD
BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA at the
regular school price.
Here are the fads: The 22 volume
1977 edition in the Aristocrat
binding which sells for $329 00
NOW can be purchased for
$246.75 by a teacher
Also, you may order NOW with
NO DOWN PAYMENT and terms
as low as $10.00 per month if you
wish You will receive the new
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPE
DIA set m three weeks
PAPERBACK BESTSELLERS'
Passages by Gail Sh.
Trinity by Leon Uris
Star by George Luc
This Loving Torment by Va
Sher
Touch Not the
varl
Elvis What Happened by Steve
Dunleavy
The Other Side of Midnight by
Sidney Sheldon
Captive Bride by Johanna Lind-
sey
Ordinary People by Judith Guest
Loves Wildest Fires by Christ
Savage
The Last Chance Diet by Dr
Robert Linn with Sandra Lee
Stuart
Life After Life by Raymond AI
Moody, Jr.
Blind Ambition by John Dean
The Users by Joyce Haber
The Pride of the Peacock by
Vidoria Holt
"From the New Yak Times Book
Review
Con! Madeline A Vincent, Sales Managei
l t4thSt
eenville, N C 752-5825
it
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I
Greenville's Roxy
to host program
The Roxy Music and Crafts Center will host a program of poetry
song and danoe, Sunday, Sept. 18, at 8 p.m.
Entitled "Thunder, Lighting Brainstorm-Mother's Earth the
program will include poetry readings from seven Roxy members: Nell
Gibson, Gina Kear, Sue Luddeke, Gilda Rivera, Phyllis Weatherly
Susan Whalen and Ruby Woods.
Admission fa the program will be $1 general public, 50 cents for
members. The Roxy is located on 629 Albermarle Avenue in
Greenville. Anyone interested in attending the program is urged to
please be on time.
Page 11 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 September 1977
THE ROXY WILL present a poetry, song and dance program Sept. 18.
U,
:
mmg book
probes murders
America's fascination with
assaanations has been pricked
once again. The House assassina-
tions committee is just the tip of
the iceberg. While committee
members toil away tracking down
leads in the John Kennedy and
Martin Luther King murders,
other people around the country
are also spending time on the
subject.
In fact, not oriy has conspir-
acy sleuthing become a respect-
able job for a congressman, it has
become the vocation of literally
hundreds more.
In Washington, DC, a small
group of youthful zealots called
the Assassination Information
Bureau has been set up shop
funneling bits of data to the
House committee and monitoring
its work. The A.I B if perhaps
the most successful of the latter-
day assassination research
groups, according to Tom Miller,
author of the just-published
assassination please almanac.
(The initial response to Miller's
book is, in fact, another example
of the fascination with assassina-
tion.)
Begun four years ago as an
informal group called the Grassy
Knoll Debating Society, the
A.I.B which still maintains a
Cambridge, Ma. office, haj a
half-dozen speakers in its fold
whose presentations throughout
the country on "Who Killed
JFK?" have regularly packed
auditoriums. This past spring, the
A LB. enlisted the support of
Norman Mailer
A.iotier major lecturer in the
field is Mark Lane, who since
1964 has probably apptred on
more campuses than any other
single person on the college
circuit. His Washington, D.C.
group, the Citizen's Commission
of Inquiry, is largely supported by
the money generated from his
college appearances.
Wnat is startling about the
interest in the Kennedy assassin-
ation is. however, that there are
local prople in scores of com-
munities throughout the United
States who lecture on the subject
at high schools, ohirches, and
fnternal organizations- in fact,
anywhere an interest is express-
ed.
These speakers are mall parts
of the country, tod in all walks of
life, and span ages from 16 to 60.
It is an underground phenomen-
on, insistsautha Miller, who last
year sent out questlonaires to
assassination lecturers around
the country. The results of
Miller's questionaire make up an
entire chapter in THE ASSAS-
SINATION PLEASE ALMANAC,
listing virtually every Kennedy
assassination speaker and re-
source group in hte United
Stat!sas well as five that Miller
discovered overseas. Most of
them, Miller concludes, are in
towns with populations between
40,000 and 90,000, have some
coHegt education, and have stud-
ied assassination literature exten-
sively.
And, adds Miller, they all
refuse to accept the Warren
Commission'sconclusion that Lee
Oswald acted alone in killing John
Kennedy and that Jack Ruby
likewise acted alone when he shot
Oswald.
THE ASSASSINATION PLEASE
ALMANAC By Tom Miller ?84
pages $5.95 (paper)
Publication Date: September
23rd, 1977
i
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or take some goodies home!
Friday's Delight
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"A whole lot more than just one store





�� t" "KtwmS 'V.
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Page 12
Intramurdls
p
'by JOHN EVANS
Intramural
lights dedicated
After two years of planning and construction the new lighted
intramural fields next to Ficklen Stadium were formally dedicated
Monday night. These two new fields are lighted fa flag football and
Softball intramural games.
The lighted fields came about through the effats of staff and
faculty members in the Health and Physical Education department at
ECU; most notably Dr. Wayne Edwards, intramural directa; and Dr.
Edgar Hooks, the chairman of the department.
Constructiai on the fields began two years ago when the fields were
dosed fa student use and regraded and leveled during the summer
and fall of 1976. Last year, this wak was completed and during this
past summer the lights were purchased and installed fa two lighted
fields.
And when the lights were turned on Monday, the benefits of all the
time, effat and wak that went into the project shone brightly. The ten
poles, which will in future years be inaeased to 12 poles fa better
lighting, illuminate the fields well enough fa two games to be played.
Most of the players seemed to think the lights lit the field enough and
at the same time were situated well enough not to blind the players.
Dr. Hooks turned the switch on the lights and eight teams had the
hona of partidpating in the first games ever played under the lights.
In the first games of the evening the Kappa Alpha fraternity
defeatedTau Kappa Epsilon fraternity in an exdting game, 34-30, and
on field two the Tyler M ites downed the Fleming Foxes 36-0 in the first
women's intramural game of the year and the first women's game ever
played under the lights. In the evening's 9:30 games, Pi Kappa Phi
defeated Sigma Nu 20-6 and the Scott Time Outs routed the Aycock
Jades 52-12.
The first touchdowns ever scaed in night football at ECU were by
Tom Gibson of Kappa Alpha and Regina Lacy of the Tyler Mites.
The operation of the two new lighted football fields makes East
Carolina only one of two schools in the State and only one of five
schools in the entire Southeastern United States who now have
fadlities fa night play in football and softball. These fields add to the
total complex of ECU intramural fadlities, which already induded a
number of lighted tennis courts at Minges and on College Hill Drive. In
the future these fields will help provide intramural adivity through the
evening hours and help enable ECU students to get in on rrxxe
intramural activity.
FLAG FOOTBALL BEGINS
Men sand women's flag football have both already begun, but play
has been spotty so far due to rain and cancellations. Fafeits and
saaity rush in the wanen's divisiai have hindered play.
In the men's divisiai there were sane lopsided vidaies fa the
stronger teams during the first week's play. The Wonbats drilled the
Commodaes 46-0, the Ruggers dropped the Thunderchiefs 54-2, the
Leathernuts downed Phi Sigma Pi 42-20, and the Top Of The Roost
shutout Jones Junkmen 28-0. Other wins by leading teams were Tau
Kappa Epsilon's 52-0 embarrasment of Delta Sigma Phi and the
Sadaharu Ohs win over the Locals 32-18.
VOLLEYBALL OFFICIALSCLINIC
There is a need fa offidals to help with volleyball intramural
games. All those interested in serving as intramural volleyball offidals
are to attend the offidals' dinicthat will be held next week on Monday
and Tuesday in B-301 of Brewster Building. The dinics will be held at
730 at night and candidates must attend both meetings Fa further
infamation, see Sam Williams in the Intramural office.
TENNIS COM PETITION HASSTARTED
Competition in all levels of intramural tennis is to begin this week,
with 56 men and 27 women oompeting in the respective singles
competition and 19 men's teams and only four women's teams
competing in the doubles competition.
This year the field in the singles competition have been seeded and
byes have been awarded in the first round to those players that in past
years have shown to be the better players. This is to insure that most of
the better players won't have to meet each other until the quarterfinals
and semifinals and gives more of a realistic tournament approach to teh
competition.
In the men's singles byes went to Rick Bright, Bob Hane, Charlie
Brownlow, Mike Davis, Steve Millard, Randy Tharrington and Jess
Brown. In the women's division the byes went to defending champion
Janice McVeigh, last year's runnerup Janet Hoeppel, famer ECU
player Lora Dionis, ECU gymnastics coach Stevie Chepko and Elaine
Times and court assignments fa first round matches have already
been posted on the intramural board outside Room 204 Memaial Gym.
Futurexxjrt and time assignments will also be listed outside the doa
of Room 204.
ECU soccer enters 14th
season with new head coach
ByANNEHOGGE
Spats Edita
Entering its 14th seasai, the
ECU soccer team is young in
quite a few respeds. Its 25-man
roster indudes only 10 returning
players. And Brad Smith has
taken over as coach, the sixth
person to hold the position.
Smith is no stranger to East
Carolina a soccer. The 25-year-
old graduated from ECU in 1975
and played soccer the four years
he attended. Playing the fullback
position, he was a team co-
captain in 1973 and 1974, and was
named to the All-Conference first
team. Smith was also a co-
founder of the Greenville Soccer
Club.
After almost losing the soccer
program last year, Smith defi-
nitely feels that this is the year to
keep soccer alive at ECU. "I
want to aeate a new and better
image and attitude about the
game, something the players can
take pride in said Smith. "We
will need suppat fran every-
aie
Smith's team will be nothing
new, using no new styles. "We' re
just improving on the basics he
said. "We're waking ai control-
ling our shat pass, and we need
to improve our speed a bit.
ECU OPENS ITS soccer season today. The Pirates will participate in
the two-day Campbell Classic
"I think spirit has inaeased
over what it was last year. I've
made the rules and the team
knows them. There will be no
favaites. Everyaie will be treat-
ed the same
Smith thinks his team has
come a long way so far. "I'm still
learning what they can do he
said, "and they're still learning
what I exped from them. The re
waking as a whole to reach goals.
There's a strong feeling of team
unity.
"We're a young team. We've
been conditioning fa three weeks
and I think that's an asset.
Basically, we're an aggressive,
defense-aiented team
So far the team has a few
standout players. On defense, the
natural leader is Tom Long. The
senia fullback was named to last
year's All-Conferenoe first team.
"He's solid, clutch defensive
player said Smith. "The big
plays will be up to him
Also on defense will be
fullback Charlie Hardy. Smith
See SOCCER, pg. 13
Pirates, Rockets switch roles
PROBABLE STARTING LINEUPS
ECU
OFFENSE
SE Terry Gallaher(Sr 174)
LT Mitchell Smith (Jr 236)
LG Nelson Smith (Jr 238)
CRickieHolliday(Sr193)
RG Wayne Bolt (Sr 257)
RT Matt Mulholland (Jr 235)
TE Barry Johnson (Sr 225)
QB Jimmy Southerland (Sr 170)
FB Theodae Sutton (So 200)
RB Eddie Hicks(Jr 201)
RB Willie Hawkins(Sr 188)
AVG. WGTS. OFF. Backs-189.8:
Line-222.6
DEFENSE
SEJohnMaris(So206
LT Wayne Poole(Jr 235)
NG Oliver Felton(Jr 207)
RT Noah Clark (So 225)
WE Zack Valentine (Jr 218)
SLB Harold Randolph (Sr 195)
WLB Mike Brewington (So 225)
LCB Chart ie Carter (So 173)
SS Gerald Hall (Jr 184)
FSSteve Hale (Sr 177)
RCB Willie Hdley (So 176)
AVG. WGTS:Line-217.6;LB's-210
Sec-177.5
Placekickers: Junia Creech, Vern
Davenport
Punters: Rodney Allen, Tay Tripp
Breakdowns: Sr. 9; Jr. 8;So. 5
Toledo
OFFENSE
WRDanCox(Fr180)
LT Mike Yelley(Sr 250)
LG Bill Greisiger(Jr 220)
C Dave Karikas(Sr 212)
RG Jim Anderson (Sr 205)
RT Gary Zoldak(Sr 258)
TE Mike Sherman (Jr 235)
QBJeff Hepinstall(Sr183)
FB Golan Perry (So228)
TB Mike Alston (So 185)
WB Kevin Murphy (Sr 179)
AVG. WGTS: OFF. Backs-194:
Line-223
DEFENSE
SEJoeConroy(Jr210)
LT Pete Fiaitto(Sr 220)
MG Jim Seymour (Sr 220).
RTJonGotwald(Jr211)
WE Jerry Bodart(Jr 201)
SLBJimWalser(So205)
JLB Aaron Bivins(Sr 212).
SHBJimKendel(So170)
S Dave Hausfeld(Sr 190)
JET Mark Sutler (Jr 160)
WHBIrvKennerly(Jr153)
AVG.WGTS:Line-212.4
LB's-208.5; Sec167.8
Placekicker: David Ridgeway
Punter :RochWurst
Breakdowns: Sr. 10; Jr. 6; So.5;
Fr. 1
Sports
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Edita
The year was 1971. East
Carolina had a new head ooach,
Sonny Randle. To add to the
exdtment of the Pirate fans, the
powerful Toledo Rockets, kings of
the Mid-American Conference
and "Top Twenty" regulars,
were coming to town. As then
recad books show, the Rockets
routed the fumbling Pirates 45-0.
Thus the Pirates became another
easy prey fa one of the nations
most winning teams. In fad,
Toledo had feasted on almost 30
straight opponents befae beating
East Carolina.
Now the tide has turned. In six
years East Carolina's football
fatunes have risen glowingly.
Meanwhile, Toledo has taken one
of the greatest downfalls in
football histay.
When the Pirates meet Toledo
fa the third meeting in the
series, the Pirates will surely
have the upper hand.
In the last two weeks East
Carolina has defeated NC State
and Duke away from Ficklen
Stadium. The Rockets, on the
other hand, lost in a rout to Ball
State, a powerful new member of
the Mid-American conference
and last year's champion. In
beating Toledo at it's "Glass
Bowl Stadium Ball State made
it look easy with a 43-3 soore.
Does this mean that the Pirates
will make Toledo their third win
in a row without a fight? Not so,
says ooach Pat Dye.
" No one can say how good or
how bad Toledo is due to the
drcumstances surrounding their
Sne TOLEDO, pg. 13
I
. 4. .
f � M4AI
� j �. ' rs
��HB





��I
mi
15 Saptembar 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pug 13
Toledo presents motivational problem
Continued from pg. 12
team Dye said. "They have a
new coaching staff, they lost their
quarterback on the third play of
the game and they played a 'real
good' Ball State team in their
opener. I expect to see a different
Toledo team this coming Saturday
than the one they played last
week. They have had a chance to
play a game, correct mistakes
and make adjustments
Besides the fact that Toledo
may surprise the Pirates young
squad, there is another problem.
That is simple motivation. Coach
Dye is all too aware that ooming
off two emotional games with
in-state rivals can hurt a team as
far as preparation for an out of
state team.
"I'm deeply concerned about
our football team ooming off two
highly emotional games with
in-state rivals Dye said. "This
could be the toughest week of the
season for the players and
coaches after coming off those
two big games
In speaking of the Toledo
team, coach Dye notes that the
Rockets have great size on their
lines as well as solid skill players.
"Toledo has exoellent players
at the skill positions Dye said.
Their first team quarterback is a
very, very good player, although
he saw little action Saturday. But
I thought their second team
quarterback played a fine game.
They have two gigantic tackles
(both 6-6, 250 plus), probably the
biggest we've ever faced. Defen-
sively, Toledo has a great line-
backer in Andre Bivens, who was
named Mid-American Conference
Defensive Player of the Year last
season. And their safety is a
three-year starter
"It's our third straight game
on the road and Toledo's second
at home Dye said. "They will
be keyed up and ready, trying to
bounce back from their loss. So I
would say we definitely have our
work cut out this Saturday
night
Another motivation fa the
THIS IS HOW it looked the last time East Carolina
and Toledo met in 1971. In this game the Pirates
were blown out of Ficklen Stadium 40-0.
Rockets is that the Pirates tried
unsuccessfully last spring to drop
them from their schedule in ader
to make room fa Duke. All
Toledo coach Chuck Stobart has
to say to his players befae the
game starts is "they didn't want
to play us
The game then shapes uo to
be a tough game fa the Pirates
even though Toledo isn't the
powerhouse they used to be. Now
is the chance fa a young East
Carolina squad to show what it is
made of in a game all too many
students and fans seem to be
overlooking as being important.
The game will start at 7:30
Saturday night. East Carolina will
depart Kinston Jetport via Sou-
thern Airways charter at 1030
p.m. Friday, arriving 1159 at
team headquarters, Holiday Inn,
60630 Freemont Pike, Perrysburg
Ohio.
13
SOCCER
Continued from pg. 12
terms Hardy a "hustler" and
expectshimtodowell. Hardy and
Long are the team's co-captains.
Offensively, the team has two
standouts, Phil Martin and Jay
High. Both are fawards but will
function differently during the
game. "Martin looks like he'll be
a big scorer fa the team
aooading to Smith, "while High
should be a big assist man. I'll
count on him more fa assists
than fa soaing
A choice candidate fa the
goalie position will be Hal Bul-
lock. "Bui lock's a sophomae who
played last year but is still a bit
untested said Smith. "Another
possibility fa goalie is Mike
Lav -enoe, a freshman
The team has already played
in a scrimmage match. They
defeated the Greenville Soccer
Club, 9-0.
The schedule will be one of
the Pirates toughest. "We play
three southern Too Ten teams
(3rd Appalachian, 7th UNC-CH ,
10th UNC-W) and an honaable
mention (Guilfad) according to
Smith. "This doesn't include
William and Mary, who's pro-
bably in the Top Ten of their own
division, and there's always the
ACC rivalry with Duke, State and
Chapel Hill
"I really can't make a predic-
tion fa the year said Smith,
" but I think we' II break even. The
soccer program will have grown
and improved even if the reoad
doesn't show it.
"We could have possibly been
a better team if we had some
recruits But due to the situation
last year (when soccer was nearly
dropped), the reauits went else-
where. Our team is made up of
people who want to play. I' m glad
to see the program back
The Pirates travel today to Guilfad College. The game cap-
compete in the Campbell Soccer
Classic in Buie's Creek, where
host team Campbell oompetes
against the Pirates, Erskine and
tain fa this match, which will be
elected befae every match, will
be senia halfback Mike Fetchko.
Coach Smith sees the Classic
as being a tough opener, Camp-
bell isalways tough and you can't
underestimate either Erskine a
Guilfad he said. "We're ready
to play and hoping fa the best. I
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 1977 SOCCER SCHEDULE
really hope, though, that there's
a la of support fa the team this
year. I want the crowds to oome
out and enjoy the game, and the
administration to see that its
enjoyed
TACOS- ENCHILADAS- TAMALES - RICE - BEANS -CHILI CON CARNE
Sept. 15-16
Sept. 24
Oct. 2
Oct.4
Oct.8
Oct.15
Oct. 18
Oct. 20
Oct. 22
Oct.26
Oct.26
Oct.28
Campbell Sec.
Classic (Camp-
bell, ECU,
Erskine, Guilfad)
Gddsoao Soooer
Club
ASU
Duke Univ.
St. Andrews Col.
UNC-Wilmington
NCSU
NC Wesleyan Col
UNC-CH
Pembroke State
Pembroke State
William & Mary
Buies Creek, NC TBA
Greenville, NC 2O0pm
Boone, NC 200pm
Greenville, NC 400pm
Laurinburg, NC 200pm
Wilmingtoi, NC 2.00pm
Greenville, NC 4.00pm
Rocky Mount, NC 4:00pm
Chapel Hill, NC 11O0am
Pembroke, NC 3 30pm.
Williamsburg, N.C. 730pm.

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Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 September 1977
Dye thinks ACC wins overemphasized
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
With two emotionally packed
victories in just two weeks over
in state rivals, Duke and N.C.
State, ECU head coach Pat Dye
sent out a precautionary reminder
Wednesday at his weekly press
luncheon.
Our fans and players have to
sit down and realize we still have
nine games remaining in our
schedule cautioned Dye.
We're coming off two very
emotionaJ wins. This could be the
toughest week of the season for
our players and coaches after
those two games
The Pirates move out of state
for a change this weekend when
they venture to Toledo, Ohio to
face the Toledo Rockets. The
game will be played in something
called the Glass Bowl Stadium
SAAD'S
SHOE
SHOP
Across from
Sherwkv Williams?
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Saturday night at 7 JO. A meager
14,000 fans are expected for the
game in a series which dates back
to 1970.
Dye praised the Pirates for
their overall performance in last
week's 17-16 victory over Duke,
but still had legitimate gripes
about the defense and the kicking
game.
"The game could have gone
either way said Dye. "We were
very fortunate to win. Duke put a
great deal of emphasis on our
game and I know they were
extremely disappointed to lose. It
just goes to show you if everybody
works hard and believes, you can
accomplish about anything
Dye cited his alternating
quarterbacks Leander Green and
Jimmy Southerland for their
leadership abilities against the
Blue Devils. Green scored the
Pirates first touchdown on a six
yard scamper while Southerland
scored the winning touchdown in
the fourth quarter.
Dye gave special recognition
to halfback Willie Hawkins, call-
ing him "the best back in the
state. He probably won't get the
yardage other backs will get, said
Dye, because we have so many
backs in our offense. He's an
excellent runner and catches the
ball extremely well
Dye also praised halfback
Eddie Hicks (7 carries 22 yards),
,lNC
10 Discount
to all ECU students with ID
All name brand merchandise
Emily Just Emily E.S. Dean
John mayer Susan Bristol
222 E PIFTH ST
GREENVILLE. N C 27834
Ahoy Mates!
Our ship The Galley
has just come in!
To introduce you to our newest
facility, bring this ad to the Galley
Room and receive a Free 9oz. soft
drink. The Galley Room is
open Mon. - Fri
Lunch 11:00-2:30
Dinner 4:30-7:00
LWe are located at the
South end of Jones
dorm.
"�fcSfr.
(This offer good Fri. and
Mon. only, LIMIT 1 AD
PER PERSON)
HhflHHk�44UK,
THIS PICTURE TELLS the story of
between Duke and East Carolina.
freshman halfback Anthony Col-
lins (2 carries, 30 yards) and
fullback Theodore Sutton (14
carries, 55 yards).
Dye had plenty of praise for
his offensive line calling it "the
best since I've been at East
Carolina Guards Wayne Bolt,
Nelson Smith along with tackles
Mitchell Smith and Joe Godette
and center Ricky Holliday all
graded well. Tight end Barry
Johnson and split end Terry
Gallaher were praised for their
downfield blocking and clutch
pass catching.
Defensively Dye pointed out
that the Pirates are not where
they were last year at this time.
"If we don't get better as the
season goes along, we're going to
lose a game we should win said
Dye. "Our opponents have aver-
aged 388 yards a game on us. The
only good thing about our defense
has been our play against the
rush. And that's only been
decent No one is getting to the
the first meeting the Duke victory was a great win over a 'tradition
Coach Dye felt rich' interstate rival. Photo by Kirk Kingsbury).
quarterback on the pass rush
unless its been a blitz. We've just
got to improve as the season
moves along
Dye lauded defensive end
Zack Valentine and John Morris
along with tackles Fred Chavis,
Noah Clark, and D.T. Joyner for
their performance against the
explosive Duke offense.
Linebackers Harold Randolph,
Tommy Summer, and Harold Fort
were also cited for their efforts.
One problem which has pla-
gued the Pirates in their first two
games has been the field goal
kicking situation. Junior Creech,
a walkon from Smithfield, has
converted 6-6 extra points this
season, but has connected on only
1 of 5 field goal attempts. Larry
Paul and Vern Davenport along
with Creech are still all battling
for the number one placekicking
spot.
"I'm just going to sit back csd
pray said Dye. "I hope we can
find someone with some consis-
tency before the end of the year
Now that the Pirates have
completed their games against
Atlantic Coast Conference teams
this year, Dye took a moment to
express his feelings concerning
the ACC games.
"Our fans, the press, and
everyone at ECU has put entirely
too much emphasis on ACC
games said Dye. "Although I
realize how important it is we
maintain close relations with ACC
teams, we' II play some teams this
year that are just as good if not
better than ACC teams.
The competition among the
ACC schools is great and I think
all members of the ACC are class
schools said Dye. "I just wish
our fans would quit making such a
big fuss over the ACC schools.
There is no way to judge how
good or how bad our team is by
playing ACC schools.
"To me, it was just another
football game
Keating made assistant trainer
East Carolina Spots Medicine
Director Rod Compton has an-
nounced the appointment of Jim
Keating as an Assistant Athletic
Trainer.
Keating, a 1977 graduate of
East Carolina, will assistCompton
in the administration of the Sports
Medicine Curriculum, and in the
duties associated with men's
athletics. He served briefly as a
graduate assistant at The Citadel
before rejoining the ECU staff.
"We are delighted that Jim
could join us again said
Compton. "He was our first
choice to fill the position that we
had open. He is a very capable
trainer and teacher, and will be a
definite asset to our program
The position came open when
former Assistant Trainer Ronnie
Barnes took a similar position at
Michigan State. Keating is a
native od Annandale, Va.
Permanent Removal Of
Unwanted Hair
From
7
Hair
Line
Neck
Face
NO NEEDLES,
NO PAIN
NO HAIR
NOSLARS
NO INFECTIONS
Stomach
Bikini Line
Thijjhs
If
Legs
Ph Of 7S6 4366
710 Greenville Blvd
Greenville, N C 278J4
Res 756 DAP
This Sunday on
Channel 9,
The Pat Dye Show
will be aired
at 12:00pm.
Highlights of the
ECU- Toledo
game
will be shown





������
� T' ; -f
t.��'I'l � ' f jf? -
15 SeWembw 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pipe 15
r
(
Pirate,
Duke
Standouts
Photo by Brian Stotler
mm
Photo by Jeff Robb)
THE PIRATES AND the Blue
Devils had many heros from
the game last Saturday. Some
of the more outstanding play-
ers for East Canxina were
quarterback Leander Green
U12 (upper left picture), run-
ningback Willie Hawkins 33
(upper right picture) Wayne
Bolt 66 )in lower right picture
toward the right) and Dukes
Mike Dunn n 8 (in lower left
picture toward the left). All of
these players did an outstan-
ding job and will be heard
from for the rest of this year at
both Duke and East Carolina.
Photo by Jeff Robb)
WSfSm
Photo by Brian Stotler
v.
ft
��
.��'
Classifieds
for sale
RUGS FOR SALE: 3 X 4 oelery
green (new) 6.00, 22 x16 12
celery green (new) 10.00, 8x11
brown braided 15.00, 8x12 aqua
(used 5 months) 30.00 Call
756-4380 after 7 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1968 Volks oonvert-
able, excellent oond. Top in good
shape too! 752-9567 after 5 p.m.
900.00.
BEDROOM SUITE: French style
wooden with large dresser and
mirror. Large headboard and
bedside table. Mattresses includ-
ed. Excellent oond. 300.00 Call
758-6645 after 5 p.m.
LOST: High School Qass Ring,
Tarboro Senior High 76, Reward.
Call 752-8647.
FOR SALE: 66 V.W. in excellent
oond. with sun roof, radio, trailer
hitch, 4 speed. Must see to
appreciate. Call 756-0267.
FOR SALE RD350 Yamaha 74,
low mileage, 500.00. 756-4946
after 9 30 p.m.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1975 Kawasaki
H1500. Over 700.00 invested in
recent performance, handling,
and appearance modifications,
including a freah bore on engine.
This is one very quick, good-
handling motorcycle. Offers
please. Steve. 758-4039.
FOR SALE: Beautiful wooden
free-standing bookcase T 8"x7
with 16 adjustable shelves and 2
others. Easy to assemble or take
apart. 125,00. Air Conditioner
24,000 BTU's 175.00. Avocado
Kelvinator Stove 65.00 Call
758-5392.
FOR SALE: 20 cu. ft. Hotpoint
Refrigerator, excellent oond in-
side and out, gets beer real cold.
Asking only 30.00. Call 758-1486
between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on
Mon Wed and Fri.
VEGA WAGON for sale with
AC, 4 speed, new clutch. One
owner. Economical transporta-
tion. 30000 9469838, after 6
p.m.
FOR SALE: 1 three-man inflat-
able canoe with break-apart pad-
dle and foot bellows. 65.00. Also
10-speed bike for 70.00. Both
items are in excellent oond. Call
Neil at 752-7065 or come by
112-A Avery St.
12 VOLT BATTERY for sale:
40.00 new, asking 25.00. Used
only two weeks . Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Lowery console piano
less than 1 yr. old. Walnut finish,
in perfect cond. 795.00 Call
756-5733.
FOR SALE: Must Sell-1 Yamaha
Trombone, used but in good
oond. 100.00,1 Ventura 12-string
guitar exoeilent oond. 200.00, Call
Ada at 752-1820 or leave
message
HONDA CIVIC 1976V2 hatch-
back, 4 speed, gold, 2700.00.
Speakers, OHM "D 100.00 for
pair. Motorcyde helmet 20.00
Call 752-7817.
PANASONIC STEREO: cassette
recorder with AM FM stereo and
two speakers. Meter reoording
foot oounter monitor jacks for
headphones. Line in line out
phono-in, extra speakers, stereo
mono switch 85 00 Call 752-6042.
FOR SALE: Female Great Dane
Brindle. 10 months old. Has
papers Great Disposition. Call
7566269.
FLEA MARKET located on
Pactolus H wy 33 of f Greene St. on
right East 112 mile. Open every-
day 11 til 5, Sunday 1 til 6.
Delivery can be arranged.
FOR SALE: Kitchen table and 4
chairs Good Cond. Call if inter-
ested. 758-3326.
FOR SALE: "Camptrail" back-
pack. Frame and bag. Ntever been
used. 60.00 Contact Alan at
752-1632.
CAPRI 1972 standard. In a-1
oond. Call after 530 p.m. 752-
7227 or anytime on weekends
ROOMS FOR RENT: near
campus, utilities extra, kitchen
privileges (females only) call
752-2859.
personal J
7)
�)
for rent (fj)
ROOMATE NEEDED: Male 105
Oak St. Rent approx. 60.00 plus
13 of utilities. Call after 6:00
752-2492.
FEMALE ROOMATE: needed to
share apartment. Graduate stud-
ent or professional student pre-
ferred. Call 758-0719after 5 p.m.
WANTED: One Aoctina. tutor fa
Accting. 2401. Call 752-5408
FOUND: A ring full of keys.
Found at Mendenhall bus stop.
Call 7S&6349 Ask fa Alioe.
TYPING SERVICE: Need any-
thing typed? I need money! Call
752-4013 after 5 p.m.
PART TIME JOB: Tennis re-
stringing in sporting goods dept.
Hodges. M jst be a male and able
to wak Mai-Sat. and holidays
(Xmas and Thanksgiving) See
John Hill at H.L. Hodges Co. 210
E. 5th St. 752-4156.
BANJO LESSONS: 5-string, now
available for the beginning
student. "Sauggs" and "Mel-
odic" styles of playing. Exper-
ienced ins�-uda. Call 756-1767.
.U��J'f'r.�
�i'i
V.W-VAVAV.V
A





�nmnRRHHini
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 September 1977
Dye thinks ACC wins overemphasized
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
With two emotionally packed
victories in just two weeks over
in state rivals, Duke and N.C.
State, ECU head coach Pat Dye
sent out a precautionary reminder
Wednesday at his weekly press
luncheon.
Our fans and players have to
sit down and realize we still have
nine games remaining in our
schedule cautioned Dye.
"We're coming off two very
emotional wins. This could be the
toughest week of the season for
our players and coaches after
those two games
The Pirates move out of state
for a change this weekend when
they venture to Toledo, Ohio to
face the Toledo Rockets. The
game will be played in something
called the Glass Bowl Stadium
SAAD'S
SHOE
SHOP
Across from
Sherwm-Williams:
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Saturday night at 7:30. A meager
14,000 fans are expected for the
game in a series which dates back
to 1970.
Dye praised the Pirates for
their overall performance in last
week's 17-16 victory over Duke,
but still had legitimate gripes
about the defense and the kicking
game.
"The game could have gone
either way said Dye. "We were
very fortunate to win. Duke put a
great deal of emphasis on our
game and I know they were
extremely disappointed to lose. It
j ust goes to show you if everybody
works hard and believes, you can
accomplish about anything
Dye cited his alternating
quarterbacks Leander Green and
Jimmy Southerland for their
leadership abilities against the
Blue Devils. Green scored the
Pirates first touchdown on a six
yard scamper while Southerland
scored the winning touchdown in
the fourth quarter.
Dye gave special recognition
to halfback Willie Hawkins, call-
ing him "the best back in the
state. He probably won't get the
yardage other backs will get, said
Dye, because we have so many
backs in our offense. He's an
excellent runner and catches the
ball extremely well
Dye also praised halfback
Eddie Hicks (7 carries 22 yards),
(lNC.
10 Discount
to all ECU students with ID
All name brand merchandise
Emily Just Emily E.S. Dean
John mayer Susan Bristol
222 E FIFTH ST
GREENVILLE. N C 27834
Ahoy Mates!
Our ship The Galley
has just come in!
To introduce you to our newest
facility, bring this ad to the Galley
Room and receive a Free 9oz. soft
drink. The Galley Room is
open Mon. - FrL
Lunch 11:00-2:30
Dinner 4:30 7:00
We are located at the
South end of Jones
dorm.
(This offer good Fri. and
Mon. only, LIMIT 1 AD
PER PERSON)
m�&M,jtm,
IMEOUTSLEFT QUARTER M TIMEOUTiEFT


THIS PICTURE TELLS the story of
between Duke and East Carolina.
freshman halfback Anthony Col-
lins (2 carries, 30 yards) and
fullback Theodore Sutton (14
carries, 55 yards).
Dye had plenty of praise fa
his offensive line calling it "the
best since I've been at East
Carolina Guards Wayne Bolt,
Nelson Smith along with tackles
Mitchell Smith and Joe Godette
and center Ricky Holliday all
graded well. Tight end Barry
Johnson and split end Terry
Gallaher were praised for their
downfield blocking and dutch
pass catching.
Defensively Dye pointed out
that the Pirates are not where
they were last year at this time.
"If we don't get better as the
season goes along, we' re going to
lose a game we should win said
Dye. Our opponents have aver-
aged 388 yards a game on us. The
only good thing about our defense
has been our play against the
rush. And that's only been
decent. No one is getting to the
the first meeting
Coach Dye felt
the Duke victory was a great win over a 'tradition
rich' interstate rival. Photo by K irk K ingsbury.
quarterback on the pass rush
unless its been a blitz. We've just
got to improve as the season
moves along
Dye lauded defensive end
Zack Valentine and John Morris
along with tackles Fred Chavis,
Noah Clark, and D.T. Joyner for
their performance against the
explosive Duke offense.
Linebackers Harold Randolph,
Tommy Summer, and Harold Fort
were also cited fa their effats.
One problem which has pla-
gued the Pirates in their first two
games has been the field goal
kicking situation. Junia Creech,
a walkon fron Smithfield, has
converted 6-6 extra points this
season, but hasoonnected on only
1 of 5 field goal attempts. Larry
Paul and Vern Davenport along
with Creech are still all battling
for the number one placekicking
spot.
"I'm just going to sit back ejid
pray said Dye. "I hope we can
find someone with some consis-
tency before the end of the year
Now that the Pirates have
completed their games against
Atlantic Coast Conferenoe teams
this year, Dye took a moment to
express his feelings concerning
the ACC games.
"Our fans, the press, and
everyone at ECU has put entirely
too much emphasis on ACC
games said Dye. "Although I
realize how important it is we
maintain close relations with ACC
teams, we' II play some teams this
year that are just as good if not
better than ACC teams.
The competition among the
ACC schools is great and I think
all members of the ACC are class
schools said Dye. "I just wish
our fans would quit making such a
big fuss over the ACC schools.
There is no way to judge how
good or how bad our team is by
playing ACC schools.
"To me, it was just another
football game
Keating made assistant trainer
East Carolina Spots Medicine
Director Rod Compton has an-
nounced the appointment of Jim
Keating as an Assistant Athletic
Trainer.
Keating, a 1977 graduate of
East Carolina, will assistCompton
in the administration of the Sports
Medicine Curriculum, and in the
duties associated with men's
athletics. He served briefly as a
graduate assistant at The Citadel
before rejoining the ECU staff.
"We are delighted that Jim
could join us again said
Compton. "He was our first
choice to fill the position that we
had open. He is a very capable
trainer and teacher, and will be a
definite asset to our program
The position came open when
former Assistant Trainer Ronnie
Barnes took a similar position at
Michigan State. Keating is a
native od Annandale, Va.
Permanent Removal Of
Unwanted Hair
From
Hair
Line
17w. Line
A'lVs Neck
VtL � Face
NO NEEDLES,
NO PAIN
NO HAIR
NOSlARS
NO INFECTIONS
Stomach
Bikini Line
Thighs
I
La 1 m i
Legs
-
' Ph O S6 4366
IX Greenville Blvd
Greenville. N C 27834
Rps 756 116
This Sunday on
Channel 9,
The Pat Dye Show
will be aired
at 1200pm.
Highlights of the
ECU- Toledo
game
will be shown
�St. Vfrf "�





r
Photo by Brian Stotler
Photo by Jeff Robb)
4
Pirate,
Duke
Standouts
THE PRATES AND the Blue
Devils had many heros from
the game last Saturday. Some
of the more outstanding play-
ers for East Carolina were
quarterback Leander Green
H12 (upper left picture), run-
ningback Willie Hawkins 33
(upper right picture) Wayne
Bolt it 65) in lower right picture
toward the right) and Dukes
Mike Dunn tt 8 (in lower left
picture toward the left). All of
these players did an outstan-
ding job and will be heard
from for the rest of this year at
both Duke and East Carolina.
15 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pigi 15
Photo by Jeff Robb)
Photo by Brian Stotler
Classifieds
for sale
RUGS FOR SALE: 3 X 4 celery
green (new) 6.00, 22 x16 12
celery green (new) 10.00, 8x11
brown braided 15.00, 8x12 aqua
(used 5 months) 30.00 Call
756-4380 after 7 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1968 VoJks convert-
able, excellent oond. Top in good
shape too! 752-9567 after 5 p.m.
900.00.
BEDROOM SUITE: French style
wooden with large dresser and
mirror. Large headboard and
bedside table. Mattresses includ-
ed. Excellent oond. 300.00 Call
758645 after 5 p.m.
LOST: High School Class Ring,
Tarboro Senior High 76, Reward.
Call 752-8647.
FOR SALE: 66 V.W. in excellent
oond. with sun roof, radio, trailer
hitch, 4 speed. Must see to
appreciate. Call 756-0267.
FOR SALE RD350 Yamaha 74,
low mileage, 500.00. 7r6-4946
after 9:30 p.m.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1975 Kawasaki
H1500. Over 700.00 invested in
recent performance, handling,
and appearance modifications,
including a freah bore on engine.
This is one very quick, good-
handling motorcycle. Offers
please. Steve. 758-4039.
FOR SALE: Beautiful wooden
free-standing bookcase T 8"x7
with 16 adjustable shelves and 2
others. Easy to assemble or take
apart. 125,00. Air Conditioner
24,000 BTU's 175.00. Avocado
Kelvinator Stove 65.00 Call
758-5392.
FOR SALE: 1 three-man inflat-
able canoe with break-apart pad-
dle and foot bellows: 65.00. Also
10-speed bike fa 70.00. Both
items are in excellent cond. Call
Neil at 752-7065 a oane by
112-A A very St.
12 VOLT BATTERY fa sale:
40.00 new, asking 25.00. Used
oily two weeks . Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Lowery console piano
less than 1 yr. old. Walnut finish,
in perfect cond. 795.00 Call
756-5733.
FOR SALE: Must Sell-1 Yamaha
Trombone, used but in good
oond. 100.00,1 Ventura 12-string
guitar excellent oond. 200.00, Call
Ada at 752-1820 or leave
message.
FOR SALE: 20 cu. ft. Hotpoint HONDA CIVIC I976y2 hatch-
Refrigerata, excellent oond in-
side and out, gets beer real cold.
Asking only 30.00. Call 758-1486
between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on
Mon Wed and Fri.
VEGA WAGON fa sale wiih
AC, 4 speed, new clutch. One
owner. Economical transpata-
tion. 30000 946 9838, after 6
p.m.
back, 4 speed, gold, 2700.00.
Speakers, OHM "D 100.00 fa
pair. Motacyde helmet 20.00
Call 752-7817.
PANASONIC STEREO; cassette
recader with AMFM stereo and
two speakers. Meter recading
feet counter monita jacks fa
headphaies. Line in line out
phono-in, extra speakas, stereo
mono switch 85 00 Call 752-6042.
FOR SALE: Female Great Dane
Brindle. 10 months old. Has
papers Great Disposition. Call
756269.
FLEA MARKET located on
Pactolus Hwy 33 off Greene St. on
right East 112 mile. Open every-
day 11 til 5, Sunday 1 til 6.
Delivery can be arranged.
FOR SALE: Kitchen table and 4
chairs Good Cond. Call if inta-
ested. 758-3326.
FOR SALE: "Camptrail" back-
pack. Frame and bag. Neva been
used. 60.00 Contact Alan at
7S2-1632.
CAPRI 1972 standard. In a-1
oond. Call afta 530 p.m. 752-
7227 a anytime oi weekends
torrent (JT
ROOM ATE NEEDED. Male 105
Oak St. Rent approx. 60.00 plus
13 of utilities. Call afta 6fl0.
752-2492
FEMALE ROOMATE: needed to
share apartment. Graduate stud-
ent a prtessional student pre-
ferred. Call: 758-0719afta 5 p.m.
ROOMS FOR RENT: near
campus, utilities extra, kitchen
privileges (females only) call
752-2859.
personal i A
WANTED One Acctina tuta fa
Accting. 2401. Call 752-5408
FOUND: A ring full of keys
Found at MendenhaJI bus stop.
Call 758-8349 Ask fa Alice.
TYPING SERVICE: Need any-
thing typed? I need money! Call
752-4013 afta 5 p.m.
PART TIME JOB: Tennis re-
stringing in sporting goods dept
Hodges. Must be a male and able
to wak Mat-Sat. and holidays
(Xmas and Thanksgiving) See
John Hill at H.L. Hodges Co. 210
E. 5th a. 752-4156.
BANJO LESSONS: 5-string, now
available fa the beginning
student "Scruggs" and "Mel-
odic" styles of playing. Exper-
ienced ins�"uda. Call 756-1767.
fjrf.V �.VHMf�.
Il UN
� V V �� V �V.
J





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 15 September 1977
Howdy Pard
Roger's Family
now
Come on in and try
our delicious Western
Fried Chicken. It's
great to carry out to
the ballgame!
The best
of the fresh"
waitin' in convenient carry-
out paks of 8 and 12. There's
a big 20pc. pak too for under
SI0.00. The whole gang can
enjoy it
8pc. pak-$3.90
12pc. pak-&5.75
2()pc. pak- $8.95
109c discount
on any chicken
purchase
of $10.00
or more.
"You've got my word
on it, pardner
Don't forget to include some
helpin'e of our crisp. Texas
Tatars an fresh cole slaw. too.
So. c'mon in and carry-out
our famous fried chicken to
the ballgame or wherever
Save TimeCall Ahead and Reserve Your Order
752-1401
Yes Pirates, We Now Have Breakfast, Also!
Breakfast Hours: MonSat. 6:30a.m10:30a.m.
Blueberry and Golden
Brown Waffles
Creamed Chipped
Beef
over butter toasted roll
Scrambled Eggs
and Grits
Early Rider Sandwich
egg and cheese with sausage or
ham on butter toasted roll.
Side Orders of Smoked Ham and Sausage
Pastries - Tatars - Juices
Have a Bottomless
cup of Coke FREE
with coupon
ENJOY A FREE COCA COLA WITH THE
PURCHASE OF ANY PLATTER. QUARTER
CHICKEN OR SANDWICH
ROY ROGERS FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Greenville
Come on in and join the ranch hands for breakfast
Located at the Corner of 10th and Cotanche





Title
Fountainhead, September 15, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.471
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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