The East Carolinian, April 14, 1988






COMING TUESDAY: Reports on the Chancellor Richard Eakin's inauguration.ENTERTAINMENT An Evening with the Bad Checks, see page 8.SPORTS ECU Cagers recruit class prospects, see page 12. t
�he i-aat Carolinian
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No
I hursday, April 14,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Air Force ROTC group is
given two-year extension
By TIM H-W1PK v
Freshmenand soph
rently enrolled in tl
ROTC need not worn
future oi . � -
an am
by Air Force (
postpone a pi m :
reducl nns
until 1990.
Tuesday's
month
ary an
- th program
tion of AFROTC
� . . to freshmen and
fall semester.
i ' ipements
urses will
d and t an be added to
� II semester
ration, Patton
'et . �
ninior
down
whit I
ate. i
i
i
:
nation
the
closii
The late sf ai
by the secretan I tl
'�
warm resj
ECl
and w
ml

ram sa
Patton � aid would
largest
expected to
. -�fore the 1 there come inior class. � the initial re affected
�a! to high . mtat ting - he will be rd that the m Aldi � � post
r stating

of the
closure plan will last for two
years.
Although the AFROTC has
been gi ven a new breath of life, the
new plan calls for a 15 percent
down-scaling in the number oi
graduates rising from the AF-
ROTC programs by 1990. The
reductions will be instated to
conform to a Congress mandate
calling for a trimming of the
number of officer accession, or
officers rising in military ranks.
Commander Patton said the 15
percent reduction will mean that
instead of the approximately
$,500 officers commissioned an-
nually by all the AFROTC pro-
grams there will be approxi-
mately 2,500 college graduates
ascending to officer ranks in the
Air Force.
Speaking about the future re-
duction, Patton said "1 don't think
it will really affect us ECU's Air
Force ROTC program commis-
sions about 2 officers annually,
according to Patton.
looking forward to the fall
semester, Patton said "We'll be up
and running next year
Not surprised bv Spe;ikj
Thomas talks about politics
1 SUSAN A
Bureau C h
Intei
ird"
Iho-
as a
who
� Tiu'
camj
as a part
Honor .
Series
Tuesday
dressed a cr
Theater taking qu
floor following her let tui
nesday found Thomas taking par!
m a panel discussion i m the :
and politics in Medenh i
Thomas, who opened her lec-
ture ruesday with thequip "I just
came from the White ! I i
us pra . -pent some ti
cussing the recent flap in Wash-
ington over former
Larry Speakes' memoirs and his
revelation that he drafted quoti -
and then attributed them t
agan. Thomas said that while sht
"wasn't as shocked as mi
Washington she didn't blamt
Speakes who felt he had
blanche" when he wasn t ailed u
book by cither Reagan or hisadvi
sors.
� the running
; - o
hd that Reagan
i k label '
. n with all
�ve his o
i v I i summit
.i act
.marl
I that Reagan
who "ii ver met an arms program
that he didn't love nor met a social
program he liked toned down
his "Rambo" like approach in
favor o the mantle of peace nego-
tiator when he found it played
better with the public. Thomas
predicted that if the summit pro-
duced a workable treaty that
Reagan would probably win a
Nobel Peace Prize.
See THOMAS, page 7
Margo Puller pushes Carol Shore towards the starting line in a wheelb. nv race held Sunday at the
Sigma Phi Epsilon house to kick off Creek Week. (Thomas Walters � Photolab)
Few rape charges filed on campus
By riM HAMPTON
;pite clain i stu-
dent group that several rapes .m
attempted i ipes ha1 eoccurredor
campus during the spring
semester, the head of E( 1' cam
pusse uritysaidW dnesdaythat
Thomas answers questions
l,v
SI SAN ADAMS
involved. You must remember
the president has 17 seconds to
blow it all up. It is the role oi the
press to act as a pipeline, but the
Carolinian Wednesday prior to a P�pte must be involved.
i mas, cteren White
� l granted a
gan. 1 v as
was verbatim
K.
anel discussion on the role of the
n poli
I.C You stated last evening (in
the Phi Kapa Phi symposium) that
you weren't shocked by the recent
it the responsibility of revelations that Larry Speakes
� as w ell as the press to had fabricated quotes and attnb-
1, mand accountability from pub- utcd them l,� 'dent ReaSa
Thomas: I should have said that
' Thorn ,s rhc people must be ' wasn' wrp that Speakes
1 .C
had paraprl
surpised that it
quote. 1 dor peak s. It is
the top aid h . all the shots.
1 have said to Mr. Speakes ley
now wait a min it� - hose state-
ment is that? Is it the Presidents
statement or not? '
E.C Past night you also said
the current ca ididates tor the
presidency lack inspiration.
Would you include Jackson in
that statement?
Thomas: No, I'm sorry I said
that. Jackson touches a chord. He
has reshaped his own image, jetti-
soned his leftist views.
E.C The recent Democratic
primaries have seem rather tame
compared to recc nt years . Is that
because the Democrats realize
they must present a united front
heading into the general election
if they are to defeat the Republi-
cans?
Thomas: 1 think the attitude is
don't burn all your bridges. Al
Gore has taken his gloves off.
Dont forget, Dole fell by the way
side when he said "Tell Bush to
stop lying His acidness came
out.
E.C There has been talk that if
the Democrats choose Jackson as
a vice presidential nominee that
the Republicans will choose a
woman. How do you view such a
senario?
Thomas: It would be total
irony. I think the people are ready.
A breakthrough was made with
Ferraro.
E.C Of the six administrations
you've covered which has been
rmdent Helen Thomas accepts a plaque of recognition Wednesday following the most open with the press?
a panel discussion on the media and politics. (Hardy Alligood - Photolab.) Thomas: None.
only one alleged rape has been
reported.
The reported alleged rape, later
i hanged loan alleged assault on a
female, took place in a Scott Dor
' iry room on February 21 in an
incident invoking several ECU
football players. The football
players were granted a continu-
ance in Pitt County Superior
I 'iirt Tuesday after the players'
i. er could not appear in court,
according to Joseph Calder, head
of campus security.
In Calder's 20 years with ECU
cam
have
pus
en manv
which a
ported a rape but latei
the ch �rgc to an ass n
ifv a charee ol rape I
'male initia ; re-
;cs
x �
tackei must ha c ma I
tion
female, Caldt r sa
Calder also said tl il
noncm called 'date rap
more often than r an un-
known indi idual. pe is
Sec Fl Wl R
t
Hot dog eating was also a part of the festivities beginning Greek
Week. Here an unidentified Delta Zeta tries to eat just one more.
(Thomas Walters � Photolab)
n





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14,1988
New ECU girls calendar published by Pika
. u. c uju-a u-t ido h� fmternitv to help decide that the pictures would be full
Bv JEANIE WHEBY
Sliff Writer
There is a new ECU calendar
out that runs from May 1988 to
June 1989 and includes exam
dates, athletic events and holi-
days.
Interested?
What if it also included 15 of
ECU'S hottest women?
Early last October, Russell
Eberher, a member of the Pi
presented his idea to the frater- however, and received help from side his fraternity to help decide that the pctures wo full
nity in hopes that it could be a them in promoting the calendar, on 25 finalists. cf�w�id the finalists wore a
grrJup project, but, at that time, He had business cards and fliers Several weeks later, each girl "
the Pikas could not finance the printed up explaining what the that had applied received her pic- yf"2toC
calendar. Eberher says he then calendar was about and had each tures and a letter saying whether bikimstoeye.nggouns new
luresdiiu a Kiva jayiij, "��� tU ,u i,
klppaAlpha fraternity, decided took it on as a personal project. of his brothers hand out five cards or not they e a finest. The he pPy w. rcsu s.
to create exactly that calendar. He He used the fraternity name, to the girls of their choice. He also cycle was then repeated with
advertised in fliers hung across more photographs
Interview dates set for VC
,r � . �! - I� n( .1 1. �
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Staff Writer
The search committee for the
replacement of Dr. Elmer Meyer,
who is retiring: this semester after
eight years of service, has nar-
rowed it's applicants to four can-
didates.
Pam Penland. chair of the
committee, said Chancellor Eakin
wanted the committee to conduct
interviews at this time to make
sure students would have the
chance to participate.
Dr. Suzanne Cordon, dean of
students at the University of Ar-
kansas, will be the first inter-
viewed. April 18-19.
The second candidate is Dr.
Alfred Matthews, who will be on
campus April 21-22. He is the
vice-president for student affairs
at Slippery Rock University in
Pennsylvania.
On April 25-26, Dr. Thomas
Goodale, vice-chancellor for stu-
dent affairs at the University of
Denver, will be interviewed.
The final interview is with Dr.
Timothy Brooks on April 28-29.
He is the dean of students at the
University of Delaware.
The committee is setting up in-
terviews for these candidates
with student leaders, according to
Penland. She said the interviews
will give the candidates "an idea
of what is important at ECU
"We're looking for leadership
qualities in handling the pro-
grams of a large, comprehensive
university said Penland.
"Someone who will be able to pull
all the programs together and
continue the work that Meyer has
done
This position directly affects
every student on campus in one
way or another. Whoever is cho-
sen will be involved in all aspects
of student life said SGA Presi-
dent Scott Thomas, a member of
the search committee
Thomas said that for this reason
it is important that students can
attend the interviews. Students
will be able to hear a presentation
campus.
According to Eberher, hun-
dreds of girls contacted him for
two weeks to ask questions and
make appointments for an inter-
view and photo session. On Octo-
ber 30,120 girls showed up at the
Comfort Inn Conference Lounge
to be interviewed and photo-
views by Eberher.
The second session was con-
ducted slightly different from the
first. 'The girls were told that they
could wear what they wanted, but
sity in the calendar to create a
broad base of appeal.
Eberher then had to make the
final cuts down to 15.
The calendars are finsihed now
and on sale at several area stores
by each candidate, have the op- graphed (from the waist up) by
porrunity to ask questions, and
afterwards fill out an evaluation
sheet. Thomas said this makes it
possible for student input to be
considered in the selection, and
for students to "get a feel for the
candidates' philosophies about
student life
Eberher. Then, to avoid favorit-
ism, Eberher went to people out
Read
the
Classifieds
Fewer campus rapes
than rumors say
department. Three of these rapes
were reported in the last school
vear and three others in the 1984-
1985 school vear. One arrest ar-
rest, made in the 1982-1983 year,
has been made after these reports.
In additon to the rapes, there
were forty two reports of assault
made on campus last vear, ac-
cording to the statistics. Fifteen
arrests were made in those assault
cases.
Calder said that assault is a
broad term used for various acts
in which one individual inflicts
nty in the last five years, ten re-
ports oi rape have made to the
have been circulating on campus
since the recent SGA elections.
uspq
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Continued from page 1
the act of forced sex between a
male and female who are ac-
quainted with one another.
1 have been here for twenty
years and more times than not the
"individuals know each other
Calder said.
One occurance of date rape
happened in farvis Dormitory in
the spring semester of 1987,
Calder said. Hie individuals in-
volved in that incident were both
under the influence of alcohol and
both knew each other, according bodily harm on another.
to Calder While the football players in-
The female in thejarvisincident volved in the Scott Dorm ordeal ,
did not prosecute the rape may have had the intention of
charges, and the male was free of rape, they were charged with as-
all charges after paving a fine for a sault, Calder said. In an incident
violation of the visitation policy, in the same dormitory a week
In past cases where the female and prior to the act, two males were
male have known each other, the charged with assault after a fisti-
female rarely follows through cuffs. Calder said these separate
with the rape charges, according reports display the broad inter-
to Calder. pertation ot the assault charge.
In a summary of crime statistics The reports made to the campus
compiled by ECU campus secu- police conflict with rumours that
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for the position of
News Editor
an you write well?
ave you had editing experience?
o you have a nose for news?
Apply today. In person.
No phone calls, please.
Ml &tfit (fftuwUfiisn
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Cerem
�� L Ncwi Bureau
�'
When Dr. Richard R. Eakin is
formally installed as East Caro-
lina University's ninth chief ex-
ecutive April 15, the ceremonvj
will take place in an historic cam-
pus building named for the
institution's first chief executive
Dr. Robert Herring Wright.
Wnght Auditorium, when
inauguration will take plao
cupies the largest and mosi
prominent area in the Robert H
Wright Building, located
center of the main campus. Thf.
60-year-old red bnck build
with its columned p rl
arched windows, reflec ts th
Classical Revival style tvpi
latel920'sbuildingson Amei
college campuses.
Originally known a
cial-Religious Build:
"Campus Life Bui
structure was Dr. Wr
ite among thecluster i r buil 1 j
that comprised the camp
East Carolina Teachers Coll
In his proposal for fund- J
struct the center. East (
early leader spoke i �! his vi-
a "home for the camp .
the institution.
Since necessary fu
complete the proposed bui J
was not forthcoming at once,
was constructed in two si j
The auditorium portion, the
est, as well as the most vers
space, was finished first. Remo
able seating and a flat I
abled theauditoriumube us J
a variety of ways.
Throughout the res!
Wright's tenure as East Carohn
Typical colleg
president is 5
white, male
The typical president of a o
lege is a white, 53-year-old mal
the American Council of Edu
tionACccmcludcUp a tx
survey coho rurjs, q. b c
pujaparaNfc). t?
The prospects for more mint
ties or women ascending to cal
pus presidents, moreover,
dim, the ACE �a group I
represents college president;
Washington � added.
Most Colleges, the survey Si
tend to pick as presidents peoj
who have been presidents r
presidents at smaller st
who were full pi
where.
But "the small -
women and minor
tial) candi
tional mold
schools will continu f
white male- �
Green director of ACI -
for Leadership Devel
"Unless that pool is red
for the short term
and minoriti
constitute a very sm
of chief executive
report concluded.
The ACE surve) ir 1
sponses from 2 1 : c-xl
tive officer- J
education ins
ACE found tl
White people filled
of the presidencies a
more likely to head doc'
granting universities ai
pendent institute
4-The median ag�
dents surveyed was i
Women presidents were tvs
likely to be younger than ac
men.
A majority of the v
60 percent. had served asa ej
president or vice predent H
their current job.
4-About two-thii 3
presidents were recru
the same or a similai
campus as they now heade
-t-Most college presiden
percent, were mart
women presidents were fai
likely than men to t
never married.
Green wants to study rj
some oi the questions the
raised.
"For example Greer
dered, "does the tact th i
presidents are married mei
that it is more difficult to tj
a president if you arc s: i
whv is it more difficult fi-
ned woman to become
executive officer"
"Are familv and carev
highest levels incompatj
women? Are married wort
likelv to be selected or le
to want a presidency
I





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Ceremony in historic building
tCL Ncwi Bureau
When Dr. Richard R. F.akin is
formally installed as East Caro-
lina University's ninth chief ex-
ecutive April 15, the ceremony
will take place in an historic cam-
pus building named for the
institution's first chief executive,
Dr. Robert Herring Wright.
Wright Auditorium, where the
inauguration will take place, oc-
cupies the largest and most
prominent area in the Robert H.
Wright Building, located near the
.enter of the main campus. The
� year-old red brick building,
with its columned portico and
arched windows, reflects the neo-
classical Revival style typical of
late W20 s buildings on American
college campuses.
Originally known as the "So-
cial-Religious building" or
ampus Life Building' the
structure was Dr. Wright's favor-
ite among the cluster ot buildings
that comprised the campus ot
East Carolina Teachers College.
In his proposal tor funds to con-
struct the center. Fast Carolina's
early leader spoke of his vision ot
a home tor the campus lite" of
the institution.
Since necessary funding to
complete the proposed building
was not forthcoming at once, it
was constructed in two stages.
The auditorium portion, the larg-
est, as well as the most versatile
space, was finished first. Remov-
e seating and a flat floor en-
abled theauditorium to be used in
a variety of waj s.
Throughout the rest of Dr.
Wright's tenure as Fast Carolina
Typical college
president is 53,
white, male
The typical president of a co
a white. 53-year-old male.
American Council of Educa-
n (.ACJv conclude ni a pgw
suryey oyrwho - .as Ly S cam-
ruses MarcVrftO. g � A.
prospects for more minori-
S or women ascending to cam-
pus presidents, moreover, are
dun, the AC E a group that
represent college presidents in
Washington added.
Most Colleges, the survey said,
tend to pick as presidents people
who have been presidents or vice
presidents at smaller schools, or
who were full professors else-
where.
But ' the small supply of
�men and minority (presiden-
tial) candidates who fit the tradi-
�nal mold" suggests many
schools will continue to be led by
hite males, said Madeleine
Green director of ACF's Center
for Leadership Development
"Unless that pool is redefined,
for the short term, at least, women
md minorities will continue to
constitute a very small percentage
chief executive officers the
report concluded.
The ACE survey included re-
sponses from 2,105 chief execu-
tive officers of accredited higher
education institutions.
ACF found that:
White people filled 93 percent
the presidencies, and were
more likely to head doctorate
granting universities and inde-
pendent institutions.
?The median age of the presi-
dents surveyed was 53 years.
Women presidents were twice as
likely to be younger than age 40 as
men.
A majority of the presidents,
60 percent, had served asa college
president or vice president before
their current job.
About two-thirds of all the
presidents were recruited from
the same or a similar type ot
campus as they now headed.
?Most college presidents, 85
percent, were married, but
women presidents were far more
likclv than men to be divorced or
never married.
Green wants to study further
some of the questions the survey
raised.
"For example Green won-
dered, "does the fact that most
presidents are married men mean
that it is more difficult to become
a president if you are single? And
why is it more difficult for a mar-
ried woman to become a chief
executive officer?"
"Are family and career at the
highest levels incompatible for
women? Are married women less
likely to be selected or less likely
to want a presidency?"
president, the hall functioned as a on its 40 foot proscenium stage.
chapel for the regular religious Ballerina Melissa Hayden led a
services students were required dance masterclass on its wooden
to attend, and also as a concert floor. A long succession oi De-
hall, a banquet hall, a dance floor comber holidays officially began
and even as a gymnasium. with Christmas band concerts in
When President Wright died in Wright. During the heyday of
1934, the campus community social dancing thousands of stu-
gathered in theauditorium for his
funeral. Appropriately, the build-
ing was named for him two years
later.
Throughout the decades,
Wright Auditorium has been the
scene of many important campus
functions. Commencement exer-
cises were held in it until graduat-
ing classes outgrew its space
Renowned pianist Arthur Rubin-
stem, opera star Robert Merrill,
Andre Previn and the London
Philharmonic Orchestra and
main other intcmationall) noted
performers have appeared in
Wright, frequently tor overflow
crowds. Traveling theatrical com-
panies have staged major shows
dents gathered in the auditorium,
both for weekly "sock hops" and
for formal balls.
The audit, rium has been trans-
formed into a Red Cross blood
donation center, a convention
hall, and � in the era before ECU
began computerized class sched-
uling a student registration site
with long, winding lines of weary
students stretching across its
lobby and across its portico and.
step
When the nearby administra-
tion building was enlarged nearly
40 years ago, temporary offices
were set up on each side of Wright
auditorium tor East Carolina
President John Messick and his
lames Griffin downed a mouthful of weenies Sunday at the Sie,ma
Phi Epsilon party to kick off the Giee Week festivities. (Thomas
Walters � Photolab)
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staff. The College Union, located
in Wright's annex, was remod-
eled in the mid-1960's, during the
tenure of Dr. Leo Jenkins, so the
auditorium was again pressed
into service asa temporary recrea-
tional and social center.
True to President Wright's vi-
sion, the building was indeed a
center of campus life, a hub of
activity, in numerous and diverse
ways.
Now that the growth and
spread of the East Carolina cam-
pus has resulted in many more
buildings, including ECU's Men-
denhall Student Center, Wright
Auditorium is no longer required
to perform its original multi-pur-
pose function. In the course of a
massive six-year renovation proj-
ect carried out in two phases and
completed just two years ago, the
hall was re-shaped and outfitted
as a concert hall of the first rank,
with new lighting and acoustical
design, a permanent orchestra
shell, sloped floor and rows of
stationary upholstered seating
which can accommodate an audi-
ence oi more than 1500.
An 8 p.m. inaugural concert, a
performance of the J.S. Bach "St.
lohn Passion will be presented
in Wright Auditorium on the
evening before the inauguration
ceremony.
Performing will be guest vocal
soloists, combined university
choirs and an orchestra of local
and guest musicians. Dr. Brett
Watson of the ECU School of
Music faculty will conduct the
performance, which is free and
open to the public.
The inauguration will begin at
1 i a.m with UNC President CD.
Spangler lr. presiding. The inau-
gural address will be presented
by Philip G. Carson, chairman of
the UNC Board of Governors.
Read
The
East
Carottnian
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THE COFFEEHOUSE
COMEDY COMPETITION
If you didn't do it last time
Now's Your Chance
Friday. April 22, 7:00 p.in.
AT THE UNDERGROUND
Downstairs in Mendenhall
Applications Available in the Student
Union offices of Mendenhall.
please sign up before April 14.
ifl
i

:('i('Uf!f!fJ
gathering plaec

$15.00 Discount For August Delivery
April 14
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
at the Student Stores
WG1RVED
CLASS RINGS
9f





�lj� EaHt Carolinian
Daniel Maurer, om�
Clay Deanhardt, mw uam
JAMES F.J. MCK.ee, Director of AdvertisingJEFE PARKERtaff Illustrator
Tim Ci iandler, sports e�wTOM rURR, Circulation Manager
Jot in Carter, rah. �.�MIKE UPCHURCH, Production Manager
Michelle England, oauMauprCM IN VV. MEDLIN, Art Or�for
Debbie Stevens, &��,MAC CLARK, Justness Manager
April 14. 1988 OPINIONPjge 4
Report card
Chancellor earns B for
first year at ECU
YES HON�V; XT 4KS K VERV NCE INAUGURATION
CEREKOtMV, NOW WILL VOU TORN OFF THE LIGHT
SO WE CAM GET SOME-SUEEPfl

oA K (yJUR �As r Afcq n ,�
Chancellor Eakin's inauguration uprooted tor the new building, the
is scheduled for Friday, and with it chancellor is at least making a con-1
comes the end of Eakin's introduc- certed effort in this area. Much has
tory period to the university. We
think the chancellor has done a fine
job for his first year, with, of course,
a few exceptions.
In keeping with the academic
been done, but more needs to be
done.
Eakin gets a C for condoms, no
pun intended. His flat refusal to
implement a plan that was sug-
atmosphere, we give him a B for the gested by his own committee does
year. We grade hard. give us a display of his strength as an
The chancellor gets A's for his administrator, but also gives a glim-
public relations work. He has been mer of closed-mindedness. We
very visible through his first year, wonder if the chancellor took heed
and has maintained both the sub- of the SGA's vote in support of the
stance and the image of a man in
charge of his surroundings.
He also gets an A for his work with
the citv. Through breakfast meet-
Carter supported by student
condom dispensers, or even the
advice of his own advisors.
Finally, we have to fail the chancel-
lor for his handling of the parking
ings and other tools, this chancellor problem. The chancellor's answer to
seems to be working hard to better the problem is short-sighted and
ECU'S image within the city, and the self-defeating. It can only hurt the
work will pay oil He has been in- morale of the students, and in reality
volved with breakfast meetings does little to alleviate the problem,
with city officials, and both in public While the chancellor did withdraw
and private has worked to assure his plan to pave the bottom of Col-
ECU's role in Greenville's growth, lege Hill Drive, that appears to have
Eakin deserves his last A for his been only a token in order to get the
workirUhe athletic department. He students to be silent about the re-
appears to be a man who under- mamder of the plan.
stands the delicate balance between Chancellor Eakin appears well on
athletics and academics. His work at his way to being one of ECU'S better
football games and his efforts in our administrators. He has shown in his
strained relations with NCSU are first year signs of strength, savvy
testimony to his support for our and understanding. Our impression
athletic programs. of him is that he can be sly as a fox,
We give the chancellor a B for but will use that ability in a postive
working in student interest. While manner for the university.
Eakin has not worked against the And, despite this year's B, the
students, we think he could do more chancellor seems to have the inter-
to involve students in the future of ests of the student body in mind. He
the university. We see little evidence proved during the 1987 SGA elec-
of Eakin consulting with students, tions fiasco that he was willing to
and he has been known to tell the trust student judgement, and he has
SGA that its voice would not be lis- done nothing to indicate he feels
tened to on at least one issue. students are second class to the insti-
We also give the chancellor a B for tution. At a time when many univer-
campus appearances. Yes, he was sities across the nation are turning
quite visible at the beginning of his their attention to graduate students
tenure, but since he learned his way and giving undergrads the cold
around campus he is hard to be shoulder, it is good that Eakin ap-
found in the university atmosphere pears to be a man for the students,
during the day. While Eakin may be
busy, it is important that any chan- We hope Dr. Eakin will stay at
cellor stay in touch writh everyday ECU for a long time. His future will
campus life in order to do his job probably be filled with A's, and that
well. can only bring good things to the
The chancellor's campus beautifi- universities. We congratulate him
cation program gets a B for effort, for the accomplishments of his first
Although we have to wonder why year, chide him for his failures and
the flowers were planted next to wish him the best in his inaugural
Mendenhall in the fall only to be weekend.
OH, IT THE USUAL PRISON �?,� r��Kl (POfi WRfflTSMOF W
TRACKS,�WENT TO W RIGHT SCH00�SMARI?tS 7HE RIGHT
WOMAN AW THEN I GOT A REA6AN Cfi&KBT POSITION.
To the editor:
This is not so much an appeal to the
students as it is to the faculty, namely
those in the history department and
otherwise who are involved in the
"non-reappointment" of Dr. John
Marshall Carter. I believe "fired" is
the word us laymen might find more
appropriate. The past editorials con-
cerning Carter reflect a genuine con-
viction among the students who have
been affected in a positive way by
Carter both in his teaching and his
person. 1 can do little more at this
point than make a moral appeal since
legally the situation may be nothing
more than an employer terminating
the need of an employee. Regardless
of legalities, morally, it is wrong. 1
believe that it is time for those in-
volved in the decision- making and
initiating of this whole "out of the
blue" ideal to stop hidingbchind their
bold banner of ECU and face the facts
(and not to mention leave their egosat
the door).
Carter is different. Carter plays in a
rock and roll band. Carter's.hair is�
tad longer and more styled than the
average hisory-Joe. Outside of hav-
ing a passion for teaching students
about history and successfully tack-
ling the problem of making it interest-
ing, Carter has many other subordi-
nate interests and projects he engages
in. His look and style of teaching are
different. He takes different paths in
teaching his classes but nonetheless
he gets there in the same given time
span as any other teacher and very
effectivly at that. Even with these
what should be called "assets and
talent and diversity Carter has even
more obvious reasons to stay on staff
in the history department that I don't
have enough space to even list. Carter
has published more and participated
in more research, not to mention been
awarded grant money from Ger-
many, than most professors. His
achievments and credentialsare what
got him the invite to East Carolina
anyway. Isn't he the same person that
you people hired years ago? If not, he
can only be more only by his own
incentive and ambition. No matter
what he has done, it doesn't seem
enough to satisfy the right people.
Yes, 1 do mean those few who must be
rubbed just right to pull the strings.
At this point I must appeal to
Carter's colleagues in the history
department, or any department for
that matter. What makes you think
you won't be the next to be unfairly
eliminated? Are you that secure
about your job? I wouldn't plan too
far ahead for those family vacations if
I were you. In addition to his pub-
lished works, Carter has also had
consistent "outstanding" student
evaluations, not "good" or
"average but "outstanding Does
that count for anything or are the
students, like Carter, just victims of
the political shuffle? Do those in-
volved even care about the students
objections to this adminstrative
move? If so, state your rationale just
for the record and an attempt at some
validity. If you are concerned with
teaching and helping the student
grow then please . . . someone . . .
enlighten me.
The only comforting thought I have
is my belief in the truth and that jus-
tice will eventually prevail eventu-
ally. For the present however, Carter
will take his talents, intellegence,
wisdom, and enthusiasm elsewhere.
His preference is to stay here with his
comfortable life, familiar students,
friends, and family. If ECU looses
John Carter, like they lost the last ter-
minated professor, John Warren, then
the students are the loosers. It is too
late for a Warren plea, but I feel the
students should have more voice in
the re-appointment of professors.
I am just a student but don't forget
there are 14,500 of me who will pay
the price for your decisions. Ulti-
mately, those who have not taken the
objectiveness to review this case and
reinstate Carter will be the ones who
loose. They will loose a valuable asset
to the University that could add di-
versity, vigor and status to the Uni-
versity in the long run.
Yes, I have ruined my chances of
getting an "A" in any given history
course and maybe some other con-
nected courses because I have ruffled
the feathers of the wrong few. That is
not a high price to pay considering the
value of one man's rights and the
justice he deserves. Dr. Carter, you
are one man who has succeeded in
touching the lives of many; that is
more than some will ever be able to
say. I wish you well.
Toni Page
Senpr
Journ.
� n Pol. So.
Issues are gray
To the editor:
I am responding to Tonya Batizy's
letter on April 9, 1988. Miss Batizy
you said in your letter, "I am thankful
for the freedom that we citizens of the
United States have established
through the Constitution Later in
your letter you also said, "I will not,
however, congratulate a soldier with
blood on his hands and eternal con-
science Miss Batizy I ask you, would
you congratulate the revolutionary
soldier who fought and killed to make
our great nation free and make it
possible for you to have a constitution
that you so greatly admire?
Sometimes when people get in-
volved in "institutions they tend to
idealize situations to have the best
possible outcome. The world is not so
black and white. There is a lot of gray
inbetween. Miss Batizy you have a
very narrow and limited idea on war
and peace. You are correct when you
state that the U.S. has not been at-
tacked since WWII, but have you sat
down and really wondered why? Our
armed forces are set up, if you believe,
in the principles of our constitution,
as first a deterrent to war, and second
to guard our country and our way of
life.
Miss Batizy, when our military goes
into these small countries do you
really think we go there on the "of-
fense" as you call it? Never, in my
opinion, has the U.S. offensively gone
into a country. We go into these coun-
tries either to get our people out, as
with Grenada andor to help deter
communism not only for our sake but
for the sake of the people who asked
for our help. When a country ask for
U.S. help to turn back aggression or
communism should we turn our
backs Miss Batizy? Have you too soon
forgotten how our nation started out
over 200 years ago?
"Thou shalt not kill" is indeed an
important commandment, but it is
based, as it was then in the Jewish
community, on "just killing" and
"unjust killing War is mentioned
throughout the Old Testament. In the
New Testament Luke 3:14, soldiers
asked Christ what to do Miss Batizy.
Christ told them not to extort money
or accuse people falsely and be con-
tent with their pay! Miss Batizy, be-
fore you bring biblical text into your
argument, be sure you have a leg to
stand on.
In closing Miss Batizy, I recom-
mend you read a book entitled "Just
And Unjust Wars" before you be-
come too set in your idealistic views.
I think afterwards you will n
that your views, as history has shown,
only lead a person to becoming either
an enslaved pacifist or a dead
Inn R
5� l
Marki
No more squabbling
To the editor:
1 have been reading with merest
the Forum section oi The 1 a
linian since the beginning I
semester, and have found I
esting that 1 have been clij .
the letters that snipe ba d
between the "right' and
What was most interestir
these letters is that they to be
written bv squabbling � at is
until the letter of David Ir
(April 12th). His mixtur
intelligence had me enthralled until
the end, in contrast to t he endless and
mindless burtals and rebuttate
1, myself, do not subscribi
party line, or fit myself into . neat
little knee-jerk peghole .1
the extreme seem to do. 1 believe in
using our intelligence and r
for each circumstance v tead
of locking ourselves into som l
quo. I also believe that to kill is w i
and everv means available should be
J
employed before violence is even
considered.
Like my friend Mr. Trevino, I am
from a militarv family and 1 have
spent much of mv time overseas so
have a little wider perspective en
world views than I would had i sper I
all my life here in the IS Having
been a guest in another's country
(while my father defended ours
have seen first hand the damage that
can be done by a strong arm foreign
policy and bullying tactics of
present administration. The Wind oi
damage I am talking about is more
subtle and insidious than can be
measured on a meter. It is when allies
and friends arc used for our little
games and purposes, without any
consideration toward the long and
shorter term effects on them. Or when
we prop up a murderous regime be-
cause they fall into step with our
wishes when we need them to. All
these things have direct and indirect
consequences on our image and the
way people of the world view who
and what we are all about.
If we don't watch out we will lose
the last remaining remnants oi US
good will still left over from WWII
Even now we don't have the confi-
dence of many Arab nations and
much of the third world, and even
good friends like Honduras and
Costa Rica aren't exactly granted by-
right. If we don't watch out we will
lose them, too. It is counter-produc-
tive for us to assume that we should
use any "gunboat diplomacy" just
because we 'think' it is in our best
interest. So let us not lean toward the
"Better Dead Than Red" mentality of
the McCarthy era, but let us shine an
example to the world that will make
communism pale in comparison.
Harrv "Theo" Bannita
J
Graduate, ECU
C MU
APS
FRM
I
OnU
Comm
By PRNELOPE WHITNEY
t"PS C omrspondrnt
When 10 people live in a house
they talk about a lot of communal
stuff: painting murals on walls,
feeding the neighbor's dog gre-
nades, cleaning the living room A
lot of talk, not so much action
when we agreed to take the AIDS
test together, I kind oi doubted
we'd follow through, even
though it was one of our n
important decisions
None of us are heroin a
but we haven't exactly led cl
tered lifestyles either. And hell,
someone said Santa Cru is
incestuous, if you - I
one moutain biker,
with them all.
The next thing ! know th-
us are wandering around the
county parking lot at the ndicu
lous hour
1080Emeline!
1060 1 79 and the Mental H
Services office. But
-
"I think this is a scam Itl nktht
FBI just make up
watch who'd show u
AIDS test Ben sa
r eah iaughed Didi, tl
probable in the bush
photos right now
We finally find it:
ROOM - FREE AND ANONi
MOUS HIV ANTIBODi
INC We enter, go to the desk
and get information
fake names to guai
ity.
Mine is Bob
Then we - I
cushv plastic benches I
papers they gave us, m I
aren't so funny ar
who you are. it's what
Individuals known to be al
are and it lists I
who share needles, hen
and others who have had I
transfusions, gay and bisexua
men and everyone else and
mother who doesn't pra I
sex and have had muliple sexu�
partners of either sex. And I
heart-stopper for me: sexua
ners of any of the above ind
als.
It goes on to explain what te
results mean. "Positive ind
you've been infected vrith (hi
AIDS virus and your bod
duced antibodies. Inri
this means an active
body and can be passed
others. But positive doesr
sarily mean you ha
AIDS or AIDS Related (
or that vou're immur
Negative" means n.
ies to the AIDS vim:
in your body at the tin
The obvious conelusi
not infected, right? But)
home tree yet. It con
you've had contact with I
but haven't become infected
Thomas discusst
top candidates
Continued from page 1
Concerning the pr
candidates rhomas said th
rent crop were
lacking in vision. She
Bush as a man who had
tracks in any of his pre I
tions" and said that he -
find' Reagan scoatt
Discussing the Jacksori
paign Thomas said he has nd
"amazing gains with the dir
chanted blue collar worker
could no longer be view I
wild card bv the political p
Thomas who atti
lackson s success to his atrilib
"tone down his tirev rhetor!
predicted this new abil -j
lowed lackson to become
hshment enough to pass
also said lackson will be a
ful force at the Democi
tional convention
Thomas described the role
the press as comforting
fected and affecting the i I
able When pressed by a men
oi Tuesday s audience on the
of objectivity of the press Thoj
said "We didn't bow out ot
human race
She further said she telt
journalists were tor the most
objective. Thomas siid that pil
officials must be "pinned d
and made accessible" and tlj
was the responsibility of the
He to "demand officials be q
tioned and interrogated "am
job of the press to provide
"pipeline" for thediseminati
information.
L, I :S
� � m�mm0tm�$0mmm0mmm0t0t00Hm
-�� �. ����, wurimfcimj





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14.1968 5
INAUGURATION
:F THE LIGHT
- i i&
& iMXVAsrNtoijm
student
irds you will realize
history has shown,
n to becoming either
st or a dead pacifist
Jim Rector
Senior
Marketing
o more squabbling
� iding with inlcrest
i he East Caro-
beginning of last
found it so inter-
ive boon clipping out
pe back and forth
it" and the "left
st interesting about
they all seem to be
�bling kids, that is
I David Trevino
ure of wit and
nthralled until
the endless and
ind rebuttals.
I subscribe to any
� myself into a neat
hole as so many on
m to do. I believe in
nee and reasoning
� ince we face instead
ves into some status
- e that to kill is wrong
- available should be
1 violence is even
friend Mr. Trevino, I am
i military family and I have
nuch of my time overseas, so I
i little wider perspective on
an I would had I spent
here in the U.S. Having
in another's country
father defended ours) I
first hand the damage that
by a strong arm foreign
I bullying tactics of our
cnt administration. The kind of
: e I am talking about is more
le and i.sidious than can be
?asured on a meter. It is when allies
Id friends arc used for our little
Imes and purposes, without any
I leration toward the long and
( -ter term effects on them. Or when
p up a murderous regime be-
use they fall into step with our
fshes when we need them to. All
?se things have direct and indirect
nsequences on our image and the
iy people of the world view who
id what we are all about.
If we don't watch out we will lose
e last remaining remnants of U.S.
d will still left over from WWII.
:en now we don't have the confi-
ne of many Arab nations and
uch of the third world, and even
)d friends like Honduras and
sta Rica aren't exactly granted by
;ht. If we don't watch out we will
them, too. It is counter-produc-
re for us to assume that we should
any "gunboat diplomacy" just
:ause we 'think' it is in our best
tprest. So let us not lean toward the
letter Dead Than Red" mentality of
(e McCarthy era, but let us shine an
ample to the world that will make
immunism pale in comparison.
Harry "Theo" Bannita
Graduate, ECU
M U
APS
QRUM
Commune takes AIDS test
By PENELOPE WHITNEY
CPS Correspondent
When 10 people live in a house
they talk about a lot of communal
stuff: painting murals on walls,
feeding the neighbor's dog gre-
nades, cleaning the living room. A
lot of talk, not so much action. So
when we agreed to take the AIDS
test together, I kind of doubted
we'd follow through, even
though it was one of our more
important decisions.
None of us are heroin addicts
but we haven't exactly led clois-
tered lifestyles either. And hell,
someone said Santa Cruz is so
incestuous, if you've slept with
one moutain biker, you've slept
with them all.
The next thing I know the 10 of
us are wandering around the
county parking lot at the ridicu-
lous hour of 8 a.m looking for
1080 Emeline St. We found 1050,
1060,1079 and the Mental Health
Services office. But where was
1080?
"I think this is a scam. I think the
FBI just make up this place to
watch who'd show up to take the
AIDS test Ben said.
"Yeah laughed Didi, "they're
probably in the bushes snapping
photos right now
We finally find it: "WAITING
ROOM � FREE AND ANONY-
MOUS HIV ANTIBODY TEST-
ING We enter, go to the desk
and get information sheets with
fake names to guarantee anonym-
ity.
Mine is Bob.
Then we sit down on the blue
cushy plastic benches to read the
papers they gave us, and things
aren't so funny anymore. "It's not
who you are, it's what you do.
Individuals known to be at risk
are and it lists IV drug users
who share needles, hemophiliacs
and others who have had blood
transfusions, gay and bisexual
men and everyone else and their
mother who doesn't practice safe
sex and have had muliple sexual
partners of either sex. And the real
heart-stopper for me: sexual part-
ners of any of the above individu-
als.
It goes on to explain what test
results mean. "Positive" indicates
you've been infected with the
AIDS virus and your body pro-
duced antibodies. In most people,
this means an active virus is in the
body and can be passed on to
others. But positive doesn't neces-
sarily mean vou have or will get
AIDS or AIDS Related Complex,
or that you're immune to it.
"Negative" means no antibod-
ies to the AIDS virus were found
in your body at the time of testing.
The obvious conclusion is you're
not infected, right? But you're not
home free yet. It could mean
you've had contact with the virus
but haven't become infected and
haven't produced antibodies. Or
it could mean you have been in-
fected but haven't made any anti-
bodies. It takes most people 2 to 8
weeks to produce them after in-
fection.
I'm mulling over this dreary
information when I hear a voice
calling "Bob My friends nudge
me, "Hey that's you I rise, go
with the nice young man. Didi is
sitting with Ben, face hidden in his
dreads. She looks like I feel.
Down corridors, past closed
doors, open doors, into a small
sterile room used for family plain-
ning. As he tells me about AIDS,
goes over everything in the sheet,
the anxiety deepens.
The the questions start: "Have
you ever used intravenous drugs
or shared needles?"
That's easy. "No
"Have you had more that one
partner in the last five years?"
"Ha I laughed too loud.
"Yes The man doesn't smile. His
hand moves over the small rec-
tangle of paper that says "BOB" at
the top. check. "Were any of them
bisexual or intravenous drug us-
ers?"
I stall as images run past like
movie credits. One screeching
halt, focus. A 6-foot-5 skinhead
from Paris, telling me afterwards
"I never get tired of sex. There are
so many things you can do with
two bodies Other blur-stop-
click memories. And I thought I
was having such a good time.
I suck in air. "Probably He
doesn't look up. Scratch-scratch.
Another crisp X.
"Have you ever had a blood
transfusion?"
Stare at his hand, forget to
breathe. "Yes One more mark.
Three strikes, you're out, right?
The man looks up, tells me the
blood is tested in Santa Clara.
Tells me if it tests positive they
send it to Berkeley to retest. Tells
me, either way, it'll take two
weeks. I schedule an appointment
to get the results. He goes to get
the nurse. "Have a good one he
says as he leaves.
Yeah, right. I don't move.
The nurse enters, friendly, asks
r
how I'm doing. I tell her I hate
blood tests, how a couple of times
nurses haven't been able to find
by vein and went rooting around
with the needle, jabbing, and
turned my arms black and blue.
I don't tell her I hate this par-
ticular test, hate what it means,
how the epidemic is far from over.
Hell, the generation before me
slept around and got herpes and
cold sores. We screw around, get
AIDS and die.
I shut my eyes, still clenching
my fist when she tells me it's over.
I see two vials of dark red stuff on
the table.
'Two teaspoons she says.
Two weeks.
I feel faint.

(�aktmmt Square pta.
2 Bdr. Townhouses now renting for
summer and fall semester.
Ask about our 2 bdr. summer special.
1212 Redbanks Road, Greenville, NC 27858
� Hi. -m n
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortion from 13 to IS week m addition cent Pregnancy
Teat Birth Control, and Problem Picgaaacy Counseling, ft-
further information, call S32-OS3S (tofi free number: 1-800-
532-53M) between 9 a jn. and 5 pjn. weekday. General aaeav
theiia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for the Managing Editor.
Experience preferred.
Apply in person at the office.
No phone calls, please.
v
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Cgntgr Is Open
MonTues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
Thomas discusses
top candidates
Continued from page 1
Concerning the presidential
candidates Thomas said the cur-
rent crop were "uninspired" and
"lacking in vision She typified
Bush as a man who had "left no
tracks in any of his previous posi-
tions" and said that he seemed to
find "Reagan's coattails just fine
Discussing the Jackson cam-
paign Thomas said he has made
"amazing gains with the disen-
chanted blue-collar worker" and
could no longer be viewed as a
wild card by the political pundits.
Thomas, who attributed
Jackson's success to his ability to
"tone down his firey rhetoric
predicted this new ability has al-
lowed Jackson to become "estab-
lishment enough to pass She
also said Jackson will be a power-
ful force at the Democratic na-
tional convention.
Thomas described the role of
the press as "comforting the af-
fected and affecting the comfort-
able When pressed by a member
of Tuesday's audience on the lack
of objectivity of the press Thomas
said "We didn't bow out of the
human race
She further said she felt that
journalists were for the most part
objective. Thorn? aid that public
officials must be "pinned down
and made accessable" and that it
was the responsibility of the pub-
lic to "demand officials be ques-
tioned and interrogated "and the
job of the press to provide the
"pipeline" for the disemination of
information.
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ATTENTION RETURNING STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility
service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time, and possibly money.
The follcfwing are available to you:
OPTION A: NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
At your parents' request, utility service
can be put in their name. Just pick up an
application in room 211 in the Off-
Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities' main
office, 200 W. Fifth Street.
Have your parents complete the applica-
tion (which must be notarized) and mail
it to Greenville Utilities, P.O. Box 1847,
att. Customer Services.
'Remember to attach a "letter of credit"
from their power company
OPTION B: DEPOSIT REQUIRED
If you wish to have the utility service put
in your name, a deposit will be required.
Deposits are as follows:
Electric Only
Electric & Water
Electric, Water & Gas
Electric & Gas
with electric or
gas space
heating
$100.00
$110.00
$110.00
$100.00
wout electric or
gas space
heating
$75.00
$85.00
$85.00
$75.00
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. Be
sure to include:
a. your name
b. where service will be requested
c. when service is to be cut on
d. a phone number where we may reach you prior to your
arrival at the service address.
Reminder: A cut on service charge will be included in your first billing
$100.00 - electric andor water $30.00 - electric, gas andor water
Request for Utility Service
(Please Print)
Name
Phone No.
Home Address
I
, effective
wish to have utility service put in my name at
Endosed
(Date)
is a credit report of my utility account with
Name of Utility Company
I realize my credit with my utility company that serves me must be good (for more than twelve
months) before a depost with Greenville Utilities can be waived. This service will be utilized by my
(son or daughter)
If a move from one location to another is necessary in the future, Ido or do not give my per-
mission for. to transfer the utility account. Please have the
(Name)
monthly billing mailed to
I agree to be responsible for all utilities in my name. If there are any questions, you may phone me at
, or write me at
Signed
COUNTY OF
STATE OF
I a Notary Public of the aforesaid County and
State, duly acknowledge the execution of the foregoing instrument for the purposes therein expressed.
Witness my hand and Notarial Seal on thisday of 1
My commission expires:
�REMINDER: THIS FORM MUST BE NOTARIZED IF THE
PARENT DOES NOT SIGN IN THE PRESENCE OF A GUC
REPRESENTATIVE �
Notary Public
For further Information, contact Customer Assistance
(919) 752-7166





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
SERVICES OFFERED
NEED SUMMER EMPLOYMENT?
Holiday Inn Reservation Center has
immediate openings for Temporary Call
Service Sales Agents. Perfect for college
students Must be available to work davs,
evenings, and weekends We offer the
following: complete paid training
program, benefit package available,
attractive base wage, plus incentive wage
plan. If you have good interactive
telephone skills, and can tvpe 30 wpm,
please apply in person to: Holiday Inn
Reservation Center, 1705 Cary-
Macedonia Road, Raleigh, N.C. or call
(919) 851-2990 for an appointment. We are
an affirmative action employer.
WANTED: Black Models needed for
Leisure Curl & Style. Hair must be
either virgin or previously curled.
Relaxed hair not suitable. Perms &
Styles to be done by outstanding stylists
during State Beautician show at the
Greenville Sheraton. Models needed
for the following dates: April 24, 25, 26,
& 27. If interested, Call Allan's Beauty
Supply, 1-800-682-2709.
FOUR STAR PIZZA is now hiring
Delivery Personel. Drivers must be 18
years or older, have own transportation,
and insurance. Minimum Wage,
Commission and tips, our drivers
average S6 to S10 dollars an hour. Apply
in person 114 E. 10th St.
PART-TIME Word Processing in law
firm. Transcribing dictation, answering
phone. I lours 3-9 pm, M-F. Experience
required. Send resume: Personnel P.O
Box 1766 Greenville, N.C, 27835.
MEN SENIOR COUNSELORS needed
for 9 weeks, June 16 - August 17.19 yrs. or
older. Call Camp Morehead, Morehead
Citv, N.C. 919-726-3960Days or 919-726-
5321Nights.
LIFEGUARDS and Rental Attendants
needed for summer work in Atlantic
Beach area. May 15th - Labor Dav. $3.75
commissions. Send Resume to Beach
Bums Beach Service, PO Box 1-432,
Atlantic Beach, N.C, 28512 919-247-7750.
3H HEAVENS: Oh gracious, here's a
t,olden nugget 'cause I know, you dug it.
Plan the party now. Contact the
1 RASHMAN DJ Service. Do a desk-top
ji Oldies, Beach, the Top 40, etc. . . dial
7 �2-3587. We own platters that matter.
VIDEO DATING-the wave of the future.
Meet your mate on a video tape. Call for
details. Promotions Unlimited Video
Dating Serivce. 756-6163.
BEACHWEAR PHOTOGRAPHER
outdoor poses only. Free proof prints
flimit 2). Enlargements available. Call Ron
at 752-3758.
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING-
Letter qualitylaser printing. Rush jobs
accepted Designer Tvpe. 752-1933.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typing and photocopying services. We
also sell software and computer diskettes.
24 hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville
N.C, 752-3694.
FOR SALE: Assorted furnishings
including coffee table, book shelves,
chairs, all at inexpensive student prices.
Graduating in May. Must sell soon. Call
758-4779, ask for Dan.
FOR SALE: 1980 Volk. Rabbit. 50 miles
gallon. Dependable, Neg. Call 752-5407.
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
TOP PAY FOR GRAPHIC ARTIST
Summer work or now! Lake front
Lodging provided. Sen Resume to:
Baldwin Sign Co Box 363, Lake
Wacamaw, N.C, 28450.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR
interested in those with I himan Service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith,
REAL Crisis Center. 758-HELP.
HELP WANTED-Part-tim interior
design student - send Resume to Designer
3010 East 10th St Greenville, N.C.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS - (Mass) Mah-Kee-Naw for Boys
Danube for girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All team sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
1 iockey. Soccer, and Volleyball; 25 Tennis
openings; also, Archery, Riflery and
Biking; other openings include
Performing Arts, Fine Arts, Yearbook,
Photography, Video, Cooking, Sewing,
Rollcrskating, Rocketry, Ropes, and Camp
Craft; All Waterfront activities
(Swimming, Skiing, Small Craft). Inquire
Action Camping (Boys) 190 Linden Ave
Glen Ridge, N.J 07028; (Girls) 44 Center
Grove Road, H-21, Randolph, NJ 07869.
Phone (Boys) 201-429-8522; (Girls) 201-
328-2727.
GOVERNMENT HOMES from 51.00. "U
Repair Also tax delinquent property.
Call 805-644-9533 ext. 75 for info.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts todav. 602-837-3401 ext. 711.
RUST COLORED sofa for sale: $100.00.
Great condition! Call Caterinc: 830-1483.
FOR SALE: dresser, $50.00; table,
$45.00; buffethutch, $90.00. Call 551-
4414, 8:00 a.m5:00 p.m 758-7923 after
5:00 p.m. All furniture in good to
excellent condition and very functional.
TIE DYES and custom painted t-shirts
for sale, $8.00-$l2.00. Designs that are
dyes done with speical t-shirt fabric
paints so they last longer. Ask for Paul or
leave a message at 752-0607 satisfaction
guaranteed
FOR SALE: 4 5 cubic refrigerator price
negotiable. Call 752-8738.
FOR SALE: 2 stained wood cabinets
with bnck in-lav and 2 shelves. Can be
used as TV stand, night stand, or as
storage cabinets in dorm rooms or
apartments Excellent condition. Good
price. Call 752-8738
FOR SALE: double bed, $150.00. Under
one year old. Excellent condition. Call
Lvnelic after 400 p m. at 758-3122-
RINGGOLD TOWERS condo for sale-
B-Unit, 2nd Boor, fully furnished. Tax
market-value, $43,730.00. Make me an
otter. 919 787-1378.
FOR SALE: 1982 Pontiac phoenix, two
tone, five door, AC, bucket seats, rear
window defroster, 125,000 miles, good
condition. Call 758-4779, ask for Dan.
1983 HONDA 650 Nighthawk, less than
8000 miles, good condition. 4 valve, 6
speed, shaftdrive, Sl.000.00. Call mark at
752-3133 after 6:00 p.m.
FAST FUN FOOD Pizza's,
sandwiches, subs, salads, lasagne,
spaghetti, and beer. Fast free delivery.
Call Famous Pizza. 757-1278 or 757-0731.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share nice, 3 bedroom apartment.
$120.00 plus 13 utilities. Private
bedroom. Available May 1st. Call 752-
3678.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
2nd SS to share a house on Meade Street.
12 rent, 12 utilities, washer, dryer,
central air. Call Jennifer at 752-4140 and
leave message.
GREAT SUMMER DEAL � 2 bedroom
apartment close to campus, only $315.00 a
month. Sublease May through August
Call 758-1576.
REGENCY HOUSE APARTMENTS
now offering short-term leases for
summer. Furnished units available.
Located at the heart of ECU on the corner
of 5th & Reade St. Contact Remco East at
758-6061 for details. Only TWO LEFT!
$60.00WEEK PER PERSON, beach
house in myrtle beach ocean view, 100
yards to beach, near Pavillion. Phone 1-
803-626-9197.
SUMMER SCHOOL HOUSING: 2
bedroom apartment 1 mile from campus.
Need roommate to fill extra bedroom.
May-July. S142.50 plus 12 utilities and-1
2 phone. Call Tonya at 758-6342 or 757-
6611 ext. 210 (leave message).
ROOM TO RENT: female nonsmoker in
Tar River. $125.00 a month plus 14
utilities. May-August, furnished. Call
Trish at 752-3708. 3:00 p.mll:00 p.m. or
before 10:45 a.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for summer
and possibly fall. Ringgold Towers,
private furnished bedroom, all major
appliances included. Microwave. Cable
included in S200.00month rent. Call
Spencer at 1-992-4543, 8-5 or collect after 5
at 929-0756.
APARTMENT TWO BLOCKS FROM
LIBRARY: One room of two bedroom
apartment available for sublease May-
August. Fully furnished and
airconditioned. Very convenient (4
minute walk to library). S145.00 per
month plus phone, cable and utilities.
757-0412.
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom�
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near BCU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
7S6-781S or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - S JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobUe homes in Azalea
Cardcns near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-781.S
FEMALE NONSMOKER wanted to
share 2 bedroom townhouse starting in
summer. Rent is $155.00 and half utilities.
Call Donna at 756-0233.
HERITAGE VILLAGE, two 2 bedroom
units for rent. Ceiling fans, private
backyard storage, reasonable rates, call
758-1177 or 355-6756.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
the summer. Room available in May. 13
rent and 13 utilities. Nonsmoker. Call
Wendy at 752-1321.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
apartment with two girls. Beginning
August 1988.13 rent and utilities. Please
call Jenny or Debbie at 752-1955.
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share
Wildwood Villas townhouse during
summer school. Call Julie at 752-4781.
ROOMMATE WANTED. Need
roommate for the summer, two
bedrooms, one and one half baths,
livingroom, kitchen, dinette, cement
patio great for barbecues, fridge,
dishwasher, central air, quiet
neighborhood, five minutes from
campus. 107-E. Cedar Court. $160.00 per
month plus utilities. Call 758-4779, ask for
Dan or Warren.
NEED TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES,
prefer upperclassman or grad,
nonsmoker, $113.75month rent, 14
utilities, own room, available beginning
to mid May, one year lease. Call 758 6614.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: Two story, 1
bedroom house located four blocks from
campus. Male preferred. $165.00 a month.
Call 758-1279 after 530 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Available May 8th to share 3 bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres. Private
bedroom, 13 rent and utilities, furnished
except for bedroom. Nonsmoker. Call
Dawn or Corey at 758-7368 or leave
message.
SPRING SPECIAL Fairlane Farms
Apartments. 2 bedroom2 bath
apartment. 894 sq. foot One month free
rent with 12 month lease. $95.(X) security
deposit. Call 355-2198.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to live
in Morehead this summer. Call Sonja
(Carolina Student) at lM2 6347.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie
Simonowich at 752-2865.
ECU STUDENTS
Greenville Cotido
Ringgold Towers
1 bd. fully furnished
$32000Owner will
consider 2nd mortgage
or trade equity for
other property.
Phone Frank Stone
at Southern Shores
Realty
1-800-334-1000
personals
PAM BARBOUR: We love you and will
always be here for you. Take care and be-
strong. Your sistersr at AOTT.
BAHAMA MOMA Get ready ECU,
Kappa Sigma's Bahama Moma is right
around the corner. The Ethics will be
pumping out the Jam, and lots of stew
will be showing off tans. Monday, April
25th.
ALPHA XI DELTA would like to thank
all the sororities and fraternities that
participated in All-Sing and made it such
a success! We would also like to give a
special thanks to Kathy Evans, Scott Kane
and the Attic for the extra work that they
did.
SAE, PHI TAU AND CHI O: thanks so
much for including us for the party it was
great Hope we can do it again soon'
Love, the Sigmas.
DEBBIE TAVIK: You did a great job
organizing Panhellenic Field Day
Thanks for spending the time! Love, the
Sigmas.
NEW DELI WANTS YOU to pm to the
best music. Welcome back Snatches of
I'ink Thursday, Indecision Friday, and
don't miss 3 I lits Saturday Don't forget
about open mike Tuesday-
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Flbo on
Fridays, from 4-until. $2.00 Teas-Why
drive anywhere else?
STERLING, ED, BRIAN, WENDY,
STEPHANIE Easter at Myrtle was really
ragin beech and beer-was a great
combination. Zack's looked great from
down on the fkxir. The "hometown" girl
vvj1- kxking poor. A carwash with beer
our favorite soda. Let's all drive to North
Dakota. Don't forget the Carebears!
They'll come in handy. Paint my nails
"cotton candy Picking up money off the
sand. Don't worry Wendy, with the fire
alarm she woke us all up at 8 in the
morning. The man with the shades wa�-
kxiking right But she slept in the room on
Sat. nite. Forget the crowds and grab the
beer-the partys in the car on the grass at
"The Til It was all lots of fun let's do it
again, to not return would be a Mn By
plane, by boat, we'll even hitch if worse
comes to worse-get into my car bitch'
Sincerely-Vicky.
LOST-Gray Himalayian cat, near
Johnston Street Apartments Needs
medication Reward Call 752-4379 or
758-4251.
HNK) NASAU (.reeks, don't forget,
Kappa Sig-Tri Sig Funky Nasau with the
Stegmons Get your teams together, no
puppies please, we use tall boys in our
contest
WINDY SPELL: Our Miss Fayetteville'
you are always a winner in i'ur hirts
Congratulations on 3rd. We hive you!
Love your Chi Omega Sisters
TO KA LITTLE SISTERS: Mandatarv
meeting April 18th. If you do not attend
we will know you will not be back in the
fall. See you Monday.
S.AIt's been about a month now, and I
want you as my date for Luau. Let's see
what these last few weeks bring maybe
you could be my summer fling?! What do
you think7 Bruce
GREEKS: 1 lope everyone has had a great
time this week. Get psyched for the Raft
Race! Love, the AOTT&
LORI STEVENSON: I laving you as a
sister AN D friend is one of the best things
in the world to me! Thank you so much
for the present and the note-you have
really helped me get through a tough
time! Thanks so much for just listening! I
love you and am always here if you ever
need to talk! DZ love, Kathie.
Announcements
FCA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9:30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
GAY COMMUNITY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
COUNSELING CFNTFR
Life planning workshop: This work-
shop is intended to provide assistance to
students unsure of the direction they wish
their lives to take. The Life Planning
Workshop will meet April 11,13,15, and 18
in 329 Wright Building. Please contact the
Counseling Center in 316 Wright Build-
ing or call 757-6661.
SOFTBALL TOlJttNFY
Registration for the Intramural All
Night Softball Tourney will be held
through April 15. For more info call 757-
6387.
GOLF
Registration for Intramural Golf will be
held on April 18 at 5 p.m. in MG 102. For
more info call 757-6387.
STUDY ABROAD
Applications are now being accepted
for study abroad placements under the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP). ISEP is a worldwide network of
colleges and universities that provides
exchanges of students on a one-for-one,
fully reciprocal basis. The cost of an ISEP-
sponsored study abroad experience is,
except for travel costs, the same as that of
attending ECU. If you have completed at
least one year of college-level work, have
a GPA of at least 2.5, and yearn to experi-
ence other people and other places, con-
tact IMMEDIATELY Dr. RJ. Hursey, Jr
ISEP Coordinator, Austin 222,757-6418 or
7560682. A limited number of summer
intensive language programs are avail-
able.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PH1-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6.00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
NASWCORSO
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. Held the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied Health
bldg room 110.
WOMEN'S FRISBFF gH
Practice will be held Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at the
bottom of College Hill. All interested
players should attend. Those who have
received foims need to have them com-
pleted and ready to turn in.
BACKPACKERS
Want to backpack the Appalachain
Trail? Planning a tripin May. Call Hugh at
355-3759.
FUTURE TEACHER?
The Foreign and Domestic Teachers
Organization needs teacher applicants in
all fields from Kindergarten through Col-
lege to fill over six hundred teaching va-
cancies both at home and abroad. Since
1968, our organization has been finding
vacancies and locating teachers both in
foreign countries and in all fifty states.
Our information is free and comes at an
opportune time when there are more
teachers than teaching positions. Should
you wish additional information about
our organization, you may write The
National Teacher's Placement Agency,
Universal Teachers, Box 5231, Portland,
Oregon 97208.
SCULPTURE GROTTP
The Sculpture Group of ECU presents a
student exhibition of current work on the
former location of Blount's department
store on the corner of 4th and Evans St.
downtown. March 29-April 19.
MARCHING PIRATFS
Auditions for flag and rifle positions on
the 1988 Colorguard will be held Sat
April 16, Sat April 23, and Sat May 21
from 12:00-4:30. Select one date to attend.
Any questions! Call Tracey 758-1217.
ORGANIZATIONS
Looking for an easy, guaranteed fun-
draiser? The Dept. of Univeristy Unions
needs ushers for its 1988-89 programs.
Please contact Lynn Jobes, 757-6611, for
more information.
PRODUCTIONS COMM,
The Student Union Productions
Committee will meet Thursday April 14th
at 4:00 p.m.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society Spring blow-
out - Pig picking party will be on Friday,
April 22nd from 4 p.m til 10 p.m. $2 for
members and $3 for non-members. Sign
up on April 11th thru the 15th in the
General Classroom building, room 3209
from 9 a.m. til 1p.m.
ACCOUNTING SOCTFTy
We will hold our monthly meeting on
April 18th at 4 p.m. in MSC Room 244.
Debra Bryant will speak on opening your
own CP.A. office. Elections take place so
please attend.
BAREFOOT ON THE MALI
All organizations interested in having a
booth at Barefoot, contact Kay at 757-6611,
ext 210. Barefoot is April 21,1988,12 Noon
to 6 p.m.
marching pre TfS
Auditions for flag and rifle positions on
the 1988 Colorguard will be held Sat
April 16, Sat April 23, and Sat May 21
from 12:00-4:30 Select one date to attend.
Any questions! Call Tracey 758-1217.
EPISCOPAL ffttow;htp
E.S.F. meets Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. at
St. Pauls Episcopal Church on 4th Street.
In the E.S.F. there is no pressure to per-
form. Call Allen Manning for more infor-
mation at 758-1440.
AUCTION
From the Heart Auction Tues April
19th, 7:00 p.m. at the Attic. Auctioned will
be a wide variety of merchandise, services
and trips. A Hilton 1 lead Island get-away,
antiques, home decor items, dinners, gift
certificates, retail items, appliances; serv-
ices�cleaning, decorating and repairs.
All bids are tax deductible. For more info
call Carol Brown at 752-9989. Sponsored
by American Heart Assoc.
CO-OP
If you are work-study eligible you may
be interested in a job off-campus this
semester or in the summer or fall of 1988.
Please contact the Cooperative Education
office, 2028 General classroom Building
for further information.
EROS
The Equal Rights Organization of Stu-
dents, meets weekly, alternating between
Tuesday and Wednesday meetings. Meet-
ing dates for April are the 5th, 13th, 19th
and 27th. If you're interested in learning
more aobut feminism or women's issues,
please attend these meetings, in Brewster
B-101. Call 752-8014 for more information
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Honor
Society will be having a meetin April 19,
1988 at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. The
Mov-a-thon will be April 16 at Elm St.
Gym beginning at 9 a.m. Congratulations
to the new state officers Tim Thornburg.
John Thrift and Lori Ann Chriscoe.
LECTURE
Dr. Melton McLaurin of UNC -
Wilmington will be speaking on "Slavery
as a moral delemma: the case of Celia, a
slave, on Wednesday April 20 at 3:00 p m
in Brewster C-103. This is the final Richard
C ToddPHI Alpha Theta lecture of the
1987-88 academic year. Ail are invited to
attend.
ECHQ
There will be a final ECHO meetin
April 14, at 5:00 p.m. in room 1004. GCB
Plans for the spring picnic and elections
for next year will be discussed, so please
plan to attend.
PRIMiTlME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for
Christ meets Thursday, 7 30 p m
Brewster C-103 Please come and join us
for Biblical teaching fun, and fellowship
Bring your friends! We look forward to
meeting you. This Sunday night at 830
p.m. in Mendenhall we will be showine
the most watched film in America
Jesus Come out and watch it with us
and bring a friend! Meet at the
information desk.
AMA MFMBFPg
The American Marketing Association
will be hosting its first ever banquet on the
19th of April. Time and place will be
posted shortly. Dinner along with a spe-
cial quest speaker will be provided The
cost will be $3.00 per person or $5.00 for
members and a guest. Money for the
banquet can be turned into Dr. Dudley's
office in advance. "
PHYSICAL FITNFgjgj
The physical education motor and
physical fitness competency test is sched-
uled for Tuesday April 26 at Minges Coli-
seum at 3:00 p.m. A passing score on this
test is required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a major.
Any student with a medical condition that
would contraindicate participation
should contact Mike McCammon or
Mitch Craib at 757-6497.
GOLDEN GIRLS
Auditions for the Golden Girls will be
held on Sat. April 23rd and Sun. April 24
for the 1988 Marching Pirates. Must at-
tend both days. For more information call
Teresa at 752-4369.
JIM MARTIN
Students for Martin present the current
and next governor: James G. Martin on
campus! Friday at 1130 a.m. Contact 752-
3587 for more information.
CAMILLE BRITT: Thanks so much for
the outstanding job you did on our Spring
Cocktial! Congratulations on your
engagement to Gary! Love, the Sigmas
3 ON 3: Good job, Pikas on winning tk
first annual Kappa Sig 3 on 1 B-Balf
Thanx to the TKE's, SAE's and Larrtbd
Chis for coming over Hope to see v '
boys next semester
FOUND: Hand held calculator o0 b
Chemlab Computer labortory '
Brewster Building and identify
SPRING FLING is coming soon
Friday, April 22 at the Phi Tau 1 Unam ?
CONGRATULATIONS to John
ski. Alpha Delta Pi 1988 Creel '
Year
Scissorsmith
would like to welcome
Susan PressfM-
to our staff
(formally of Headsllp)
Call Susan for an
appointment
758-7570
KXi Eaatia -
Gamma Delta
Pledge Class
of
Phi Kappa Tau
would like to congrndulate
Lisa Green
For Winning A
Sony Compact Disc in
the Boys ClubPhi Tau
Fundraising Raffle
FIZZ BISTRO
$1.50 Happy Hour
every night in April
10 - til?
Special Drinks:
Tequila Shots Ml
Rcppenmnl s rmappi - n ,
K:v. Scrardrtvera B
110 K. 4th St 752 5855
Outside Deck Open for 1988
Dive
PfenneKamp
in
Key Largo, Fla.
2 Persons $369
4 Persons $309
May 8-13
For More Information ft
Registration Call The
Rum Runner
Dive Shop
atya
DIVE CLUB
The Coral Reef Dive Club spring rar'v
is on 4-16-88. For more information come
to club meeting on Thursda) 4-14-88 �
contact Rob or Clenn at 752 4399
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications are now being accepted
(or the David B. and Wil!a H Stevens
Scholarship for undergraduates enrolled
�n the School of Social Work It will be
awarded for the fall semester ot 1988 The
Herman C. and Marian S MoeDer Fellow
ship for M.S.VV. students will be awarded
at the end of Spring Semester 1988 Irk
recipients will be selected on the basis
academic excellence, leadership activi-
ties, qualities of good citizenship and
dedication to the Social work and Crimi-
nal Justice Professions. Applications are
available from and should be returned re
the School of Social Work. Room 301. Al-
lied Health (Carol Belk) Building Dead
line: April 18,1988. For more information
call 757-6961, Ext. 258.
VISUAL ARTS FORUM
The Beaux Arts Ball will be held April
16inCrayArtGalleryfrom9until2 Open
to all ECU students, faculty and their
guests. Door prizes and the' Band. The
Amateurs. BYOB. Costumes not required
Sponsored by the VAF. ID. required
$4.00 in advance and $5.00 at the door.
BASKETBALL BANQUET
The 1988 ECU Men's Basketball
a raf Banq��et will be held on Sundav,
rfll ,at ,2 "o at the Hilton Inn
weenville. The public is invited to attend
nefc cost js $10. For further information
�L! KPTha8e tickets- Pase call the Pi-
dav - offi� at 757-6472 bv Fn
aav'April 15.
tv SBBALL TATT GATT.
aub chLtI5ountyECU Mumni & nn
at 'ImiI " sponsoring a cookout
hotdogs t rim if 2 � an
fa� cold ice w8� �" the � P1"5
Tickets w Bmiill,?c 8nd km �"�
at 6:00 d m " do"le header starts
ticket iTextra881"8 Richmond The game
I
Gay s
(CPS) � A bitter eight J
stuggle that could affect gay'1
dents at private colleges arc
the country ended March 2
draw
ma court comprorri -
dents at private G wn ;
versity in Washii .
the nght to use camj
while Georgetown officials
who had claii
gay group on campus would
late the school'satholic p
triples � didn't ha rant
rial recognition to thi
1 he compromise
in December and n
last week
get about $127 million u
funds, whi
CalifoVi
Temp
� apparentl)
levels by intense heat, 1
ond major -
springbreak -
end oi March.
Palm Beach. C
rested 7 people and issued C
tions to 200 others during
end of sporadic fighting and p
lie drunkenness among the 50,
students vacationing in I
"When you have alcor
volved said police Officer -
1 foltz, "mouths start getting b
x, and guys start thii I
they're tougher than they are '
Holtz said the mixture oi 11
degree heat and alcohol conti
uted to the disturbanc
A week earlier, students
break in Port Aransas, Tex r J
for fourhours, dispersing oi
after seven people were lnjun
police bombed the crowd wi
tear gas, and eight pc-ople w
arrested.
I loltz sud the troubles in Ta
Springs � where in 19S6 hi
dreds of students ran wild,
dalized property, threw r J
assaulted female passersbv aj
briefly toojoyer the central bi
College Studen
are older
The nation's college studi
body has gotten older faster th
anyone � including colleg
themselves -realized, a stj
unpublished report circulated
national higher education j
ence last week contended.
Forty-five percent oi the pc
now enrolled in college are o
than the age oi 23, the repor
the College Board said.
"Xontraditional" students
make up 50 percent of U.S. cell
enrollment by 1998, the re
predicted.
Report author Carol
Aslanian added that, while mj
colleges have started cam;
to recruit older students
pensate for the declining nu i j
oi 18-ycar-olds in the pope J
many haven't instal graj
that serve the older student-
While Aslanian wouldn
ment on the re-r - rt which i:
officially released yet, it ca i
big stir at the American Colll
Personnel Association convj
tion in Miami
Most seemed to agree with
report's conclusions that cam
orientation programs, geared
18-ycar-olds, generally dd
address the needs ot older
dents, who in some cases
never invited to orientation.
Colleges, moreover, hJ
found they re attracting a ditj
ent type of nontraditional snw
than they had expected
Though most schools ai
enroll "suburban housewi
who had money to spend
nontraditional students act
registering for classes otter
poorer women aiming to ?
themselves for clerical i
Open 7 Days
Mon. - Sat.
9:30 & 8:30
Sun. 1-5
r
?8
10 Gal. St
QQwilli
L
10 gal Tank ki!
� Food � Purrp
Gravel � Carbon
WithO
X
imiwuipi nn i jummiw�ffli�i
mn��M�n
wttm i- mi i� - "





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, 1988
� � much tor
rSpnng
' �" your
winning the
�n 3 B-Baij
'Umhda
'toi g0 bN
1 �
ow
ZZ BISTRO
Happy Hour
it in April
til?
�ri for 1988
uive
I PenneKamp
in
rgo, Fla.
ins S369
rsons $309
May 8-13
-formation &
son Call The
un Runner
Dive Shop
7581444

I LB
it �
I I
ESHIPS
���
ites enrolled
: will b�
t Fellow
eawai
nit-

i rivi
and
i Crimi
jr
tum
301, Al-
. ng. Dead
rmation
Mls FORUM
I April
� rtbl2 Open
ind their
a The
� required
��quired
� ' ittl loot
BASK! FHM.BANQUET
� tball
I on Sunday,
� ! Iiiton Inn
1 to attend
r information
ill the Pi
' 6472 by Fri
, BASlBAU IAILGATE
' �imnii Pirate
sponsoring a cookout
Held Saturday April 16th
P m All vou can eat
hamburgers on the grill plus
and lots of fun.
The double header starts
i against Richmond The game
Gay students to use facilities
vCPS) A btter eight vear
;le that an,Id atfcvt gav stu
i nts at private colleges around
the country ended March 2l in a
draw.
In a court compromise, gay stu-
dents at private Georgetown Uni
versih in Washington, D.C, won
� use campus facilities
ile Georgetown officials
had claimed sanctioning a
p-oup on campus would vio-
hool s Catholic prin-
dn't have to grant offi-
recognition to the students.
mpromise concocted
in December and made official
: week o lets Georgstown
� ' t about SI27 million in public
' d- District of Columbia
officials had been withholding
because (Jeorgetown, by refusing
to recognize the gay student
group, was violating a district law
banning discrimination on the
basis ot sexual orientation.
"It is gratifying to have Geor-
getown admit that if was wrong
all these years said Lorri lean,
who as a first-year law student
sued the school for recognition of
her lesbian group in 1980.
In a written statement after the
compromise, however, Geor-
getown administrators didn't
confess to being "wrong" at all.
While the agreement
reached in the District of Colum-
bia Superior Court requires
that (Georgetown treat and appro-
priate money for the gay students
the same way they might for other
student groups, it did not force
the school to grant the gay groups
official student group recogni-
tion.
"The university
Georgetown's statement an-
nounced, "will not recognize or
endorse these student groups,
and will be able top make clear
that is does not share their views
Superior Court fudge Sylvia
Bacon in December had ordered
Georgetown to give the gay
groups equal treatment without
officially recognizing them.
Georgetown then appealed the
case to the U.S. Supreme Court,
which in fanuary refused to hear
it. Last week, Georgetown admin-
istrators accepted Bacon's De-
cember ruling.
In years past, gay groups had
claimed the Greogetown case
would help clarify the rights of
homosexual and lesbian student
groups to organize at other pri-
vate campuses around the coun-
try.
The ramifications of the cases
for other campuses ire unclear,
however.
Kevin Berrill of the National
Gay and Lesbian Task F:orce
"ampus Project said the kev to the
(Georgetown compromise was the
District of Columbia's law ban-
ning discrimination on the basis
of sexual preference. While gay
student groups in communities
with similar laws may use thecase
as a precedent, homosexual
groups in communities without
such legislation may find them
selves in a weaker position.
But Berrill pointed out other
courts have ruled shools that
deny homosexual groups access
to funds and facilities have been
found guilty of violating constitu-
tional guarantees to freedom of
speech and assembly.
"The decision is a good one he
said. "Hopefully it will encourge
other gay student groups to seek
recognition
College
Graduate
When you graduate you
may no longer be
covered by your parents
health insurance
SHORT-TERM
MEDICAL INSURANCE
1-6 Months
Coverage Very
Reasonable Rates
McGLOHON ft COMPANY
758-1177
Underwritten by
Golden Rule Insurance
"A" Rated (Excellent)
California college burst into roit
i efforts to show
raised to explosive
ntense heat, led to the
ml major riots of the college
k seas n the last week
March.
i'T ich, Cal police ar-
�ple and issued cita-
others during a week
�! sporadic fighting and pub-
cenncss among the 50,000
acationing in town.
you have alcohol in-
: police Officer Karen
ulhs start getting big-
start thinking
tougher than they are
aid the mixture oi 100-
ee heat and alcohol contrib
url ances
k earlier, students on
! Aransas.Tex noted
urs, dispersing only
so en people were injured,
e bombed the crowd with
andight people were
1
� ubles in Palm
where in 1986 hun-
� Tits ran wild, van-
threw rocks,
i female passersby and
k. pi Ti' i entral busi
( ollew Students
ness district before police moved
in to arrest 708 people and issue
4,943 citations were "nothing
out ot hand
After the 1986 riots, Palm
Springs and Fort Lauderdale in
Flordia dropped their efforts to
attract students for spring break
Only amaica, the Gulf Coast of
Texas and a handful to Flordia
towns now actively trv to lure
students to their beaches.
Mexico reportedly also is con-
sidering discouraging American
collegians from vacationing in
traditional places like Mazatlan,
Nogales and Rocky Point.
"There aren't very good feel-
ings in Mexico about young
Americans said University of
Arizona Dean of Students Rosal-
ind Andreas, who added students
"are behaving as if they don't
have to be responsible for their
actions.?
are older
college-student
ten older faster than
luding colle.
realized, a still-
: irt circulated at a
� �duration confer-
�ntended.
five percent of the people
nrollcd m ge are older
ige of 25, the report by
College Board said.
"Nontraditional" students may
percent of U.S. college
�s. the report
: Carol B.
slanian added that, while most
lieges have started campaigns
ler students to com-
nsate for the declining numbers
I 3-year-olds in the population,
installed programs
the older students yet.
ile Aslanian wouldn't com-
on the report, which is not
illy released yet, it caused a
tir tt the American College
- nnel Association conven-
Miami.
ned to agree with the
inclusions that campus
tat m programs, geared to
generally don't
needs of older stu-
who in some cases are
� : to orientation.
� s moreover, have
tracting a differ-
ent typeol nontraditional student
than they had expected.
h most schools aimed to
enroll "suburban housewives"
io had money to spend, the
noi tional students actually
registering for classes often are
poorer women aiming to train
themselves for clerical jobs.
Andrea's office, hoping to pre-
vent students from offending
their hosts, in late February pub-
lished a list of trip guidelines
advising students they don't have
the same rights in Mexico as they
do at home.
In early March, moreover, an
Arizona State University student
was killed when he fell oh the top
oi a train carrying a group of stu-
dents to Mazatlan.
In I )aytona Beach by far now
the most popular spring break
locale, this year bringing an esti-
mated 500,000 students to
town six people have died this
season.
Baby take a look at this banner marking the beginning of Greek Week
for 1988. (Thomas Walters � I'hotolab)
v iuTin,i
MdWkHlsC
1987 88
Season
General Public $5 00 CALL:
ECU Students S4 00 757 6390
McGINNIS THEATRE
(Corner of Fifth & Eastern)
( Hx'n 7 Days
Man - Sat.
9:30 & 8:30
SPRING
SPECIALS
GOOD THRU 4-21-88
422 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville - 756-7202
L
10 �"? "2Ld I $i" limTt 2 pTr Visit j
-Vvrith purchasp of food I
7T With Coupon
wi- �l �. .� mmm� lii �j
12 Off Feeder Fish j
With CouponIWithCou�on
?8
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Gravel � Carbon. Reg $15 99
r
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PSl
Dance & Active Wear
355-3531
422 Arlington Bbd
Gri'itnille
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The Jag Swim Suit Line
ATTIC
The �
CoMedY
WED
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CoMedi
7XW
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
FREE-
SPIRIT
FREE-
SPIRIT
$1 ECU wad
FRIDAY
i
Tribute to
Pink Floyd
SATURDAY
1k
Wr
&
u
SI ECU wad
i
The Student Union proudly presents
i
Thursday, April 21 from 12 noon 'til 6 p.m.
�Bob and the Rocking Horses
�The Original Drifters - Beach Music Extraordinaire
�Joey Gutierrez - the brash new comic fresh from appearances on
The Tonight Show and Late Night with David Letterman
�Denny Dent and His Two Fisted Art Attack - this man will merge
art and music like you've never seen!
� WIZARD OF OZ - on the big screen!
Balloon Animals, Picture Buttons, Arcade Games,
Food, Drinks, and more OJL� .�.
4
Reptile World
Lester - juggler, and mime extraordinaire
�The Birthday Chronicle
�Sun and Fun
��
Donft Miss This! It's The Event Of The Year!
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 14. 1988 Page 8
A typical night in the life of the Bad Checks
By KAREN ARD1 N
sjxvui to thr ! js; Carolinian
It hasn't been a good evening
for Robin Mann. Thanks to North
Carolina's ever-changing
weather, an outdoor show at
Greenville's Delta Sigma Phi
house was quickly turned into a
living-room fiasco.
After assembling, disassem-
bling, and then reassembling all
of their equipment, the guitarist
and the rest of his band mates
were allowed to plav, two hours
Kite, on space barely ten feet wide.
Then, five songs into the set, they
were mysteriously told to quit
playing by a high-ranking mem-
ber of the fraternity.
In the meantime, a drunken co-
ed was hi t by a car just ou tsidc the
house. Strange things happen
when the Bad Checks come to
town.
"I don't really know what hap-
pened Mann said later at a
friend's apartment. "They said
something about cops but they
had been there all night and
hadn't given us any trouble I lis
brother Cliff, the band's bass
player, has his own theory on
what happened.
"I think they just didn't like us
he says laughing. "I mean, they'd
probably never heard us and
didn't know what to expect. It was
probably too much for them
The apartment has n .urniture
and Robin and Cliff arc sitting on
the floor where they'll sleep later.
Traveling light often means bum-
ming a place to stay. They don't
look like the instigators of rock
and roll mayhem, in fact they look
like they'd be more at home under
the hood of a car.
Cliff, in fact, bears a strange
resemblance to Comer Pyle. But,
Violinist to play on April 21
CU School of Music Press Release
Robert McDuffie, one of the
most gifted oi American violin-
ists, will he on campus April 21
tor a public concert with ECU
School of Music faculty members
Paul Tardit and Selma Cokcen.
The program begins at 8:15 p.m.
in the AT Fletcher Recital I all oi
the School of Music and is free to
all interested persons.
McDuffie and Tardit will per-
fom three works tor violin and
piano - Beethoven's "Soanta in
G Major Op. 30, 'o. 3; "Ro-
mance in F Minor' Op. 11 by
Dvorak; and Camille Saint-Saens'
Introduction and Rondo Ca-
priccioso Op. 28. following in-
termission, Selma Cokcen will
join them for the perfomance of
Felix Mendelssohn's "Trio in D
Minor Op. 4e for violin, piano,
an cello.
Gokcen's recent career appear-
ances include performances of the
Lalo cello concetto with the Is-
tanbul Philharmonic to sold-out
houses on a recent two-day en-
gagement at the Ataturk Cultural
Center in Istanbul, Turkey. To-
gether they have performed recit-
als at the Spoleto Festival in Char-
leston, S.C and the National
Gallery in Washington DC.
Devoting as much of his concert
season to concerto appearance as
to the recital stage, Mr.
McDuffic's recent orchestral en-
gagements have included the
Chicago Symphony, Atlanta
Symphony, Czech Philharmonic,
Cincinnati Symphony, Baltimore
Symphony, St. Louis Symphony,
American Symphony, and the
Danish State Radio Orchestra.
As rccitalist, he has been heard
in almost every major music capi-
tal of North and South America,
Europe, the Orient and the Soviet
Union. He performs frequently
with Yehudi Mcnuhin in chamber
music concerts, and his first re-
cording is to be released soon for
Angel Records.
McDuffie is a violinist
ECU Music School Press Release
Robert McDuffie isn't just an-
other virtuoso with a prettv face.
Sure, he's done uilliard and Car-
negie Hall and the London
umphonv. And yes, Yehudi
Menuhin is his friend. Rut deep
down, under the white tie and
tails, beats the heart of an all-
American kid.
A kid who played Little League
baseball and varsity basketball in
high school. How many violinists
can boast that?
Next Tuesday, McDuffie opens
the Portland Communitv Concert
Association's 1986-87 season with
a concert at Civic Auditorium.
The series contains six concerts
and sells out annuallv, according
to the association's Wanda
Weiskopf.
McDuffie was 6 when he took
up a glove and then a fiddle in
Macon, Ga. For the next 10 years,
he alternated grounders and free
throws with scales and etudes.
The scales and etudes eventuallv
predominated; these days,
McDuffie lives in New York and
travels with his fiddle 30 weeks a
year.
When McDuffie turned 16, he
realized he'd better get serious
about music, he packed up his
violin and moved to New York to
study in the preparatory division
at Juilliard. For two years, he prac-
ticed four hours a day.
"If anybody doesn't get better
after that, something's wrong
he said. "You'd better get better,
and I did
McDuffie they entered
uilliard's college division to
study with Dorothy DeLay, the
matriarch of violin teachers. He
worked with DeLay for five years;
Shlomo Mintz and Nadja Saicrno-
Sonnenber, two ascending violin-
ists, were colleagues in his weekly
master classes with DeLay.
Before leaving juilliard,
McDuffie auditioned for and was
signed by Columbia Artists Man-
agement, the company that man-
ages Yehudi Menuhin. In 1983,
Menuhin played a concert in Car-
negie Hall to celebrate the 150th
anniversary of Brahms's birth.
McDuffie was asked to partici-
pate.
"The hall was completely full,
there were about 150 seats set up
on the stage McDuffie remem-
bered. "It didn't hit me until the
middle oi the concert-her I was,
sitting next to Yehudi Menuhin in
Carnegie I lall. I could barely con-
centrate but 1 kept my eves on the
music
The following year, McDuffie
played with Menuhin on the
"Great Performers" series at Lin-
coln Center; they continue to see
each other whenever McDuffie is
in London. "He's a wonderful
man and he's helped me a lot,
He's a great friend
Now 28, McDuffie is preparing
for a major career. He's beginning
to appear more frequently with
orchestras and , this year, made a
record oi both David Diamond
violin sonatas for Angel. Dia-
mond wrote his second sonata for
McDuffie, who premiered it at the
Library of Congress. Another
piece that McDuffie frequently
plays is William Schuman's Vio-
lin Concerto.
"I love to play contemporarv
music, especially American mu-
sic. But I don't want to be typecast.
I feel I can use my imagination.
This is a picture of violinist Robert McDuffie. He plays the violin. He
will be playing the violin April 21 in the AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Apathy leads to big trouble
for this Voting ECU student
By JIM LAYTON
Staff Writer
Bored, I pretended to be unde-
cided during the SGA election. I
was now labeled with millions of
other apathetic students who
ironically don't care enough
about their school to vote. Now
dedicated hordes of followers
would try to convert me to their
choice.
Preparing for the ordeal that
was the campaign, I armed myself
with an art fag tool box hoping it
would help if 1 was pursued by
their fanatical hordes of follow-
ers. I was ready for the onslaught.
Before I went off to class, I ate a
tasty, nutritous meal at Jones cafe-
teria. While in gourmet ecstacy, I
perceived a bad omen about the
oncoming day: the infamous
Carolina Blue tray with "Weeb isa
dick on it. I shrieked in horror,
knowing 1 was doomed.
A candidate, that I had seen
before in Jones, came up to me and
smiled grimacingly. fudging by
his face and the fact that I had to
leave for class, 1 knew he was a
candidate. Cornered, I Knit to his
will.
He convinced me of the superi-
ority of his ideals. I le was a man
of character devoted toasideof an
issue, but I was still too devoted to
my apathy.
Eventhough I was caught up in
his aura of majesty and I knew I
had better make a mad dash for
class so I told him he had my vote.
At the door, he gave me a picture
of himself, which I promptly
framed on the way out.
In Poly Sci, I learned how much
my vote counted in any election
and was apalled that so few took
the time to vote. My solution was
to make the voting age 21 so that
all underage people who drink,
would vote as well.
Class over, I prepared for the
trip to the dorm by tying my
sneakers and loading my arsenal
of excuses. I began to walk to-
ward a voting box when a beauti-
ful young woman came up to me,
kissed me on the cheek, and
begged for my vote.
I was in love. As I melted at her
feet, she told me why I should
make the right choice. I had never
done "It" before, but I felt as if I
was being pressured into a deci-
sion that could affect both of us for
a long time. I wasn't ready yet, so
sadly I moved on.
Walking away wounded, a
strange guy wearing glasses came
up to me and told me I did the
right thing. I le went on to con-
vince me there was too much in-
justice in the world and that his
liberal ideas were mv ideas.
J
1 le went on to say that mari-
juana should be legalized, stu-
dents should have more rights,
and that men should have the
right to have babies. Now I was
on the right track- he got mv vote
for Congress!
I could tell I was getting closer
to the dorm when a bald mob
dressed in togas, armed with
flowers and campaign stickers
started chanting my way. I knew
I was in trouble when I tripped
over someone who had tried an
ill-fated escape.
Getting my art fag tool box out,
I walked toward the mob. Armed
only with this, naturally I was
captured . Torturing my naked
body they tried to convert me to
their choice but I resisted. Their
leader told me he was the chosen
one. He was Zeus, King of the
Gods.
A thunderbolt of campaign
stickers was hurled upon my
naked body, but I escaped to
neutral ground, the voting box.
Confident that I was an educated
voter like the rest, I made my
mark and walked away, satisfied.
I have decided never again to
pretend apathy towards voting -
for my own good.
Noted critic to visit
ECU School of Art
and lecture is free
Pontiac Bros, sign autographs
at local music and video store
The Pontiac Brothers signed autographs at East Coast Music and Video yesterday. The Pontiacs played
the New Deli Wednesday night. They are touring to support their album "Johnson Photo by Photolab V
Hardy Alligood.
School of Art Pre�� Release
East Carolina University's
School of Art Visiting Critics Pro-
gram will sponsor a public lecture
by New York critic Marshall Ber-
man on tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium. Berman's
visit is funded by a grant from the
North Carolina Arts Council
which allows him to also visit
classes and students during his
stay.
Berman ws born in New York.
He has been a professor of Politi-
cal Science at City College,
CUNY, since 1978. He also served
as visiting professor in Political
Science at Stanford and in Ameri-
can Studie; at the University of
New Mexico.
Among his many awards, Ber-
man was elected Phi Beta Kappa
at Columbia in 1961 and subse-
quently was awarded the Kellett
Fellowship, Coumbia and Oxfor-
dand Guggenheim Fellowship. In
addition, Berman serves on the
Editorial Board of Dissent maga-
zine and on the Executive
Committee for the Center for
Worker Education at CUNY.
Books by Berman include "The
Politics of Authenticity 1970;
and "All That is Solid Melts Into
Air "The Experience of Moder-
nity 1982. Living for the City:
Destruction and Renewal in New
York" is in progress u(ider con-
tract to Random House.
then again, the band members
usually aren't the ones involved.
"We have a little trouble at our
shows sometimes admits Robin
That's putting it mildly. Past
shows have resulted in the de-
struction of a Stage, near riots, and
bodily injury to fans as well as
band members. Lead singer
Hunter Land en, who has a pen-
chant for jumping into the audi
ence, got a little more than he
bargained for one night.
"We were filming a show at The
Brcwerv in Raleigh slid Robin
laughing, "and this guv pulls
Hunter from the stage and hits
him in the mouth. That was a frat
party too
In addition to being the band's
guitarist, Robin is also respon
sible for writing most ot tin1
band's songs. Citing influences
from the Beatles to ohn I Jenver,
Robin writes about the simj
everyday pleasure of life grave
yards, necrophilic girlfriends,
going to jail, etc.
Their music, however, is hai
to classifv. In North Carol �
J
they're considered to be "thra
rock In New York they play at
heavy metal clubs. Maybe the
only thing that can truthfull) W
said about the Bad Checks i tl
they are an experience which i
amount oi preparation can pre
pare you tor.
Future plans include a new
album, ("When we get
money"), and a tour of i ranee and
Holland. Their last album "Ini
cence" was recently n i i ed
with a picture ot a ballerina on I
new cover.
Even the band
thought thepi( tureof a girl
bottom and a record on the
cover was a bit much.
thought, They'll never put this
Record Bar Just another c ntro
versy for the Bad Checks.
Beaux Arts
Ball Saturday
By CAROL WETHERINGTON
s dr! Featfum Editor
Saturday the Visual Arts Fo-
rum, an SGA organization, is
sponsoring the Beaux Arts
BallBeaux Arts which is
French for "Fine Arts is a party
that most colleges, around the
country, hold annuallv.
The Ball originated within the
art school as a masquerade ball
partv'strictlv for art students. It
quickly changed into a down
town "free-for-all" Halloween
blow out.
This year it was not held at
Halloween, as planners decided
to takea more original, traditional
turn and hold it in the spring,
within the art school. It's to be
mainly social, catering to ECU'S
entire body. This year, most of the
excitement is due to the costumes
and prizes that are given for the
best costumes. The grand prize to
be given for the best costume is a
waterbed. Door prizes will also be
given out.
The profits madeon the ball will
go back into the art school. 5
will go towards furthering VAF
art scholarships, and the rest into
a fund for art promotions activi-
ties, trips and socials.
The cost of this big event i s 54
dollars in advance and $5 at the
door. BEER is allowed- absolutely
no liquor or glass containers
Under-age guests will be tagged -
valid identification is required.
Chancellor's
Inauguration
Concert on
Friday night
The Chancellor's Inaugural
Concert, " The Passion According
to St. John" by J.S. Bach, will be
presented by the ECU Choir and
Orchestra Thursday.
Under the direction of Dr Brett
Watson, this year's performance
is to be one of the season's biggest
The performance will be h Id in
Wright Auditorium and will start
at 8 pm. There is no cost and the
public is welcome. For more infor-
mation, call 757-6331
Produ
The Bearsville record label
fvhose best-known c i
low resident Todd Rundgren, has
been inactive sir an's
death. But the studio, once u
almost exclusively by Beai
artists, has seen more action
"We just kind of intensifie I
atys Grossman's widow, Sail v.
nrho now owns the company
Sally Grossman ma)
erly of the Greenwich
dubs she grew up around ii
'60s, but her studi
a corporate retreat
Fresh-smelling .
and blackened ��� �
the modem and ru
pictures ot tin
recorded in -� ir
Rupert d
the sight
NEW YORK
Rupert I
ing "Mail
looking a
wrote the musi
Broad wo. musi
at the Music :
Theshow
man named Alex v.
home after four montr
tudeandd - moun-
mail just wait ng
When he df
bills and even junk mail
life in song and dan
For Rupert, the decisi i I
in a musical he helped wrife
difficult one to make. He need
persuading
"It's been exactly v.
cared it was going to be -exr
ing he says now
have any time to myself at all. But!
I love it. I'm a bit oi a w -
"Mail" bega n life in t he su rr
of 1984 when Rupert and his part-
ner, Jerry Colker, already w
working on "3 Guys Naked fromi
the Waist Down, a musical ab
the world of stand-up comics
At the time, "3 Car. -
tween an out-of-town tryout ii
North Carolina and its off-Bn
way premiere. The duo had soi J
moments to spare and kick I
around and .dea that Colker
about a man .vho drops out ot
for four months and then come
back to face a stack of mail.
Colker envisioned thestorv as
play. But what stuck in Rupert
head was the part of the
about the letter writers spri
to life on stage
"Alex, the main chara
would interact with thest
people he recalls Maj
Correction
The April 7 edition oi the Fast
Carolinian contained an error.
probablv contained many, but
the most glaring was the re
spelling oi the artist's narrv.
page 9, under the picture of
Batman and the loker.
The correct cutline should read
Illustration by left Man. s.
I fronted you. 1 should know
better. Def?" Barker.
The editorial staff oi this pae
would like to apologize tor thi-
gross mistake, and they wish t
promise to take more care in th
future, and if it ever happ.
again, the artist is hereb) giver
permission to smack the ed
rial staff soundly in the head.
Also, said editorial staff pr
ises to try and keep its collect; vj
rear out oi Richmond for a
while. Word.
RACK ,
i BRANDED SH
I Greenville Buyer s M;
I Memorial Drive
I
I
I
I
I
�Open
� Monday - Saturday LI
I Sunday 1-6
mmammmtmm





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14.1988 9
makes records way up in mts
Checks
;ain, the band members
aren t the ones involved,
ivc a little trouble at our
'w ssometimes, admits Robin.
- putting it mildly Past
ws have resulted in the de-
letion of a stage near riots and
- ,is well .is
id sin
ho has a pen-
into the audi-
i he
n 5ht.
ishowat rhe
said Robin
t ra t
band s
the
ive-
girlfriends,
i ork they play at
:lubs Maybe the
uthfull)
the Bad Checks is that
re an experience which no
pre-
ire plans include a now
When we get the
la I rof Fi and
� la�
was r
:
I
II
the Bad Or
eau Arts
all Saturday
RO WETHERINGTON
'� �
I u x A �
i party
r und the
illy.
n ithin the
i n isquerade ball
for art students. It
i into a down-
r all" Halloween
ir it was not held at
is planners decided
riginal, traditional
and hold it in the spring,
in the art school. It's to be
il, catering to EC!
. ar,mostofthe
�. ment is duo to the costumes
prizes that are given tor the
es.Thegrand prize to
� for the bcsl me is a
L Door prizes will ala
n out.
ieprofits madeon the ball will
- into the art school. 51 I
pill go towards furthering VAF
urships, and the rest ii
r art promotions ictivi-
, trips and social-
he cost of this big event i; S4
in advance and $5 at the
r. BEER is allowed-absolutely
liquor or glass containers
der-age guests will be tagged -
id identification is required.
Chancellor's
nauguration
Concert on
Friday night
The Chancellor's Inaugural
Concert The Passion According
to St. John" by J.S. Bach, will be
presented by the ECU Choir and
Orchestra Thursday.
Under the direction of Dr. Brett
I Watson, this year's performance
is to be one of the season's biggest.
The performance will be h Id in
I Wright Auditorium and will start
it 8 pm. There is no cost and the
public is welcome. For more infor-
Imation, call 757-6331
The Bearsville record label,
whose best-known client was fel-
low resident Todd Rundgren, has
been inactive since Grossman's
death. But the studio, once used
almost exclusively by Bearsville
artists, has seen more action.
"We just kind of intensified it
says Grossman's widow, Sally,
hvho now owns the company.
Sally Grossman may talk earg-
erly of the Greenwich Village
Iclubs she grew up around in the
I'oOs, but her studio was the air of
a corporate retreat.
Fresh-smelling wood paneling
ind blackened windows blend
the modern and rustic. Framed
pictures of the cover art of albums
recorded in Bearsville during the
past year line the walls of second-
floor offices.
Halfway down the hill is one of
a handful of pn vate homes Gross-
man has converted into apart-
ments for clients to use while re-
cording. A second house, sepa-
rated by a Catskill mountain
stream and wooden bridge, has
been converted into a rehearsal
studio.
"It's in Woodstock, not in
downtown Manhattan, and if you
want to �et some air you just walk
outside Clearmountain says.
"You don't walk outside and get
hit by bus fumes
It was in Woodstock, in a house
dubbed "Big Pink that the Band
recorded some of its best music,
including tne famed "basement
tapes" with Dylan. At the time,
Dylan was recovering from a
near-fatal motorcycle accident.
Woodstock's singular event,
the three-day concert that at-
tracted 450,000 people and such
artists as Janis Joplin, the Who,
Jimi Hendrix and Sly and the
Family Stone, took place in 1969.
Its actual location was 'several
miles away in Bethel.
It's the foreign bands who are
usually most interested in
Woodstock's history, Grossman
says.
"I think it means something
Clearmountain, who attended the
festival, says of the Woodstock
mysticque. "Originally, people
upert dances and sings at
he sight of all his "Mail"
NEW YORK (AP)-Michael
upert does double duty deliver-
g "Maii The affable, boyish-
king actor not only stars in but
�rote the music for the new
Broadway musical now playing
p the Music Box Theater.
The show concerns a distraught
n named Alex who returns
home after tour months of soli-
tude and discovers a mountain of
mail just waiting to be opened.
When he does, personal letters,
bills and even junk mail come to
We in song and dance.
�For Rupert, the decision to star
Ja a musical he helped write was a
�fficult one to make. He needed
persuading.
tit's been exactly what I was
cared it was going to be - exhaust-
ing he says now. "I just don't
have any time to myself at all. But
Ilove it. I'm a bit of a workaholic
"Mail" began life in the summer
of 1984 when Rupert and his part-
ner, Jerrv Colker, already were
working on "3 Guys Naked from
the Waist Down a musical about
the world of stand-up comics.
At the time, "3 Guys" was be-
tween an out-of-town tryout in
North Carolina and its off-Broad-
way premiere. The duo had some
moments to spare and kicked
around and .clea that Colker had
about a man .vho drops out of life
for four months and then comes
back to face a stack of mail.
er envisioned the story as a
But what stuck in Rupert's
head was the part of the story
about the letter writers springing
Ifrj&fe on stage.
�Alex, the main character,
would interact with these
people' he recalls. "Maybe one
letter was written four months
ago and he was here today. So you
have these two different times
and places, and yet they were in-
teracting. I thought, 'How bizarre
and interesting this would be as a
musical
It wasn't until more than a year
later that Rupert and Colker
picked up the pieces of "Mail
They worked furiously for three
months, rewriting the show for a
reading in Los Angeles.
Then they wrote by long dis-
tance. Colker was in Los Angeles
and Rupert was starring on
Broadway with Debbie Allen in a
revival of "Sweet Charity
"It is a little strange to switch
gears from writing to performing
to writing he recalls, "but it was
fun getting back into 'Mail' for
me. I was ready for some creative
sriting
After "Sweet Charity" closed in
March 1987, Rupert and Colker
began reworking "Mail refining
it on its long road to Broadway
that took the show to the Pasad-
eno Playhouse in California and
then to the Kennedy Center in
Washington.
Wjitirig musal comedy is a
logicafextension fbrkupert who
at 36 is a veteran stage performer.
"Since I was a kid, I've been
I lu.i i Ciiwma
Discount Tickets
Available at Mendenhall
?Fatal Attraction
-R
?Johnny Be Good
-PG 13
doing musical theater he says
summing up in one sentence a
show business career that begin in
earnest at age 12. By his teens,
Rupert, born in Colorado but
transplanted to California, was
great-starring on television
shows such as "Gunsmoke" and
"My Three Sons
Broadway beckoned in 1968
when he starred with Robert
Goulet in the musical "The Happy
Time He later appeared in New
York in such shows as "Pippin"
' and "March of the Falsettos
The cities did. Rupert and
Colker were hailed as a promising
songwriting team. They hope to
cement that reputation with
"Mail The show, however,
wasn't written with the idea that
Rupert would star in it.
But the producers, director
Andrew Cadiff and Colker all
wanted their composer to do it.
He resisited at first, but what won
him over was the fact that he
would be supported by an experi-
enced musical department.
Heading the team-with the title
of musical supervisor-Paul Semi-
gnani, one of Broadway's most
experienced musicians. In recent
years he has conducted evfcy
show bv Stephen Sondheim.
are curious about it
Rut it's the reputation of the
studio, not the community, that
ultimately keeps musicians com-
ing back, he says. "It reinforces
how current we are
Record producer Bob Clear-
mountain is used to the skeptical
looks he gets when he invites
musicians to this upstate New
York hamlet to make records.
"They get this picture in their
minds of a gang of hippies run-
ning around says Clearmoun-
tain, producer or mixer for Bruce
Springsteen, the Pretenders and
dozens of other artists.
Woodstock may always be syn-
onymous with the festival that
bears its name, the last great party
of the flower children before the
70s set in.
But in a new generation of
musicians, this town of boutiques
and endless back roads has a
growing reuputation as one of the
best places to make a record out-
side the music capitals of Los
Angeles and New York.
Like Max Yasgur's farm, the
Bearsville Studio is not actually in
Woodstock. It's about two miles
west, atop a hill reached by a
winding, unmarked dirt road that
in winter sometimes takes two or
three attempts to climb by car.
Despite the locations, Suzane
Vega found Bearsville to record
her breakthrough hit, "Luke
Robbie Robertson returned to the
site of "Big Pink" to mix his come-
back album. Artists as diverse as
Simple Minds, Cher, Allen
Ginsbert and Loudness have laid
down tracks at Bearsville in the
last year.
The big draw? A country ambi-
ance and equipment that makes
technicians like Clearmountain
marvel.
"It's one of my favorite stu-
dios Clearmountain says. "It's
very versatile. The recording
room is very large and it's very
good for recording drums and
guitars. It has a lot of air and a lot
of space The other room is one
of the best mixing rooms that I've
ever worked in
The studio is part of the late
Albert Grossman's mini-empire
in the village of Bearsville, a
hundred miles north of Manhat-
tan. The one-time manager of Bob
Dylan, the Band and Janis Joplin
bought a restaurant, homes and
offices and built the studio before
his death two years ago.
GIVE
BLOOD,
PLEASE.
SELF-SERVICE
COPIES
5
ECU
At Kinko's we offer the highest quality copies at a very low-
price. Our other services include binding, collating and a
self-serve workspace stocked with all the things you need
to put together that project or proposal. Try Kinko's. For
great copies. And great deals.
kinkes
Open early. Open late.
Open weekends.
321 E. 10th Street (919) 752 0875
Monday - Friday 7:OOam - 10:00pm Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm
Correction I Hairspray-PG
oundLeu
�� i if w -
WORTH
GOD
PG
1Q8? Touchstone Pictures
�tie April 7 edition of the East
tarolinian contained an error. It
�jrobably contained many, but
�he most glaring was the mis-
spelling of the artist's name on
page 9, under the picture of
Batman and the Joker.
The correct cutline should read,
Illustration by Jeff "Man, sorry
I fronted you. I should know
better. Def?" Parker.
I The editorial staff of this pae
! would like to apologize for this
gross mistake, and they wish to
promise to take more care in the
future, and if it ever happens
again, the artist is hereby given
permission to smack the edito-
rial staff soundly in the head.
Also, said editorial staff prom-
ises to try and keep its collective
rear out of Richmond for a
while. Word.
)Oc-k Thiiutre
?Police Academy, 1
Part 5
$1.50 All Times J
Playing: Thursday,
April 14 - Sun. 17
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
$15.00 Discount For August Delivery
TO71PVED
CLASS RINGS
April 14
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the
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������

THE SEVENTH SIGN
rated R 1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
ECU
rated pg BEETLEJUICE
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
V
RATED PG Starts Friday
RETURN TO SNOWY RIVER
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
WPHWMW!
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ifc .llii M "





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, 1988
Henson outs life into even more Mu
NEW YORK (AP) � Over the
iges storytellers have bridged
generational and geographical
boundaries by retelling folk tales,
usually invoking some magic ot
their own to highlight their talents
and suit the audience.
Continuing the tradition in the
rV age is im 1 lenson, creator of
Fraggle Rock "The Muppet
Show and Kermit the Frog and
Big Bird on "Sesame Street
Borrowing a monster here,
Wending in a few fairly tales
there, 1 lenson has been delight-
ing even the crustiest of curmudg-
eons with "The Storyteller a
enes ot half-hour specials on
NBC The fourth installment,
i'he Luck Child airsSaturdav.
For Ihe luck Child Heson
his borrowed a griffin from the
brother Grimm and blended
clembents of some early Russian
Ik tales. I'he show's magic is
seamless thanks to the witty script
by British playwright Anthony
Minghella, and, of course, the
Muppet mutations.
The 14-foot-tall taking griffin (a
inking man's Big Bird � it
claims to be misunderstood) is
ne of the biggest bunches of
wood, wire and widgets ever cre-
ated in the London-based Mup-
pet creature shop With some
h tech and human help, the
people-eating, havoc-wreaking
beast is brought to life by
! lensen's 24-year-old son, Brian.
"Performing the griffin on a
small platform inside its neck,
throwing mv bodv out at different
angles was sort ot like being in an
aerobics class said Brian Hen-
son.
On a smaller scale, he also
"performs" the story teller's talk-
ing dog with an assistant, a tiny
TV monitor, a computer and 13
thimble-size motors controlling
the dog's facial movements. He
says the dog, a stylized blend of
breeds, "has a hard edge, in-
tended to play against the lectur-
ing stive oi the narrator played
by British actor John Hurt in the
title role.
"The Luck Child" borrows
elements from 'The Lucky Child"
and "Marco the Rich and Vasily
the Luckless" in a collection by
Alexander Afanasev. A Russian
ethnographer and lawyer, he
published more than 600 native
folk tales in the mid-1800s, be-
coming the Russian counterpart
to the brothers Grimm of Ger-
man v.
"The Luck Child" also contains
elements of Grimm's "The Grit-
fin" and Tine Devil with Three
Golden Hairs A peasant child is
born and, according to a proph-
ecv, he will one day rule the land,
whose current leader tries to do
away with him. But the luck child
survives, after tricking the griffin.
The sponsors hope viewers will
look for more stories like "The
Luck Child" in books. One of the
show's sponsors, Clorox, also is a
sponsor of the national, non-
profit literacy organization, Read-
ing Is Fundamental, which has
distributed 78 million bocks to
childern since 1966. It's arare
event: a prime-time network
sponsor hoping you'll read more
books!
One such book could be "Folk
Talcs of the Amur" (Abrams),
which includes 31 stories from the
Russian far east. Another is
Afanasev's collection, "Russian
Fain' Tales" (Random House).
The Afanasev book is a stan-
dard, according to Alex Alexan-
der, head of the Slavic Depart-
ment at Hunter College in New
York and an expert on Russia
folklore. It includes Russian �
sions of universal fairy-tale fig-
ures as well as the Firebird, the
witch Babe Yaga and Ivan theTer-
rible.
Ironically, Russian tales like
these apparently first appeared in
written form, not in their home-
land in their native tongue, but in
Fnland in the 1600s after being
brought out and translated by
foreign travelers.
This was mainly because Rus-
sian written literature was almost
entirely based on church teach-
ings and folk tales were passed by
word of mouth.
The tradition ot borrowing and
retelling to suit different nations
and storytellers continued when
authors such as Gogol, Dos-
toevski and Tolstoy, incorporated
folklore into their works.
For example, although Pushkin
knew Russian folk tales and re-
corded htem, he wrote story
poems based tor the most part on
French translations of the Arabian
Nights, Grimm or Washington
Irving. Pushkin's "Tale of the
( ;oldcnockerel" is simply a re
telling of Irving's "Legend ot the
Arabian Astrologer Yet Russian
and American readers think it's
Russian folklore
Sp.lllkill
r
Singin' honky tonk detective
SHELBY, N.C. (AP) - Back
when Dale Ledbetter sang Hank
lliams songs in Da Nang
k ti inks, the clientele always
rowdv.
- metimes between "Your
I leart" and "I'm So
I Could Cry a beer
connect with a head.
1 iring the ensuing fight,
tter and his country band,
i'he Tadpoles, kept the music
flowing.
Ledbetter is still singing coun-
trv music, but the avidiences and
settings are a far cry from those of
his tour .is a U.S. Air Force mili-
�liceman in Vietnam.
I) year-old Ledbetter, now
mmandcr of the Shelby Police
rtment's detective division,
is the lead singer for Carolina
ss, a newly organized band
made up of other police and tire
department personnel.
Shelby Police Chief J.D. Fish
plays rhythm flattop guitar;
Shelby Fire Marshal Phil Lovelace
plays saxophone; Mackie Lin-
nens, a police line officer, is the
band's keyboard expert.
lumens has had professional
experience playing with thecoun-
trv-rock band, Stateline.
Other band members come
from varied backgrounds: Johnny
Scarborough, lead singer and
electric rhythm guitarist, is a truck
driver for Spartan Foods. Drum-
mer Roger Gee works for Asphalt
Paving oi Shelby. J.R. Toney of
Gastonia, the group's bass guitar-
ist, is a technician with Channel IS
in Charlotte.
Ledbetter's brother, Ralph,
plays rhythm guitar when he isn't
working at Carolina Freight. And
Bill Moose, who plays lead elec-
tric guitar, runs Moose Trim Shop
outside oi Shelby.
The trim shop is headquarters
for Carolina Express.
"Two nights a week we get
together and jam says
Ledbetter.
"This is more like a hobby with
us. Some people in the office like
to hunt and fish. We like the music
and camaraderie
Visitors are welcome. Some join
the picking and grinning while
others just listen. A coffee pot is
always full.
"Last summer, we had a cov-
ered-dish supper with over 75
people Ledbetter says.
ATTENTION STUDENTS!
For Your Summer Storage Needs
Call
Economy Mini-Storage
757-0373
300 Farmer's St.
Greenx lie, NC 27834
Discount To All Students
FIZZThe newest gathering place in town.
Thursday, April 14th
10 p.m. -1 a.m.


Klee Liles
acoustic rock featuring
James Taylor & Jimmy Buffett
SI.50 Happy Hour every night in April
CI0-til?) Special Drinks: Tequila Shots, Hi-Balls,
Peppermint Schnappes, Fireballs, Whiskey Fizz,
Screwdrivers, Bullfrogs, and Imports
Come enjoy our outdoor deck
for spirits and good food.
Open MonSat. 110 E. Fourth St.
752-5855 All ABC Permits
Private Parties and Entertainment
FREE
CHICK-FIL-A
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BUY ANY CHICK-FIL-A VALUE MEAL� and get a free Chick-
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' 12 pack of Chick-fil-A Nuggets,� Waffle Potato Fries� and coleslaw. Coupon not
I " good with any other offer. One coupon per person per visit. Closed Sundays.
I Carolina East Mall
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KEEBLER�REGULAR OR LOW SALT
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ALL FLAVORS A&P
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STOP
ALL FLAVORS
Pet Ice Cream
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ArmFal
' &U Of
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half gal.
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PRICES GOOD IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
AT 703 GREENVILLE BLVD.
OPEN SUNDAY 7:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:00 A.M. -12 MIDNIGHT
� �-? � I
Hl III .juiir MiiHHllUpiii





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WASHINGTON STATE RED
0' Clock
-J88
RAFT REGULAR OR LIGHT
ALL FLAVORS
EQ51
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14,1988
11
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By frieprich Undercover Cats
W3�s worst moht
LIVnIG With 2 PTAll-Y
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IlIlN U .
Bv PARKER
Join the Arm Fall Off Boy� Fanboy Club!
A r mFall-OffBoy By racer x
Be the first in your dorm room or apartment
to join the amazing new Arm Fall Off Boy�
Fanboy Club! Send one(l) dollar in American
money in a plain white envelope to the East
Carolinian offices, across from the library.
Address the letter to Racer X or the Bonehead
Memorial Fund.
For your dollar, you will receive a boss Arm
Fall Off Boy� button, an autographed Xerox
picture of the creator of Arm Fall-Off Boy, the
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print in Fun N Games�.
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Coming soon! Arm Fall Off Boy�
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I
wmmmmm mm �� M
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 14, 1988 Page 12
JL
Pirate coaches obtain good recruiting class
East Carolina basketball coach Scherer (6-2,185, Huntsville, Ala);
Mike Steele expected to sign six Brooks Bryant (6-9, 230,
student-athletes Wednesday to Huntsville, Ala.); Jeff Terlich (6-2,
letters-of-intent to join the Pirate 175, Fort Wayne, Ind.); and Casey
program for the 1988-89 year. Mote (6-7,185, Demorest, Ga.).
The freshmen signees are Jay Two junior college transfers to
sign on Wednesday were Kevin The recruiting class was the first
Staples (6-5, 205, from Southern for the new Pirate coaching staff
J.C. in Birmingham, Ala.) and
Jerome Obey (6-6, 225 from
Calhoun Community College in
Decatur, Ala.).
�o
HI Ho
TO
HI
I
I m HO, IT'S OFF
WO?K WE GO I
1
as Steele was forced to sign last
year's class after the April signing
date. The 1987-88 ECU team
posted an 8-20 record with a
squad consisting mostly of
freshmen and sophomores.
prestigiuos post-season all-star
games.
Mote was the all-time leading
scorer in school history at
Haversham Central High School
Dan Bell as he averaged 20.7
points, 9.0 rebounds, and 3.2
assists per game last season.
Staples won two different slam-
dunk contests at B.C. All-Star
in
Demorest, Ga. He averaged camps in Georgia and Alabama
20.3 points, 10.5 rebounds and
shot 63 percent from the field
"We arc extremely pleased with during his senior season. He was
this group of young men and we
know that we filled much of our
needs Steele said. "We needed
players with size, who were fine
athletes and could shoot the
basketball. Dan Bell and Chris
Benetti (ECU assistant coaches)
and helped lead his Logan
(W.Va.) High School team to
back-to-back state
championships.
Obey was
selection
a highly-recruited
from Calhoun
named to the all-area team and
was an all-star at two different
B.C. All-Star camps in Georgia
and Alabama.
Staples wasa first-team all-state Community College, where he
JUCO selection at Southern Junior averaged 17 points, 8.2 rebounds
College in Birmingham. He was and had 98 blocked shots last
did an excellent job of finding also named to the prestigious all- season. The 6-6, 225, pounder led
young men who would fit into region JUCO team that consists of his Williamston (W.Va.) High
our program both academically players in Alabama, Mississippi School team to a state
and athletically and Louisiana. He is described as championship during his senior
Scherer and Bryant both come an outstanding athlete by ECU's season,
to ECU after playing together at
Grissom High School in
Huntsville. Scherer was named
the player of the year in
Alabama's highest rated 6A
classification.
Scherer was also a first team all-
state selection and most valuable
player in the city of Huntsville in
leading Grissom to the Alabama
state championship. He averaged
20.6 points per game, while
connecting on 82 percent of his
free throws and 55 percent of his
3-point field goals.
Bryant was the post man for the
state championship Grissom
squad as he averaged 19 points
Grid trials put off
The attorney for two East
Carolina University football
players facing charges of
assaulting a female was not in
court Mondav and the case was
J
continued for the second time in
less than one month.
Judge J.W.H. Roberts set the
trial for April 21 in Pitt County
District Court.
Lester Errol McCorvey, 19, of
Pensacola, Ha and Ernest L.
Pendleton, 18, of Devon, Pa are
decided to bring the issue up and
flush it out, judge, because we arc
ready to go
A third ECU football player.
Lewis E.Wilson, 21, of Foley, Ala
is charged in the case with two
counts of aiding and abetting an
assault on a female. His attorney,
Hugh Cox, was present the
second time the second time the
case was called Monday.
ECU officials have suspended
all three players from the team
and 9.3 rebounds, while
connecting on 81 percent of his with an incident reported in Scott
free throws and 58 percent from Residence Hall on the ECU
each charged with one count of indefinitely pending the outcome
assault on a female in connection of the trial.
the field He was named the most
valuable player of the state
tournament as he averaged 29
points, eight rebounds and three
blocks during the three games.
Perlich was the second-leading
campus Feb. 21.
Assistant District Attorney Joe
Blick called the case to trial three
times Monday, but Milton Fitch,
counsel for McCorvev and
Baseballers
at home
NOVAlTHfVT'KECKUlTlNG SEASON IS OVER, CQAcH
STEELE AND HIS vNBrt'TErtt VI ILL BE6IN
WORKING -JO IMPROVE OH LAST YEAR'S
The East Carolina baseball
team, currentlv sporting a 22-11
Pendleton, was not in court,
scorer in the Indiana high school Reginald Scott, an attorney with
ranks last season as he averaged Fitch's law office, said Fitch was
32 points per game for scheduled to be in Wilson County record, return to action tonight at
Chururubusco High School in Superior Court. home at Harrington Field against
Fort Wayne. He was named the "I've called a bluff on Mt. Olive.
Fort Wayne player of the year and everybody involved, and nobody Cametime for the contest is set
has been chosen for several isready Blicksaid to the court. '1 for
p.m.
Fifth Annual Pigskin Pi
Party nearing
Shaggin' under Ficklen �
Alright all you beach music
lovers, this is your chance. On
Friday night, April 22, during the
5th Annual Great Pirate Purple
Gold Pigskin Pigout Party, which
will be held April 21-23, the
Entertainers will be chiming and
rhyming your favorite beach
tunes under the stands at Ficklen
Stadium.
The show, sponsored by Frito-
Lay, will start up at 9 p.m. with the
attractive. Prepare that arm, and
put the folks in the water.
Leading the list of dunkees for
the booth this year is ECU's
Athletic Director Dave Hart. Also
scheduled to roost in the tank is
Associate Athletic Director
Charlie Carr and yours truly.
Head basketball coach Mike
Steele is an unconfirmed
participant as is women's head
coach Pat Pierson. The two are in
the process of taking swimming
action-packed Pigskin Pigout
Weekend is the Rental Tool
CompanyECU Intramural
Recreational Services All-Night
Softball Tournament.
The all-nighter gets underway
at 4 p.m. on Friday with 16 men's
teams and eight women's teams
competing in seperate double-
elimination tournaments.
Play will be held through the
night Friday with the
championship game of the
Glancing at the Pigskin Pigout
By TIM CHANDLER
tunes continuing almost nonstop
until the midnight hour. Charge
for this is absolutely NOTHING.
So, shag till you drop � or until
the music stops.
�������
Stylin' and profilin' � Alright
all you tanned ladies, this is your
chance to get into the spotlight
during the Pigskin Pigout
Weekend.
Frito-Lay, in conjunction with
the ECU Athletic Department, is
sponsoring the Fifth Annual
Suntan Bikini Contest. The
contest will take place on
Saturday, April 23 at 2 p.m.
The contest is open to any
female, students or non-students.
Prizes will be awarded to the
top three tans, with the grand
prize being $300. Second prize
money is listed at $125, while the
third-place contestant will receive
$75.
There is no entry fee to enter the
contest, however, contestants are
asked to register for the event
before the last day.
To enter the contest or obtain
more information contact the
ECU Marketing Office at 757-6491
or write to the of f ice at Scales Field
House, Greenville, N.C. 27858.
Down and under � One of the
main attractions for Saturday's
portion of the Pigskin Pigout
Party will be the annual Dunkin'
Booth. The booth will be open
from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.
The list of prospective dunkees
is small now, however, once the
news spreads and people get over
their fears of being plunged into
thc H20 the list should be quite
lessons now so as to insure their
safety when coaches from the
CAA wind up and hurl their best
shots.
Other hopefuls for the booth
include local sportscasters Brian
Bailey (no comment), Brad
Zaruba and Lee Moore.
The search is still on for more
idiots willing to get soaked, so the
list could grow and grow and
Free with your I.D. � The
conclusion to the Pigskin Pigout
Party will be the annual Purple
Gold football intrasquad
scrimmage game. After all, that is
what the whole weekend of
madness is held for anyway.
You've got to give the guys a
chance to show what they have
learned during the long days of
spring practice sometime.
Students with a valid I.D. and
activity card can get into the
game, which has a scheduled 3:30
p.m. kickoff, for free. Cost of the
game for non-students will be
$1.50, if the tickets are bought
before the day of the game.
Tickets on game day will sell for
$2.50.
So, look at it this way, you have
the band Friday night, the fun
around the midway on Friday
and Saturday and the football
game all for free if you are a
student. The only cash you have
to dish out is a meager $3.50 for
the barbeque plate Saturday. The
plates will be served behind the
stadium from 10:30 a.m. until 3
p.m or until all the pork is gone.
Playing all night long �
Another feature attraction of the
tournament being played on
Saturday at high noon.
Champions of both tourneys will
be awarded with trophies and T-
shirts.
Participants are warned to
come prepared with plenty of
coffee and an ample supply of No-
Doz.
The stars will shine � This
being the fifth year of the Pigout
Party, organizers decided it
would be a good idea to try and
round up all of the Miller Lite All-
Stars that had been in atttendance
before for a reunion party.
The idea went off very well as
L.C. Greenwood, Ben Davidson,
Boog Powell, Jack "Hacksaw"
Reynolds, Larry Csonka, Conrad
Dobler and Lee Meredith will all
be in attendance for this year's
party.
Thc appearance by Meredith
will be her first, while all the other
All-Stars have been in attendance
at previous Pigout parties.
Thc stars will be featured on
Friday, April 22, at the Hilton Inn
for "An Evening with the Stars
Reunion Banquet Ticket cost for
the dinner, which lasts from 6
p.m. until 9 p.m. is$50 per person.
If that price seems a little too
steep for your budget, have no
fear. The stars will be walking the
midway at the stadium later that
evening from 10 p.m. until the
lights go out and again on
Saturday when they will sign
autographs in the afternoon.
Last year's winners in the Suntan Bikini Contest are shown with Conrad Dobler. The girls who are all smte '
this photo hope to return and defend their titles in this year's contest. In the bottom photo, ECU Assistant Athl ti
Marketing Director John Althoff explains to the pig cookers how the job is supposed to be done at last '
Pigout Party. (File photos courtesy of ECU Athletic Marketing Office) -ear s
Strawh
' eo"v 1�
ibout then
� in the
It -
basebal
to N
� -

r
UCLA ha
11
t
-
- - -
-
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rr -
I
�� s
-
1
hire

-
inten
Am ng them
Carol
-
from c
Kansas
offered
night an I
change 1
deciding
champion K ins -
"Deadlines
manv time -
always be that
business
Harrick said
about not being
choice for the
"Did you t
Wooden was '
UCLA? I'm sei
said, referr
coach who
NCAAchampi
before retiring
"If it was .
it's good enough I
that when was in � -
(for the NCAA
4)
Harrick, who- I four
contract, has high hopes I
future.
"I've worked every iv �
last 28 ears to prepai
this opporutnity he
know the magnit;
program. I know w
accomplish.
'I've had the pri
jin the (NCAA) tourr
times in the last set
expect to get there every
(have the nucleus t g
T don't think I wou
my position at Pepperdine ?
other position than LCl ��
The Bruins were -47
iHazzard, but only It- -
season, well below expectan
fear after thev won thc P
-onference championship
Under Harrick, Tcpp
fas 17-13 this season ano
verall. The Waves appcanv:
-v
flkril v-
m iMnflH mmii





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NM'M Hast wear's
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14. 1988
13
Strawberry is pitchers' nemesis
�here arc hitters who
i the plate with a presence
that absolutely strikes
the hearts oi pitchers.
'�'� that no nutter
r the man with the
rts to thev
Wll
is
1 frightening
H H you happen
m with the baseball.
Fine. Curves away.
v e it your best shot,
I he bottom line is!
you're going to
the ball. And when
monies it could be
'I!
had that aura
;e Bell. And
s Darryly
it.
' stai ted the season
ionic run in
Montreal that still might be
traveling except tor the root that
covers the stadium. It was
measured at better than 500 feet
and had players still talking about
it around the batting cage the next
daw
1 lehad two more homerson the
New York Mets' road trip ,nd
then punctuated opening d.w at
Shea Stadium Tuesday with a
rainbow homer that lacked the
majesty of the Montreal homer
but was still impressive.
It's just another home run
Strawberry ho hummed after the
Mets'0 victory over the Expos.
"It means we got one run and got
oft to a good start. That's my job.
To make things happen
The home run came on a 3-2
pitch. Not theone usually lumped
on by a slugger like a 2-0 u' 3 I
With the count 3-2, the batter has
to protect the plate. Yet
Strawberry has developed .is a
hitter to the point where he slugs,
even when he's protecting.
The next time up, he walked
with two out and none on, an
indication that Montreal starter
Paseual Perez was paying more
attention to him, pitching more
carefully, perhaps even
defensi ely. That could be
entirely understandable, given
the cin umstances.
"1 don't feel feared at the plate
Strawberry said. "I feel they just
don't want to make a mistake
against me, that thev want to
make their pitch.
"1 lome ru n hitters take
advantage ot mistakes
Was his homer a mistake, then"
was a slider down, a good
pitch Strawberry decided. "He
beat us with sliders last week
That is exactly the point. Perez
is a slider pitcher and Strawberry
hits the pitcher's pitch for his
homer. That's what makes him so
dangerous.
There was a time when
Strawberry could be had. Pitchers
took advantage of his
aggresiveness at the plate and he
was strikeout bait. Now he seems
less anxious, more willing to wait
for the hittable pitches.
Tor Strawberry, the goals are
only to better last year's numbers
when he hit .284 and stole 36bases
to go with 39 home runs and 104
runs batted in. Better than 39
homers and 36 steals would be 4(1
of each, a feat that no player has
ever achieved.
02;
I o
v��
'add
I u i ?� aArt r�
IL
fte. t24t
tt
I
("LA has a hoops coach at long last
. , l i �, i �U xir i -r . . . iti : i .
UC1 A
basketball coach.
d two things
�nuns are no
us- they once
ide search
' man
It! i orncr.
i ach at
irb Malibu the
' a termer
was named
r to Walt
1 I days
i he Manned to
" at is m o. 1
. t now
� i ick 'd campus
' h get
taw ole lot
ie first dav
. period tor
players, but
ii -hips
ins know
' them
. I can
Vallcv High.
of the
i in the
uld
his decision until
ich.
Andre
- Amlamitos
�. made a
t to attend
Id change
�mmitment
� 1 was coach.
� i tor Peter
; I e had hoped to
iui h earlier, but it
mainly because
i i mi lies were
ie look thejob.
� - .core North
ano, who
il withdrew
i April 2, and
vn. who was
-� rhursday
. . ptcd it, but
nd the next day,
. with national
insa
ime and went,
aid. "It will
� � ay in the
didn't care
being U LA's first
; that John
h hoice at
(larrick
� thi legendary
who 1 I the Bruins to 10
ipsin 12 years
. � lughforhim,
ugh for me. I knew
as in Kansas City
r the NCAA Final 1 our April 2-
� i i k, who signed a four-year
has high hopes for the
re
"I'vi worked every day of the
- years to prepare myself for
opporutnity he said. "I
a the magnitude of this
'ram. 1 know what we can
H i omplish.
"I've Tad the privilege of being
in the (NCAA) tournament four
limes in the last seven years. I
ct to get there every year. We
have the nucleus to go next year.
"1 don't think I would have left
position at Pepperdine for any
r position than IA I A "
Bruii 4 under
I this j
fi below expectations a
ifter thev won the Pacific-10
terence championship
Under Harriett, Pepperdine
- -son and 167-97
i in
the NCAA Tournament tour
times and the National Invitation
Tournmane twice in 1 larrick's
nine years.
Harrick is the sixth coach at
UCLA since Wooden retired.
Gene Bartow, Gary Cunningham
and Brown lasted two years each:
Larry Farmer held the job three
years and Hazzard four. None
won an NCAA championship.
larrick was an assistant under
Cum i n from 1977-79. 1 le
took ovi r at Pepperdine the
followii ; on
Palis said he made up his mind
to hire i larrick Monday night
an hour-long discussion
with Louisville coach Denny
(rum. a termer classmate of
Palis' and assistant under
� den. 1 larrii k was inform d
of the decision Tuesday morning.
"When I called im this morning
1 asked him if he was ready to join
me in the toughest job in college
basketball Palis said. "It is,
without a doubt This place is a
fishbowl, it really is- 'There is a
built-in anxictv at UCLA
UCLA forward Trevor Wilson
said he was relieved a coach has
finally been hired.
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ivast n to call longdistance
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I





I
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14,1988 13
B Page 12
:lass
i
Dan Bell as he averaged 20.7
points 9.0 rebounds, and 3.2
assists per game last season.
Staples won two different slam-
dunk contests at B.C. All-Star
camps in Georgia and Alabama
and helped lead his Logan
CW.Va.) High School team to
back-to-back state
championships.
Obey was a highly-recruited
selection from Calhoun
Community College, where he
averaged 17 points, 8.2 rebounds
and had 98 blocked shots last
season. The 6-6, 225, pounder led
his Williamston (VV.Va.) High
School team to a state
championship during his senior
season.
s put off
decided to bring the issue up and
Hush it out, judge, because we are
ready to go
A third ECU football player,
Lewis E. Wilson, 21, of Foley, Ala
is charged in the case with two
counts of aiding and abetting an
assault on a female. His attorney,
Hugh Cox, was present the
second time the second time the
case was called Monday.
ECU officials have suspended
all three players from the team
indefinitely pending the outcome
of the trial.
Baseballers
at home
The East Carolina baseball
team, currently sporting a 22-11
record, return to action tonight at
home at Harrington Field against
Mt. Olive.
Gametime for the contest is set
for 7 p.m.
aring
V
-8p
dDobler. The girls who are �
le bottom photo, ECU Assist Athletic
ob �s supposed to be done at last year's
Strawberry is pitchers' nemesis
(AP) � There are hitters who
come to the plate with a presence
aabout them that absolutely strikes
fear in the hearts of pitchers.
It is a feeling that no matter
what trickery the man with the
baseball resorts to, they will
handle it. It is a frightening
feeling, especially if you happen
-to be the man with the baseball.
5 Fastball in. Fine. Curves away.
Go for it. Give it your best shot,
Mr. Titcher. The bottom line is'
1sooner or later, you're going to
jha c to throw the ball. And when
(that time comes, it could be
trouble for you.
Andre Dawson had that aura
last year. So did George Bell. And
ever so surely, Darryly
Strawberry is developing it.
Strawberry started the season
'with a monster home run in
Montreal that still might be
traveling except for the roof that
covers the stadium. It was
measured at better than 500 feet
and had players still talking about
it around the batting cage the next
day.
He had two more homers on the
New York Mets' road trip and
then punctuated opening day at
Shea Stadium Tuesday with a
rainbow homer that lacked the
majesty of the Montreal homer
but was still impressive.
"It's just another home run
Strawberry ho-hummed after the
Mets' 3-0 victory over the Expos.
"It means we got one run and got
off to a good start. Thaf s my job.
To make things happen
The home run came on a 3-2
pitch. Not the one usually jumped
on by a slugger like a 2-0 or 3-1.
With the count 3-2, the batter has
to protect the plate. Yet
Strawberry has developed as a
hitter to the point where he slugs,
even when he's protecting.
The next time up, he walked
with two out and none on, an
indication that Montreal starter
Pascual Perez was paying more
attention to him, pitching more
carefully, perhaps even
defensively. That could be
entirely understandable, given
the circumstances.
"I don't feel feared at the plate
Strawberry said. "I feel they just
don't want to make a mistake
against me, that they want to
make their pitch.
"Home run hitters take
advantage of mistakes
Was his homer a mistake, then?
"It was a slider down, a good
pitch Strawberry decided. "He
beat us with sliders last week
That is exactly the point. Perez
is a slider pitcher and Strawberry
hits the pitcher's pitch for his
homer. That's what makes him so
dangerous.
There was a time when
Strawberry could be had. Pitchers
took advantage of his
aggresiveness at the plate and he
was strikeout bait. Now he seems
less anxious, more willing to wait
for the hittable pitches.
For Strawberry, the goals are
only to better last year's numbers
when he hit .284 and stole 36bases
to go with 39 home runs and 104
runs batted in. Better than 39
homers and 36 steals would be 40
of each, a feat that no player has
ever achieved.
c@J
I e
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r �o
)
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'4ve fiu . .
(&)
UCLA has a hoops coach at long last
LOS ANGELES (AP) - - UCLA
finally has a basketball coach.
That accomplished, two things
are clear � the Bruins are no
longer the powerhouse they once
were, and a nationwide search
the NCAA Tournament four
times and the National Invitation
Tournmane twice in Harrick's
nine years.
Harrick is the sixth coach at
UCLA since Wooden retired.
kj J' J I
wasn't necessary because the man Gene Bartow, Gary Cunningham
lii red was right around the corner, and Brown lasted two years each:
Jim Harrick, the coach at Larry Farmer held the job three
Pepperdine in nearby Malibu the years and Hazzard four. None
last nine years and a former won an NCAA championship.
UCLA asistant, was named
Tuesday the successor to Walt
Hazzard, who was fired 13 days
ago.
Harrick, 49, said he planned to
get right to work.
Recruiting, that is my No. 1
'priority sitting here right now
Harrick said at a packed campus
news conference. "I've got to get
things firmed up
Actually, there's not a whole lot
�to firm up. Today was the first day
of the late signing period for
college basketball players, but
UCLA has only two scholarships
available.
Harrick and the Bruins know
who they want to fill one of them
� 6-foot-10 center Don MacLean
of nearby Simi Valley High.
MacLean is considered one of the
finest prep prospects in the
country and he has said he would
not enounce nis decision until
LCI A named a coach.
Another center, Andre
Lamoureux of Los Amlamitos
High in Orange County, made a
verbal comitment to attend
UCLA, but that could change
considering his commitment
came when Hazzard was coach.
UCLA Athletic Director Peter
Daiis admitted he had hoped to
hire a coach much earlier, but it
didn't happen, mainly because
several big-name coaches were
interviewed but none took the job.
Among them wee North
Carolin? State's Jim Valvano, who
visited the school but withdrew
from contention on April 2, and
Kansas' Larry Brown, who was
offered the job last Thursday
night and accepted it, but
changed his mind the next day,
deciding to stay with national
champion Kansas.
"Deadlines came and went,
many times Dalis said. "It will
always be that way in the
business
Harrick said he didn't care
about not being UCLA's first
choice for the job.
"Did you know that John
Wooden was the fourth choice at
UCLA? I'm serious Harrick
said, referring to the legendary
coach who led the Bruins to 10
NCAA championships in 12 years
before retiring in 1975.
"If it was good enough for him,
if s good enough for me. I knew
hat when I was in Kansas City
for the NCAA Final Four April 2-
4)
; Harrick, who signed a four-year
contract, has high hopes for the
future.
"I've worked every day of the
last 28 years to prepare myself for
this opporutnity he said. "I
know the magnitude of this
program. I know what we can
accomplish.
"I've had the privilege of being
in the (NCAA) tournament four
times in the last seven years. I
Expect to get there every year. We
have the nucleus to go next year.
"I don't think I would have left
my position at Pepperdine for any
other position than UCLA
The Bruins were 77-47 under
Hazzard, but only 16-14 this past
season, well below expectations a
year after they won the Paciffc-10
Conference championship.
Under Harrick, Pepperdine
was 17-13 this season and 167-97
overall. The Waves appeared in
Harrick was an assistant under of the decision Tuesday morning.
Cunningham from 1977-79. He "When I called Jim this morning
took over at Pepperdine the I asked him if he was ready to join
following season. me in the toughest job in college
Dalis said he made up his mind basketball Dalis said. "It is,
to hire Harrick Monday night without a doubt. This place is a
after an hour-long discussion fishbowl, it really is. There is a
with Louisville coach Denny built-in anxietv at UCLA
Crum, a former classmate of UCLA forward Trevor Wilson
Dalis' and an assistant under said he was relieved a coach has
Wooden. Harrick was informed finally been hired.
COPIES
5
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758-2400
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
(NEHT TO CHIC0S IN THE GEROGETOIilN SHOPS)
?No matter how
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Grandma loves
to hear the
latest jokes.55
i i
lU(
- mm.
s her sparkling
K)r. She misses
jokes. Even the
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, I9K8
Orioles dish Rioken Sr.
BALTIMORE (AP) � Even a
new manager couldn't help the
Baltimore Orioles from setting a
club record for lossesat the start of
the season.
Hall of Famer Frank Robinson,
the first and last black to manage
in the major leagues, was named
as the Orioles manager on
Tuesday and he could only watch
as Baltimore dropped its seventh
in a row, 6-1 to the Kansas City
Royals.
"If I knew what would work I
wouldn't be sitting here
Robinson, 52, said. "I would be
sitting on some island some
place
Robinson might want to be
sitting on an island if the Orioles
continue in the manner that got
Cal Ripken, his predecessor,
tired.
Mark Gubicza and Dan
Quisenberry combined on a two-
hitter as Baltimore managed just
two infield singles and hit only
tour balls out of the infield.
Baltimore has been outscored 49-
8 this season.
"I'm realistic enough to know
that I'm not going to wave a wand
and change everything said
Robinson, who was the major
league's first black manager with
the Cleveland Indians from 1974-
1977. He also managed San
Francisco from 1981-1984.
Robinson, the third black to
manage � along with Larry Doby
and Maury Wills � doesn't think
the Orioles need a major
overhaul.
"I don't think the organization
has hit rock bottom Robinson
said of the club that slipped to
sixth place last year just four years
after winning the World Series.
It's just a matter of putting it
together and getting our heads
up
Ironically, Cal Ripken Jr one of
two sons of the fired manager in
the starting lineup, drove in the
Orioles lone run with a first-
inning sacrifice fly.
The Ripkens were in a somber
mood before and after the game.
"My job stays the same Cal Jr.
said. "I'm going to do the same
things no matter who is
managing. When you're in
baseball, you realize it's a
business. The reality of that is that
no one's job is secure. It's just the
way it works.
"As a player, the change doesn't
matter. As a son, I'll keep my
feelings to myself
Bill Ripken, who is normally the
clubhouse clown, was unusually
quiet.
"It's a front office decision, and
I don't get involved in front office
decisions the rookie said before
the start of the game. "Right now
I feel like it will be tough to play,
but when gametime rolls around I
don't think it will be
Last year, Ripken became the
first father to manage two sons
simutaneously in major league
baseball history.
Ripken replaced the retiring
Earl Weaver at the start of the 1987
season, and under Ripken the
Orioles finished sixth with a 67-95
record. It was the Orioles worst
season in 32 years.
General manager Roland
Hemond, who replaced the fired
Hank Peterson Nov. 10,1987, said
Ripken will remain with the club
as a special assistant to the general
manager.
Earlier Tuesday, Ripken Sr
pleaded guilty to a drunken
driving charge, and was
sentenced to three years
probation and required to
perform 100 hours of community
service.
Hemond said the Orioles
decision to fire Ripken was made
Monday, and the manager's court
appearance did not figure in the
firing.
"I'm disappointed, no
question Ripken said by
telephone. "There was no
indication that it was coming. I
was in uniform. I was at my desk
getting ready to write the lineup.
Roland called me to come up to
his office and he told me I was
being relieved
Heafner trims tour
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) � Vance
heafner, who has been hindered
in recent years by a lower-back
injury that has limited his practice
and playing time, said Tuesday he
will curtail his PGA Tour career to
become director of golf at a North
Carolina country club.
"It's a hard decision, but I had to
think it's a great opportunity for
me Heafner told the News and
Observer of Raleigh. "It will give
me the chance to be home with my
familv and to get involved with a
growing company and club
The former N.C State All-
America will begin his duties
with the Prestonwood Country
Club in Cary on Monday after
competing in the Heritage Golf
Classic this week in Hilton Head
Island, S.C.
"I never thought I'd be semi-
retired at 33, but the opportunity
came along quicker than I thought
it would he said.
Heafner maintained his exempt
staus on the tour this year and
said he may play as many as 10
tournaments in furture years in
addition to the various Carolinas
PGA Section events.
Pirate Police
Only in the East Carolinian
STAY ON TOP OF
WHAT'S HAPPENING
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Clip this coupon and mnll it to the address helow to receive
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Mail To:77ie East Carolinian. Old South Bldg East Carolina University.
Greenville. NC 27858-4353.
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r
HE USED TO DO DRUGS I
'9,
NOW HE'S DOING TIME!
FORMER ECU STUDENT TO SPEAK
ON HIS LIFE IN PRISON
AND HIS CONNECTION TO DRUGS.
THINK SMART!
DOOR PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN !
APRIL 19, 7:00, HENDRIX THEATRE
SPONSORED BY: Student Services, Residence
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ft
iremuiimiw i"
mn��
mtfmgmtmtmmtip�iiiWii��" if
. ���:�� . :�
� � ��� . :
: ,





Title
The East Carolinian, April 14, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 14, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.604
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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