The East Carolinian, November 18, 1986






�he
Carolinian
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 192S
Vol. No.22
Tuesda), November 18, 1986
Internship
Offered To
Students
Bv ttiERESA ROSINS
staff Writer
rwenty-four NC students will
be selected this vear to gain first
hand experience with state
government h applying for an
internship with the Institute of
(iovernment. Interns selected will
receive $150 per week and can ar-
range tor course credit.
The internships last tor 10
weeks and are open to all
sophomores, juniors and seniors
who are enrolled at a North
( arolina college or university.
S Lidents must hae completed
two sears of college and have not
entered graduate school as of
May, 1987
1 he application, must he
eceived b the Institute of
Government, who sponsors the
interships, no later than Ian. 19.
1987. Thev are available at the
Placement Center in the Bloxton
House.
The intern program is looking
tor students not onlj studying
law or political science, hut also
students interested in economics,
accounting. journalism,
engineering. torestr. computer
-cience, social work, and other
Melds related to the government
The interns live together on the
North Carolina State University
campus, and attend weklv
seminars with government of
ficials
I ast summer's projects includ-
ed: working in the Governors
Office; traveling and writing
press releases for the Department
of Commerce's Tourism D
sion; working for the Crime Con-
trol and Public Safetv to improve
crime-prevention activities in
public housing; auditing for the
State Auditor's Office funds
deposited in banks by the state
and many others.
Anthonv Norris. a former in-
tern from N.C. State, said that
"The internship has served as a
vital component in mv political,
academic and social maturation
Everv aspect has taught me
something about myself and mv
life
The interns are selected bv an
adMsorv board that includes
government officials, college pro
fessors, and former interns.
The final selection will be bas-
ed on academic performance.
participation in extracurricular
activities, general interest in
government and an interview
which will be held in Chapel Hill
More detailed descriptions of
the internship are available in the
Bloxton House, the campus
placement center.
"It's a great opportunitj for
students to get hands-on ex
perience with State government
that will be valuable to them
said Steve Cunanan, SGA presi
dent.
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
; MUMllm - ii, phoic Lib
HiAa Hut and the SRA are sponsoring a blood drive todav and
"ednesdav. Free pizza coupons will be given to all donors.
Blood Drive
SRA
By p4sy,�M,s
Pizza Hut of Greenville is
donating almost $2,000 this week
to a blood drive the businesses
are co-sponsoring with the Stu-
dent Residence Association.
According to Bryan Lassiter,
SRA president, anyone who at-
tempts to give blood during the
two day drive will be given a
coupon for a free personal pan
pizza from Pizza Hut.
He added that the three
residence halls with the most
donors will receive $100, $50 and
$25 for first, second and third
places.
"This is the time of year when
people slack off giving said
Lassiter. "but with the holiday
season around the corner more
people are on the road and blood
is really needed
Lassiter said the goal for this
blood drive is 1,000 pints. Last
year the Biology Club collected
800 pints.
To give blood, you must be
between the ages of 17 and 70 and
weigh at least 110 lbs. According
Sets New Goal
to Deborah Eaves of the Red
Cross, anyone who has a sore
throat, who is on antibiotics or
who has any type of infectious il-
lness should not donate blood.
"We give everyone a mini-
physical said Eaves. "We
check for high temperatures and
blood pressures, and the donors'
hemoglobin (amount of iron in
blood).
Donors are also questioned
about their medical history and
any medication they might be on.
Blood donnated at ECU gets
distributed to 63 hospitals in the
region. Eaves said Pitt Memorial
gets a large percentage of the
blood donated here sinct it is
the second largest hospital in the
region.
She added that ECU is the big-
gest donator in Pitt County and
possibly in the Eastern part of the
state, bringing in around 2.000
pints a year
Once blood is donnated. it is
processed here in Greenville and
then taken to Norfolk were it is
typed and tested.
"We make the most out of
each donation said Eaves The
donated blood is seperated into
red cells, plasma and platelet
that one donation mav serve as
many as four people
"We don't have a shortage of
any type right now she said.
"but Type O positive and
negative is alwavs the most need
ed "
Eaves added, ��.All d, na-ed
blood is checked for nep�iuus.
syphilis, and AlDs. If a test pro-
ves positive, the donor is notified
and the blood is not used "
She stated that there is no wav
to get A IDs from d na; .
blood. "Everything we us 5
sterile and disposable
"This is a very critical time of
the year Eaves said. "Students
don't have the money to make
lots of donations, but this one
doesn't cost anything � and it
can save lives "
The blood drive will run on
Tuesday and Wednesdav, Nov.
18 and 19. from 12-6 p.m. in
room 244 Mendenhall.
Q
B TOM PAGE
SlMtf Writer
1 have come to ECU to tell
si dents the truth about the
repressive Sandinistine regime
said Carroll Rios, the keynote
speaker at a recent Students for
America meeting.
Carrol Rios. the deputy direc-
tor for the Coalition for Jobs,
Peae, and Freedom in the
Americas. Rios and a native of
Guatamala, is a central America
expert dedicated to informing
students with accurate informa-
tion about the war in Central
America and the Nicaraguan
quest for freedom. "The 1979
popular revolution has been
betrayed by the Marxist-Leninist
Sandinistas. The people are
fighting for the very thing they
For Freedom Discussed
fought to gain in 1979 and never
received: a chance to freely elect
their government said Rios.
Rios discussed the events that
led up to the domination of the
Sandinista regime and how the
Sandinistas capitalized on the
Nicaraguans resentment after the
overthrow of the Samoa govern-
ment in 1979. The Sandinista Na-
tional Liberation Front (FSLN)
captured the Nicaraguans im-
agination, and also the imagina-
tion of the world. The leaders of
the FSI N publicly pledged the
principals of democracy, and
therefore enjoyed the interna-
tional support offered to them
towards their reconstruction. The
US lead this support by providing
$118 million of economic aid and
humanitarian assistance.
There was only one thing
wrong with their plan for
reconstruction, they believed that
Nicaragua's salvation lay in
Marxist, economics and Leninist
politics. Today, after learning
how the Sandinistas have op-
pressed Nicaragua, many who
have helped and aided the San-
dinstas come to power, feel they
nave been manipulated and lied
to.
Chip Hoffman, who spent part
of the summer with the
Nicaraguan Democratic Front
(F.D.N.) in Honduras, was also a
speaker at the meeting and he
summed it up, "The 400,000 peo-
ple who have fled the persecution
of the Cuban-backed Sandinista
regime are testimony to San-
dinista oppression. It is the moral
obligation of the US. as the
leader of the free world, to sup-
port the Democratic Resistance in
the Nicaraguan's struggle for
freedom
In a report released bv the
Department of State and Depart-
ment of Defense this year, of-
ficials said that with the help of
the Soviets, and the Cubans, the
Sandinistas have enforced cen-
sorship of the press, restricted
religious freedom, and waged ag-
gression against their neighbors.
More than anything they have
gone back on their promise to
strive towards political pluralism.
The report also said that there
is no question that the Marxist-
Leninist government in
Nicaragua has seized power
through armed revolution and
false promises The US sees the
Sandinistian government as serv-
ing the interests of the Sovet
Lnion. which threatens the
security interests of 'he US-
Rios ended her discussion
dressing that the democratic
resistance in Nicaragua is struggl-
ing to achieve democracv but in
order to achieve this, people must
be informed of the truth, then
onlv can they seek a political
solution, and help stop the war in
central America.
The Central American
Freedom Project was sponsored
by the ECU chapter of Students
for America, a non-partisan
political organization that has
just initiated a c- mr.� at ECU
ee GROUP page 5.
Smokers Urged To Break Habit
B PAITIKKMMIS
V�s Kditor
In a national effort to get the
54 million smoking Americans to
break the habit, the American
C ancer Society is sponsoring the
10th annual Great American
Smokeout on Nov. 20.
The goal of the Smokeout is to
get at least one in every five
smokers to give up cigarettes
from midnight to midnight on
Thursday. If it cannot be started
at midnight, an extended 24-hour
period is suggested.
According Mary Elesha-
Adams, health educator at the
Student Health Center, there will
be an information booth set up in
Mendenhall on Thursday for
ECU students.
"We will have different
materials about smoking and the
effects of smoking said Elesha-
Adams. "It's interesting
material
She said there w ill be tips about
how to stop smoking as well as a
few freebies to celebrate the
event.
"There had been a lot of
research done on smoking in the
past years. This research has
given us proff that smoking can
have dangerous effects on a per-
GREAT
AMERICAN
SMOKEOUT
sons nealth Elesha-Adams ex-
plained. "There's a lot of infor-
mal .i out now that people
should really know
The first mass movement by
smokers to give up cigarettes was
led by Lynn R. Smith, editor of
the Monticello (Minnesota)
Times in his hometown in 1974.
Smith's idea, 'D-Day spread
throughout Minnesota. In 1976,
it reached California where it
became known as the Great
American Smokeout. In 1977 the
Smokeout was observed for the
first time nationwide.
In just one decade, the idea of
taking a day off from smoking
has spread to other countries
such as Canada, Great Bntain.
Ireland, France and South
Africa. Although the names and
dates may vary in other coun-
tries, there are increasing signs
that the Smokeout is evolving in-
to a worldwide no-smoking day.
(For most people, quitting the
smoking habit "cold turkey"
seems to work better than a
gradual tapering off, according
to the experience of many ex-
smokers.)
Spangler Addresses SGA
B LESLEY DEES
Mrff Writer
The SGA hosted a reception
Monday afternoon for CD.
Spangler, the new president of
the LJNC system.
Spangler, who has never before
visited the ECU campus did so
"because he wanted to meet with
the students according to Steve
Cunanan, president of SGA.
Spangler informed the
legislature about the procedures
that are being followed in choos-
ing a replacement for Chancellor
John Howell.
Howell, who has been
chancellor since 1982, announced
last year that he would be retiring
no later than June 30, 1987. A
search committee has narrowed
the 186 applicants down to less
than five candidates. Two of
those candidates will be visiting
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4 �R.E.M.s Wilmington ap-
Health Column5 pearance reviewed� see STYLE
Style7 page 7.
Sports10
Announcements3 'Pirates pull through on last
Classifieds12 home game� see SPORTS page
10.
campus in the next two weeks.
When asked his opinion on tui-
tion for in- and out-of-state
students, Spangler said he feels
"it is essential to keep tuition as
low as possible
In their regular meeting, the
legislature passed a bill which ap-
propriated to the Visual Arts
Forum the amount of $1800,
allotting $800 for shipping and
$1000 for printing and binding.
Cunanan also informed the
legislature that the Board of
Trustees is deliberating on
whether or not to install a man-
datory lab class fee for students
beginning in the fall semester of
1987. There would be a flat fee of
$25 each semester a lab is taken,
no matter how many labs a stu-
dent is taking per semester. An
open hearing on the issue will be
held on Dec. 3 at 2 p.m. in
Mendenhall.
Signs Of Fantasy
JO O JO�D�N- T�� nw.
L�b
SKTrSS" s'�" ��' cb ������� -�. t, p.�
I


� Mi �. I





THE FAST CAROLINIANNOVEMBER II, Bt6
Group Tries To Change School Texts Oldest
MOBILE, AL(CPS)-Chnst.an
fundamentalists seeking to
change high school textbooks in a
much-publicized trial here got
help from an unusual source: col-
lege professors.
The testimony of professors
from widely diverse campuses
suggests the critique that
American public schools teach
"secular humanism" is gaining
academic respectabilitv. some
say.
"Yes, it is spreading savs
Cornell Prof. Richard Baer. who
testified two weeks ago in the
case here in which a parent-
teacher r up wants to junk 47
high school texts that, they say.
dismiss "JuJeo-Christian views"
of history in favor of a "secular
humanist" view.
And while the number of
scholars who agree there's even
such a thing as "secular
humanism" still mav be small,
the professors who testified in
Mobile generallv had impressive
credentials.
Baer, Timothy Smith of Johns
Hopkins, James Hunter of
Virginia, Kenneth Strike of Cor-
nell, James Hitchcock of St.
Louis University and William
Coulson of U.S. International
University all testified they
believed textbooks incorporated
a secular humanism perspective
of history to some extent.
The U.S. Dept. of Education,
moreover, has given a grant to
New York University Prof. Paul
Vit � who testified in a similar
case in Tennessee in which a
judge last week agreed to let
parents refuse to have their kids
read texts that don't agree with
their religious beliefs � to ex-
amine if high school texts talk
about "the role of religion" in
U.S. history.
And Education Sec. William
Bennett recently called the treat-
ment of religion in most schools
"a self-inflicted wound
At Mobile, U.S.
International's Coulson com-
plained that "humanistic" home
economics books he reviewed
teach that parents should not
"direct" their children in learn-
ing right from wrong, and that
they should let kids "make their
own decisions
"Secular humanism says the
time for tradition has passed
Coulson explained after his
testimony.
"There's no such animal as a
secular humanist counters
Metropolitan State College Prof.
Charles Dobbs.
Texas teacher Verdene Ryder,
who authored one of the texts
under fire, testified she'd never
heard of the term "secular
humanism until she was accused
of promoting it.
Ryder, like many of the
witnesses defending the texts,
said she was worried the trial �
and the issue of secular
humanism � was little more than
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an excuse to censor books.
She was not alone. In mid-
trial, the American Association
of University Professors held a
press conference in Washington,
D.C to fret about textbook cen-
sorship and called on the "higher
education community" to stop it.
Lawyers � paid by People of
the American Way and the
American Civil Liberties Union
� battling the parent lawsuit in
Alabama also portrayed the text
critics as religious fanatics bent
on keeping certain ideas and "a
disposition toward inquiry" out
of schools.
The anti-intellectual strain in
the new wave of textbook trials
� the ACLU says Christian fun-
damentalist groups have filed 120
suits objecting to texts and novels
being used in public schools �
have kept most college professors
out of the debate until recently.
"It's like the McCarthy era
says Coulson, who worries his
appearance at the trial will
associate him with fundamen-
talist groups. "Anyone who is
associated with a communist was
labelled a communist. (Fun-
damentalism) is an unfriendly
label
Indeed, one professor who
testified at the trial asked not to
be named in this story because he
didn't want to jeopardize his
chances for achieving tenure.
None of the professors who
criticized the texts as humanistic
said they were themselves par-
ticularly religious. All vehement-
ly disagree they're anti-
intellectual.
"I am opposed to Christianiz-
ing schools Cornell's Baer
says.
Prof. Kenneth Strike just
thinks "students should become
acquainted with" as many "basic
mqralideas" as possible, "from
Jerry Falwell to Karl Marx
Texts today, Strike and the
others argue, simply don't men-
tion the basic moral ideas that
come out of religions. They
believe the books should.
It's "unfortunate and unfair
Baer adds.
Strike hopes the trials will in-
spire new texts that make
students "more sensitive to not
trampling on other peoples' con-
victions. It will be like in the six-
ties, when blacks and women said
hey, we're not in (texts), or, if
we are, we're just washing
dishes And they got in. I hope
that's how it's going to work
out
But others see all the recent
textbook trials as an ettort to im.
pose one religion's point of Me
on all students, not to fostc
pluralism.
Citizens for Excellence jg
Education, a Santa Monica.a
group funded by the Nationa
Association of C hristjaE
Educators, for example,
organizing volunteer group
pressure schools to ban r ,
that feature characters who quei.
tion authority, mention
supernatural or portrav w
working outside the home
In explaining wh, the gj
alleges books that do men -
such things are propagating j
religious view called
� �� ���� La
ATTENTION BSN
CUSS OF 1987.
The Air Force has a special pro
gram for 1987BSNs If selected
you can enter active duty soon
atter giaduafion without waiting
for fhe results of your State Boaras
To qualify you must have an
overall B average After commas
stoning you II attend a five month
internship at a major Air Force
medical faciliy Its an excellent
way to prepare for the wide range
of experiences you II have serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information call
Capt Anne Butcher
(919)850-9471 collect
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L
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h x,4i ireBi old ht
tound in the Mediterrantd
tains a weaJth of matr
tormauon from the lime wl
King Tu! ruled . undei
water ar.haet . ud edt
IB) Rl 1
Dr George F Bass a

Texa. -VVM ' n
14th C enturs H
oldest shipwrt �
loaded with B-
man of wh;
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found nc
198-
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Texts
l the
men-
that
The
itair
U in-
nake
I � not
:on
n said
i
hope
er
textbook trials as an ettort to im
pose one religion's point of view
on all students, not to f0st
pluralism.
Citizens tor Excellence jn
Education, a Santa Monica, Ca
group funded b the National
Association of Christian
Educators, for example, js
organizing olunteer groups to
pressure schools to ban books
that feature characters who qUCs
n authonts, mention th
vrnatural or portray women
working outside the home.
In explaining vshy, the groun
alleges books that do mention
- things are propagating a
religious view called "secular
t &ar0lftifcm
h ig Repreen!atiM's;
VDVERTlSINt,
� �
1 i
) �.
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ins
John Rusk
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TUMfY DINNER
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2 POUNDS YAMS
2 POUNDS GREEN BEANS
2 POUNDS CORNBREAD
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Coovngrtr � 38f
�rrgr CJ- O"
Ou�ntitv maun ���rvo
o�� sota To o��if-s
Oldest Vessel Discovered
BCU News Bureau fcet of watr . . . W
THEEASTALJNIANNVEMBER 18. 19W 3
A 3,400 year-old merchant ship
found in the Mediterranean con-
tains a wealth of materials and in-
formation from the time when
King Tut ruled Egypt, an under-
water archaeologist said Wednes-
day at East Carolina University.
Or. George F. Bass, a pro-
fessor of nautical archaeology at
TexasA&V1 University, said the
14th Century B.C. vessel is the
oldest shipwreck ever found. It is
loaded with Bronze Age artifacts
many of which have surprised
and delighted archaeologists and
historians.
Bass said the vessel, bound
from Cyprus to Greece, was
found near the coast of Turkey in
1983 by sponge divers. The divers
notified Bass and the Institute for
Nautical Archaeology at Texas
A&Mthat they had seen some
unusual, four pointed metal in-
gots lying on the bottom in 150
feet of water.
The ingots turned out to be a
royal shipment of copper. More
than 500 of the large ingots have
been found at the site.
"There is enough metal to
make swords and shields for an
army-for five armies said
Bass. "It was a costly loss
Bass has been involved in the
excavation of the ship and says
the excavation will take at least
five more years. A film and a Na-
tional Geographic article about
the shipwreck excavation will be
released next year.
In addition to the copper, the
archaeologist also found tin in-
gots at th? wreck site. It is the
earliest tin ever found and Bass
said he is unsure where it came
from. "Maybe from Iran or
Afgahanistan he said.
A very unusual discovery made
at the site was some large ingots
of raw glass. Subsequent ex-
amination of the glass has found
that it is identical in substance to
14 Century B.C. Egyptian
glassware. The raw glass may
have come from Palestine.
Other finds at the site include
silver and gold jewelry, amber
beads from the Baltic region,
weapons, small containers of fig
seeds, ivory and hippopotamus
teeth, large vases containing
china, smaller vases that contain-
ed frankincense, and a royal
scarab and other jewelry that
may have belonged to Queen
Nefertiti of Egypt.
A surprise to archaeologists
and historians was the discovery
of a book or writing tablet on
board the vessel. Although its
pages of beeswax have long since
decayed it is the oldest book ever
found and the only book known
to exist during the Bronze Age.
"Years of work went into min-
ing and gathering these items and
in one day it was all lost said
Bass. "It was a staggering loss
he said.
Bass said the shipment was so
important that there may have
been some historial record made
of it.
"We will search for these
records he said. "In ar-
chaeology, the most important
discoveries are made in
libraries Bass said.
Bass spoke while visiting with
archaeologists and students in the
ECU program in Maritime
History and Underwater Ar-
chaeology. The ECU program
and the Institute for Nautical Ar-
chaeology at Texas A&Mare the
only two programs of its type in
the United States.
Bass is founder of the institute
in Texas. His books on under-
water archaeology and articles in
National Geographic Magazine
have made him a world authority
on underwater research.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
J Buy � Sell � Trade x
, 752-0322 tf�c
Howi: 9 oo :m.m p.m. Moa-Sat
Voted the 1 Vanilla Ice Cream In
America
Don't settle for less. Enjoy the Best Ice
Cream in the Nation!
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street Greenville, N.C. Call 758-48
This ("nupon good for
50 OFF
Announcements
RAFNn LAiGAE,?RVING �F VANLA ICE CREAM, AND
BLEND IN MADE WITH VANILLA or ANY SUNDAE MADE
WITH VANILLA
Come Celebrate With Us Today
CLIP THIS COUPON
JZ- I
J
PHI BETASIGMA
T�e X Nu C-Mpter � Ph, Bei� S.gma
Fral i i r- sponsoring a upsmg contest
'uesoav Dec J atp m F irst priIe ,s jjo
� (tl second pnze Being $?0 't mtereted in
Demg a contestant contact Jonnny McDonald
ii P53 8759 or any brother ot Pr. Be'a Sigma
CORSONASW
There will be a meet.ng Tues Nov is In
Menaenhali Rm 212 for all criminal iust.ee
and social work maiors and intended ma
iors Our guest speaker will be from the
State Bureau ot Investigation Be sure to
come
PHI ETA SIGMA
A social for old and new Phi Eta Sigma
members will be neld on Nov Hat 7pm in
Mendenhails mulfi purpose room Please
attend! Canned food items will be collected
tor our food drive
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
DATING RELATIONSHIPS? INTER
� ARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP In
v 'es everyone to ,o.n us mil Wednesaa.
n ght to near two speoai guest speakers joe
ano Vanon Shrgder from Campus Crusade
� � - hrisl win d.scuss their v.ews on oatmg
�eiat.onsh.ps on an open forum So bring
�ends ano please ,o.n us for fun
'enowship smg.ng and to h&r mese �wo
ipec.a. guest speakers this Wednesday n,gh.
Nov IWti at rpm in Raw 130
BACCUS
BACCHUS .Boosting Alcohol Con
s ousness Concerning the health of un.ver
tlty student , havmo a v,ry ,mpor,an,
meeting for an members ano prospective In
'oom 242 Venoenhan Thurs Nov 20th at t,
c - Aiso the trammg session ,s scheduled
.t Nov Ji'0�Hpm Please can 752 4231 to
make plans o attend
CO-OP: STATE
GOVERNMENT INTERNS
Positions are available for students in a
variety of maioi-s with state government for
Summer 19�7 For more information regar
fling the North Carolina internship Program
and the institute of Government contact
Cooperative Education In 313 Rawl
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA
� cm pledges- There w ill ce a - ��� ��
- c 3C- at 6 30 Our regular matting m ;��
heloaf 7w,tn 9�. ip,aKe, Dlja K.a.7
DPV a'oca.poo a s- rooftfacftM a
"� e ana refes-me-s rev
INSTITUTE OP
GOVERNMENT
v- vae s f w 0'scuss rtirnhjp
ocoorv-tes wttft if government on
Weonesoa. DecemDe- 3 19M a� 4 p m in
Raw J02 or more-rrformat,on on-hese ana
x- '� M���Cl Cooperative
- � afwjr 'Bj� jij
PALLSEMESTER
GRADUATES
Caps ano gowns should be picked up n Nmj
Sfudentstore Wnght Bu.ld.ng December 2 3
and 4 These keepsake gowns are yours to
keep providing the graduation fee has on
oaid For those 'ece.vmg a Master, degree
'he graduation tee pays tor your cap ano
gown, but there is an e�fra tee for your hood
Announcement, are now on sale M me
students stores There are f,ve m a packaoe
tor �2 �
Student Union Recreation Committee
presents
an All Campus
TURKEY SHOOT
IN BOWLING
NOVEMBER 20, 1986 7:00 PM
Knock down at least 8 pins on JO consecutive
lanes and WIN A TURKEY
MENDENHALL BOWLING CENTER
Entry fee: $2.00
No pre-registration necessary!
j&fcT,
. Present
DRAFT NITE
Tues November 18. 198c 9:00-1:00 AM Adm. $1.50 Guys $1 00 Ladies
75C TALL CANS & COOLERS
10r Draft All Nite
& TTKA
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wed November 19, 1986 9:00-1:00 AM Adm. $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
7S TALL CANS & COOLERS
10 Draft All Nite
fy
y.
A Thanks:
Greei
card lakes v
COWING FTRAGTIONS
�HiirniiMij j,j i
Hannah and Her Sisters
Wednesday, November 19 8.00 PM
Clue
November 20, 21, 22, and 23 8:00 P.M.
Travel Adventure Film
Glory on the River
Monday, November 24 8:00 PM.
Recreation
All-Campus
Chess Tournament
12:30 P.M. MSC
Turkey Shoot
Thursday, November 20 7:oo P.M
Bowling Center
Visual Arts
Photography Exhibit by
Mel Stanford and Larry Lean
November 9-29
College Satellite Network
The Presidency
Wednesday, November 19 7:00 p m
Joyner Library
home tor the holiday.
AMERJONf8rGREETINGS
far that y"(rxYV)n
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
1
V"
i otn �o u �w� wx
i"1 gathering place
,� -





�i?e IzuBt (Earnlinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. aa .�,�
Daniel Maurer. -mtlmi.
PATTl KEMM1S. s�, wmm Stfvf Fni m a d
�, S'fcVfc rOLMAR, nww of Adim
r, JL ?�PER' �-a Anthony Martin. ��
RICK MCCORMAC. C. m. MEG NEEDHAM. c� �.��,
JOHN SHANNON. w, a. SHANNON SHORT. .
PAT MOLLOY. i, , Ullor DECHANIL E JOHNSON, An ,w,v
November 18, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Playing Catch-Up
It's That Time Of The Year Again
With only three weeks left in the
semester, students are frantically
calculating their GPAs, desperately
searching for their syllabuses and
relentlessly hounding professors for
a status report on their grades. Yes,
it's that time of the year again. It's
catch-up time.
This is when students partake in a
ritual we like to call "Calculated
Studying This is a natural
phenomenon found only among
college students; it's when genuine-
ly concerned individuals not only
calculate their present GPA, but
also forecast their best and worst
possible grades.
This gives the student two things:
1) a clear idea of what work must be
done before the end of the
semester, i.e. how much cramming
he or she needs to do; and 2) plenty
of time to think of an elaborate lie a
gullible parent might swallow.
So what does this lead to besides
a rise in No-Doze sales0 Sleepless
nights, irritated professors, and
overworked minds, for starters; in
short, it leads to a blend of self-
imposed and unexpected cir-
cumstances that consequently result
in emotional and physical stress.
To chastise these people would be
hypocritical, as most every student
has found him or herself in this
same position at least once in their
academic career, if not once a
semester.
"How did it happen?" you ask
yourself. No mystery there.
Misplaced priorities, poor time
management and procrastination
are three quick ways to get trapped
into playing catch-up.
"How do I get caught-up?" you
wonder? The answer is really very
simple when you think about it.
Don't just deal" with the problem of
catching up, but also with the stress
that accompanies, if not causes,
your work load. If you can deal
with the stress in a healthy way,
your battle is half won. The rest, in
many cases, is a matter of time
management and fortitude.
The Student Health Center and
the Counseling Center are at your
disposal. Literature on coping with
stress is available and professionals
are willing to help. Remember, the
first step in solving a problem is
recognizing it.
"Distribute these defensive arks' among these
soldiers of tslm' and send them to the fronti

Campus Forum
It's Not Apathy; We're Just Busy
QIHZ:
IS THIS ANOTHER
AMERICAN
HOSTAGE
OR JUST A
CATHOLIC �
THE0106AN f
COlifGt P�SS S8WCI
ft Uttfe woe
tfouT KK T
yttDWArl
D& Trtl otM)
1 would like to take a moment to rep-
ly to Susan Hayne's article, "Disease
Covers Campus" (Nov. 11). I agree
that apathy is widespread on campus
and difficult to overcome. However,
do not make the mistake of thinking
that is the only reason students do not
attend these programs.
Another reason some students do
not attend campus programs is
because, believe it or not, some of us
are too busy to attend. 1 saw the
posters for the Storaski lecture and
even went so far as writing the date and
time in my notebook. However, as
soon as I wrote it down, I realized I
had to work that night.
Please look around. Note how many
students you see who work at nights in
local restaurants and stores. Some of
us go to school by day and work by-
night.
I'm afraid that for those students
who are like me, there is nothing you
can do to get us to programs. We do
read the papers, see the posters, and
hear the radio. There are only 24 hours
in a day though, and priorities have to
be chosen. So do not oversimplify the
issue and assume everyone is guilty of
apathy. Some of us are "just" busy.
Barbara Barnes
Senior
Theater Arts
Steroid Use
I would like to make a few remarks
in regard to Mary' Elesha-Adams' arti-
cle on steroid use in the Nov. 4 issue of
The East Carolinian.
First, 1 would like to say that the ar-
ticle was right on time. People need to
know about anabolic steroids because
they are becoming a bigger problem
everyday. A convicted dealer says,
"Nobody has taken steroids seriously
because it's not heroin and it's not co-
caine. It's clear now that these things
can be dangerous drugs Even experts
on the effects of anabolic steroids have
said, "The user only gets to reach his
goal as long as the drug is working.
When it wears off, he can no longer
achieve the same feat Plus steroids
are found not only in professional
levels of competition, but they're fin-
ding their ways into colleges and high
schools as well.
She touched on many of the impor-
tant aspects, yet she failed to mention
some things that may be equally impor-
tant, such as steroids can be taken in
many forms like pills, injection, drinks
or skin creams. This list shows where
the athlete is most likely to get them:
club owners (38 percent), fellow
athletes (20 percent), LICENSED
medical physicians (15 percent), drug
company representatives (7 percent),
pharmacists (6 percent), nurses (5 per-
cent), coaches and trainers (4 percent),
direct company orders (2 percent), and
health food stores (1 percent).
Most research on steroids does not
involve the heavy doses commonly us-
ed by the athlete in real life. Through
approved studies, researches found
that if there is continued use of
steroids, you should take one aspirin a
day. Studies also say that usage is
highest when testing is not conducted.
When prescribed by a physician to
improve certain physiological condi-
tions steroids have value; yet in order
to avoid the undesirable side effects,
they need to be taken in their prescrib-
ed form to improve such things as mus-
cle, bone and red blood cell growth,
and nerve conduction. Rarely will you
suffer these side effects if the steroids
are taken in the prescribed manner.
The most commonly used are Anavar,
Dianabol, Durabolin, Dec Durabolin,
Maxibolin, Nilevar and Winstrol.
Most athletes take them either
because they're convinced everyone
else is, or because as Lyle Alzado,
former NFL all-pro for the L.A.
Raiders, put it, "Steroids create more
raw power, speed, endurance A
player cannot compete today at a top-
notch level of football without some
sort of an aid
Some companies that furnish
bodybuilding supplies have come up
with steroid substitutes. These give the
same desired effects without the com-
plications.
T.J.
Thompson
Freshman
ECU Sports Medicine
Physical Education
Swanson's Review
In response to the gentleman behind
the "Boston's Back" letter in the Nov
6 issue, I'd like to say a few words in
behalf of Mr. Swanson. First of all
your statement, we, who wrote the
letter, know the author was terribly
misguided in his thoughts about the
group Boston is ignorant. Mr. Swan-
son's job is to critique the mu
reviews. There is no right or wroi .
no "misguidance of thoughts
opinion and I'm sure he wrote wl
thought. That you agree or disagree is
totally up to you.
Now about your enlightei
facts to which it seems that he (Mr
Swanson) was oblivious y
"On Boston's first two album -
Scholz plays these instrument-
guitar, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar,
12-string guitar, special effects guitar.
bass, organ, clarinet and percuss
Are you so mucicallv blind tha-
think there is a difference in pU
these different styles of guitar0 I)
think there is a difference in playii . u
electric and an acoustic g � .
guitar is simply that, a guitar A �-
who can play a six-string guitar
well (and I think Tom Scholz cai
play any of the guitars on youi
even the bass. Or did you thinl
played them all at one time0 -V for the
organ, clarinet and percussion, there's
nothing extraordinary in a m .
his caliber being able to play that varie-
ty of instruments.
As you can probably tell, I'm iota
big Boston fan by any means. Pa
sonally, I find their music ver? v.�-J
produced and monotonous B is in
Mr. Swanson's case, that is rn opi-
nion. In six years though, 1 would
think that Mr. Scholz would wan: to be
a bit more versatile. It seems Mr.
Scholz is stuck in "Pop Mode " If the
song isn't loaded with his "patented"
power chords, the singer is croomag
out some juvenile love song
In closing, I'd like to sa) that Mr
Swanson has a very tough alignment
(it's obvious that you can please
everyone), and I believe he does a fine
job. Compliments also go to Dave
Elliott, who assists Sanon m his
task. Keep up the fine work.
Oh, by the way, you also wrote
"���we suggest he (Mr Swanson i
become better informed on his sub-
jects. As stated on the first album
cover, Mr. Swanson, LISTEN TO
THE RECORD If the future Boston
sounds anything like the first three
albums, I'd just as soon NOT 1 STEN
TO THE RECORD!
Michael Hart
Senior
Communications
� � � � � ' communication
Politic s Strange Bedfellows Bush And Falwell Get A Divnrc
"�9�mi �.�JTM wnyjvisiuivorc
By MALCOLM GLADWELL
After a little more than a year and a half, one of
the strangest marriages in American politics is
foundering. Jerry Falwell is backing out of his en-
dorsement of George Bush's presidential bid.
Falwell met with Pat Robertson in early
September, and the two made a deal. "Jerry pro-
mised he wouldn't campaign for Bush says a top
Robertson aide. The official announcement came
Sept. 17, when Falwell made it known that he was
retreating from politics.
Of course, Falwell has no intention of leaving
politics. In fact, this election year he was more ac-
tive than ever.
All Falwell wants to do is sever his ties to Bush.
Ever since he suddenly and unexpectedly backed the
vice president after a private meeting with him last
year, the endorsement has caused Falwell nothing
but trouble.
"He went in there and got his ego stroked says
one former White House official of Falwell's
private meeting with Bush. "His whole organiza-
tion was totally shocked Falwell tried, in the
beginning, to convince his people that Bush was a
worthy ally, but to no avail. When the Moral Ma-
jority polled its major contributors on Bush, 55 per-
cent still had strong objections.
Today sources close to the Falwell campaign
point to the Bush factor as one good reason
Falwell's contributions are down as much as $20
million, or 25 percent, from last year. And with the
rise of Robertson, the break with Bush became all
the more imperative. Challenged for the first time
by another evangelist to his right, Falwell had to
deal with Robertson or watch his organization slow-
ly bleed to death.
Falwell's aides insit that nothing has changed,
that their boss will be "honoring his commitments
to Bush But what commitments? The other side
of the story is that Bush hasn't returned Falwell's
phone calls for weeks. That's quite a change from
before, when Bush gave Falwell White House access
and Washington perks � briefings by the chief of
staff, private audiences at the Bush residence � in
exchange for an introduction to the hitherto hostile
fundamentalist world.
Bush was excited by his Falwell connection. He
dropped out of the Trilateral Commission to
mollify his new friends and made a fawning ap-
pearance at Falwell's Liberty University. In June,
Bush was the cover boy of the evangelical monthly
Christian Herald. In the accompanying profile, he
insisted, "Yes, I've had some life-changing ex-
periences that have left me with a profound sense of
faith in God. Those are the times when a person
reaches deep down inside himself and comes to
grips with the question of why God put you here,
and what does it all mean anyway
He had a video made of that "Christian
testimony" at last summer's Christian Bookseller's
Convention in Washington. Bush had his handlers
hustle evangelical leaders to a private suite for
special screenings. Not to mention the evangelical
leaders that Falwell constantly squired to vice presi-
dent's mansion. "It was a real dog and pony
show says one administration official.
But Falwell couldn't deliver. He assured Bush
that he had firm commitments from Charles
Stanley and Jimmy Drapper, both past presidents
of the country's largest Protestant denomination
the Southern Baptist Convention. In September
both of them started leaning toward Robertson
The current president of the Southern Baptists
Adrian Rodgers, appears to be for Robertson as
well.
And then there's Jimmy Swaggart, whom Bush
people thought they had successfully weaned from
the Kemp campaign. Falwell, in fact, had a Sept. 11
"CBS Morning News" appearance planned with
Swaggart, at which time he expected the Louisiana
evangelist to declare for Bush. Swaggart instead
backed Robertson, and according to syndicated col-
umnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak Bush
was so upset that he called Swaggart himself
(Bush's people unequivocally deny the story.)
The whole Bush-Falwell connection started
because Bush thought if he could line up the sup-
port of evangelical leaders, evangeUcal voters would
that by getting the backing of evangelical leadersj
Robertson captured "a substantial portion" of tN
movement, thereby taking evangelicals "out of th
political bargaining process Because Robertson
has Swaggart and Oral Roberts and Charles Stanley
and others on his side, he is assumed to have the
allegiances of evangelical rank and file the sam
way Jessc Jackson had 'he support of blacks.
The problem is that there is no evidence that this
is true. Look at Falwell. His backing of Bush ha
nothing to do with the inclinations of the Man
Majority constituency.
"He could have backed Attila the Hun savs
former Falwell aide. "1 don't thi ik anyone who hi
ever worked for Jerry or who works for him no.
ever knows his real motivation
The same goes for the Falwell deal with Robert
son. which seems less an endorsement than an ac
commodation. "These men don't like each other 3
J.A .?r.une,CVangeUcal- P�intin� to questions ol
9! ��! differences between Falwell'
fundamentalism and Robertson's Pentacostahsm.
It s an open question whether evangeUcal leadei
JZS Tay �V" their flocks "hn it comes u
pohuca choices. George Marsden. a historian a
follow. With 22 million evangelical voters at stake
Bush and the other GOP presidential candidates' hav�.� " qucstion wh�her evangeUcal lead
have been playing the endorsement game with a Stori dSLTW ' nocks when il comcs
vengeance. n�� ,� Geor8e Marsden, a historian
It isn't just GOP candidates who believe in the schcL S E �f a number of evangelic
power of endorsements. The press buys into it too - mMdt a career out o
Evans and Novak have called Roberts fce T ! jgj, ��� lli.Hll
"unified candidate of the born-agains, here to slay ZSEZlZZZF-
as potential kingmaker in the Republican Party" be enntrSft movem�� will not and canno
because of his success in lining up commitments Everyone c� Su� 0ne�n" � flatly
from evangelical leaders. Salltr, J8 m9' Even if George and Jerr
Washington Post reporter Thomas Edsall wrote difference " ' n�! 8�ing to makc an
Are C
Is the nicotine in cigarettes
addictive?
All drugs that produce
dependence have cert
characteristics. Cigarettes arc
considered to be an addictive
or
GGutEE
acra
LDC
drug because the)
nicotine which:
-creates a dependence
leads to compulsive use
-affects the chemistrv ol
brain and nervous svstem
-may cause p
tional distress if you give
cigarettes abruptly
Group Tn
Continued from page .
humanism. ana tha
dictates their own religious views
deserve at least equal treatmei
The Anti-Defamation Le
Of B'nai B'rith recently -
such views as "dangerous
"flirting with making scl
to arms of a state religion
I
Mr-
This Spaa
Be Workh
Yod
AdvertiSi
The East Carl
TOM TOGS FACTj
1900 Dickinson Ave
Dif�ct From Th� Local M� ;�
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& Famous Names That We
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Come Anfl ;i�k
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MMtofCard 1 . vi �:
fUTj
L
M I MH





A


�te �aat (Earnlfntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Tom Luvender. �
DanielMairer U-M
Patti Kemmis. ��, m, s F
Scott r�D ' �"r" 0 4rfv�
RirJmT � ANTH�NY MART,N- � �- �
RICK MCCORMAC. o MEG Needham
John Shannon. � Shannon Short .
p onIrMvJIN 3m)Rl , Production Manager
AT MOLLOY. - � warn DeCHANU.E JOHNSON. � ���
November 18. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Playing Catch-Up
It's That Time Of The Year Again
With only three weeks left in the
semester, students are frantically
calculating their GPAs, desperately
searching for their syllabuses and
relentlessly hounding professors for
a status report on their grades. Yes,
it's that time of the year again. It's
catch-up time.
This is when students partake in a
ritual we like to call "Calculated
Studying This is a natural
phenomenon found only among
college students; it's when genuine-
ly concerned individuals not only
calculate their present GPA, but
also forecast their best and worst
possible grades.
This gives the student two things:
1) a clear idea of what work must be
done before the end of the
semester, i.e. how much cramming
he or she needs to do; and 2) plenty
of time to think of an elaborate lie a
gullible parent might swallow.
So what does this lead to besides
a rise in No-Doze sales? Sleepless
nights, irritated professors, and
overworked minds, for starters, in
short, it leads to a blend of self-
imposed and unexpected cir-
cumstances that consequently result
in emotional and physical stress.
To chastise these people would be
hypocritical, as most every student
has found him or herself in this
same position at least once in their
academic career, if not once a
semester.
"How did it happen?" you ask
yourself. No mystery there.
Misplaced priorities, poor time
management and procrastination
are three quick ways to get trapped
into playing catch-up.
"How do I get caught-up?" you
wonder? The answer is really very
simple when you think about it.
Don't just deal with the problem of
catching up, but also with the stress
that accompanies, if not causes,
your work load. If you can deal
with the stress in a healthy way
your battle is half won. The rest, in
many cases, is a matter of time
management and fortitude.
The Student Health Center and
the Counseling Center are at your
disposal. Literature on coping with
stress is available and professionals
are willing to help. Remember, the
first step in solving a problem is
recognizing it.
DISTRIBUTE THESE DEFENSIVE ARMS' AMONG THESE
SOLDIERS OF TSLm' AND SEND THEM TO THE FRONTi
Campus Forum
It's Not Apathy; We're Just Busy
IiLnnUi;i,�i�l- - �
QUIZ:
IS THIS ANOTHER
AMERICAN
HOSTAGE,�.
OR JUST A
CATHOLIC �
TWE0L06AN f
COUiGt �SS SiBVCt
mMt
CUB ME Wfctt,
iRXTBMSrtteTtf.
SPIED LT T
�.& Ttt. o-
I would like to take a moment to rep
ly to Susan Hayne's article, "Disease
Covers Campus" (Nov. 11). I agree
that apathy is widespread on campus
and difficult to overcome. However,
do not make the mistake of thinking
that is the only reason students do not
attend these programs.
Another reason some students do
not attend campus programs is
because, believe it or not, some of us
are too busy to attend. I saw the
posters for the Storaski lecture and
even went so far as writing the date and
time in my notebook. However, as
soon as I wrote it down, I realized I
had to work that night.
Please look around. Note how many
students you see who work at nights in
local restaurants and stores. Some of
us go to school by day and work bv
night.
I'm afraid that for those students
who are like me. there is nothing you
can do to get us to programs. We do
read the papers, see the posters, and
hear the radio. There are only 24 hours
in a day though, and priorities have to
be chosen. So do not oversimplify the
issue and assume everyone is guilty of
apathy. Some of us are "just" busy.
Barbara Barnes
Senior
Theater Arts
Steroid Use
1 would like to make a few remarks
in regard to Mary Elesha-Adams' arti-
cle on steroid use in the Nov. 4 issue of
The East Carolinian.
First, I would like to say that the ar-
ticle was right on time. People need to
know about anabolic steroids because
they are becoming a bigger problem
everyday. A convicted dealer says,
"Nobody has taken steroids seriously
because it's not heroin and it's not co-
caine. It's clear now that these things
can be dangerous drugs Even experts
on the effects of anabolic steroids have
said, "The user only gets to reach his
goal as long as the drug is working.
When it wears off, he can no longer
achieve the same feat Plus steroids
are found not only in professional
levels of competition, but they're fin-
ding their ways into colleges and high
schools as well.
She touched on many of the impor-
tant aspects, yet she failed to mention
some things that may be equally impor-
tant, such as steroids can be taken in
many forms like pills, injection, drinks
or skin creams. This list shows where
the athlete is most likely to get them:
club owners (38 percent), fellow
athletes (20 percent), LICENSED
medical physicians (15 percent), drug
company representatives (7 percent),
pharmacists (6 percent), nurses (5 per-
cent), coaches and trainers (4 percent),
direct company orders (2 percent), and
health food stores (1 percent).
Most research on steroids does not
involve the heavy doses commonly us-
ed by the athlete in real life. Through
approved studies, researches found
that if there is continued use of
steroids, you should take one aspirin a
day. Studies also say that usage is
highest when testing is not conducted.
When prescribed by a physician to
improve certain physiological condi-
tions steroids have value; yet in order
to avoid the undesirable side effects,
they need to be taken in their prescrib-
ed form to improve such things as mus-
cle, bone and red blood cell growth,
and nerve conduction. Rarely will you
suffer these side effects if the steroids
are taken in the prescribed manner.
The most commonly used are Anavar,
Dianabol, Durabolin, Dec Durabolin,
Maxibolin, Nilevar and Winstrol.
Most athletes take them either
because they're convinced everyone
else is, or because as Lyle Alzado,
former NFL all-pro for the L.A.
Raiders, put it, "Steroids create more
raw power, speed, endurance A
player cannot compete today at a top-
notch level of football without some
sort of an aid
Some companies that furnish
bodybuilding supplies have come up
with steroid substitutes. These give the
same desired effects without the com-
plications.
T.J. Thompson
Freshman
ECU Sports Medicine
Physical Education
Swanson's Review
In response to the gentleman behind
the "Boston's Back" letter in the Nov
6 issue, I'd like to say a few words in
behalf of Mr. Swanson. First of all
your statement, we, who wrote the
letter, know the author was terribly
misguided in his thoughts about the
group Boston is ignorant. Mr. Swan-
son's job is to critique the music he
reviews. There is no right or wrong, or
no "misguidance of thoughts It is his
opinion and I'm sure he wrote wha: he
thought. That you agree or disagree is
totally up to you.
Now about your enlightening
facts to which it seems that he (Mr.
Swanson) was oblivious you stated.
"On Boston's first two albums, Tom
Scholz plays these instruments: lead
guitar, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar.
12-string guitar, special effects gu
bass, organ, clarinet and percussion
Are you so mucically blind that you
think there is a difference in playing
these different styles of guitar? D.
think there is a difference in playing an
electric and an acoustic guitar0 A
guitar is simply that, a guitar. A:
who can play a six-string guitar fairly
well (and 1 think Tom Schol can) can
play any of the guitars on your
even the bass. Or did you think he
played them all at one time? As f
organ, clarinet and percussion, there's
nothing extraordinary in a musicia:
his caliber being able to play that varie-
ty of instruments.
As you can probably tell, I'm Ml a
big Boston fan by any mean
sonally, I find their music
produced and monotonous. Bu: is
Mr. Swanson's case, that is m opi-
nion. In six years though, I � . :
think that Mr. Scholz would wan: be
a bit more versatile. It seems Mr
Scholz is stuck in "Pop Mode If the
song isn't loaded with his "patented"
power chords, the singer is crooning
out some juvenile love song.
In closing, I'd like to say that Mr
Swanson has a very tough assignment
(it's obvious that you can't please
everyone), and I believe he does a fine
job. Compliments also go to Dave
Elliott, who assists Swanson in hi?
task. Keep up the fine ork.
Oh, by the way, you also wrote
we suggest he (Mr. Swanson)
become better informed on his sub-
jects. As stated on the first album
cover, Mr. Swanson, LISTEN TO
THE RECORD If the future Boston
sounds anything like the first three
albums, I'd just as soon NOT LISTEN
TO THE RECORD!
Michael Hart
Senior
Communications
, I'm not a
leans. Per- J
ven v-et-J
�- �� � � � - 1. yjmi- communications
Politic s Strange Bedfellows Bush And FalwellGetA nivnrrt
By MALCOLM GLADWELL
After a little more than a year and a half, one of
the strangest marriages in American politics is
foundering. Jerry Falwell is backing out of his en-
dorsement of George Bush's presidential bid.
Falwell met with Pat Robertson in early
September, and the two made a deal. "Jerry pro-
mised he wouldn't campaign for Bush says a top
Robertson aide. The official announcement came
Sept. 17, when Falwell made it known that he was
retreating from politics.
Of course, Falwell has no intention of leaving
politics. In fact, this election year he was more ac-
tive than ever.
All Falwell wants to do is sever his ties to Bush.
Ever since he suddenly and unexpectedly backed the
vice president after a private meeting with him last
year, the endorsement has caused Falwell nothing
but trouble.
"He went in there and got his ego stroked says
one former White House official of Falwell's
private meeting with Bush. "His whole organiza-
tion was totally shocked Falwell tried, in the
beginring, to convince his people that Bush was a
worthy ally, but to no avail. When the Moral Ma-
jority polled its major contributors on Bush, 55 per-
cent still had strong objections.
Today sources close to the Falwell campaign
point to the Bush factor as one good reason
Falwell's contributions are down as much as $20
million, or 25 percent, from last year. And with the
rise of Robertson, the break with Bush became all
the more imperative. Challenged for the first time
by another evangelist to his right, Falwell had to
deal with Robertson or watch his organization slow-
ly bleed to death.
Falwell's aides insit that nothing has changed,
that their boss will be "honoring his commitments
to Bush But what commitments? The other side
of the story is that Bush hasn't returned Falwell's
phone calls for weeks. That's quite a change from
before, when Bush gave Falwell White House access
and Washington perks � briefings by the chief of
staff, private audiences at the Bush residence � in
exchange for an introduction to the hitherto hostile
fundamentalist world.
Bush was excited by his Falwell connection. He
dropped out of the Trilateral Commission to
mollify his new friends and made a fawning ap-
pearance at Falwell's Liberty University. In June,
Bush was the cover boy of the evangelical monthly
Christian Herald. In the accompanying profile, he
insisted, "Yes, I've had some life-changing ex-
periences that have left me with a profound sense of
faith in God. Those are the times when a person
reaches deep down inside himself and comes to
grips with the question of why God put you here,
and what does it ail mean anyway
He had a video made of that "Christian
testimony" at last summer's Christian Bookseller's
Convention in Washington. Bush had his handlers
hustle evangelical leaders to a private suite for
special screenings. Not to mention the evangelical
leaders that Falwell constantly squired to vice presi-
dent's mansion. "It was a real dog and pony
show says one administration official.
But Falwell couldn't deliver. He assured Bush
that he had firm commitments from Charles
Stanley and Jimmy Drapper, both past presidents
of the country's largest Protestant denomination
the Southern Baptist Convention. In September
both of them started leaning toward Robertson
The current president of the Southern Baptists
Adrian Rodgers, appears to be for Robertson as
well.
And then there's Jimmy Swaggart, whom Bush
people thought they had successfully weaned from
the Kemp campaign. Falwell, in fact, had a Sept. 11
"CBS Morning News" appearance planned with
Swaggart, at which time he expected the Louisiana
evangelist to declare for Bush. Swaggart instead
backed Robertson, and according to syndicated col-
umnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak, Bush
was so upset that he called Swaggart himself.
(Bush's people unequivocally deny the story.)
The whole Bush-Falwell connection started
because Bush thought if he could line up the sup-
port of evangelical leaders, evangelical voters would "�"�gH differences between Falwel
follow. With 22 million evanadical voters ?uk�? �"�����n and Robertson's Pentacostalism
follow. With 22 million evangelical voters at stake,
Bush and the other GOP presidential candidates
have been playing the endorsement game with a
vengeance.
It isn't just GOr .andidates who believe in the
power of endorsements. The press buys into it too.
Evans and Novak have called Robertson the
unified candidate of the born-agains, here to stay
as potential kingmaker in the Republican Party"
that by getting the backing of evangelical leaders.
Robertson captured "a substantial portion" of the
movement, thereby taking evangelicals "out of the
political bargaining process Because Robertson
has Swaggart and Oral Roberts and Charles Stanlo
and others on his side, he is assumed to have the
allegiances of evangelical rank and file the same
way Jesse Jackson had 'he support of blacks.
The problem is that there is no evidence that this
is true. Look at Falwell. His backing of Bush had
nothing to do with the inclinations of the Moral
Majority constituency.
"He could have backed Attila the Hun savs a
former Falwell aide. "I don't thi anyone who has
ever worked for Jerry or who works for him now
ever knows his real motivation
The same goes for the Falwell deal with Robert
S SCems lcss � endorsement than an ac-
commodation. "These men don't like each other at
L "y��ne evangelical, pointing to questions of
ego and theological differences between Falwell's
it s an open question whether evangelical leaders
nXriS Tay �VCT their nocks hen it comes to
polmca choices. George Marsden, a historian a.
schoL, �Ky �?� �f a numbcr of evangelical
dl� h� ��� a career out of
saas indcpenden
because of his success in lining up commitments Eveone cS rL" on!?Pcrso ays flatly.
from evangelical leaders. Mt h v can rest easy. Even if George and Jem
Washington Post reporter Thomas Edsall wrote difforenci0 ' "0t 8�ing to make any
Are C
Is the nicotine in cigarettes
addictive?
All drugs that produce
dependence have certain
characteristics Cigarettes arc
considered to be an addictive
CLLMMI
mm
drug because thej c nt
nicotine which:
-creates a dependence
leads to compulsive use
-affects the chemistrv ol
brain and nervous system
-may cause physical or emo
tional distress if you g
cigarettes abruptly
Group Ti
Continued from pajje 1
humanism, ana tha
dictates their own rehgiou
deserve at least equal treat
The Anti-Defamation Lea
pf B'nai B'rith recer
such views as "dangerous
"flirting with making sch
to arms of a state religion
I
This Spa
Be Worli
Yo
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i





AHONG HESE
- RONTl
re Just Busy
ue the music he
or wrong, or
gls " It is his
hc wrote what he
disagree is


enlightening
at he (Mr.
you stated,
dbums, Tom
ruments: lead
acoustic guitar,
effects guitar,
and percussion
Wind that you
nee in playing
guitar? Do you
in playing an
v guitar? A
litar Anyone
- guitar fairly
�' -an) can
n your list,
. think he
time0 As for the
n, there's
i musician of
ly that varie-
Bostor. fan b"
mea:
not a
Per

k
over
But as in
is my opi-
. 1 would
- want to be
eems Mr.
Mode If the
"patented"
nger is crooning
: ong.
i sa that Mr.
ugh assignment
can't please
� e he does a fine
co to Dave
sanon in his
�.ork.
wrote
Mi Hanson)
his sub-
on the first album
1 1STEN TO
) If the future Boston
- like 'he first three
' v soon NOT 1 ISTEN
i -kir
Michael Hart
Senior
Communications
et A Divorce
I ing the backing of evangelical leaders,
captured "a substantial portion" of the
I thereby 'akmg evangelicals "out of the
ftg process Because Robertson
�aggar and Orai Roberts and Charles Stanley
s side, he is assumed to have the
f evangelical rank and file the same
Jackson had 'he support of blacks.
biem is that there is no evidence that this
Look at Falweil. His backing of Bush had
ig ' do with the inclinations of the Moral
tty constituent
le could have backed Attila the Hun says a
fr FaJwell aide "I don't thi ik anyone who has
forked for Jerry or who works for him now
Jnows his real motivation "
same goes for the Falweil deal with Robert-
rtuch seems less an endorsement than an ac-
"These men don't like each other at
ays one evangelical, pointing to questions of
d theological differences between Falwell's
�nentahsm and Robertson's Pentacostalism.
Ian open question whether evangelical leaders
fny sway over their flocks when it comes to
II choices. George Marsden, a historian at
is only one of a number of evangelical
rs who have made a career out of
Jstrating the factiousness and independence
lenca s born-agains.
le evangelical movement will not and cannot
rolled by any �ne person he says flatly,
frne can rest easy. Even if George and Jerry
tk together again, it's not going to make any
nee.

Are Cigarettes Addictive?
TiJEJSTARQUNtAN NOVEMBER 18. 19
Is the nicotine in cigarettes
addictive?
All drugs that produce
dependence have certain
characteristics. Cigarettes are
considered to be an addictive
-may cause relapses among
former users sometimes months
or even years after quitting
Studies have suggested that
nicotine, which occurs naturally
EC
Gams? m��&mm
� ii
drug because they contain
nicotine which:
-creates a dependence and
leads to compulsive use
-affects the chemistry of the
brain and nervous system
-may cause physical or emo-
tional distress if you give up
cigarettes abruptly
J
in the tobacco plant, reinforces
and strengthens the desire to
smoke and causes users to keep
on smoking. The nicotine in
cigarettes reaches the brain faster
than in cigars, chewing tobacco
and snuff because it is inhaled.
When someone smokes, the
following events occur:
The first cigarette of the day
sends a burst of nicotine to the
brain which produces an almost
immediate feeling of satisfaction
and euphoria.
-For the rest of the day the
smoker tries to maintain this feel-
ing by manipulating his or her in-
take of tobacco smoke. The
smoker may inhale more or less
deeply, take more or fewer puffs,
or smoke at different intervals of
time.
-If the smoker exceeds a certain
number of cigarettes, sudden
side-effects may occur, including
nausea, light-headedness, and a
marked rise in the heart rate.
-When the smoker smokes less
than a minimal amount of
cigarettes (around 10 cigarettes a
day), the amount of nicotine in
the blood drops and the smoker
begins to experience distress.
Nicotine can affect the body in
different ways. It can act as an
anti-anxiety drug in stressful
situations, or it can act as a
stimulant in serene situations.
Some people enjoy the
psychological effects of smoking
such as handling cigarettes, mat-
ches, lighters and ash trays.
When a person tries to stop
smoking, a number of physical
and emotional reactions may oc-
cur during the first few days:
-occasional headaches
-mood changes such as ir-
ritability, aggressiveness, anxiety
and difficulty in sleeping
-gastrointestinal disturbances
such as nausea, bloating, con-
stipation
-increased or decreased
petite
-weight gain
-a feeling of loss
ap
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Group Tries For Change
Continued from page 1.
humanism. ' and thai fairness
dictates their own religious views
deserve at least equal treatment.
The Anti-Defamation League
pf B'nai B'rith recently blasted
such views as "dangerous and
"flirting with making schools in-
to arms of a state religion
"Serious historians adds
University of Houston Prof.
Hyland Packard, "don't
recognize secular humanism as a
legitimate academic term
"The only people who know
what the term means says
Metro State's Dobbs, "are the
people who want to yank books
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
Advertise In
The East Carolinian
off the shelves
During the trial, various
witnesses defined secular
humanism as a religion, a "style
of probing modern life without
preconceived notions a move-
ment, a way of life, a philosophy,
a "buzzword for atheistic
humanism and as a
"hedonistic" way of life.
U.S. District Judge W.
Brevard expects to rule on the
case shortly.
South Park
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I





t Busy
CO



i
Mr
i
r i
Han
ins
et A Divorce
� iders,
11 f i he
il �? the
R ibertson
es Stanle
� ave the
ile the same
� � bla �
lencc 'ha; this
tcking ol Hush had
� � � Moral
cHui says a
� u ne who has
� him n�
-a! with Robert-
than an ac-
l � ea I � ther at
I u-stions of
etw en FalwdPs
i alism.
i whether evangelical leaders
� hen it comes to
� Marsden. a historian at
a number of evangelical
? a career out of
'rating -he factiousness and independence
le-ica s born-agains
e evangelical movement will not and cannot
trolled K ") he savs flatly.
can res' easv Even if George and Jerry
?k together again, it's not going to make any
Are Cigarettes Addictive?
IHf EAS1 AKOI IMAN
VAIMHIK � m
Is the nicotine in cigarettes addictive?
All drugs dependence characteristics considered tothat produce have certain Cigarettes are be an addictive
niav cause relapses among
tormer users sometimes months
or even vears after quitting
Studies have suggested that
nicotine, which occurs naturallv
mam wmm
drug because thev contain
nicotine which:
-creates a dependence and
leads to compulsive use
affects the chemistrv of the
brain and nervous system
-mav cause physical or emo-
tional distress if you give up
cigarettes abruptlv
J
m the tobacco plant, reinforces
and strengthens the desire to
smoke and causes users to keep
on smoking The nicotine in
cigarettes reaches the brain faster
than in cigars, chewing tobacco
and snuff" because it is inhaled.
When someone smokes, the
following events occur:
I he fust cigarette of the da
sends a burst ol nicotine to the
hi am which produces an almost
immediate feeling ol satisfaction
and euphoria.
Foi the test ol the day the
smokei tries to maintain this feel-
ing bv manipulating his or her in-
take ol tobacco smoke, "he
smokei mav inhale more or less
deeply, take more or fewer puffs.
Ol smoke at different intervals ol
time.
It the smokei exceeds a certain
number of cigarettes, sudden
side effects mav occur, including
nausea, light-headedness, and a
marked rise in the heart rate.
�When the smokei smokes less
than a minimal amount ol
cigarettes (around 10 cigarettes a
day), the amount of nicotine in
the blood drops and the smoker
begins to experience distress
Nicotine can affect the bodv in
different ways. It can acl as an
anti an.xietv drug in stressful
situations, or it can act as a
stimulant in serene situations
Some people enjoy the
psychological effects ol smoking
such as handling cigarettes, mat-
ches, lighters and ash travs
When a person tries to stop
smoking, a number ol physical
and emotional reactions may m
cur during the first few das
-occasional headaches
mood changes such as ir
ritability, aggressiveness, anxiety
and difficulty in sleeping
gastrointestinal disturbances
such as nausea, bloating, con
st i pat i on
increased oi decreased ap
petite
-weight gain
a feeling of loss
r
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CAROI INA EAST MAI I (Across from kl-Rk D .
Breakfast SUPER TAST1 I RIP 1 i( Kl I'
Group Tries For Change
Continued from page 1
jmanism, and mat fairness
dictates their own religious views
deserve at least equal treatment.
The Anti-Defamation I eague
B'nai B'ruh recentlv blasted
such views as "dangerous and
'flirting with making schools in-
to arms of a state religion
"Serious historians adds
I niversity of Houston Prof.
Hvland Packard, "don't
recognie secular humanism as a
legitimate academic term
"The only people who know
what the term means savs
Metro State's Dobbs, "are the
people who want to vank books
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
Advertise In
The Fast Carolinian
ol t the shelves "
During the trial, various
witnesses defined secular
humanism as a religion, a "style
of probing modern life without
preconceived notions a move-
ment, a wav of life, a philosophv,
a "buzword for atheistic
humanism and as a
"hedonistic" wa ol life.
U.S. District Judge K
Brevard expects to rule on the
case shortlv.
South Park
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WE ARE NOW PAYING
THE HIGHEST PRICES
ON MORE TITLES
THAN EVER BEFORE
i I �. i ai m
-4
Sell your books in the Student Stores
and register for three (3) drawings on
the last day of exams.
YOU COULD BE A WIKNER!
1st Prize$125.00 Gift Certificate
2nd Prize$100.00 Gift Certificate
3rd Prize$ 75.00 Gift Certificate
Customer copy of buyback ticket will serve as registration form.
DRAWING WILL BE HELD ON DECEMBER 17, 1986
Gift Certificates Redeemable With Spring Semester Book Purchases
UiH
Wright Building
YOUR ON-CAMPUS SHOPPING CENTER
bbmmEmmmmbhmMmmmemh
i
1





yilASTCAROL,NlAN
NOVEMBER II, 9M
Group Gains A cceptance
TUSCALOOSA, ALA. (IP)
Attitudes toward bi-racial room-
ing have fluctuated over the past
23 years, according to surveys
conducted by a University of
Alabama professor. Donald
Muir, a sociology professor, said
he thinks "there has been an ac-
ceptance of blacks on campus
Muir has conducted surveys of
racial attitudes at the University
since 1963.
In 1963, just after the Universi-
ty was desegregated, about 6 per-
cent of whites surveyed said they
would have no objection to shar-
ing a room with a black person.
"The University has effectively
accepted desegregation Muir
said. "The integration is another
story
The 1982 survey showed an in-
crease in racial prejudice from 10
years earlier even though the rela-
tionship between blacks and
whites had apparently improved.
In 1972, nearly 40 percent of the
whites surveyed said they would
not mind rooming with a black.
In 1982, 34 percent, a 6 percent
decrease from 1972, said they
would not mind sharing a room
with a black.
Muir's survey also showed
there has been an increase in ac-
ceptance of blacks as students,
but a decline in their acceptance
of "social intimates His survey
also showed that white females
tend to more readily accept
blacks in student-related ac-
tivities while white males tend to
accept them more readily as
roommates or social compa-
nions. Nearly 28 percent of the
females said they would not mind
rooming with a black in 1982
while 39 percent of the males said
they would not mind rooming
with a black. Mike Lawrence,
associate director for residence
life, said he does not see any real
Advertisers
Get New
Syndication
NEW YORK, NY (CPS) -
Advertisers, long barred from
buying ads on noncommercial
college radio stations, now have a
way to get around the law, a com-
pany boasts.
In fact, Campus Voice
magazine promotes its new audio
syndication to campus stations as
a way for advertisers "to, in ef-
fect, circumvent the law
The campus stations, however,
get no revenues from the service.
"The idea behind the Campus
Voice Encounter is that the five-
minute programs open and close
with billboards (commercials) on
the shows says Jim Omastiak,
vice president and publisher of
Campus Voice. "We call them
'infomercials
Some 271 campus stations now
get the four-week-old show,
which, Omastiak says, features
news of everything from "the ex-
otic and crazy to pranksters to
politicians and authors
The Federal Communications
Commission, which regulates the
nation's radio and tv stations,
doesn't allow "noncommercial"
stations to take ads, explains
FCC lawyer Barbara Kriesman.
But "infomercials she con-
cedes, are not considered ads
"Say, for example, General
Motors sponsored � profrim.
They could say 'GM b�lMi ����
and they could even identity At
cars, but there could be no call Jd
action she says.
"They cannot say 'Go to GM
and buy a car
The FCC has been relaxing its
rules for what constitutes a com-
mercial on noncommercial sta-
tions for several years.
Omastiak says General Foods,
International Coffees, Snickers
candy and Smith-Corona, among
others, have bought "infomer-
cials" from Campus Voice.
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Don't
spoil nature
leave only
��
�:�:��
problems between blacks and
whites in housing today.
He estimated the entire Univer-
sity Housing program is made up
of about 10 to 15 percent black
students. "We don't have that
exact figure because we don't ask
for race on the (Housing) ap-
plications he said. "We're do-
ing more and more to integrate
the system from hall to hall
Lawrence added.
Traces of racial tension exist at
the University today, but several
resident assistants say the majori-
ty of problems are not caused by
racial discrimination, but by per-
sonality conflicts or differences
in musical tastes. Terence
Purnell, a resident assistant at
Paty, said there have been a few
isolated cases of racial problems
in the past, but he has not heard
of any recent ones.
The main problem at Paty,
Purnell said, is people living in
closed areas. But this doesn't
break down into racial troubles.
"The good relations far outweigh
the bad ones (between the
races) Purnell said. Blacks and
whites "hang out" and socialize
with one another at Paty because
of shared interests. For the most
pan, he said, the reason blacks
and whites have separate social
lives is because of different social
interests.
Billy Srofe, a resident assistant
at Palmer Hall, said he knows of
no racial problems in his dorm.
"We've not really had the pro-
blems of racial troubles at
Palmer he said. "Relations at
Palmer are pretty good Blacks
and whites mix well together and
there is no problem of group
clustering, Srofe said.
Friedman Resident Assistant
Greg Thompson said black and
white relations in his dorm are
good. "The only complaints are
differences in personalities. I
can't really think of one problem
that has come up. Obviously,
you're going to find some natural
desegregation
Sommerville Hall Resident
Assistant Liz Tubbs said there are
several sets of black white room-
mates in her dorm. "We've never
had any racial problems she
said. "I've been on staff here for
three years, and we've never had
any problem, at least that I know
of
Shauna Marbury, a resident of
Tutwiler and member of the
Minority Affairs Committee,
said the relationship between
blacks and whites in dorms have
improved since she has been at
the University.
"I believe it's getting better
she said. "From what I've seen
and heard from others, things are
getting better. Attitudes are
changing. In a lot of instances
this eases dissention. If I've made
friends with others and they in-
troduce me to their friends,
things get easier
Marbury also said she doesn't
see the problems in dorms as race
related. "I don't think there are
racial problems. It is more per-
sonality. It should be worked out
whether it is racial or
personality The problem, she
said, is inherent. "People from
different backgrounds are not
getting exposure to other races,
black and white she said.
A possible solution, Marbury
said, would be to work out a
method of bringing everyone
together in programs such as
freshman orientation In some
cases, the differences sometimes
arise from such things as dif-
ferent musical tastes or
disagreements on television pro-
grams, not because of one's race,
she said.
Diana Anderson, director of
Tutwiler, said she knows of no
racial problems in her dorm.
"We don't discriminate at
(Univeristy) housing she said.
When housing receives a room
application, the applicant is
assigned a room and race is not
even considered in the decision.
Anderson said residents can
change rooms at the beginning of
each semester if they want a dif-
ferent roommate.
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PEN IS THE RIGHT TIME TO
CALL YOUR GRANDPARENTS?
a) Five minutes into "The Lawrence Welk Show
b) About a week before your birthday.
c) When you just want to tell them you miss
them, and that you ate the last of Grandma's
chocolate-chip cookies this morning.
Theres nothing grandparents like better than a call from a grandchild
in college. But if you do accidentally happen to interrupt I .avvrence, y u
ought to have something worth telling them.
For example, you could mention that you called using
AT&T Long Distance Service because you can depend on AT&T's
high quality service and exceptional value.
And then you can tell them that AT&T gives you
immediate credit if you dial a wrong number.
And that you can count on AT&T for clear
long distance connections.
Finally, of course,
S you should quickly
reassure them that
you're eating enough,
then let them hurrv
back to the TV to
catch the rest of the
Lennon Sisters' Blue
Oyster Cult Medlev.
ART
The right choice.
966 AH?
AMfflCAN GPCE Ti�iGS COW
HO l as!
Even O,
Bs I) sw assos
Searing -he enc
"Pageantrs tour, R �
boys from Georgia, present
singular i - and roll
mance such as only the
Unlike their onl other N
Carolina appearance in D
the show Sunday ru
UNC-Wilmington .amp
not sold out. F-ortunate
strange state o(
feet the standard
V- 4t -
R.F.M shown her dotrtg what the
the I AC W campus �sundav proving
they ever were. Opening for R m
Anthologie
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neglected
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and or re. �.
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watch the
could be
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Now � hat � u .
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merely intere?
S mehow . s als
mg.
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thing, were i .
"Twilight
Stones" w
Alfred Hitchc 1
resurrected n
USA Cha
Local Scene
Together T
B JOHN sHsVSON
With place like W
Salem. Raleigh andhapc
cropping up regula
headlines of national mi
magazines, one mas iegnima
Pose the question "When
Greenville going to attract some
�f the attention it desert
The answer is: not until it has
its own original music scene
least Apart from the one or two
hands that hase become Iocs
legends, all the original groupi
that tried and tried has en Hayed
around long enough to Brj agar
Maybe it's not all their fault
maybe Greenville hasn't exactly
been a nurturing community
And maybe that's beginning to
change
Anyone who caught the bands
at the Tavern Thursday rught got
a glimpse of the k:nd of audience
creative musicians thrive on
When Lost Together took the
tge after opening act The Gyro
Unit, some technical difficulties
forced them to play without bass
guitar for a short time The au-
l
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i





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QS

THE EAST C AROl INAN
NOVEMBER 18. 1986
Page'
B D. A. SWA.NSON
Staff Wrtm
Searing the end of their
�Pageantry" tour, R.E.M the
boys from Georgia, presented a
Mngular rock and roll pefor-
mance such as only they can.
Unlike their only other North
Carolina appearance in Durham,
the show Sunday night on the
St" Wilmington campus was
not sold out. Fortunately this
strange state of affairs did not af-
fect the standard that R.E.M.
Off Night, R.E.M. Pulls Through
fans have come to expect.
Opening the show was Let's
Active, Mitch Easter's Winston-
Salem based band known for
their psychedelic progressive rock
and irregular band membership.
As usual, Easter strummed his
guitar with all of the spunk and
subdued hype of a Danny Par-
tridge on mushrooms.
As usual their set emphasized
their more familiar material from
their first album, Cypress, along
with new tunes, many of which
will appear on their upcoming
album. Despite the brevity of the
set, Let's Active certainly was.
A new keyboardist has also
been added in Easter's continuing
quest for the perfect replacement
of former memeber Sarah
Romweber. As a special note, the
new mystery girl and Easter have
been known to spend more than
just business hours together.
Although her musical ability is
definitely up to par, her vocals
seem somewhat strained and as
yet still amateurish. Let's give her
Z �ZT�?Z KS! rEES?cridc" du"prov" � - - - -
some time to get better ac-
climated.
But the grand spectacle
presented by Stipes and company
was obviously the highlight.
Continuing in the tradition of
their highly stylistic set designs,
Sunday evening's backdrop was
impressive. A deep, three-sided
alcove was erected with scattered
window frames through which
backlights peered down on the
foursome. The effect, as with
most of their previous tour sets,
seemed more descriptive of a
theatrical drama than a rock and
roll show, which, most surely, it
was.
But the drama indeed was ap-
parent. In the wake of a tour
marred by several disruptive in-
cidents, the band, and especially
the moody and self-indulgent
Stipe, seemed very much on edge.
The blame, however, lies in many
more places than with rowdy au-
diences. Speculating, the
paranoia may have been caused
by once-adoring critics suddenly
turning on the band's latest
album, Life's Rich Pageant. Or it
may be a growing sense of self-
importance by not only Stipe, but
the entire band.
Despite the tension and a ten-
tative moment during Stipe's in-
troduction of "Swan, Swan,
Hummingbird the show went
off relatively flawlessly, main-
taining a strong sense of purpose.
The main set featured a good
mix of tunes from their new
album including "Cuyahoga"
and "The Flowers of
Guatemala Especially in-
Anthologies Fallen On Hardest Times
By MICAH HARRIS
si.ff Hnlct
A few months back. 1 wrote a
ol the new anthology
M ol the last TV season and
concentrated attempt had
made to revive this
ted program format which
its heyday during the 50s and
been going down hill ever
ce.
Since the response to the new
: or revived "Twilight Zone
Amaing Stories" and "Alfred
he ock" had run from
Aeuarm to cold, 1 mentioned
at it would be interesting to
ch the new season since the
I anthology programming
be decided for years to
ne.
Now that we are in "the new
on somehow it is no longer
rely interesting to watch.
nehow . it is also now depress-
At the end of the summer,
tigs were actually looking up.
"Twilight Zone" and "Amazing
ries" would be back and even
Alfred Hitchcock" would be
"surrected with new episodes by
the USA Channel, the station
Local Scene
which, ironically, contributed to
the NBC remake series' failure by
making original episodes of
"Hitchcock" visible. "Amazing
Stories" would have the services
of acclaimed fantasist Richard
Matheson, and while "Twilight
Zone" had lost the services of
consultant Harlan Ellison, award
winning author George R.R.
Martin was coming aboard.
All of this certainly made fans
dizzy with excitement, perhaps
too dizzy � things took an im-
mediate nose dive. NBC an-
nounced there was to be more
emphasis on "comedy" in the
new "Amazing Stories" season,
all the better to segue with the
yuk-it-up antics of "Alf" which
preceeds it.
Whatever the merits of "Alf
they are not appropriate for
"Amazing Stories" to emulate.
If anything, "Amazing" needs
more character stories to even out
its repertoire of one-liners from
last season. What I've seen of this
season's "humor" is mostly
silliness. The recent episode of a
teen TV late-show addict who
gets sucked into the plot of Hit-
chcock's Psycho was a total em-
barrassment.
Even worse, the episode of a
teen (do I detect a pattern here?)
chemistry whiz who attempts to
create his dream girl was an ap-
parent case of plagarism.
The old EC Comics of the fif-
ties did the same story. I am not
talking about a near similarity in
ideas (artificially engineered
cuties are a dime-a-dozen in
science fiction). I'm talking
about the plot, point-by-point.
Both were entitled
"Miscalculation Both involved
a nerd who bigins mixing up his
ideal woman but keeps botching
the recipe. She's too skinny; now
she's a giant; now she looks like
Bea Arthur, etc. Finally, when he
gets it right, another guy strolls in
and the ideal girl falls for him.
Certainly, "Amazing Stories"
could have come with a different
plot, or at least given EC Comics
some credit. Maybe it was an
oversight, but I don't know.
Yet, maybe there is still hope
for "Amazing Stories An
episode in which a boy exchanges
minds with his dying grandpa was
good; ironically, it was reminis-
cent of one type of story Rod
Serling did for the "Twilight
Zone Also, "The Greibble a
story of a soap opera-addicted
housewife who browbeats her son
for not outgrowing hjs children's
books and is subsequently visited
by an annoying Dr. Seuss type
critter, was well done. The Greib-
ble itself was a charming beast.
"The Twilight Zone" started
off on a bad foot with "The Once
and Future King In this story,
an Elvis impersonator travels
back in time and meets the real
Elvis shortly before he makes his
first record. Elvis thinks the im-
personator is his dead twin resur-
rected.
The impersonator tries to en-
courage Elvis on his career but
only succeeds in making him
fighting mad. During their strug-
gle, the real Elvis is impaled on
his own guitar's neck � which
has been conveniently broken in-
to a stake.
Okay � is there anyone who
hasn't figured out yet that the
Elvis impersonator is going to
take the real "king's" place?
What is so awful about this
episode is not that it opens the
season, not that the twist ending
was unmercifully dragged out by
See TWILIGHT, page 8
Together They Find An Original Way
Bv JOHN SHANNON
SI ,1, t ��
With places like Winston
Salem, Raleigh and Chapel Hill
topping up regularly in the
headlines of national music
magazines, one may legitimately
Pose the question: "When is
Greenville going to attract some
�f the attention it deserves?"
The answer is: not until it has
its own original music scene, at
least. Apart from the one or two
hands that have become local
'egends, all the original groups
that tried and tried haven't stayed
around long enough to try again.
Maybe it's not all their fault
maybe Greenville hasn't exactly
been a nurturing community.
And maybe that's beginning to
change.
Anyone who caught the bands
at the Tavern Thursday night got
a glimpse of the kind of audience
creative musicians thrive on.
When Lost Together took the
stage after opening act The Gyro
Unit, some technical difficulties
forced them to play without bass
guitar for a short time. The au-
dience (incidentally, a very good
turnout for a Thursday), seemed
unphased and waited politely
while the problem was corrected.
I don't think anyone left.
Maybe Lost Together is the
kind of band that promotes
tolerance. Lead guitarist Tracy
Cain, singerrhythm guitarist
Rob Frayser, bassist Will Holt
and drummer Kerry Richardson
come off as refreshingly non-
aggressive, sometimes to the ex-
tent of turning their backs to the
audience. Any musician will tell
you it's poor stage presence to do
so, but Lost Together seemed to
turn not so much away from the
audience as toward the center of
the music.
Overall, the feeling was one of
people having a good time
together. One might be reminded
of the vibe of a Grateful Dead
concert, especially when the band
launched into covers of Dead
favorites like "Good Lovin
"Scarlet Begonias" and "Fire on
the Mountain One of the
climaxes of the evening came in
Lost Together's cover of "The
Other One in which Cain stret-
ched out in a modal stream-of-
consciousness guitar solo which
was deeply felt, yet intense in a
way that can only be described as
"demonic
Lost Together's sound was
fullest when Sue Haynie joined in
on vocals. She and Frayser
together hit some of the sweetest
harmonies Greenville has heard
in a good while, at least since los-
ing its premiere, harmonizing
sisters and brothers.
Lest the wrong impression
come across, it should be said
that Lost Together's main staples
are their original tunes. From the
opening rocker, "Grey Shake
to less frenetic numbers like
"Slow Trippin "The Ride"
and "On Edge Frayser and
Cain display a consistent ability
to write memorable songs that
complement their style and
abilities. Maybe they'll have
some new ones for us when they
play at New Deli on Saturday,
Dec. 13.
It's a shame the wonderfully
responsive audience hadn't all
shown up yet when The Gyro
Unit opened with a thumping
cover of Jeff Beck's "Wired
one of the definitive fusion hits
of the 1970s. That tune set the
tone for the trio's style, which
was rock-leaning fusion all the
way.
Morad Rowshan-araghi on
bass, Drew Lyle on guitar and
Dan Davis on drums played a
tight set of predominately
original instrumental which,
while not highly danceable, were
definitely well executed and
highly listenable. Most tunes
featured Lyle's jazz-influenced
guitar solos over solid bassdrum
accompaniment.
With original songs like
"Leroy's House of Abundance
"Nyrobian Punjab "In Search
Of and "My Life Is So Bor-
ing I Use Toothpicks To Poke
The Eyes Out Of Housewives
Who Gather On My Kitchen Ap-
pliances it's easy to see why
The Gyro Unit feel it necessary to
make some concessions to nor-
mality with covers of Hendrix
and Led Zeppelin tunes.
Original music isn't absent in
Greenville � it just needs some
support if it's to stay active.
teresting was Mike Mills' song.
"Superman in which Stipes
grudgingly gave up center stage
for the bassist.
An obligatory salute to their
first commercially successful
tune, "Radio Free Europe was
played with a noticeably sarcastic
bent. Also presented from
Murmer were "Moral Kioske"
and "Pilgrimage From
Reckoning was "Rockville and
from Fablesof the Reconstruc-
tion was "Feeling Gravity's
Michael Stipes
Pull "Driver Eight" and
"Can't Get There From Here "
Mills' new importance on stage
was further cemented during the
first encore when the band tore
into thetr rendition of the old
KISS tune "Firehouse (During
R.E.M.s eariy days it was typical
tor Mills to appear wearing a
t-shirt of his apparentlv favorite
band. KISS.)
Also featured in the encores,
usually used to showcase the
band's favorite cover songs, were
the old standard made famous by
Santana, "Spooky the Moun-
tain hit. "Missippi Queen" and
the folk song "Broken Lover's
Waltz
Accusations from critics across
the country that R.E.M. has
become indignant toward fans
and audiences who may or mav
not be good enough for their
many-layered music were oniv
somewhat substantiated at Sun-
day evening's show While Stipe
at times seemed put out by the
noisy, hyped-up crowd, the rest
oi the band, especially the affable
Mills, made up with personal and
light-hearted performances.
Joffrey Ensemble
Dances At Wright
HratftakaU Dm.
The Joffrey II Dancers, sister
company of America's foremost
world-class ballet ensemble. The
Joffrey Ballet, will open the
1986-198 Department of Univer-
sity Unions Theatre Arts Series
on Tuesday. November 2 The
performance wiii be held in
W'right Auditorium at 8:15 p.m.
The Joffrey Ballet has
established itself as a dance com-
pany with a reputation for top
quality performances. However,
the Joffrey Ballet is too large and
costly to tour today, so the Jof-
frey II Dancers were charged with
taking the Joffrey name to the
world and to maintain its stan-
dard of excellence. But the Jof-
frey II Dancers is different in that
it is not just a program for
dancers.
Since 19, the Dancers have
operated under a four-rule guide
that outlines the purpose of the
program. It acts as a complete
course designed to prepare voung
dancers of outstanding potential
to enter The Joffrey Ballet. The
program also provides emerging
choreographers, composers and
costume and lighting designers
with produced performance op-
portunities for their works. Final-
ly, this plan acts as a training
ground for arts administrators
and production personnel, and
allows communities to support a
large ballet company to view pro-
fessional dance, so there is no
loss of quality.
The Companv is working hard
in its dance by exhausting class
schedules, rehearsals, and perfor-
mances but the instruction
Prf: stop there. The dancers
Study the art of make-up, hair
styling, costuming, and stage eti-
quette.
Most Joffrey II Dancers stay
with the Company for about two
years. Eighty percent of the near-
ly 2"0 participants in the program
move up to The Joffrey Ballet.
The Joffrey II Dancers, as an ex-
tension oi The Joffrey Ballet,
have added a full-length ballet
and special children's programm-
ing in the repertory.
The Company tours year
round with its combination of
classical, contemporary, roman-
tic, and neo-classical ballet
ensemble pieces with modern and
jazz works. The Joffrey II Ballet
is in its second decade. This com-
pany follows the Joffrey Ballet's
reputation as one of America's
foremost world-class ballet com-
panies.
Tickets are $6 for ECU
students and guest. $6 for youth
(high school and under), $8 for
ECU faculty and staff, and $10
for the public and at the door.
The Joffrey D Dancen will perform in Wright Auditorium Tfc�
day, Nov. 25 for the opening of the Student Union's Theatre Arts






8
JMIEASTCAR O L1N l A N
jjOVEMBER 18. 9M
BLOOM COUNTY
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Continued from page 7
an extended anti-climax, but that
adapter George R. R. Martin and
the script people � all of whom
should have known better � ac-
tually enthusiastically committed
this story to the screen!
Fortunately, this episode has
been the exception and not the
rule. While this year's TV has yet
to produce anything exceptional
like last year's "Paladin of the
lost Hour there have been
some good, solid stories.
The adaptation of Theodore
Sturgeon's "Saucer of
Loneliness a story of a boy
who encounters his father's
childhood "imaginary friend a
predictable but touching
fountain-of-youth story and an
exceptional remake of Rod Serl-
ing's "The After Hours" have all
made for a fairly consistent level
of quality this season.
Perhaps the most exceptional
story, however, has been script
editor Rockne O'Bannon's "The
Storyteller He captured the
charming spirit of those classic,
original "Twilight Zone"
episodes of mountain folk writ-
ten by Earl Hamner, Jr the
same guy who created "The
Walton's Yes, strange but true,
John Boy Walton grew up to
write for the "Twilight Zone
Unfortunately, CBS is putting
"Twilight Zone" on indefinite
hiatus right when the program
was on a roll. I hope I'm wrong,
but I think I know how this stor
will turn out. Sigh. Good night.
Rod. Good night, Griebble
Good night John Boy. You're
now entering the Cancellation
Zone.
C " ft; aABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF PREGNANCY $20? Abortion from 13 10 18 weeks ai additional cost Pregnanc Tesi. Binh Control, and Problem Pregnanc Counseling For further information, call 832-053? (toll free number: 1-800-532 3M) between 9am and J P m weekdays General anesthesia available R A HIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS
irj a p
"Gnmvilk'n Fim Bmttry or over 63 y�n
752-5251
S4HI
815
Dickinson J.
Avenue
jUNIO 0t The Fas( Carolinian
Students Serving Students
CLIFF'S gfy
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washing i Highway N.C 33 Ext � Greenville North Carolina
Phone 752-31 72
(Past RnerbluffApts.)
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
$325
SD Family Owned & Operated
BTWithin Walking Distance From
Girl's Dorm
I ST Baked Fresh Daily
K Pies chocolate lemon apple peach I
French apple sweet potatoe lemon
I custard blueberry coconut custard
-NEWLY REMODELED -
J KT Cakes Carrot spice butternut chocolate
I caramel pineapple rum banana gcrman
CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER
Over 200 Christmas presents
through the month of November
91.3 FM
ECU
�v1
JOIN THE SPIRIT AND CALL
757-6913
When you hear them sleigh bells
ringin' be the right caller
&
WIN
WZMB wishes to thank these area merchants
Sunshine Video, Inc.
TW's Nightlife
Substation II
Spice of Life
Deiner s Bakery
A Cut Above
Hank s Ice Cream
Sheir Hair Design
Apple Records
for making a November Christmas possible
ECU Special Concerts Committee
Hooters
ECU Play House
Campus Pizza and Subs
University Rentals
Fabricate Too
Record Bar
Wrong Way Corrigans
Chinatown Express
Your Local Budweiser Distributor
Marsh's Surf & Sea
NewDeU
Pizza Hut
Grogs
Tequila Bar
Attic
Simply Elegant Caterers
B JOHN SHANNON
�MtMMi
As at any other univr
students at ECL tend to ignore
the region outside their com
munity Their isolation is unfor-
tunate, because often oppor-
tunities for growth and new
penences are as near a- t
down the road
Take, for instance, harrrmlle
Many students know no more
than the name implies, thai
that it's a smail, rural comrr
ty, hardly like. nor culture
other than the "agn sort
Six EC I �-�jdentv
learned better, and for 10 da
November took advantage
people of Farmille'
and sophistication
In the town's historic bu
district, the Fannvilk Con
ty Arts Council has an ok:
theater, the Paramount. aI
has been used off and
Film Recalls
Clory On The Rner. a
story to America written or
waters of its mightier
latest film from Howciee V
and Lucia Perngo an
film on the ECU Trae
ture Film Series Sr
the Student Union I-
mittee. this recollection
Old South will be presr
Hendrix Theatre on Monda
p.m.
This film recalls the G
Age of the r
Mississippi River from
to New Orleans Once An
outpost, her wiiderne- -
centuries ago. the reg
!�er Mississippi became
realm of the Cotton K g
here the vast major
country's millionaires In
plying two-thirds of the �
cotton. Nowhere d
grandeur gleam more
than along the 200-miie course
the rner from Natchez to New
Orleans Here, like a eft over
dream, to a rlamTrfKvn para8f
���e pUImm arrw
Explore anlainieP We
Spanish, the French, and the
British, the Mississippi �a-
a
Mi
;
y' 1
1
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FEELING Li
UNCERTAl
NEED HEI
Why not com by th� REAL Cniii u
10� St; or c�ti 7SIHELP. For Pr CoH
Our Voiurttoort and Staff arc on outy
�� orttor to aaaiat you in rtrtuaHy any pn
Our tongatandtng ooal has arwayt b�
tho quattry of Ma for you and our commj
�"l � Accr4nc I. N�
Wheel Alignment
l$15.
88 with couponv
: 4
�Frol
it
Air Conditioning
Servicing
$17
on
� 88 (Includes 1
Can Freon)
! $
12-
Used Tires
$8.
�Ji
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88
Offer Valid Onlx H
C0GGINS CAI
��, � ,






e Shows
Cancelled
� m w hu ston
Sig d night,
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Daily
pie peach
potatoe lemon
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li banana german
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for all occasions
ER
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:aller
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?a
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THE I AST C AKOUN1AN
9

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D Picture Show' Successful
VAIMBJK .w
B JOHN SHANNON
As at any other university,
�students at ECU tend to ignore
the region outside their com-
munity. Their isolation is unfor-
tunate, because often oppor-
tunities for growth and new ex-
periences are as near as the town
down the road.
Take, for Instance, Farmville.
Manv students know no more
than the name implies; that is,
that it's a small, rural communi-
ty . hardly likely to harbor culture
other than the "agri" sort.
S: ECU students recently
learned better, and for 10 days in
November took advantage of the
people of Farmyille's hospitality
and sophistication.
In the town's historic business
district, the Farrmille Communi-
rts Council has an old movie
;heaier, the Paramount, which
has been used off and on as a
gallery. Until now, most work
housed there has been of the two-
dimensional, hang-on-the-wall
variety.
In an effort to try something
different, the Arts Council con-
tacted ECU'S School of Art. Six
students from the sculpture
department were chosen to do the
exhibit: Robbie Barber, Roger
Alan Core, Merieh Pilkey, Matt
Savino, William Smith and Evan
Stanford. They call their col
laborative effort "3-D Picture
Show
Quite an appropriate title, as it
turns out. From the entrance to
the theater, attention is im-
mediately drawn to the stage,
where six large screens (about 3
feet by 8 feet) stand in front of
nine pieces of sculpture. The
sculptures are brightly lit from
behind, so their shadows are cast
onto the screens. From the
theater seats, only the shadows
can clearly be seen
Film Recalls Mississippi
K�- t f1A.ii: .�
Glory On The River, a love
story to America written on the
waters of its mightiest river, is the
latest film from Howdee Meyers
and 1 ucia Perrigo and is the next
film on the ECU Travel Adven-
ture Film Series. Sponsored bv
the Student Union Travel Com-
mittee, this recollection of the
Old South will be presented at
Hendnx Theatre on Monday at 8
m,
- film recalls the Golden
Age of the history of the
sippi River from Natchez
New Orleans. Once America's
out er wilderness west two
centuries ago, the region of the
lower Mississippi became the
realm of the Cotton Kingdom
where the vast majority of the
country's millionaires lived, sup-
plying two-thirds of the world's
l'ton. Nowhere did the
ndeur gleam more brightlv
along the 200-mile course of
r"?r trom Natchez to New
ans Here, like a left over
am, k a plantation pSfaflfor
Explorel inJKlairaePty Ke
Spanish, the French, and the
-�i-h, the Mississippi was seized
by a fledgling nation and made
American river. On this
riverscape a panorama of settlers,
soldiers, and slaves is painted
against a backdrop of some ol
the finest examples of Southern
architecture.
It all began with a 16mm mo-
tion picture camera in the toe ol
Howard B. Meyers' Christmas
stocking. Now he and his wife,
I ucia Perrigo, are unique in the
travel film business. They com-
bine his experiences as a broad-
caster, her experience as a feature
writer and their knowledge i I
show business to wed storyline to
scene.
Favorites in the Hollywood cir-
cle, their other films include
reviews of Europe and its rulers,
such as "Mad" Ludwig ol
Bav ana and Elizabeth of Austria
Glory On The River was three
vears in the making and reflects a
deep pride in a subject much
closer to home.
Tickets are available from the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Monda'y through'Tridav, a.m.
�"IPm PCterrareTJeero i.CC
students and guest with current
in, and are $3.50 for all others
and at the door
UrMtadVMMj
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not corn, by th� REAL Crisis Intsrvsntlon Csntsr 312 E
10th St; or csll 7M-HELP, For Fros Confidential CounsoHng or A
Our Voluntosrs and Staff srs on duty 24 hrs. s dsy, yar .round
to ordsf to aaaial you In virtually sny probfm srsa you might hsvs'
Our lontsHsHBgfl has ahssys boon to prsssrvs snd srhanca
rha quality of llfs for you and our community
UBjwaaj �� A�w�drtd 8. Th SiaU of North CAroUna
WELCOME
STUDENTS
COUPON SERVICE
SPECIALS
Wheel Alignment
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with coupon)
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88 (Includes l
Can Freon)
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�P l�OU (with coupon)
��
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4-Wheel Computer
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$ I 7 88 (with coupon)
Offer Valid Only With Coupon
COGGINS CAR CARE
GrowcwH, N.C Phono 75S5244
Viewers can walk down to the
stage and examine the works
close up, from hehind the
screens. When they do this, their
own shadows mingle with the
silhouetted sculpture.
"We've tried to do something
that would use the idea of the
place as a movie theater said
Stanford. "That's why we used
the screens
Although the six artists had on-
ly three weeks to complete the in-
stallation from the time they
found out about it, at least two of
them (Stanford and Pilkey) con-
structed their sculptures especial-
ly for "3-D Picture Show The
main concept was the work of all
six heads, however.
"At first we thought it was go-
ing to be in a regular gallery
said Barber. "Then we got here
and saw it was a real theater. We
all got together and brainstorm-
ed there was a lot of tension,
but we solved the problem so we
were all happy in the end, which I
think is kind of rare
The installation is in several
ways analogous to a movie The
flickering, distorted images of the
actors are projected onto the
screen, where they form a two-
dimensional representation of
life. Individual actors, each uni-
que, come together under a uni-
fying scheme, or plot.
Though taken separately the
pieces of sculpture are unique
the exhibit as a whoit
tually unified
The integrity and original;
"3-D Picture Show " attes' �
possibility of consti .
cooperation among individual"
as well as between neighboi
communities Hopefully, the �
cess of this show will
more exchanges like it and pn
mote greater dialogue on matte
of significant culture
The supermarket with
WilirilHMIXI
KM
r THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
TOP
Boneless
Sirloin Steak
DOUBLE
COUPON SAVINGS
F Will Hcnccu i.D rn rr
WE Will REDEEM UP TO FIVE
MANUFACTURERS COUPONS
FOR DOUBLE THEIR VAIUE
UP TO THE RETAIL PRICE
REDEEMED AT ITS F4CE H� ONir
. ��
P�.CES�ECf -MRUSA NOVEMBER.
S. ENTER � SHEEN
WgWtSgWVtTWtWCMTTOLMTI 3 �
GOLDEN RIPE
Chiquita
Bananas
lbs.
LUNCHEON MEAT
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20 Oval
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NO.lOW MANOtf IHSTCX. GRIP
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3 Piece Caf�iRf Set
i Piece Steak Knife Set
Open 24 Hours, Open Mon. 7 A.M Close Sat. 11 P.M Open Sunday 7 A M,11 p.m.
703 Greenville Boulevard
i
mmmmmfe;





t Shows
incelled
all occasions
X T R
I m I
pr
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7

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3-D Picture Show'Successful Collaborator
B JOHN MIWNOS
I C I tend to ignore
outside theii com
: ' iso i is unfoi
oppoi
- owth and now ex
I
ance, I a; m ille
dents know no m
a ne implies, that is.
'mm urn
v likeh � hoi cull
son
entl
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k advantage ol
pi tail t

IH'ss
he Fa nn
W movie

Sa r : now. most u, .
housed there has I
dimension
In
� ferent, the
E I 's �
students from the sculpi
depai tmeni were chosi
tbil Rohhie Ba R, .
Man -ore, Merieh Pi Ma
Savino, William Smitl
Stanford I he call theii c�
"3-D Pi '
�A
� ' From tl e
theate i lention is
�diateh
whei � i
stand
heh
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lew talk down l
u- the uorks
ehind the
� �� with the
some
: i oi the
atei said
h we used
IX ill I ISl s
hai
MIC Hi
lation � � �
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'hem � mu pjjk(
structed �hen sculptures
"3 I) Picture Sh m I he
y "all
i heads, h( iw o ei
A ' tgl vas g
ii' .i regulai .
said Bai �� hen w
and sau n vds a rcaj theatei
all got togethei and brains;
ed a 1.
� �
ensmii.
but ve solved
ev
think i� .
install �
ua � � .
flickering, JisMrred in ag
i tors are pi
-�en, where they 1
dimensional repr-
lite Individual
que. come together under a
fying schen �
Though taken sep i i
Film Recalls Mississippi
Xrl
Ri
-
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'

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To n"da v 11
T fpi: ftc) ! � B i n
� -
n the d
��� "wr . Jr� ��� �
5 � r'v ,t.
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
�u neED HELP?
not coma by tha REAL CrlaJa Intarvantkm Canta. 312 E
� St; or call 7S�-HELP. For Fraa Confidential CounaaWIno or Aa
Itarw-
oiuntaar� and Staff ara on duty 24 hra. a day yaar around
' to aaaial you In virtually any probam araa vou might hava
oftg�tanding goal has always baan to pniwy and a-hanca
ta quality of Ufa for you and our community
.Kn�3 And Accr�jti� B- ts, Sl�t� o North Lowni
WELCOME
STUDENTS
OUPON SERVICE
SPECIALS
Alignment
$15.
: 4 Wheel Drum or
� Front Disc Reline
88 with coupon)
Conditioning
Tvicing
I ,hh (Includes 1
Can Freon)
I Z� Used Tires
$0.88
i$59.
88 (with coupon)
I Lubrication
: OH Filter, Oil Change
a -�
! $12.88
(with coupon)
4 Wheel Computer
Balance and Rotate
� II � 88 (with coupon
Offer I alid Only Withoupon
COGGINSCAR CARE
N.C W�na 754-5244
i he supermarket with
iViiinii
IN TRIM GRAIN FED b
TOP
Boneless
Sirloin Steak
ODUBLt.
COUPON SAVING
4
A
MAHUfACTURtRS COu- .
fORDOuBlf t - ,i
UPrOTHfRf- �-
- . .
5 i
lb.
REGULAR OR BUTTER
Crisco
'Shortening
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour
Treet
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can
Free Turkey
20 Oval
Meat Platter
hOv LOW MAMOtf P�ST(
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Knife Set
FREETURKEY
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6 Piece Steak Unite Se!
IMI' , isf WITH AN AODi
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3UWCHAst A' I vtRVDAY I OW PRll t
Open 24 Hours. Open Mon 7 A.M Close Sat. 11 P.M Open Sunday 7 A M 11 P M
703 Greenville Boulevard





IHI t s I i Hi H INIAN
Sports
Pirates
S( 1 MM N �
�r
onlinued
Bucs Down Bearcats
In Final Home Game
HI iOU.h Art U I JUNO JORDAN Ih.PMol.b
k.aim O! (He season for the Bucs �ho are currenth 2-8.
The Pirates are nine days (Nov. 27, Thanksgiv-
ing I)a) ana from an Orange Boh I meeting
with No. 1 ranked Miami, Fla. The game, which
Hill be aired national!) on VVTBS, could hae a
direct bearing on this year's national champion-
ship.
Bv IIM HANDI FK
XVOIK OOPER
Np.TC. Wnir
" I his was ob iously our best
overall performance oi the
easi said ECU Football
coach Am Bakei aftei the Pirates
soundly defeated c incinnati
32 W in their final home Ap
p ,iiu e ' his season
I game, played in adverse
weathei conditions, went the way
of the Pirates all day long ECU
fumbled the ball six nines during
the course of the game but
� � p up all of the
loose hails.
1 he first break ol the day tor
E i with 1 3 22 left to play
in the lust quartet The Bearcats
had taken the opening kickofl
ere driving in Pirate ter
hen senioi Reggie 1 aylot
oughed the ball . �� EC!
� inson Smith pick
up th ball fot the
ites
1 l blood in the
11 d dt ive, which
was cap
nan illie I ewis
's PA1 gave E I
I � e w as set up
I i I defense held on a
�tie play at their own
s yard line
x play he ti ichdown
Bullets
Shoot Down
Pirates
Hv SPORTS SI AH
Brisba
d ii c se
hi
hibition basket
- � . ' in Minges
i B illei -
g 12
id
L'NC-Cha
tie
EC1
2" poii
-
.
ts as a
a
lt g n Ba
nts
lid grab a ga
ites
u m a long way
'
�P ECl
Han iid "We're
a bettet team than this He
e consistant.
not let little humps
iffect as hke
P ' .�: their
i - n Sat No 2v against
g Ed boro I !niversit .
Senior forward Man hell Henry g
high 27 points in the Pirates
Brisbane Bullets.
oes up for two of his team
exhibition game with the
drive for ECU was a pass comple
tion from harlie 1 ibretto to
Matt Mel aughlm on a fourth-
and four from the Cincinnati
21 yard line.
The Pirates added three more
points to their first half with 11
remaining in the second quarter
when Berleth split the uprights
with a 35-yard attempt
The Pirates wasted little time
padding their lead in the third
quarter when they went on an
eight play, 64-yard drive which
concluded on a one-yard plunge
hv freshman Brian McPhattei
A kev plav of the drive came
on a second-and-five play at the
Bearcat 45. The once consei
vative Pirate offense threw a
wrinkle at Cincinnati when coach
Baker inserted back-up quarter-
hack Fodd Abrams at the slot
position. Abrams took a pitch
from 1 ibretto and lotted a
37 vard pass to Walter Wilson,
setting up a first and goal
ECU at the eight-yard line
Baker felt that the kev to the
game was the opening drive ol
the second half.
"V ithout a doubt, the key
our winning the football game
was our opening drive o! the se
cond half an elated Baker said
"This
v iously
overall perfor-
mance of the
season M
�Art Baker
"We have played out � �
hall in the third quart
and we stressed to our players at
half time oi the imp
getting oi to a good start in the
third quartet Ve took it right
down the field to lead 17-0
Down 17-0, the Bearcats tried
to rails behind junior quartet
hack Damn McCoin Mc
easily directed the Cincinnati
tense downficld to the P
five vard line before the Cl
defense stiffened. Mc oin
threw three consecutive
completions which brought
placekicker Phil Insalaco t
tempt a 22 yai : field goal
Following a high snap to holder
and back-up quarterback Billy
Davis, the Bearcats were forced
to try a pass for a touchdown
However, the pass fell harmless!)
to the ground as ECU took over
After holding the Pirates,
Cicinnati took possession on
their own 46-yard line. This time
McCoin needed just five plavs to
go 54 yards for the score. The big
plav oi the drive was a 22-yard
toss to lav lor. Taylor later cap-
ped the drive with a nine-vard run
up the middle. However, Mike
Donohue busted through the
middle oi the line to block the
PAT, leaving the score at 17-6
See PIRATES, page 11
.
B'
The defensive unit Essray raiiaferro (35), Gary 1 ondon i - and John
Williamson iHni prepare to crunchincinnati quarterback Dannv M.
om in 1I 32- l(J win
Lady Swimmers Crush
League Rival Indians
Bv Hl( K M, OHM At
m- -
- �
S 1
E C U. 3
i
!

ECl
"1 as: yeat the
s � behind us in the conference
hem '

by K
Junior Anthun
line to score the P
the game
Rock the I
fellas froi

w�-



K be -v as
Tafl
to finish first CAA a
placing se,
"Last � i at �
was a surpi
sa:d '� l his
both Richmond and V &
Mary we are
and lo � .
Madison for the conference
p
� - �
Seniors Share Memories Of Football
BvAROLYN JUSTICI
arr h � U'dliam Jennette,
I David Plum all have man
gs in .ommon � thev're all
� who help make up ECU's
nse
her, they've been
gh mans ups ami downs
i ise the are all five-year
rs who were red shirted in
'K2 freshman vear
a . three, some of their best
nemories came from the 19
n David Plum plaved his
�'llegiate game in 1983
� unst Honda State while Larry
Berry remembers the 1983 N (
State game which E U won in
'he final seconds William Jen-
- likes to remember the entire
Sports Fact
lues. No. 18. 1954
The New York Yankees andl
BaJtimore Orioles engage in anl
18-player trade, the largest
swap in major league historv
One of the new Yankees is Don I
I arsen. who will pitch the only
perfect game in World Seriesj
historv two vears later
ISOn which was a great vear foi
Pi rates
nh E I 's upcoming game
with Miami. Jennette remembers
a funny moment that happened
in their W meeting. "As we lin
ed up. I told the center, who had
a good tan, that my tan was bet
ter than his I was serious, trying
to be tough. He started laughing
and for the rest of the game 1
wanted to laugh everv time I
looked at him
A highlight of Plum's careei
was an interception against Tern
pie in 1984 Plum isn't sure what
he'll remember more, the in
terception, or the fact that he was
tackled on the one-yard line w hen
he ran it back
Berrv an laugh as he looks
back at an embarassing moment
in practue his freshman vear "1
was moved from tunning back
which I plaved in high school to
linebacker I was trving to act like
I knew what I was doing in this
position Berrv said. "I got off
to a bad start hv lining up in a
three point stance which should
have been a two-point stance
Everyone, including the coaches,
laughed because I looked reallv
rediculous "
Berr, a C riminal Justice ma-
jor has learned that toothall takes
a lot oi discipline as well as a lot
Of hard work He was inspired by
a high school friend to plav col-
lege football
"He told me that 1 should plav
because I had the abilitv and it
would help me later in life
Beirv remembered
One thing Berrv has gotten out
of football at ECU is a special
friendship with former Pirate
1 onv Baket. who now plavs for
the Cleveland Browns. "Tony-
was mv roommate tor four vears
and he is mv best friend in the
world fie said "I've learned a
lot from him and would like to he
like him
Berry's last vear of football
hasn't been exactly what he ex-
pected it to he Plaqued hv in-
juries, Berrv has missed five
games and hopes now that he can
do his best to help the team end
the season on a good note.
Jennette, also a Criminal
Justice major, said he learned a
lot from losing "Fven though it
doesn't (eel too good. I've learn-
ed a lot he said "It makes me
want to be a success outside o
football "
The defensive tackle has learn
ed patience which is necessary
with his coaches and authority
figures. The Belhaven native
thinks a lot of ECU's program.
"I've made a lot oi friends and
this team has some of the best
athletes and talent in the
county
Defensive tackle Plum was in-
spired to play football hv his
father who played college and
professional football.
He said through his years at
ECU that he and his team have
learned how to stick together.
The Industrial Technology maior
wants good things to happen for
the team � this includes
achievements for teammates as
well as himself. Before the season
ends. Plum wants to see reciever
Tony Smith score a touchdown
After graduation, Plum
doesn't know what the future
holds for him, but football has
prepared him for almost
anything.
These three seniors all agree
that football has prepared them
for life in various uavs. And no
matter where they go in life, the
will always remember their vears
as ECU Pirates
A w
1U
Senior defensive personnel William JenntttWrV �.� L"
N
I � �
Sat De.
Pint





H
THE EAST I'AROI INIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 18. 1986 Pa�e 10
Bucs Down Bearcats
In Final Home Game
game of the season for the Bucs who arVeurrenth 2 '
The Pirates are nine days (Nov. 27, Thanksgiv-
ing Day) away from an Orange Bowl meeting
with No. 1 ranked Miami, Fla. The game, which
will be aired nationally on WTBS, could have a
direct bearing on this year's national champion-
ship.
Bullets
Shoot Down
Pirates
By SPORTS STAFF
GmNNi
Australia's Brisbane Bullets
came from behind in the se-
cond half to defeat ECU 81-72
in an exhibition basketball
game Thursday night in Minges
Coliseum.
Former collegiate star Leroy
Loggins paced the Bullets with
32 points, hitting 12 of 15 field
goals in the second half to br-
ing the visitors back. Former
UNC-Charlotte standout
Emory Atkinson added 28 for
Brisbane.
ECU was led by Marchell
Henry's 27 point effort while
"Blue" Edwards poured in 14.
Harold Brown added eight
points as William Grady chip-
ped in a half dozen.
Although Leon Bass only
contributed five points offen-
sively, he did grab a game high
15 rebounds to help the Pirates.
"We've still got a long way
to go to put it together and
polish it up ECU coach
Charlie Harrison said. "We're
a better team than this. We
have got to be more consistant.
We have to not let little bumps
and blocked shots affect us like
we did
The Pirates will open their
season on Sat Nov. 29 against
visiting Edinboro University.
By TIM CHANDLER
& SCOTT COOPER
Sort,Wrtln
"This was obviously our best
overall performance of the
season said ECU football
coach Art Baker after the Pirates
soundly defeated Cincinnati
32-19 in their final home ap-
pearance this season.
The game, played in adverse
weather conditions, went the way
of the Pirates all day long. ECU
fumbled the ball six times during
the course of the game but
managed to scoop up all of the
loose balls.
The first break of the day for
ECU came with 13:22 left to play
in the first quarter. The Bearcats
had taken the opening kickoff
and were driving in Pirate ter-
ritory when senior Reggie Taylor
coughed the ball up at the ECU
32-yard line. Vinson Smith pick-
ed up the loose ball for the
Pirates.
ECU drew first blood in the
game with a 62-yard drive, which
was capped off with a one-yard
run by freshman Willie Lewis.
Chuck Berleth's PAT gave ECU
a 7-0 lead. The drive was set up
when the ECU defense held on a
fourth-and-one play at their own
38-yard line.
A key play on the touchdown
; t HUMBERT
� T� Photo Lab
drive for ECU was a pass comple-
tion from Charlie Libretto to
Matt McLaughlin on a fourth-
and-four from the Cincinnati
21-yard line.
The Pirates added three more
points to their first half with :11
remaining in the second quarter
when Berleth split the uprights
with a 35-yard attempt.
The Pirates wasted little time
padding their lead in the third
quarter when they went on an
eight-play, 64-yard drive which
concluded on a one-yard plunge
by freshman Brian McPhatter.
A key play of the drive came
on a second-and-five play at the
Bearcat 45. The once conser-
vative Pirate offense threw a
wrinkle at Cincinnati when coach
Baker inserted back-up quarter-
back Todd Abrams at the slot
position. Abrams took a pitch
from Libretto and lofted a
37-yard pass to Walter Wilson,
setting up a first-and-goal for
ECU at the eight-yard line.
Baker felt that the key to the
game was the opening drive of
the second haJf.
"Without a doubt, the key to
our winning the football game
was our opening drive of the sc-
cond half an elated Baker said.
"This was ob-
viously our best
overall perfor-
mance of the
season M
JON D JOftOAN � Th� PK t �b
The defensive unit Essray Tali.ferro (35), Gary London (7) and John
Williamson (86) prepare to crunch Cincinnati quarterback Dannv Mc-
t oin in ECU s 32-19 win.
Lady Swimmers Crush
League Rival Indians
By RICK McCORMAC
� Art Baker
A ttkttl mA
l
Senior forward Marchell Henry goes up for two of his team-
hign 27 points in the Pirates exhibition game with the
Brisbane Bullets.
"We have played our worst foot-
ball in the third quarter this year
and we stressed to our players at
halftime of the importance of
getting off to a good start in the
third quarter. We took it right
down the field to lead 17-0
Down 17-0, the Bearcats tried
to rally behind junior quarter-
back Danny McCoin. McCoin
easily directed the Cincinnati of-
fense downfield to the Pirate
five-yard line before the ECU
defense stiffened. McCoin then
threw three consecutive in-
completions which brought on
placekicker Phil Insalaco to at-
tempt a 22-yard field goal.
Following a high snap to holder
and back-up quarterback Billy
Davis, the Bearcats were forced
to try a pass for a touchdown.
However, the pass fell harmlessly
to the ground as ECU took over.
After holding the Pirates,
Cicinnati took possession on
their own 46-yard line. This time
McCoin needed just five plays to
go 54 yards for the score. The big
play of the drive was a 22-yard
toss to Taylor. Taylor later cap-
ped the drive with a nine-yard run
up the middle. However, Mike
Donohue busted through the
middle of the line to block the
PAT, leaving the score at 17-6.
See PIRATES, page 11
Seniors Share Memories Of Football
Freshman Robin Wicks won
both the 200-meter and 100-meter
butterfly to lead the Lady Pirate
Swim team to an easy 145-10'
win over league rival William &
Mary Friday.
ECU, 3-0 overall and 2-0 in the
Colonial Athletic Association,
dominated the dual meet winning
15 of the 16 events.
"It was an incredible meet
ECU coach Rick Kobe said
"Last year they finished third,
right behind us in the conference,
but we totally dominated them
Wicks, who was named
outstanding swimmer of the meet
by Kobe, won the 200 butterflv in
a time of 2:13.03 and the 100 but-
terfly in a time of 1:02.69. She
also teamed with Caycee Poust,
Ryan Philyaw and Patti Walsh
for a time of 1:56.00 on the winn-
ing 200-meter medley relay team.
Poust also enjoyed a good day
for the Lady Pirates winning the
100-meter backstroke and
finishing second in both the
200-meter backstroke and
200-meter medley.
Kobe was pleased with the en-
tire team's performance. He also
praised assistant coach John
Taffe for the job he has done
with the women, who are hoping
to finish first in the CAA after
placing second last season.
"Last year finishing second
was a surprise for us Kobe
said. "This year after beating
both Richmond and William &
Mary, we are solidly in second
and looking to get past James
Madison for the conference
championship
The next meet for the Pirate
swimmers will be on Sat Has
22 when both the men and
women will host UNC-Charlotte
in Minges Natatonum. The meet
will get underway at 2:00 p.m.
Ml 14" Willi,m4 Mao HT
200-Mcdies Rela ECl (Poust. Phihaw
W:ckv Wahhi ! 56.00, WM � ;4
1000 Free Pam Wiihar.n- F . ' 4 4
VaJlere fWM) 10 51 I. Scoua Miller
(ECU) 11 08 24
200 Free Jennifer Dolan (ECU) 1 59 11
Burke (WM) I 59 2.V Par Olsen (FCU)
2:00.0. � -
100 Back Caycee Poust (ECU) 1
Alleva (WM) 103.1. Ginger
(ECU) I 06 9
100 Breast Susie Wcntmk (ECl
Ryan Philyaw (ECU) 1:11.3
fWM) 1 23 9
200 Fh Robin Wicks (ECU) ;
A. C
14 3. Susan Augustus
Johnson (WM)
(ECU) 2:18 1
50 Free Part; Waish (ECU) 2i
BrunsaJd (WM, , Tammie Childe-
(ECU) 26 6
Meter Diving Shern Campbell (ECU)
n, Rene Seach (ECU) 10 Becks
Kerber (ECU) 105
100 Free: Patti Walsh (ECU 56 9, Shushe
(WM) 5" 2. Tammie Childerv (ECU) 57 '
100 Free. Walsh (ECU) 6 M, Hughes
(WM) r? 22. Childers (ECl) 57 M
200 Back Burhe (WM) 2 P9 Cas �
Poust (ECU) 2 14 9. Ailevea WM.
2:P 2
200 Breas: Ran PhiKa (ECU) 5 20 0
Valiere (WM) 5 24 9. Burke, WM J J2 J
500 Free: Olson (ECL) 5 20 ,). Valley
(WM) 5:24 99
100 Butterfly: W,cks (ECU) 102 6. Susan
Augustus (ECU) 103 2. Shushe (WM)
103 8
3-Meter Diving Rene Seach 110
200 Indmdual Medley Wilson
2 16 2. (acee Poust (ECU)
Robin Wicks (ECU) 2 20 2
400 Free Relay ECU (Wtlbanks.
Philyaw, ChiJders) 3:32.4. W'M
(ECU)
2.18 4,
Dolan.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
�jmaiiMhv
Larry Berry, William Jennette,
and David Plum all have many
things in common � they're all
seniors who help make up ECU's
defense.
Together, they've been
through many ups and downs
because they are all five-year
seniors who were red shirted in
their 1982 freshman year.
For all three, some of their best
memories came from the 1983
season. David Plum played his
first collegiate game in 1983
against Florida State while Larry
Berry remembers the 1983 N.C.
State game which ECU won in
the final seconds. William Jen-
nette likes to remember the entire
Sports Fact
Tues. Nov. IS, 1954
The New York Yankees andj
Baltimore Orioles engage in an
18-player trade, the largest!
swap in major league history
One of the new Yankees is Don
Larsen, who will pitch the only
perfect game in World Series
history two years later.
season which was a great year for
the Pirates.
With ECU's upcoming game
with Miami, Jennette remembers
a funny moment that happened
in their 1985 meeting. "As we lin-
ed up, I told the center, who had
a good tan, that my tan was bet-
ter than his. I was serious, trying
to be tough. He started laughing
and for the rest of the game I
wanted to laugh every time I
looked at him
A highlight of Plum's career
was an interception against Tem-
ple in 1984. Plum isn't sure what
he'll remember more, the in-
terception, or the fact that he was
tackled on the one-yard line when
he ran it back.
Berry can laugh as he looks
back at an embarassing moment
in practice his freshman year. "I
was moved from running back
which I played in high school to
linebacker. I was trying to act like
I knew what I was doing in this
position Berry said. "I got off
to a bad start by lining up in a
three-point stance which should
have been a two-point stance.
Everyone, including the coaches,
laughed because I looked really
rediculous
Berry, a Criminal Justice ma-
jor has learned that football takes
a lot of discipline as well as a lot
of hard work. He was inspired by
a high school friend to play col-
lege football.
"He told me that 1 should play
because I had the ability and it
would help me later in life
Berry remembered.
One thing Berry has gotten out
of football at ECU is a special
friendship with former Pirate
Tony Baker, who now plays for
the Cleveland Browns. "Tony
was my roommate for four years
and he is my best friend in the
world he said. "I've learned a
lot from him and would like to be
like him
Berry's last year of football
hasn't been exactly what he ex-
pected it to be. Plaqued by in-
juries, Berry has missed five
games and hopes now that he can
do his best to help the team end
the season on a good note.
Jennette, also a Criminal
Justice major, said he learned a
lot from losing. "Even though it
doesn't feel too good, I've learn-
ed a lot he said. "It makes me
want to be a success outside of
football
The defensive tackle has learn-
ed patience which is necessary
with his coaches and authority
figures. The Belhaven native
thinks a lot of ECU's program.
"I've made a lot of friends and
this team has some of the best
athletes and talent in the
county
Defensive tackle Plum was in-
spired to play football by his
father who played college and
professional football.
He said through his years at
ECU that he and his team have
learned how to stick together.
The Industrial Technology major
wants good things to happen for
the team � this includes
achievements for teammates as
well as himself. Before the season
ends, Plum wants to see reciever
Tony Smith score a touchdown.
After graduation, Plum
doesn't know what the future
holds for him, but football has
prepared him for almost
anything.
These three seniors all agree
that football has prepared them
for life in various ways. And no
matter where they go in life, they
will always remember their years
as ECU Pirates.
die) aad Urry Berry (right) after . toiSc.
�� MMPPM �v � � Mi
Pirates
Continued from par II
The Pirates retaliated
their potent ground :?ier
Tim James gase ECl fa
field position as he returned
kickoff 2" sard- to midfield
Behind the running ol
Anthons S:mpn and fr
Lewis and McPha!er
netted 42 rushing
six-plav dme a M -
scored on a four
with 1:03 left in the tl
Berleth's third PAT gave 1
commanding 24 6 advanuuj
The Bear.r af-
oul firing as 'he rjj
in eight plav- The
plav of the drive a
enough for a
touchdown run b I
cinnati's attempt for a two-poi

w
Junior Anthony Mmpx.n 311 buN
line to score the Pirate rwo-poiai
the game.
Rock the Hi
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Pirates Down Bearcats 32-19
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER IS. 1986
11
Continued from page 11
The Pirates retaliated with
their potent ground attack after
Tim James gave ECU favorable
field position as he returned the
kickoff 27 yards to midfield.
Behind the running of junior
Anthony Simpson and freshmen
L ewis and McPhatter, the Pirates
netted 42 rushing yards on the
six-play drive as McPhatter
scored on a four-yard scamper
with 1:03 left in the third period.
Berleth's third PAT gave ECU a
commanding 24-6 advantage.
The Bearcat aerial attack came
out firing as they drove 83 yards
in eight plays. The only running
play of the drive was good
enough for a two-yard
touchdown run by Taylor. Cin-
cinnati's attempt for a two-point
conversion was no good, leaving
I,???" behmd 24"12 Wlfh
13:47 left to play.
The Pirates were unable to take
advantage of Wilson's 45-yard
kickoff return as Berleth missed
his first field goal in nine tries
this one from 34 yards out.
After the Bearcats regained
possession. McCoin completed
three-of-four passes. However
the latter resulted in Taylor's se-
cond fumble of the day. Senior
Roswell Streeter recovered the
miscue at the Bearcat 48.
The Pirates were unsuccessful
m trying to move the football
partly due to a holding penalty
Punter Craig I osito had his punt
blocked for the first time this
season, giving the Bearcats
possession at the Pirate 33-yard
line.
Cincinnati then methodically
moved down and scored on a
two-yard run by Taylor. The
PAT closed the gap to 24-19 with
4:11 remaining.
McLaughlin recovered an at-
tempted onside kick by Cincin-
nati, giving the Pirates posession
at the Bearcat 44.
Cincinnati coach Dave Currey
explained why the Bearcats at-
tempted the onside kick with four
minutes and three timeouts re-
maining.
"We felt like they had been
moving the ball effectively he
said. "We wanted to see if we
could come up with a big play.
We thought we'd score, go with
an onsides kick and that would
give us another chance to score.
But it just wasn't our dayit
wasn't meant to be
The Pirates put the game on ice
as they drove 44 yards in six plays
with Lewis, who rushed for 85
yards on 15 carries, scoring his
second touchdown of the game.
The score came on a 10-yard run
with only 2:34 left. Simpson, who
led the Bucs in rushing with 88
yards on 18 carries, ran up the
middle for the two-point conver-
sion.
"You can't say enough about
the continued effort we get from
Anthony Simpson each week.
He's such a workhorse for us
Baker said. "We had confidence
in our offensive line because they
controlled the line of scrimmage
throughout most of the game
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����1





'
12
JHIEASTCARpL IN1A N
NOVEMBER 18, IVHr-
E R S O N A L
ECU STUDENTS. On Nov. 12 the
President of a certain fraternity sub
mitted a Personal Classified Ad
soliciting a homosexual partner for
Mr. Berry Oliver. Unfortunately,
this joke classified slipped through
our verification process unnoticed
and was subsequently published
The truth is, Mr. Oliver is not gay
He is, however, an understanding in
dividual who would like to set th�
record straight. Our apologies go out
to Mr. Oliver.
For the record: if any individual
or organization places another such
ad, that person or persons will be
denied the privilege of advertising
(classified or display) in The East
Carolinian for a time not to exceed
one year. The Editor.
RANDY, SUE, FRANK, CINDY
KELLY, JIM, NANCY, BANG AND
LINDA: Let's meet at 9 30 in "The
Lot" before the Savatage concert at
the Attic on Thursday.
SIG EPS: The flowers were
beautiful, the party first rate But
you guys are what really made it
great It was a blast from beginning
to end Coulda danced all night, We
won't pretend! To party again soon.
we surely will try Love, the Sisters
of Alpha Delta Pi.
ATTENTION ALL ECU
STUDENTS: Come party with Beta
Theta Pi, Wed , Nov 19th at the
TAVERN Starts around 9 with 50
draft
SORORITY WOMEN: OX men for
sale Wednesday 8 p m See our other
ad Amanda Weatherspoon this
pledge wants to be sold, so get some
money
FOR RENT: Semi private room
with kitchen privileges for 2 females
or 2 males, $90month, or private
room with kitchen privileges,
$145month. Good constructive
students 758 2201.
KATHY JOHNSON: Happy An
niversary! From the one at USC
who thinks you are a special lady1
Lane
LOST: Late October Small (301b.)
female dog, short, straight black
hair except browns around forearms
and calves Distinguishing white
area on nose and chest. Reward of
fered for information 757 36�
SHARON PHILLIPS: You are cor
dially invited to dinner you know
where with you know who as long as
I can get outof my seatbelt RSVP
THE OX IS BACK: Congratulations
Steve Layman, President and all in
ducted officers of Theta Chi Frater
nity. Rev.
LAMBDA CHI: The party was the
Lambda Burn. Our dates were to
take their embarrassing turn It was
Apt number l for cocktails we did
meet Some of us passed out, others
were seen on the "seat The burns
were fun, the dance was alive We
stayed up and partied until around
five. Chip, johnny a, Berme. we
most definately had a blast. Let's
party some more cause Lambda
Chi's and AZD's can last! Love,
Kathy, Suzanne &. Debbie PS Some
last longer than others!
TO ALL THE FANTASTIC AOTT
DATES: Get psyched for
Roseball. if will be a blast!
KATHY JOHNSON Hello
sweetheart! Hope you had a good
weekend. I thought about you! I
have something for you in the
library. Go back to your room and
you'll find out where! Keep wat
ching! (Smile)
L.F You are loved K S
I CAN'T BELIEVE THIS The"Jef-
frey ll Dancers are coming to
Wright Auditorium on Tuesday,
Nov 25 at8 15 p m. They are partof
the most incredible ballet in the
world the Joffrey Ballet from New
York City And get this tickets are
only So for students at the Central
Ticket Office See you at the ballet
SALE
ATTENTION ALL ECU
STUDENTS: Come party with Delta
Zeta and Beta Theta Pi. Wed , Nov
19th at the TAVERN. Starts around 9
with 50c draff special
AOTT, AZD, CHI O, TRI SIG, DZ,
ALPHA PHI, ADTT, & ZTA: Tomor
row at8 p.m. is the time Biology 103
is the place for prizes, refreshments
and OX men on stage Wear your let
ters to win the prizes.
PHI TAU BROTHERS, LITTLE
SISTERS AND PLEDGES: Don't
forget our Happy Hour is tonight at
the Elbo at 9
TONIGHT: Happy Hour at the Elbo
Bag studying and come on down and
try to drink your face off 9 until
STACEY H Thanks for the Incredl
bie weekend at Va Beach i love
you! Scott
TUXEDO RENTALS: Chi Omega
and AOTT dates please contact Jon
Reibel for your complete formal
wear needs 757 0351
TUXEDOS: Anyone needing formal
wear this tall for any occassion
please contact Jon Reibel at
757 0351
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB: Lad.es
nite Tuesday night at the Tequila
Bar from 9 p.m til l am
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB: There
will be a meeting on Thurs . Nov
20th at 4 p m in Mendenhall.
Christmas party will be discussed!
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message.
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS
ING: Experienced secretary wlBM
computer and letter quality printer
can fulfill all your typing and
secretarial needs Theses, business
letters, resumes and mailing labels
Call Donna at 355 6434
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE: An
nounces the opening of a new club in
addition to its regular club. Because
of the large response from PROFES
SIONAL SINGLES we will have a
separate club for those people in
terested in meeting other profes
sionals Call 355 7595 or write to P O
Box 8003. Greenville, NC 27835
DEAR ADPI'S: Thanks for making
the Ronald McDonald
House Leukemia fund raiser a huge
success! We had fun, and raised
funds. Thanks again and good luck
to you all going into finals Love, The
Kappa Sigs
RUM RUNNER DIVE SHOP: Scuba
Diving Trip Jan 5th 10th In Key
Largo. Florida Call 758 1444
ALL TYPING NEEDS: Lowest
rates on campus include pro
ofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections Over 10 years
experience Call 7570398 and leave
message or call after 5 15 p m
TYPING SERVICE. If you have
papers reports, etc that need to be
'yped 758 8934 between 5 30 ana
9 30 p m Very reasonable rates
501: THEY SAY GOOD THINGS
COME TO THOSE WHO WAIT. I
GUESS THAT'S WHY I HAD THE
BEST DATE WE PARTIED HARD
AND STAYED UP LATE. UNTIL
THE NEXT TIME. I JUST CAN'T
WAIT XOXOXO LOVE ALWAYS.
P S YOU'RE THE BEST' LOVE
YA! 105
Ihe Off.ce of student rin.ncial A.d ish� to rem.nd ail students �ho have
received thenollege Work Stud) � WS) awards � I � obtained -her
Hmng uthonzatioti Form � WS-2) io J These forms ma he secured
the IinanaaJ aid office. There are still numerous C Ws ,obs available to elijuble
( W S students EhgiWeWS students are those who have been offered WSas a
part ortheir financial aid package Students who have applied bu: have not been
notified of their award should he aware that the financial aid office is continuing
IO process applications and make awards to eligible students Due to the annlua
lion processing backlog, the Off.ce ol Student Financial Aid is dosed to .he
public during certain hours each dav Students requiring aance are requested
10 refer to 'he schedule below wh.ch indicates (he hours the office is open to the
public
Mondm, Uednesdnv, Fndav 1-5 P.m. Tmnimy, Ihursd-v 8-12 �.m
RACK ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10
OFF
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except Aigner, Nike and Reebok)
, ,
Thrr pi in as tht kpmud 9�r � ,mr HUn� r. iMi,r-I its pr�er.ur.
fcf niUrgr frrshrrrr. s.ph�nrr in uins Wmmkl surt
reruns MX Jim likt iht n�-n m rhr : hjv. vjh! ik - ruv �in
jrrai ntv-mugi-s likr
� rjrrurtg 111�11 rr� Kitti dunrni it �
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tiHildoimpkit-mr his trainmi:
iliinnc rn i sn ff-K sumnwr
srs.su ms ind nrn mufrjun 11200
during rai h srsn m
� lunpfscarr nrr (tur $-Huur
ing mr Im wrri summrr vs,sh
t � .1.1-n
� s, i r jjhI fft&atr , 1 h, cimmssauned 4mO0t g flfc t-f
I JI�ULlU I JiSs h-i IKT4ITI
� V hi i j ukr irtT i mIuii frm; k-m
� iri ilKnnusMiititii ii padUMm
If you f Kikinti. nun ,ip.ju�kr !��� inu.au Minrx i
i limmLssfcMiini: prurims
. rns
knu
Wknttqmove
upqukkly?
ttartnfl nuxini;
man dun M ��
See Capt. Cariker Oct. 21-23 at the
Wright Building or call 1-800-722-6715.
HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER:
211 Adams Blvd. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths
on large wooded lot with end of
street privacy, $6,000 down and
assume v'j percent FHA loan with p
and I payments of $47 93 Call
752 2334 after 5.
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER OATINO SERVICE: Can
help you find that someone special
with whom to spend the holidays
Whether you want a serious reia
tionahip or just to meet many new
friends we can help Everything con
fidential and all referrals personally
given 355 7595
FOR SALE: Tappan Microwave
oven. Full size, NEW. Moving, must
sell. $175. 757 3408. 752 4973
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
To share a furnished 2 bedroom ap,
$135month and ' utilities Located
on 10th St Call 75t 904t
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301.
WANTED
COLLEGE REP WANTED To
distribute "Student Rate" subscrip
tion cards at this campus Good in
come For information and appiica
tion write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glen
wood Dr. Mooresvilie. NC 28115
704 664 4063
INTRO. TO LOGIC TUTOR NEED
EO IMMEDIATELY Call Bo,f?rte
at 752 1112
TYPING: Low rates. Proofreading,
grammatical corrections 10 years
experience 757 0398 after 6 p.m
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDENTS:
Part time work available in your
field. Call 758 2300 or stop by Larry's
Carpetland, 3010 E 10th St and fill
out application.
20 TOP HITS: LP's, cassettes, or
compact disds are yours for only 50
cents each. Buy one at regular price
and receive additional selection for
only fifty cents. Rock Pop Soul
Country Jan. if its sold in a record
store, we have it too! You can save
up to $200 or more! Satisfaction
guaranteed or money back! Order
now send only $10 for each Super
Discount 20 Coupon Booklet to:
Down East Marketing, PO Box 190.
Ayden, NC 28513
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
For the perfect duplex on 14th St
Only $140 a month plus 'a utilities
Call Susan 758 4231.
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS:
Need 1 or 2 female roommates for
Dec 1 and next semester! Great
location, across from downtown!
Practically on campus! All new
paint and carpet. Call 752 9245 Keep
trying
TYPING: Done on a work processor
with letter quality printer. Years of
experience typing for students and
many more years of secretarial ex
perience that can fulfill all your
secretarial needs 50,000 word die
tionary and thesaurus, and profes
sional proofing tor grammatical er-
rors Low student prices, call Debbie
at 355 7595
WANTED: School representative
for collegiate sporting company
Great pay. Call collect
1 813 346 2009
COLLEGE STUDENTS: Interested
m earning a free Spring Break in the
Bahamas? Call CAMPUS TOURS
INC. at 305 523 TOUR
WANTED:
babysitting!
Students interested in
Call 355 6852
Orange Bowl Bound!
Follow the Pirates'
trip to the Orange
Bowl with complete
coverage in The East
Carolinian. Hopeful-
ly, well have some
positive and in-
teresting informa-
tion.
Pizza inn .��
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn
$2.00 Off Any Large
$3.00 Off Any Giant
Eat In Or Take Out
Phone 758-6266
Save Time & Money WhenYoiT
Shop Student Stores Convenient
For Between-Classes Shopping.
Gift Wrapping Free On Any
Purchase of $3.00 and Over.
y r.oonies s
(portfolios, pad holders, etc.)
Hazel Items
Acrylic ECU License Plates
Toboggans
Ladies Khaki Skirt
Infant Sleeper
Children's Football Suit
12x18 ECU Pennant
Bumper Stickers 2 for 1
(equal value)
10 OFF
25 OFF
25 OFF
25 OFF
20 OFF
25 OFF
25 OFF
Huge Selection of Gift
Books Including:
Children's Books
Bibles
Cookbooks
Prices Starting at
$1.98
$5.00 OFF
;Navy Necktie with
ECU Emblem
i One Coupon Per Item
Regular Priced Item Onlv
$2.00 OFF
MUGAPHONE
One Coupon Per Item
i
i
j Reg Priced Item Only
I
I
I lift
$1.00 OFF
All Hooded
Sweatshirts
One Coupon Per Item
Regular Priced Item Onlv
$1.00 OFF i $1.00 OFF
STONEWARE MUGBe� Hog.n" Snap
One Coupon Per Item t Cmn
Rei"l�r Priced Item Onl V�p
MtMM ()ne l oupon Per Item
Regular Priced Item OnK
�.���
$10.00 OFF : $i.00 OFF
Urge ECU Golf CAR FLAGS
Umbrella J One Coupon Per Item
One Coupon Per Item ' Regular hM I'm ni
Regular Priced Item Onlv '��
$1.00 OFF
Any Jacket In Stock
One Coupon Per Item
Regular Pncad Item (nlv
$1.00 OFF
All Crew Neck
Sweatshirts
One Coupon Per hem
Regular Priced hem Onlv
� � it I'm
SIUDENTSTORES
Wright Building
Your On-Campus Shopping Center

A





Title
The East Carolinian, November 18, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 18, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.509
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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