The East Carolinian, February 13, 1986






�h�
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.60o.3
Ihursday, February 13, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Speaker Calls For New
Stature In Education
Misery Loves Company
JIMIHK.I s Ihr r �rolinun
It your classes have been empty you might be able to find your classmates at the Student Health
(enter. I he dreaded flu season has struck, but not with the ususal fur here at ECU. See the related
stor on page I.
Flu Season
ECU Escapes Flu Epidemic
H.lfMHRIHKs
Desp e . higl rate ol
coughs,
eezes that s
bi mi on i
pus, - . : io flu epidemic he: e
. rding to Ka an Nort-
Health Sei
i - .�; th� students seen on
Monda) 21 had mp
ions, whicl ne-hall
nt. On Tu Iv 14
"V.ents with
res
S 1 v�'Ids.but noi
. a sesan
:e Nor
(. aem
. illaneport
toheDi: Heal:i Sei v ices
inRalegh, �COltains the
numberol flu- reprted eac h
we� 1as w;ek EC Ideclared
onv 53cases.
In order to be catagorized as a
flu ease, the Division of Health
Services uses guideline symptons
tor doctors to diagnose as in-
fluenza. These symptons include
a fever ol 100 degrees or greater.
m .i Igias m u scle ac he).
idache, and cough.
lames VIcCallum, Director of
Student Health Services, stated
that, "l-ve: year at tins time in-
fectious diseases with flu-like
symptoms occur. Some years it's
worse than this vear. Flu season is
during December through early
March This year it's not as bad,
due to the warm weather. "In-
lenza seems to move from west
as' I here are more eases than
tal in western and central NC
than eastern. It could move, but
you can't be sure. In eastern NC,
there is nothing unusal as of now .
regarding flu cases McCallum
said.
North Carolina State Universi-
ty reported K)0 tlu cases last
week, with a patient load of 500
per day.
According to McCallum. all
tlu symptoms do not necessariy
indicate the flu virus. "There are
hundreds of viruses causing the
same symptons. It is very dif-
ficult to isolate a virus and deter-
mine what causes it Viruses
have to be grovn on various
media or extensive blood tests
have to be done to determine
what causes lack virus. A patient
might have flu symptoms, but
really hav another type of virus.
It you feel you have any of
these symptonms, the best
medicine is to rest, drink plenty
of fluids, take aspirin to keep the
fever down and aches and pains
away, and to refrain from activi-
ty where you might infect others.
Moreover, do not hesitate to go
to the infirmary and wait in line
with all the others feeling the
same wav vou do.
ECU News Bureau
Teacher education must be
elevated "to a higher status" and
upgraded in resources and sup-
port in the nation's colleges and
universities, says the chairman of
the National Commission on Ex-
cellence in Teacher Education.
In addition, teacher education
must be "insistently stimulated to
increase its quality and its stan-
dards C. Peter MaGrath, presi-
dent of the University of
Missouri, said in an address here
Tuesday night.
Education in its most mean-
ingful sense � "in the sense that
it is truly the obligation of our
colleges and universities" �
means looking forward, not
backward, MaGrath said. He
quoted Henry Brooks Adams'
phrase: "Teachers affect eterni-
ty; they can never tell where their
influence stops
MaGrath, also a former chair-
man of the American Council on
Education's Commission on In-
ternational Education, delivered
the annual Batten-Brimley Lec-
ture of the School of
Education at East Carolina
University.
The responsibility for
upgrading teacher education, he
said, "involves a total college and
university, the faculty and leaders
in arts and sciences as well as
those in our teacher education
programs
"The point of our common
concern should be that teacher
education is so important that all
of us who engage in the enterprise
of education at all levels have r
shared responsibility to improve
the standards of teacher educa-
tion, the effectiveness of the
teaching profession and,
therefore, the quality and the
outcomes that emerge from our
nation's elementary and secon-
dary schools MaGrath said.
He said that teacher quality is
of particular concern for colleges
and universities "for the quality
of those who teach is one of the
most powerful determiners of the
quality of entering students
"Students who attend schools
staffed by relatively untrained
teachers will be poor candidates
for college he said.
MaGrath forecast that "the
next 10 years offer both an op-
portunity and a potential disaster
as we replenish our teaching
force.
"Our schools must have
teachers. But if colleges and
universities do not prepare them,
states will design alternative pro-
cesses for finding teachers to
staff their schools he said.
"The most fundamental at-
titudinal change we can en-
courage is the simple fact that
those of us in colleges and univer-
sities have a legitimate, vested in-
terest in good quality teachers in
our nation's schools he said.
MaGrath called for "substan-
tial investments" in both teacher
education programs and the
teaching profession. "Such in-
vestments will not occur it there
is not a strong public commit-
ment, indeed an insistence, on
raising the status of teachers and
the critical work that they do
Saying the the situation poses a
"national dilemma MaGrath
called for increasing teacher
salaries to levels commensurate
with other professions that re-
quire comparable training and
experience; responsibilities and
working conditions commen-
surate with requirements of the
job; providing professional
development opportunities and
incentives and improving ad-
ministrative preparation within
the schools so that principals and
superintendents can provide in-
structional leadership and create
the conditions that will nurture
the profession of teaching.
MaGrath said critical changes
in curricular and program
organization include "a much
stronger liberal arts component
in teacher education program
establishment of a five vear cur-
See UPGRADING Page 3.
Valentines Started In Rome
By DAWN STEWARD
Slrfi Writer
Just before St. Valentine's
Day. store windows feature
Valentine's. Adults as well as
children are attracted by the
displays of artistic cards and
gifts. Even though this holiday
has lost some of its romance,
many still like to observe it by
sending affectionate messages.
There are, nevertheless, con-
flicting ideas about the origin of
Valentine's Day. Some sources
say it goes back when there were
Club Offers Self-defense Classes
By CAROI N l)Rs( Ol I
Staff Wruer
"One! . Keeya!
TwoKeeya!
Three Keej 'A clas ! JO
girK shout arid puch in cadence as
the instruct i walks up and down
the rows of girls giving each one a
chance to strike the punching
bag.
"his is a self defense class
sponsored by the ECU Karate
On The Inside
Announcements2
Classifieds16
Editorials4
Featuresm
Sports 13
LOVE FINES8
It is sufficiently clear that all
things are changed, and
nothing realh perishes, and
that the sum of matter remains
absolutely the same.
�Francis Bacon
Club, held in Memorial Gym.
The club offers two beginner
classes a week with an addi-
tional class for advanced
students.
This particular class is taught
by Anne VanLith, a tall, blonde
lady with her black belt in karate.
She has been teaching these
classes for one and one-half years
now and started learning karate
when she first came to college. "1
had always been interested in
self-defense, but my dad
wouldn't allow me to take lessons
at home. So when 1 came to
school, I just got started in it
Her classes usually start out
with about 30 girls who attend
for a variety of reasons. One stu-
dent, Daron Langley, a
sophomore child development
and family relations major, takes
the classes three times each week.
"The two beginners classes give
me a good workout she ex-
plains, and the advanced class
"will help earn my green belt this
summer Langley, who now
holds a yellow belt in karate,
began lessons when some friends
at home encouraged her to take
the classes with them. "1 just
really enjoyed it so 1 stuck with
it she says.
Another member of the class,
Deanna Paveo, a sophomore ma-
joring in special education, is try-
ing to earn her yellow belt by the
end of the semester. "Both of my
parents are black belts in
karate she explains, "and I've
always been interested in it. I
heard they were offering a class
so I decided to give it a try. Com-
ing here is a lot of fun she
adds.
Although karate is not typical-
ly something many women take
part in, wanting to be able to pro-
tect themselves on campus is the
reason both Cindy Michl, a
sophomore business major and
Laura Jenkins, a sophomore
journalism major give for taking
the class.
"It's really important to be
able to defend yourself. The class
is also a lot of fun says Michl.
Explains Jenkins, "There's
always a time when you need to
go across campus but there is no
one to walk with, so this class is
good. It's also good to learn to
control you body
The class works on what Van
Lith calls the "five sources of
power speed, focus, balance,
stance and form. "The 'keeya's'
help you to breath correctly she
explains.
After about an hour of work-
ing out everyone sits down on the
floor to do "crunches a type of
sit-up. As the girls crunch, Van
Lith goes up and down the rows
walking on each student's
stomach. "This is to help you see
how important is to breath pro-
perly. Make sure you exhale
before 1 step on you
The Karate Club has a com-
petative team which participates
in local tournaments as well as in
a national tournament in Atlanta
each year. The members compete
in both form and point fighting.
The classes are $10 for the
semester and are offered Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday
night at Memorial Gym.
hordes of hungry wolves outside
Rome. The god, Lupercus, was
said to watch over the shepherds
and their flocks.
Therefore, ;n February
Romans celebrated a feast, called
the Lupercalia, in his honor. At
this festival, all the names of the
young Roman females were plac-
ed in a box to be drawn out by the
Roman males. This paired young
couples for a whole year, until
the next festival.
When Christianity became
prevalent, the priests wanted
their converts to give up their
heathen practices. The officials,
therefore, christianized the an-
cient pagan celebration and call-
ed it St. Valentine's Day.
Sometimes a priest placed
names of different saints in an
urn; the young people drew these
names, then during the following
year each youth was supposed to
emulate the life of the saint
whose name he had drawn.
So where does St. Valentine
come in? Actually there were
eight men named St. Valentine.
However, the three most impor-
tant ones were a priest, beheaded
at Rome in 269. a bishop of Im-
bria, and the third, who was put
to death in Africa.
One story about St. Valentine
states that he was a priest in a
beautiul temple during the reign
of the cruel Emperor Claudius.
Claudius ordered all men to war
but these men refused to leave
their wives and sweehearts.
Claudius, in retaliation, ordered
no further marriage ceremonies.
St. Valentine thought this unfair
and continued to marry young
couples. As a result, he was
beheaded.
Another story states that St.
Valentine was seized while aiding
Christians; while in prison he fell
in love with the jailor's daughter,
and wrote her love letters signed
"From your Valentine
So gradually, as time passed,
this new Christian holiday
became a time for exchanging
See SHOWING Page 3.
Haley Visits ECU
By MIKE LUDWICK
Nun Mllor
Alex Haley, author of Roots,
will be on campus Tuesdav Feb.
18 & 19.
Haley will deliver his lecture,
"The Background of Roots: The
Significance of the Family" at
7:30pm Tuesday in Hendrix
Theater.
In the lecture, Haley will
discuss the research necessary in
developing his book and deal
directly with the subject of Black
History in America.
Haley will also treat the many
changes the family structure in
America has gone through in the
last two decades. He will outline,
moreover, his predictions of the
family's future.
Haley's writing has won him
America's two most prestigous
awards: the Pulitzer Prize and the
National Book Award. Colleges
and Universities have awarded
doctorate degrees and have
received over 300 special recogni-
tions from different sources.
� - - - - ���� - - ���' � . .
� ;
'
"nyilin "imiHIf a






HE EAST CARPI INIAN
ECU women s Slylfr Club indoor Locc
ameni please onta. �
'SVM �� "�3?5 The �ounwnwii
be held Peo ;s a no March , �, 2 Tnere
be a minimal entry fee
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
' � �' eet'iiq Tues
" "i Ha, in Soe.ght job a' S
be the tea'urea
"�� - � � �( r, ECC GET
mvoi v r r
AFROTC
A I
� �
A f- OQ T .
N om i oo
rooentj
�' ana e�
� - � ��� -olar
: ks and HOC Der month
' ' ' r Jua :ty "u Tes-
s ottereo or ?? February . Thursi
6 00 � �. �. -e. isa' . n order to
'Sidered tor St"oiarsh,ps tor 'h
� Jgf Al "Vrpow uttpnts arp
� � ' v � Patl It Ail Force
A
At
m
PHI ETA SIGMA
i or
13 at
Kent
ECU GOSPELCHOIR
e cast Ca � . . .
-��i � �� � � t Her
' ' � 4 ' � v. . ,
me will � . ,
KING YOUTH FELLOWSHIP
� � � ��.� w .
4 '�' � � f� i ��
' e informal - � .
BEDTIME ENTERPRISE
BY SCOTT HALL
A f a
COO I - . 2 midnight v
' -� M f l) v eset . ,�.
now b.
BIOLOGY CLUB
8 3 b is I . � . . �
i part ot
� a -
rt ��� . r B 01
BIOLOGY CLUB
-
ss �
BKA
Despite the various rumors that you have
heard. BKA is alive ana well There will be a
organiiat.onai meeting on Wed Fet l� at
4 00 in Rawl 102 All people .nteresfefl in
tmance and banking are welcome to attend
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vce m the Bioxton House is ottering one hour
sessions to help you prepare vour own
resume Few graduates get obs without
some preparation Many employers request
a resume showing your education and ex
penence Sessions to help will be helo in the
Career Planning Room on February 17 at 3
p m
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will meet Wed . Feb 19
at 3 00 m Rawl 34? We will have a speaker
Lloyd Gardner who will talk about State
Competition
SURFING
Spring Break is almost here It you plan to
�'avel to FI or,da ano compete with the team
you must attend the meeting tonight at 8 00
in room 221 Mendenhal! Following the short
meeting will be a presentation ot three hot
new videos The ECU Surt Club is open t0
men and women Anyone interested in om
mg is urged to attend Call 757 1502 for more
into (Note the Florida trip is open to an
dub members and not iust the top 12 surfers
on the team)
NSSLHA
The ECU Chapter ot NSSlMA will be spon
sor.ng the 16th Annual Speech Language
anc Hearing Symposium on February 13 and
'4 1984 n �he Blue Auditor,um of the Brody
VVedica' Sciences Buying Eas' Carolina
iniversity Gues' speakers are Dr Daniel
R Boone presenting A ,986 Look at Vo.ce
Therapv Mrs Lynns Kelly TheSpeec
Pathoiogist Aud'Oiogis' and the Ger a
Population and Or Theorore R Sunder
I ear i,ng Disabilities A
Neurodevelopmentai Pom' o V,ew It you
would like more information contact Carol
Townseno or Martha White a- the ECU
Speec" and Hearing Clinic
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
���� win be a meeting on Sat Feb 15
'�86 a' 8 OOpr a' 'he Internationa House
� �emat.onai loreign students are r-
dues ted fc a"ena
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
A s'a. w Tuesday Fee B a' e 30pm
Mendenhali Dr Harold Zauen a
� i phys� .s' appointed Dy Go Va i
secwe ' I �p'i'av omm,ss,on ano a
" �' ' ' " �' State h .use ot Represen
v ��"� Of our goes' speaxpr (.a
151 O'lt tor more information
SURFING CLUB
ECU Surl ng C ub meeting a' J2I
� Thursday nighl a- s rhree ne�
� le is will be shown along rt �� event;
�' spr.ng semes-er Also an persons
eresteo -g ,0 F)orila 5jr ng Br(ah
IttenO! Ar guest.onsoe"a . � �� .
) call John McCann a tS7 l502
Announcements
CAPTRED"McDANIEL '
Capt Eugent Red McDaniel. Navy
pilot, retired and former POW in Vietnam,
will speak on his experiences and his work
as president of the American Defense In
stitute a bipartisan citizens lobbying
organization which promotes a strong na
tional defense and the Strategic Defense in
itiat.ve He will also answer any questions
Thursday Feb 13. room 244 Mendenhali at
2 00pm
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Campus Crusade for Christ is sponsoring
Prime Time" this Thursday night at
7 30pm ,n the Old Joyner Library, second
floor Please iom us for fun fellowship and
Bible study We are looking forward to
meeting you
HONORS (ECHO) MEETING
There will be an ECHO (East Carolina
Honors Organization) meeting on Thursday
Feb 13 at 5 00 m the Honors Lounge (200
Ragsdaiei All members and interested
students come out' Please bring your $10
dues i semester i if possible
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Positions available tor industrial Hygiene
ma,or with Duke Power Company beginning
Summer 1986 Sophmore Junior status, 2 5
GPA and willingness to work three work
terms requ'reo Salary 7 81 per hour ana
academic cred t available Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawi
NORTHERN TELECOM
Coop positions arp available tor students
maioring ,n computer science industrial
�e nnoiogy business aon-vmstration ano ac
Hinting commencing summer )v86 Two
term comm.tment and 2 8 GPA required
Deafline Feb'uar, u i�fVj Contact Co ou
OH'ce 3)3 Raw
N.C. STATE PARKS
Pos fions avaiacie for summer in nc
State Parks For more infoi nta �
Cooperatve Education j 13 DM
INDT
naior employers w 11 oe
recruiting iNDT ma,ors for Coop posons
Degmn nq summer W86 it you a'e a
soonmore ;un,orw th a 2 5GPA con'actB.ii
Ba-e" 313 Rawl to ieam more abou' these
ou'stana iy oppor'un es
VALENTINESDAY DANCE
The Student inion Minority arts
OMAf "FF , sponsor CARAVAN OF
.OVE .AkfNrlNES DAV DANCF
'� � ' fnulti Purpose room on Fr.
lay Feo 14 1986 from 10 00pm 1 , j ooam
The iance will leature live en'erta.nmen'
door pr.jes ano spec a' aacf,ons T,cke's
a'e avanabie from members ot 'he Minor t,
A"s Comm-tee ano througr Mcndcnha
Centra T cxe' Orf.ee Aom.ss on $1 n a0
�' student D ano S2 a' door and
; il
CIRCLE K
rhere be a" mportan'
� " � iunaa. Fee it a' I 00 in
'�'� '� "� room 221 Ai. memoers mus'a'
�pne ' you canrKH a"ec cease -ontac-
� ai '56 8428 mportani ssues will De
issed Be rhe� �
BUSINESSCLASSES
Will and Estate Planning Tues 8. Thurs
Fet 18 20. 7 9pm Money Matters. Tues
Feb 18 Mar 11. 6 30 9 30pm Retirement
Planning Now. Tues & Thurs Feb It 27
6 30 8pm Real Estate Financing Thurs
Fet 20. 9am 4pm Advising Real Eastat
Client. Tues & Thurs. Mar 18 20 7 9pm
Continuing Education Erwm Hall or Call
757 6143
SPECIAL INTEREST
Halieys Comet. Mon. �, Tues Mar 17 18
Camera I. Tues. Feb 18 Mar 18 Scuba
Tues S. Thurs . Mar 18 Apr 10
Baseball, Sotibali Officiating. Wed Mar
l� Apr 23 Basic Sailing, Apr 17 ivar 3
Continuing Education, Erwm Hall or Call
757 6413
ATTENTION GOLFERS
ECU Varsity Golf Team will hold try outs
for Spring Applicants must call Assistant
Coach Chris Claia at 758 9069 Call only
Thurs Fn 6 9pm
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
Join the best party in town' ECU College
Democrats will meet tonight, room 212
Menoenhali at 7 00 For more information
can Hugh Carroll at 752 5611
ATTENTION SOPHOMORES
Learn what il takes t0 lead at the 1986 Ar
my ROTC Basic Camp Successful compie
t.onot the Army ROTC you II learn the skills
and develop the self confidence t0 be a sue
cessful Lieutenant ,n the United States Ar
my For more information, attend the Basic
Camp information Session on Wednesday 26
February from 4 00pm to 6 00pm in the Cot
feehouse located in the basement of
Mendenhan Student Center or contact Cap
am A J Mitchell a' 757 6967
VETERANSCLUB
Club of ECU on Wednesday February 13 at
JO d m in room 721 Mendenha Ae will
be discussing our p,ans for the semes'er arc
oth ex�ng ,ul, 0on, qut
S .dents )acu V ana staff who are
ve'erans Dependents Art,ve duty person
nel Resery.sts and ar other .nterested per
sons are encouraged to attend �;�� -n -
ifcTjHvWAPTER
OF NSSLHA
The ECU Chapter of NSSLHA wn be spon
soring the 16th annual Speech. Language and
Hearing Symposium on Feb 13 and 14. 1986
n the Blue Auditor ium of the Brody Medn a
Sciences Bldg Guest speakers art Dr
Daniel R Boone presenting A 1986 Look a'
Voice Therapy " Mrs Lynn S Kelly. The
Speech Pathologist Audioiogist and the
Geriatric Population and Dr Theodore R
Sunder ' Learning Disabiiit.es A
Neurodevelopmentai Point of View " if you
would like more into contact Carol Town
send or Martha White at the ECU Speech and
Hearing Clinic
LASER PRINTSALE
m Mendenhali Student Center February
'0 February U 9 am 5 pm
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
tne Dept of Eirmeniar, Edu.a- �
srhedule upper Division interviews beg.nn
ngMonoay Feb 24, 1986 El student,
must submit applications tor adm.ss.or
'ne departmenial office iSpe.gh' I02B) by
F"day. Feb 14 1986 The application enht,
�J Application tor Admission to uppe-
Division of Teacher Education at ECU s 1
-iuded m the appendices of We.rom, �
Teacher Education (Apple Bookj
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing is available.
511 Kvans St.
Greenville, C 27834
Phone: 756-9222
Kentucky Nugget Snack
6 Kentucky Nuggets
Kentucky Fries
1 Large Drink
"We do Chicken Right"
COUPONJ
$1.99
Coupon Redeemable at
Greenville locations only
Expiration Date 3-3-86
4
V
V
OVERT0N&
Juicy
Florida
A
- COLPON-
2 Blocks from ECU �
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
We reserve the right to limit quantities.
Prices Effective Through Tuesday, Feb. 18
Richfood 2
Lowfot MILK
h gallon carton
SuptW-
�$M
ORANGES
5 lb bag
$1.29
Inc
White Cloud
�� a
89f
TOILET TISSUE
4 roll pkg
89 J

BUSCH BEER
Limit 2
Please
Grade "A" Fresh White
Jumbo EGGS
69C
Limit 4
dozen please.
dozen
WIN
CASH
WIN
.rfABULOUsT 6R0CERIES
L1" " 11111 in 11111' 1111 ilJixirrrrririTTri
rWHBBL op nmirri
aiiiI ii 11i, 111�,�,DoEgSxSnStD
CASH & GROCERIES GIVE-AWAY
$175.00 Cash Jack Pot This Week!
Complete Details in Store.
BUj BUSCH JLJSQJ&JSQJ!
rvv
6 pack - 12 oz cans
$1.89
v
Heinz
KETCHUP
99
Campbell's
CHICKEN
NOODLE SOUP
10 oz can
28

A
�V
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
�v
A
A
A
A
A
ftamp&lk
Chicken a
l Noodle
quart bottle
Grade "A"
Whole
FRYERS
lb
39C
99 �
lb.
Limit 3 with
$10.00 or more
food order
BREAST
QUARTERS
lb.
Grade "A" Fryer
Donald Duck Fresh LEG
, D . - ORANGE IO.CE QUARTERS
Kegular or Diet
V 4 PEPSI
a9- 2 Lite'Bonle
V PEPSI Fresh Green Lydia Gr�y
�- SkWi kn 4ak BROCCOLI PAPER TOWELS .
A
JJ0M0m m w .pr r Limit 3 roU
V

99
Crisp Iceberg
LETTUCE
A
A
each
Limit 2 oj your choice. A dditional Pepsi's each $1.15
69
bunch
r�rKi IVWEld giant roll mm
3$1.00 59
head
ssss
Collegl
Over hall I E
surveyed reli a
prepared
university
maj sample poll tak(
Iky-
prepaid for higher edu
and those who felt preparec
buted their acade
-urnculcum, tea
study habits ei
high school
ccordiiu
Associate b
Students e: � � .
the UNC systcn a
new reg
�Una Sch
Showing
Continued From Page 1.
love messages and Si V
emerged as the pa
lovers.
The la
most people prefei
sider. There -
Epicurean b
February 14
began i
mates. In his
Foules Chaucer wi
this a as Seym Va
When every foul comet
their mate.
The old custom
names on St. Yale:
continued in England
parts of the Continent, v.
youth drew a
wrote it on his sleeve, a
ed and protected her .

Upgrading
Teacher
Education
Continued From Page 1.
riculum; establishment of a
internship year for prospec
new teachers; development
new linkages between tea.
education programs and
elementary ar. d sec
schools tea. txchai .
development of pro, .
viding entry into the
prospective older tea
former teachers who have .
profession.
MaGrath said "there is j
cant room for strengthening
liberal arts or subject ma'
component of teacher educal
programs He said man
"wrongly assert that the r
teacher education programs are
foolishly focused on to
methodology at the expense
academic content
All who enter the teaching pi
fession ought to hae
academic concentration in a .
nuine liberal arts curriculum
which the requirements are clea
ly equivalent to a bacheloi
degree.
Gre
Stea
?
1
Fri. & Sot.
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Sirloin
$4.
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I HI I -AS IAROl MAN M BRIARY 13, 198ft
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
College Qualifications Questioned

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Over half of ECU students
surveyed felt academically
prepared upon entering the
university, according to an infor-
mal sample poll taken recently.
Both those who did not feel
prepared for higher education
and those who felt prepared at-
tributed their academic success to
the curriculcum, teachers and
study habits enforced by their
high school.
According to Eugene Owens.
Associate Director of Admissions
Students entering universities in
the UNC system will follow the
new regulation except The North
Carolina School of the Arts.
"The regulation which was ap-
pproved two years ago will re-
quire students entering the UNC
system to have three units of
math, including Algebra 1,
Algebra II and Geometry. Three
units of social studies will be re-
quired, with two of the units be-
ing history, and a course is
government or economics. Three
sciences will be required, two of
which should be biology and a
physical science. At least one of
the sciences should include a
lab said Owens.
"In high school the college
preparatory course load was
similar to the college curriculum.
My abilities and weaknesses all lie
within the structure of impor-
Showing Your Love
Continued From Page 1.
love messages and St. Valentine
emerged as the patron saint of
lovers.
The last theory is one which
most people prefer not to con-
sider. There was an old
Epicurean belief that on
February 14 of each year the
birds began to choose their
mates. In his "Parliament of
Foules Chaucer wrote: "For
this was Seym Valentine's Day
When every foul cometh to chose
their mate.
The old custom o drawing
names on St. Valentine's Eve
continued in England and some
parts of the Continent. When a
youth drew a girl's name, he
wrote it on his sleeve, and attend-
ed and protected her during the
Upgrading
Teacher
Education
Continued From Page 1.
riculum; establishment of a full
internship year for prospective
new teachers; development of
new linkages between teacher
education programs and the
elementary and secondary-
schools (teacher exchanges) and
development of programs pro-
viding entry into the profession
of prospective older teachers,
former teachers who have left the
profession.
MaGrath said "there is signifi-
cant room for strengthening the
liberal arts or subject matter
component of teacher education
programs He said many critics
"wrongly assert that the nation's
teacher education programs are
foolishly focused on teaching
methodology at the expense of
academic content
All who enter the teaching pro-
fession ought to have an
academic concentration in a ge-
nuine liberal arts curriculum in
which the requirements are clear-
ly equivalent to a bachelor's
degree.
following year. Thus she became
his valentine and they exchanged
love tokens. Later, only men gave
presents and often signed the
card "From your valentine.
Many presents were exchanged
( guys take notes on these) such
as: flowers, heart-shaped can-
dies, love cards and sometimes,
more expensive gifts such as
jewelry.
Even though, today, most of
us don't care for the overly sen-
timental Valentine's of bygone
days, we are glad that the spirit of
good St. Valentine's is still
prevalent. No doubt the saint �
whoever he is � is glad to know
he started a custom that brings
happiness to many people.
tance at my high school. I was in-
terested in English. There were
no math courses required for
seniors and I felt another year
should have been offered to
students preparting for college
according to Tony McQueen, a
senior political science major.
Craig Harman, a junior
chemistry major felt his high
school was geared to students
planning to enter college after
graduation. Harman recognized
his ability in the fields of math
and science during his years in
high school. "I feel that I was
very prepared for college
academically speaking. My high
school education helped me
prepare for college and choose a
major suited to my abilities he
added.
Thirty percent of students
surveyed felt their high school did
not provide the opportunity to
provide the skills necessary for a
successful college career.
"Small high schools face the
same problems as small colleges.
The instruction and classes of-
fered at the smaller school
depends on the socialand
HV
lining
economic conditions oi the
area Owen said.
"My high school mostly
graduated students who were
planning to entei the job
market according to Crowdei
Cayton, a junioi Industrial
Technology major.
"The few college preparatory
classes were small and there
weren't many advanced classes
ottered saidayton
"I was minimally prepared foi
college. I realized m potential
and mechanical abil t when I
took the ASV B test, otherwise 1
might not have realized where my
abilties are she added
Senior mana I major Lin-
da Horov.ii tee's thai the most
valuable skill she learned in high
school that benefit the most in
college are study skills. "I believe
that some students haven't been
taught how to study properly. My
high school reinforced study
habits that have stayed with me. 1
can attribute my college success
to that factor she said.
Only one in 10 students
surveyed had attended a private
school. Claire Ward, a senior
sociology major attended both
public and private high schools.
"1 found that public school
tried to prepare me for college
while preparing other students to
enter the job market. Since I at-
tended a private arts school, I felt
my instructors understood my
objectives more clearly because
they had the same interest as the
students and we all shared a com-
mon bond within that interest
added Ward.
All ot the students surveyed
felt their weaknesses and best
abilities were directly related to
subjects offered and stresses at
their high school.
"There are a multitude of fac-
tors that determine a student's in-
struction in any school. Different
instructors teach and grade dif-
ferently added Owens.
Nearly all of the students
surveyed felt ECU students chose
their major due to ability in a
specific field rather than
monetary reasons.
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Stye iEaut Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Mike Ludwick,
Scott Cooper. v i
Danu t Maurer, ,
.ions Shannon, � i.
DeChanii t Johnson. , ,
TOM LUVENDER, Gmm Wir.
Jay Stone, wanati� i
Greg Winchester, ��.�� 4m��
Anthony Martin, swws mmk!
John Peterson, . � wmr
Shannon Short, �����,�
Debbii Stevens, v
February 13, I486
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Reagan Cuts Hurt Students
What can the president of this
country be thinking of when, accor-
ding to the National Education
Association, he cuts $23 billion in
domestic programs "that affect
education directly or indirectly" �
while adding about $33 billion to
military spending What is Presi-
dent Reagan thinking of?
According to a report compiled
by Charles B. Saunders Jr. of the
American Council on Education,
President Reagan's budget for
higher education would impose a
"triple whammy' on student aid
programs. First, the Guaranteed
Student Loan Program is threaten-
ed with collapse if proposed
changes are enacted. Banks may
pull out of the program if the
government ceases to back student
loans with in-school interest sub-
sidies as the new budget proposes.
Over 1 million students would be
dropped from eligibility for Pell
Grants and other programs alread
appropriated tot fiscal year '86 and
scheduled foi allotment this fall.
290,000 middle income eligibles
will be dropped from the program
and awards will be reduced foi
another 500,000 recipients with
family income between $12,000and
$20,tXX). Another 304,000 awards
would be eliminated by axing the
State Student Incentive Gram pro-
gram; 202,000 awards will be wiped
out b eliminating capital contribu-
tions to the Direct I oan program;
271,000 awards broadsided by cut-
ling Supplemental Grants $155
million; and 119.000 awards
mutilated by cutting College Work-
StuJv S90 million from the original
� � � rpriation.
Another 2,100 awards to need)
students would be lost resulting in
the elimination of all graduate
fellowship programs funded for
this fall. Special services under the
TRIO program, serving over
460,000 students, would be cut in
half.
The third phase of the Ad-
ministration's budget war on stu-
dent aid programs, its fiscal year
'87 proposals, would take effect in
Academic Year 1987-88. Further
restrictions in Pell Grant eligibility
would result and Supplemental
Grants and Work-Study would be
eliminated, and replaced by a new
work giant program which would
provide 681,(XX) fewer awards and
require institutions to provide 50
percent matching funds by 1990-91.
There are other proposals as well
which can only be described as
draconian. For example, the pro-
posed replacement of the Direct
Loan program by a new unsubsidiz-
ed and substantially higher-interest
loan program, but the point is that
the Administration's student aid
proposals would eliminate or
reduce rewards for over three
million students, whose only alter-
native source of assistance would be
loans carrying a significantly higher
burden of debt. lor main of these
students a college education would
be an unatainable goal.
There is something absuid in an
administration that makes gran-
diose speeches about the future of
this nation and then butchers fun-
ding tor education. There is
something that is even contemp-
table about it. At a time when our
country is challenged bv foreign in-
dustry, environmental problems
and world hunger the president
wants to w ipe out the potential con-
tributions of main of our future
scientists, engineers, economists
and other scholars. It wants to
eliminate opportunities for
minorities and working class people
and make higher education
something that is reserved for the
rich and upper middle classes. It is
willing to turn America into a more-
class polarized nation rather than a
land oi equal opportunity. And all
of this to; what aid to the con-
tras in Nicaragua, a U.S. supported
war in II Salvador to save an
oligarchy, (which is killing as many
civilians as it is rebels) and a few
more MX missiles which still lack a
survivable basing mode.
Maybe I'm out on the fringe, but
there's something that seems com-
pletely warped about these
priorities to me. The United States
Student Association is leading the
fight, against the Reagan budget
cuts bv calling on every student and
his or her parents to write letters to
their congressmen and senators.
They are also organizing a National
Lobby Day on Monday March 17
and a National legislative Con-
ference on March 14 in
Washington. Some of us should try
to attend.
Shanty Towns Destroyed
RAGHT Ha; Xhn -wi.
rn� MPoftucRV RtRliVr.n' l-u�
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Campus Forum
A Call For Civility And Respect
lo comment on the continuing
rounds of Democrats versus
Republicans or Republicans versus
Democrats forum editorial over ihe
last month, I would like to say I have
never seen so much root-stomping,
name-calling, political raving, and
dealing o blovs below the belt, but I
guess thals politics or is it political
warfare? I'm not sure if motives are
intact. I do not disagree that as
American citizens and students with
ambitious ideas we should express
our views,but need we inflict them on
those who disagree with us in such an
unattractive manner. It makes tor
distasteful reading and the reader
loses sight of the rationale behind the
argument when the writer starts
finger-pointing and personally at-
tacking his enemy.
I have a personal interest in the
history, progress, and future of
politics in our great nat.�&JA. own
grandfather, Francis A. Cherry, as
Governor oi Arkansas from 1952 4
served the people with honesty and
wholesomeness. He was a true
statesman who refused to play dirty
political games. It is unfortunate that
he was defeated bv the corruption oi
Orval Faubus when running for
reelection in '54. What people will do
to get their views expressed and car-
ried out is a shame. I would hope our
politics had moved beyond the cor-
ruptiveness and reached a higher
standard, but it seems the viscious
mud-slinging and throwing oi low
blows continues as Democrat battles
Rehulican in a brawlish free for all.
I realize that the liberals and the
conservatives both believe thay are
whole-heartedly right in their views.
I've come to accept this fact,
however, I'd like to see a little more
openmindedness. Openmindedness is
essential to developing the
understanding necessary to get
things done and make positive ad-
vancements. I will not label myself as
Democrat or Republican for labeling
oneself can be quite limiting and
debilitating, but I would like to af-
firm my beliefs. (You can label me if
you like).
1 believe m the prescrv a' ioi
and the betterment ol all mar.kind. I
loe God. America, and all fel
men. 1 believe in the prospect ol a
hopeful and exciting future I
country and the world. 1
believe in killing the imrrn
or unborn, for this is unjustil
ing oi life that we should n
power to do. Power should ne
choice of control. I feel we n
aware aware l our aliveness i
vitalitv ol every othei living
and we should know what
and affirm it positivelv
I think i; is impoitant
iews and opinions ap-
preciate them. I also i
opportui express my views h is
a p:ivelage not enjoyed b ��'
and it hould be used sensibly.
1 recongnize that not everyone is
going to agree on the issue- us,
utcaiiil we akirac on. 4jjj .ihi.
and perhaps go at things :
perspective. Look around and v
the beauty of this earth, i
much more to life than the political
pitter-patter I've been reading seems
to indicate. Can't we strive l
beyond the faults ol our fellow n
to the joys, wonders and
complishments he has experienced '
Can't we agree on living out dreams
be it soaring into space or beco
ing president As Americans, can we
not agree on upholding the bask
ideaU ot I ite. love and the pursuit
oi happiness
In closing, I would say. its time
show a little compassion and love
one another as we approach the sim
pie sentimental holiday ot the he
So 1 make my plea to our politicains
� present and future � Please cut
out the political bickering and gel
work on something constructive in
stead of destructive tor a change
Thanks.
Marty Cherry . Jr.
Jr. Physical Education
Away With Bias
In reference to the sports writers ol
the East Carolinian, we concerned
Pira ol
ATI �
; EasI
Cat ite a
"B it of I
know
rampa Bay a
lie.
I� t bucca

Pira
�dimes
"Bucs" in lieu I md
Dwards
I been observed in many issues
� We realizt tl .adhne space is
limi �
le overboard (no pun intended),
x . � lii .� to Webster's Collegiate
Dictionary's definition. .� Buccaneer
� th � free' � � � ring r
�� p
� the
�. � � nt century . a
enville Pi'ate. � ever
West ho
v ;et-
� in R i. . N ; . ng
I
rw ei try a
. mbet " a
he Pii
Dui controversial I
inge his name irom
11 Buc, and hopefully
nevei will, His name is "The Pira
are " I he Piartes :
B
II the wi iters o tntinue to indul
tis chea
nalistic pseudonym, then the studeni
l is going to be forced to live up
theil true names and make these
people walk the plank (pun intended i
We don't mean to rock the boat, oi
B - e authority. but when it
�s to referring to the distinquish-
ed Pirate athletic program, the
H must stop here.
Neil Rowerdink
Sophomore, Business
Dartmouth Right Sees Victory Over Left
Ihe contentions at Dartmouth are
once again front-page news, for the very
good reason that what is going on there
is newsworthy. The reason for this is
that the students there on the left are
highly mobilized, but so also are they on
the right, who have their own publica-
tion, The Dartmouth Review.
On The Right
�p
By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR.
Since we
are engaged in describing an order of
battle, one might add that the faculty of
Dartmouth is ever so trendy-left, while
the president, David McLaughlin, is a
centrist. The stage is set for a very long
war, the most recent episode of which
was The Matter of the Shanties.
A couple of months ago, something
calling itself the Dartmouth Community
for Divestment suddenly marched into
the center of the fabled College Green
and erected a number of shanties design-
ed in the mind's eye to imitate living
quarters of many blacks in South
Africa. Now, demonstrations of that
order are, in the judgement of
reasonable folk, OK as one-night stands.
But pretty soon it transpired that the
students had in mind a more or less per-
manent addition to the architecture of
Dartmouth, an upsetting development
to those with an aesthetic eye, and
positively infuriating to those who
believe that political demonstrations
should be contained within a fairly short
leash.
The reaction of the deans was to com-
mand the students to remove their shan-
ties. But President McLaughlin, seeking
to be as permissive as possible, overruled
the deans and said the shanties might
stay so long as they served "an educa-
tional purpose One can think, of
course, of any number of things that
would serve an educational purpose that
are inappropriate exhibits in a public
park, but nothing was done for weeks
until last Tuesday.
At which point a group calling itself
the Dartmouth Committee to Beautify
the Green Before Winter Carnival (that
is Dartmouth's equivalent of Mardi
Gras, the Super Bowl, and the Fourth of
July, scheduled for next weekend)
mobilized at 3 o'clock in the morning.
The 12 students, most of them
associated with The Dartmouth Review,
arrived with sledgehammers and, 1 kid
you not, a rented flatbed truck, and
before you knew it, whoosshh! Divest-
ment City was no more.
The committee left word that it was
"merely picking trash up off the Green
and restoring pride and sparkle to the
college we love so much There are
those who believe that a repristinated
campus green is not necessarily a setback
for black South Africans.
Mr. McLaughlin had been warned by
politically acute observers that he had
been mistaken in taking so permissive a
stand on the shanties because what the
left-students wanted � today as back in
the '60s � was confrontation, and sure
enough they got this by staging a
30-hour sit-in in the office of the presi-
dent a couple of days after the shanties
came down. At that demonstration they
were pleading the case against racism,
sexism and the toleration of dissent,
which is Newspeak for immunitv for
whatever left-minded students sav or do.
Now, President McLaughlin has his
own problems, having been denounced a
few weeks ago by the faculty for not ex
ercising sufficient "governance by
which is meant docility to faculty edicts
that, at Dartmouth, more often than not
communicate faculty crotchets, as when
the faculty expressed disgust a couple of
years ago not with a black dean who
physically bit a student editor of The
Dartmout Review, but with his victim.
Perhaps responding to such pressure,
McLaughlin ordered quick trial and ex-
ecution of the shanty-destroyers, this
followed by their hiring an attorney,
who has got an extension, etc etc etc.
One more scene at Dartmouth.
A good thing, in the opinion of some
observers, inasmuch as Dartmouth is
serving a useful purpose. When in 1968
the campus at Columbia exploded, the
students destroyed scholars' papers and
defecated into presidential wastebaskets
and before we knew it it was so in
Berkeley, and Iowa State, Cornell and
Yale and Harvard and, to be sure, Kent
State. The germs of that universal
upheaval are not dead and. interestingly
enough, not bv anv means vet diagnos
ed. (Ihat was the great failure oi the
American academv, the greatest failure
oi this century.) The left took effective
control oi campus life and declared
themselves members oi a revolutionary
movement. Some of those folk are these
days tenured professors at places like
Dartmouth College.
But this time the right is organizing, if
you want to use that word for such as
believe that if the left asserts the right to
build shanties in the middle ot the green.
othei students inherit the right to tear
them down. As New Hampshire goes, so
goes the nation.
William . Buckley Jr. is a widely syn-
dicated conservative columnist who ap-
pears in over 300 newspapers. He was
the founder of ational Review
magazine and he is the host of Firing
Tine, a debate program airing on PBS
stations. Mr. Buckley is also the author
of many books, including God and Man
at Yale, Saving the Queen, Stained Glass
and Overdrive.
Guide
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can't help tl en t
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In the case
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Darryl
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IHI EAS1 CAROLINIAN FEBRUAR 13, I98( 5
)
ect
ver Left
� the
failure
� � live
� �
� ��
like
tnizing.il

. hi to
. een,
Han �' . so
widely syn-
who ap-
� � sfwfwrs He as
ational Review
the host oj hiring
atrinn on PBS
ii Buckley is also she author
Its, including God and Man
Saving (he Queen. Stained Glass

(herdrm
Guidelines Cover Scholars
lC PS) � The government says
i! will impose new "controls"
Over most education research it
will let scholars publish.
While the Department of
Education sas the controls are
needed to keep "suspect" and
"poorly-written" research out of
circulation, campus scholars
themselves equate the controls
with censorship.
"It's more goof) requirements
and goof) criteria saying research
has to be consistent with the
secretar) (ol Education's) and
the president's mission com-
plains Joseph Schneider of the
Council for Educational
Developmeni and Research.
"That's just right-wing ability
down everything they
don like, he says.
Bu: Chester Finn, the Educa
tion Department official who will
scrutinize sponsored research
rts before deciding whether
the) should be published, argues
mm - like weapons, paper
du
buildings and
everything else the government
buys � should be subject to strict
quality controls.
"In the past, shoddy research
just slipped through the cracks
says Jim Bencivenga, Finn's
assistant at the Office of Educa-
tion Research and Improvement
(OERI).
The guidelines will cover only-
research commissioned by the
OERI
The OERI signs contracts with
sociologists, psychologists,
economists and other scholars to
do research that the Dept. of
Education needs.
But their research was left
largely unmonitored, Bencivenga
says. Some of "it should never
have gone out because data col-
lection was suspect or the papers
were just poorly written
Review boards and Finn's per-
sonal judgment will replace the
old, routine research publication
approvals, Bencivenga adds.
"We're about two weeks awa)
from a solid policy that will be
distributed to all our
researchers he says.
Schneider, for one, worries the
new policy will make scientific
research subject to bureaucratic-
whims.
"Each undersecretary (of
education) can define research
any way he or she want to
Schneider says.
"Chester (Finn) is not a resear
cher Schneider notes. "He's a
policy analyst and would write
something far differently. A
researcher would have grounds to
claim he's not qualified to judge
his work
"Educational research is not
one discipline, but manv
disciplines he explains. "Some
work is performed by
psychologists, others by
sociologists. Even a noted educa
tional psychologist may be
critical of a psychologist's work
and the opposite even more so
Last year, the Dept. of Educa-
tion's research review procedure
provoked charges of censorship.
SGA Offers Legal Advice
B Jf-NMthR MKRs
surf WrlUr
I egal counseling foi students
needing advice is offei b) ECU
ough the Student Government
ssociati
In cooperation with the law
firm, McLawhorn and Short,
students car. schedule appoint-
ments with the lawyers to seek
advice in m - legal subject.
id .1- landlord and contract
situation to advise the student in
the most helpful way.
With cases involving the
university, it is usually a matter
of miscommunication. An exam-
ple is paving in-state tuition. V
cording to Short, "we can let the
administration know what the
circumstances are. We can
him or her in court, the student
must go elsewhere. The school is
paying us, so we can't go against
it
In order to make an appoint-
ment for counseling call or go by
the SCiA office. The lawyers are
available during these hours:
Monday 2:30-5:30, Tuesday
counsel the student, and if he or 9:00-11:30, and Thursday
she needs a lawyer to represent 3:00-5:30.
tral
v uuations.
� laws, or more seriou
McLawhorn and Short are
iva able to the student who is
sure ol the law regai ding his
lai According to
Nancy s' tl e � elp tl e stu
den "know i at the law is in the
� �� , We tall en
and lei them ki then ega
jcessary, we cai ake
a copy tatute n King the
let VV f will see anyone 1 we
;an el e'll refei the stu-
dei i ' someone else
In the case oj traffic disputes,
"we :an let them know the max
n im penalty, the options the)
the vpe of things
�akv ' ;
Ii a conti ic' dispute with a
ai dl rd mmate, "from
time Tie we might call the
get his side oi the
"hurs.
Sat.
Avalanche
In Concert
$1 00 ECU Students
Dor-ns iree
MEXICAN MADNESS
FREE NACHO BAR 9 UNTIL
75 DRAFT � 3 50 PITCHERS
TUESDAY.
LADIES NIGHT 5
9 PM
ALL LADIES WILL RECEIVE A CARNATION
1.67 WINE SPECIAL - 1 50 HOUSE HIGHBALLS
9-UNTIL: FREE PIZZA BAR
WEDNESDAY:
RIBTACULAR
ALL YOU CAN EAT BEEF RIBS . . . 7.95
INCLUDES SALAD. POTATO AND BREAD
BOSTON TEA PARTY
LONG ISLAND TEAS 2.95
THURSDAY:
COLLEGE NIGHT
3 50 PITCHER - 75 DRAFT - 1 67 WINE SPECIAL
FRIDAY:
leading to a congressional hear-
ing and an about-face by the
department, which agreed to
fund certain research projects it
previously had deemed unaccep-
table.
"But nobody's saving 'you
can't say this or that lien
civenga contends. "We are iusi
saying 'you can't sav it with
government money
Rather than hampering
research, Bencivenga savs lighter
monitoring will salvage the
department's tailing reputation.
"We've taken some broadsides
of criticism from the media and
the research community that our
quality is lousv. Finn would like
to create an institutional identity
of excellence
The price of such a policy,
however, may be the loss ol new
and unusual ideas. Schneider
says.
�BEAU'S�
NIGHTCLUB
presents
Friday, February 14, 1986
Happy Valentine 9s Day
PARTY
All Members Just $1.00 Admission
All GuestS JuSt $3.00 (includes membership)
All Couples (members only, Just $1.50
$1.75 Highballs all night long Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth
will be spinning the hottest funk & top 40 music in Greenville!
Phone 756-6401 for more info.
Beau's, a private club, located in the Carolina East Centre
beside Carolina East Mall in Greenville. All ABC Permits.
Happy Valentine's Day
from the staff A management of Beau 'sf
151
1
Happy Valentine's Day From
Marathon Restaurants
Greek Owned and Operated Since 1979
SUBS
Pizza Menu

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GYRO Sand �-
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PEPPER
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Pepporoni, Onions, Ground Beef
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Soft Drinks

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560 Evans Street r�
Greenville, N.C 27834
yiMIMIMPPPPPPPli
CALLUS
FAST FREE DELIVERY
752-0326 or 752-3753
s
The Store Outlet
Are Envious Of!
SCHNAPPS NIGHT
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TEQUILA SUNRISES � BLOODY MARYS
MIMOSA � CHAMPAGNE � SCREWDRIVERS
VALENTINE'S DAY
ALL LADIES RECEIVE
A FREE CARNATION
New Spring Arrivals
College Town Coordinates
Manor House Coordinates
California Ivy Separates
Swim Suits by Sassafras
and Pierre Cardin
Darryl's Delivers � Call 757-1973
m
Open 10-8
MonSat.
Arlington Blvd.
Across from
Buccaneer Theater
Mastercard, Choice,
and Visa accepted
17
.�





.THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 13. 1986
Record Enrollment Due To Older Students
WASHINGTON. DC (CPS)
� In still another count of how
many students are going to col-
lege this fall, the U.S. Census
Bureau says enrollment is up
again this year.
But various official head
counters have been disagreeing
about just how many students are
in school all year:
In December, the American
Council on Education reported
national college enrollment
decreased one percent this year,
while a few weeks ago the
American Association of Col-
legiate Registrars and Admissions
Officaers reported enrollment
was just about the same as in
1984-85.
Now the Census Bureau says
enrollment actually has risen
significantly during the decade,
thanks largely to a mass move-
ment of students over age 25 back
to campus.
At the same time, a leading ac-
crediting agency warned schools
had better reform their course of-
ferings if they're going to keep at-
tracting older students.
By setting new broad "objec-
tives" for future classroom stan-
dards, the agency appears to be
serving notice that it some day
will base accrediting decisions on
how well colleges serve older,
"nontraditional" students.
In all, there were 12.3 million
students in college in 1984. up
from 11.7 million in 1980, the
Census Bureau announced last
week.
The head count is very dif-
ferent from Department of
Education warnings that college
enrollment would drop
precipitously. The department in-
itially warned the first big drops
would begin in 1981.
Enrollments were supposed to
drop because there are fewer
18-to-22-year-olds in the popula-
tion, but the Census Bureau says
the increase in the number of
older students registering tor
classes more than offsets the
decline in the number of
"traditionally-aged" students.
The National Center for
Education Statistics, in its fall,
1985 prediction of this year's
enrollment, agreed the influx of
older students probably would
keep enrollment stable this school
year.
But the bureau "disagrees
enrollment will decline in the next
few years says staffer Wendy
Bruno.
While Bruno refuses to "make
any future predictions the
bureau does report students over
age 25" accounted for 36 percent
of all college enrollment in 1984.
In contrast, only 28 percent of
the nation's students in 1972 were
25 years or older.
To keep filling classes with
older students, however, the
Council tor Posisecondarv Ac-
creditation (CPA) last week
warned schools to "adapt to
serve society's future needs and
resist temptation to return to the
old ways
"In order to continue attrac-
ting the older students, colleges
must hurry now and define their
objectives in terms of the new
students and their needs ex-
plains the CPA's Janet Froom.
The council says students over
age 22 now comprise more than
half of all enrollments. "Tradi-
tional" students � under 22, at-
tending full-time and living on
campus � numbered only two
million of a total 12.4 million in
1985.
The CPA's report, "Educa-
tional Quality and Accreditation:
A Call for Diversity, Continuity
and Innovation was written
"to get higher education at least
to look at the way things are now,
and adjust to them in order to
keep up enrollment says
Froom.
"Over 50 percent of today's
students are over 22, many with
employment obligations and
family responsibilities that make
full-time college attendance im-
possible the report says.
"Yet most colleges and univer-
sities still focus largely on
students at the traditional college
age the report adds.
Colleges, Froom says, need to
recognize that "as student make-
up changes, the ideal curriculum
is changing
There are other demographic
changes besides age in the
American student body, the Cen-
sus Bureau found.
The bureau says women com-
prised 51 percent of enrollment
two years ago. The number
blacks doubled from 1970 to l i
million in 1984, while white
enrollment went up 37 percen'
9.3 million.
Enrollment in two-year col
leges grew 45 percent from 194
to 1982. The 2.8 mill
undergrads in 1982 accounted I
30 percent of the year's to
undergraduate enrollment.
ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF P REGS AM Y $195 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Con and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For Further information, call 832-0535 (toll tree number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 am and ' p.m weekdays General anesthesia available RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS 917 West Morgan St. Raleigh, M.C.
k BV fl'
Chlamy dia Prevails onCollege Campuses
(CPS) � Medical researchers
claim chlamydia has become the
most prevalent sexually
transmitted disease in the coun-
try, and college students are
among the most likely to contract
it.
Screenings of women coming
to health clinics at the universities
of Washington, Denver.
Nebraska, Alabama, Boston and
Tufts, among others, show seven
to 15 percent test positive for
chlamydia.
And rates as high as 35 percent
have been reported at certain
clinics.
There may now be three to
four million new cases of
chlamydia each year in the
United States, estimates
Lawrence Sanders of the Centers
for Disease Control in Atlanta.
Furthermore. 15-to-I9-year-
olds are the most likely people to
get the disease, the CDC says.
Little hard data exists to verify
that incidence of the seemingly-
obscure disease is rising, but
general observations b doctors
around the country suggest the
disease is spreading, savs Walter
Stamm of the University of
Washington's medical school.
However, research in England
does show incidence of the
disease has been increasing there
annually for the last ten ears,
Stamm adds.
Especially troubling to doctors
is that chlamydia often does not
produce symptomes in its vie
tims.
And, if left untreated in
women, the disease can catiNC
pelvic inflammatory disease.
which can lead to sterility, main-
nans Teri Anderson, a clinical
supervisor at Denver General
Hospital.
However, unlike acquired im-
mune deficiency syndrome
(AIDS) and herpes, chlamydia is
readil) treatable with antibiotics
such as tetracycline, Anderson
explains.
Symplons, usually occurring
within ten day often include
discharge and a burning sensa-
tion when urinating.
Increased availability of
cheaper tests for chlamydia also
may be contributing to the rise in
reports of the disease, Anderson
notes.
Spring Break in
DAYTON A BEACH !
Designers of Travel
is your best bet
For info call Tamara 757-1520
Valentine's Specials
Tar Landing Seafood
All You Can Eat
4 I ten
$6
Any One Or Any Combination i p
Shrimp, Oysters, Trout,
Clam Strips, Deviled
Crabs, Flounder
Alaskan Crab Legs Or
Steamed Shrimp
Served With Fried Or Baked Potato, Cole sa
Hushpuppies
105 Airport Koad
Greenville. C
0
� �! � tA,

rt' . Ml �
51
Magazine'
The Minority Affairs Publication of East Carolina University
OLD 5th BLDC EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE NC 27834 TEL (9W) 757-�92f
has openings for the following positions:
Typesetters
Photographers
Advertising Representatives
Writers
Associate Editors
Applications will be available at
The Expressions office or Media Board Secretary
in the Publications Building.
Camp
What is your idea
Doreen Mai Doujjal!
Daren Johnson
Tec'
"An a
I ia Simon
Freshman B
"I gue a perl
be dinner and a mo
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
Id The East Carolinian
St. Peter's C
Grad
j
:
;
;
CATHOLI
A RAINBOW OI
� En-ptQS'S
.
� Da �
� Em c hment proQi m
� Compere's a �
A rd process r, wril
� Leaning Cent � . �
grams or jli �
� Phy!
� Accredited Pv rtn f
struction and the N I al G
� Active pare' �
� A; -e c n
REGISTRATION BEGIN!
(Limited Open�n
8:30 a.m. t
St. Peter
2605 E Fourth St
752-
U
I





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 13, 1986
Students! Campus Voice
on prised 51 percent of enrollment
two ears ago. The number of
blacks doubled from 170 to l.l
million m 1984, vshile white
enrollment went up 37 percent to
um 9 ; million
Enrollment in two-year col-
eges grew 45 percent from 1974
the -s- The 2 8 million
dei grads in W82 accounted for
V perceni of the vear's total
a aduate enrollment
ABORTIOSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PRECS AMY
(195 Ab 18 eeks ai
rg I ic rest, Birth Comrol,
-
" jj il free
i-53M betww � and 5
ttkda) s i ieneraJ .i
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
'17 West Morgon St Raleigh, N.C.
fine's Specials
ding Seafood
u Can Eat
ombination ; 41
$6
99
Or Baked Potato. Cole Slaw,
tippies.
105 Airport Road
Greenville, NC
V v : �
ersity
bns:
s
ecretary
What is your idea of the perfect date?
Speaker Attacks Reaganomics
Doreen MacDougall
Junior Nursing
"A perfect date would be a late
dinner, then to a party with
friends
Jon Jordan
Junior Chemistry
"Someone who doesn't blindly
agree with everything I say, so-
meone with ideas of her own
-0.
1
Daren JohnsonKric Stepnoski
Sophomore IndustrialFreshman Business
Technology"A great looking girl who just
"An awesome looking chickdoes what you want to do
with a good personally
S x
"SrW
By JAY STONE
Managing Miliw
In an appearance at ECU last
Thursday author and political ac-
tivist Michael Harrington charg-
ed that the Reagan Administration
is in trouble. "I think he has fail-
ed Harrington said of Reagan.
"And 1 think that his greatest
acheivement, the one that got
him reelected, was an accident
Harrington went on to allege
that the economic recovery which
Reagan used as a campaign issue
in his successful reelection bid
was the result of deficit spending
on the military, a drop in oil
prices and the normal business
cycle rather than supply side
policies. "What Reagan said was:
in the '60s, under the liberals, we
spent too much money on the
poor, on consumption and not
enough on investment and pro-
ductivity. "Thus" Harrington
added, "The government should
give money to the rich so that
they can inv it productively
and create jops for the rest of
us
According to Harrington,
however, the government never
gave much money to the poor.
He added that the United States
spends less money on the poor
�haii any other advanced
democracy.
"If you think that welfare
spending makes a country un-
productive, then we should be the
most productive country in the
world, but we're not
Harrington also observed that
most non-military government
spending goes to social security
Lisa Simon
Freshman Business
"1 guess a perfect date would
be dinner and a movie
Linda Lynch
Freshman Physical Therapy
"My idea would be something
romantic, like a candlelight din-
ner
S
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
In Tbe Ernst Carolinian
NEED CASH?
Southern
Gun & Pawn
752-2464
500 N. Greene
r$
J
uiSSSSSSsS-
t.
y


y
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'y

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.
St. Peter's Catholic School
Grades K-6
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS
RAINBOW OF EXCELLENCE
� Emphasis on educational basics with a commitment to
Christian principles
� Dedicated, state certified teachers
� Enrichment programs in drama and foreign languages
� Computers accessible for all students
(Word processor, writing programs, Science and Math)
� Learning Center to open in September: Computer Lab, pro-
grams for all students including gifted and talented
� Physical education and intramural sports
� '� Accredited by the North Carolina Department of Public In-
I struction and the National Catholic Education Association
h � Active parent volunteer program
B � All religious traditions welcome
recipients rather than to poor
people. Reagan has worsened this
problem, according to Harr-
ington, by enacting transfer pro-
grams which transfer money
from the poor to the rich.
Yet, putting money in the
hands of the rich did not enhance
productivity or create jobs. Harr-
ington said this was so, because
the rich received a tax cut in the
middle of a severe recession.
"What those tax cuts did was
finance speculation, leveraged
buy-outs, green mail and cor-
porate takeovers but they didn't
create any jobs At present,
Harrington said, no sustained
recovery is possible because most
consumers arc deep in debt and
unemployment is high.
Harrington noted that four con
tributing factors have combined
to create crisis conditions in the
U.S. and world econimics: l)The
international redistribution of
labor 2) Multi-National cor-
porate monopolies 3) the interna-
tional debt crisis and 4) the tran-
sition from an industrial based
to a service based economy.
Therefore, Harrington main-
tained, Reagan's greatest failure
will be in the area of the
economy. Yet, he added, the
democrats do not presently have
the ideas that they need to solve
the crisis.
But, Harrington made it cleai
that the neo-liberalism touted by
Gary Hart was an even worse
answer to the crisis than tradi
tional liberalism. Instead, Harr
ington said, an alternative which
creates full employment,
dev elopes the economies of the
Third World and puts more
decision-making power in the
hands of working people is
desirable.
Valentine Day Cards
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week
9:30 to 9:30
����;�;��;�;������ �;�
�. . . ' ' . � . . � .
Something Special For
Your Valentine
omething
special
of Greenville Heart Shaped cookies
Gift Baskets
Made To Order
205 Fifth St.
757-3636
� Chocolate Covered Pretzels
Cueese Puffs

REGISTRATION BEGINS FEBRUARY 10, 1086
(Limited Openings Grades 3-6)
8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
y
y
y
y
y
y
y.
y
y
t
y
y.
y
y
i
y
y
y
y
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y
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y
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1

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i


St. Peter's School
2605 E. Fourth St Greenville, N.C.
752-3529
- ��. H
Buccaneer
THE YEARBOOK OF EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Portraits 1986
SCHEDULE
All dates: 9-12am & 1-5pm
tebruaru 3i3
(Sign up at the Bucca
Seniors
aru
neer)
Underclassmen �9larcb
and seniors & retakes -yy � OH
faculty
b
aoove
dales
�5 poses -No charge�
Questions? 757-6501
2nd floor�publications building
AgggggsssssSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSW;
vSSSSSSSSS
- - - ��
I - -





HI S c .Rn MAS i-HKl R1 13, 1
9Hb
Thanks
For
The
Coffee
Happy Valentine's Day
fA
'
'i

V
A �
a
k'Jf
r
A
tfK'
v x-i rnL-
? mIMCJIIIMIMC 3
y
,s.
Everybody Gets A
"little heart"
at
Fosdicks
And if your heart has
one of our winning numbers
you could take home
one of our
50
prixes
FOSDICKS
SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans
756-2011
Karate Kid
It s time tor
his moment of truth.
PG
rtint i timmitin
I hur t n Nai
MH V� nfcaM m u.tr nt . nil
!��
georges
hair designers
Valentine's
Day
Tanning
Special
10 Visits
$35.00

4

For the
Latest In
Contemporary
Hairstyling
Pale isn't your color.
The Plaa
Klafsun Suntanning Beds
World's til Tanning System
756-6220 Open 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
RECORDS
Blank Tapes
TDKUD90 $2.98
Maxell XLII90 $2.98
112 E. 5th St. 758-4298
Students l
Hatter as
Hammocks

ii
ii
�xtoMMm,m �ai
Needs You
Work Your Own Hours
NO Weekends
Easy to Learn
Apply 1104 Clark St.
8:00-5:00 Mon-Fri
No Phone Calls, Please
SHOE OUTLET
NAME BRAND SHOES A
At Discount Prices
Quality Casual Shoes $15
Ladies Dress and Casual Shoes
at discount prices
Large Selection of Name Brand
Tennis Shoes $12.88 to $29.88
752-2332 one block off Evans
X

'�
X
� :
ii
I
6 Day Cruise To Mexico
Over Spring Break
Cost: $445.00 from Miami
Call: Greenville Travel Center
756-1521
The
Flowi
Remember voi
Friday, Fa
Roses
Spring Am
Plai
2904 East Tenth St.
?
A
m I





y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 13, 1986
ay Love Lines
American
Gem Society
Certified
Gemologists
NORTH HILLS
325 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE 756-9889
7teMs3�
ON�X�
Process & Print
with this coupon
From 110, 126, 35mm or
Disc Color Print Film.
14140 per print
(reg. 29C)feS1.49de v.hg.(reg S2.98)
Lxample: 24 exp. film reg $9 94
NOW $4.97!
Carolina East Mall
(North Entranc �Near Belk's)
756-6078
OPEN MONSAT.
8 AM to 9 PM
Limit one roll per coupon
Not valid with other ufters
Expire 3 12 86 a
Greenville
The Plaza � Ngf I -
Flip Chairs
49.99
s
$100 value
� Opens up to a smgie Ped
8 colors
Milk Crates
$8valueO�yy
� Great for stacking & storage
galleria
galeiQh�Durham�Greensboro�Wilson�Gteenville�Wilmington�Fayettevil e
Presents
'y Our Special
End Of
The Week Party
Free Admission Friday
February 14, 3:30 til 7:30
uise To Mexico
pring Break
5.00 from Miami
iville Travel Center
56-1521
The m t
Flower
mm
Basket
Remember your sweetheart
Friday, February 14
Roses Balloons
Spring Arrangments
Plants
2904 East Tenth St.
Telephone 757-3857
rfdfafaGfifafiffa
5th Street Import Service
Finest in Sports Ccr Repair
6 Month- 60,000 MileWorranty on
all Work
We Repair Toyota, Honda, VW
Fiat, Porsche, Volvo, Datsun
Lotus, Mercedes, BMW, Audi
Subaru and Othe rs DIAL
758-1534
1007 E. 5th Greenville
VISA
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AMERICAN EXPRESS
�,� , � ,





THF FAST CAROI INIAN
Entertainment
Teamed Ladies
A Play With Heart
M Hkl ARY M. IVhft Page 10
Hv -l.l RISHFI
sun VS rili i
wife She provide I the play with
�ll! 'in so abhorrent and
strong hai M
Wednesday s performance ol would I ive I
the turned Ladies showed fine hei intentions
performances b the entire cast. Hal Wells a. I Brinlo
tie renowned omh was in blended en,s
deed tunny and witty, sot it also to pn vide th
Proved ver powerful. around a!ln jsfe
Mohcre s comedy was set in a Chrvsale'
seventeenth century Paris home Henriette, hrvsale
owned by a rich bourgeois named sopl Vrjste
,The, pKM focused was t i the
around the fact that three women pn u
irmly had conformed to his broth,
he scientific and philosophical state. Hen, ,eill
hte normally load by learned distress' wh, s
men. In short, they took up lives upon hei I
inopp ion to the stereotypical
J
Oscar Nominations
Surprise Industry
lifestyle thev were expe te 1 I
lead.
Pei' the best perfn
ghl n,h that ol Kevin
Meade, who played C hrysale He
n�i dded a great dea I
plas overall comedic
nio with his stage at
ty but he ah
ii
foi
v line pet to was
demoi by Mollx t �
portravi I � . i
.i I ew is, di
'
D"l"ir P14t�
)av,d Blanchard. Vnnoatney, Brink) Vkkers and Rene Maxwell
f�P �� ����om) m the I-asl Carolina Playhouse production of 'The
learnedlad.es, Keb. 12-15 at 8:15 p.m. in the McGinn rheatre for
reservations call 6390.
Great Debate Held
trable wort I
ol � � .
will he the subjei
' . Sarah VV'eddinj
-
I i I Hendi
cep tluating a
a i .ystem thai measures
skills, effort, and responsibility.
Everyone will ime ami
ol pay tumid not be a
wit �
Act f 196.1 ci .rdi
and a .men ar recj i r
pay �
job, no �
perform arc usidei
shoul -
also .
� �
V iliu-d
and

ireeuom I ind to

Schl l of coi
lorth, say . ai
- women
. rdous sin
�: kplaces is
lud � H � . � ad
worth, say s
the comparison is n n just an ap
pie and orange one She teeU that
" case and dil' an's job
x ; i than i regurj
i i.iiise ,e
le advocates t. om-
aiII move women
into non traditional roles,
portents feel that it will encourage
n I stay ii id
: ; I � paid
� v
Vh is some dif-
Producers Perform MTV Hits
� N Ml Klsiihl
Mall U - I,
ing ol .i Saturday night sui
remembered, by the most sol
v -i ���� i- . , 3nj ' :
v untune spot huh sen � . ,
the lout faces -t I he i � ,� ,i,
Pr.srl ,11, �
I roducers, the wall to wall Attic cam. �
crowd drove themselves into a C
frenzy, fhis was only the beginn- as of the!
JIT! l MlQMIv
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
The Producers included several of their popular MIV video tunes in
last Saturday nights performance at the Attic. The groups lead vocalist
and guitarist. Van lemple (above), closed with A Hard Day. Njo,t
lour Music relevision video
songs, "1 I ove I ucy
I he croud had finally received
what they had been waiting for: a
first hand look at 'and sure to
b one of the best
Energy poured Morn the
amplifiers to till the capacity plus
croud with enough stamina and
' t to dance throughout the en-
show .
i ead singer and lone guitarist
Van remple best expresses the
group's style and distinct nature.
Wayne Famous' keyboards and
rim Smith's bass lines, paced
with Bryan Holmes' percussion.
seem to envelope femple's words
to form a sound uncontested by
the bands who've played the At-
tic before.
I he highlight and final song o'
the regulai set was, ol course, the
Atlanta band's classic, "She
Sheila Most of the croud
responded by singing and danc-
ing to the words while others just
stared in awe and admiration.
Now, one might ask how The
Producers could possibly follow
this up with an encore. This was
no problem for the veteran band.
In theii first encore they played
yet another ot their more promi-
nent songs. "What's He Got?"
I his stopped the departing crowd
and brought them back to the
center ol the floor.
Alter their first encore set, the
lights were dimmed once more.
I he crowd seemed like a hungry-
mob at an execution. The con-
demned entered and began to
sing once more. At last, in merg-
ing red and yellow lights, an ex-
haused, sweat covered face
strained upward to produce the
final words to the Beatles' "Hard
Days Night As the band stag-
gered off the stage, the crowd
staggered out of the Attic � not
the least bit emptv. but terribly
fatigued.
�: he male female
ning rati . generally. I
sides agree that to every one
a man earns, a woman
n ns only about 60 cents.
Advocates say thai comparable
" th will diversify the jobs
men choose. (pj -a
that it will only succeed
segregating jobs. In fat
portents of comparable �
suggest integration ol the � i �
:e as ,i better remedy
wage cap problem. I tics'
stand seems to be based upon
assertion that women choose
where they work and what kind
of work they do. While advocates
agree, thev assert that women
choose these roles because of the
sexisi socialization in the United
States, Another point thev
disagree on is the concept of ap-
plying value to specific jobs. Op-
ponents say that jobs have no in-
herent worth. Advocates say that
relative worth is the issue.
The result oi comparable
worth will be female unemploy-
ment and increased inflation, op-
ponents sav. Also, the free enter-
See DEBATE, Page 11
(UPI) This year's Oscar race
promises to be the weirdest m re
cent Academy Award memory
thanks to the exclusion ol some
deserving candidates and the in-
clusion ii others.
The greatest oversight wa�
ol director Steven Spielberg who
poduced and directed The Color
Purple, which accumulated 11
nominations earlier this month
It came as a shock to most oi
Hollywood that Spielberg, who
has directed some ol the screen's
all time box oft'ii; winners, was
not among the nominees. In past
years he was nominated for
Raiders oj the I ost irk. and
Close Encounters oj the third
hind
He has neve? won an Oscai
Spielberg has nothing
about his omission. He was in
Hauan on vacation when the
nominations were announc
Bui he must be wondering about
his popularity in the film com-
munity .
Everyone agrees movies are a
collaboi � � irm. But it one
person can be held responsible
the succes Mtlure i I
� almo tinly the
director.
The olor Purple. �
most films, .eflects its j-
-Meet aird passions j- Was
ninated fot best p
academy ignored Spiell . i
e were notl
spectator.
Warnet Bros , which released
lhe( olor Purple, fired of! a
porate announcement lament
the academy slight:
"Warner Bros, wishes to ex
press its sincere appreciation to
the members of the motion pic-
ture academy to; according The
((dor Purple the total of l l
nominations and also c
gratulates all of the picture's
wonderfully talented Oscai
nominees At the same time, the
company is shocked and
dismayed thai the movie's
primary creative force. Steven
Spielberg, was no! recognized.
Then there's the case of the
nomination ol Japan's master
filmmaker Akiro Kurosawa for
best director for Ran. He was
nominated but his picture was ig-
nored for best picture and besl
foreign language film.
The Academv rules eliminate
foreign language films from com-
peting for best picture, so the
4,200 academv members are oft
the hook for overlooking Ran in
I hat category.
But why was it not nominated
for best foreign language film?
spokesman for Ran said,
"Well, it was a combined
Japanese and Trench project. I
guess the French contingent
thought the Japanese would put
it up for nomination and vice ver
sa. It's a shame it wasn't
nominated
Kurosawa, however, ha w
Oscars tor best foreign language
film, Rashomon in 1951, and
Dersu I zala in 1975
like Spielberg. Kurosawa, 75,
seems to be a prophet with
honor at home He has not exact-
ly endeared himsell his
Japanese peers who have dubbed
him "The Emperor His ad-
mires call turn "Sensei ar,
fectionate appellation for teacher
or master
FILM
X " �n.r. r yriatJBr frnrr.r. i
spokesmai for the Dire
I ' America, l
elberg for itsawa
yeai and also � red Ron
H iward tor Cocoon, said, "We
ated lom Sawyer and
H ick fmn while the academy
;igl guvs
Kurosawa and (He.ton Babenco
(who won a nomination for Kiss
f the Spider H oman.)
Spielberg could still win the
Guild award March 8, becoming
only the third director in history.
win the DGA award and still
fail to capture the Oscar. The
:s were Francis Coppola in
i2 tor The Godfather, when
Boh fosse won the Oscar for
C aberel. and Anthony Harvey in
1968 who wot: the DGA award
for The I ion In Winter the same
year Carol Reed won the Oscar
for Oliver
Gilbert Cates, president o the
Directors Guild, said, "I find it
amazing that anyone can be
nominated for best director and
not have his picture nominated,
and the corollary is just as
astonishing. How can you
separate the quality ot the film
from the work of the director?
"It's happened before.
Everyone is entitled to vote the
was they feel. But I am truly sur-
prised
Another oi' beat nomination
that of The Color Purple for best
original score. Starting at the top
See ACADEMY, Page 11
It's My Move
Love: A Four Letter Word
By ROBERT MAZZOLI
SUft Wriltr
Love.
It's a well-meaning word filled with connota-
tions ranging from the smell o roses to the sight
of a new-born infant slobbering on the lapel of a
Gucci sweater, love is the misunderstood word of
the 80s. Now, love carries harsh connotation fill-
ed with caustic words and
plastic faces. In a way, love has
become a parody of itself.
Let's look at some history
In the earliest recorded
history of the word's first
usage, a caveman that scientists
refer to as Joe Caveguy used the
word "wuv which in that time
period meant, "you look like
dinosaur meat Joe's
girlfriend, Jane, heard him say
this word, and mistakenly took
the phrase as a compliment.
Now, we turn to the Greeks
and Romans. By this time, love
had thoroughly been hashed
v-v. out bv the
philosophersthoroughly hashed out, but never
defined. Unable to hide their embarrassment, the
bigwig philosophers gathered on the island of
Crete and decided to abolish the word "wuv" and
replace it with another word or phrase.
Eventually, they came up with a new word and
called it "divorce Unfortunately, divorce did
not go over very well, but it later resurfaced and
became popular when a certain large gentleman
became king of England.
In the 1700s, love began to take on a new mean-
mg. Men were loving their country and loving
their statesmanship. The women, however
became unhappv with the new love in their men's
lives and decided to fight back. Zero population
centers made a big move across Europe and its col-
onies m what scientists refer to as the "Women
Openly Hostile Towards Husbands Because The
Man m Their Life has a New Woman Age or
simply -The Frigidaire Age "
1Lovecontinued to attract more definitions as
I jK "vent trough. In the high-brow circles
of England, love was used of-
fhandedly and without depth.
Lor instance, snobby women
would ask their servants, "bring
me a demitasse, love Ot
course, the snobby women were
in no way, shape or form in love
with their servants, and the set
vants knew that the overweight
and pompous "ladies" were
simply teasing and taunting.
This teasing and taunting
lasted into the early part of the
-0th century until the Unloved
Servants Revolution of 1909 put
Place, ssr SLHTAStSS
2, tJ Tly found ilstlf eatoct. The two
See ITS, Page 11
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Award
( onlinufd from Pat In
total ol
and com
will breai
record
divu: .
( teopatra ba I
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comedia
tor best
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Continued From Pane Id
kids were tired
their vocabu u
thei
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Rev,
c r ea
tor exai
I ove P
tor V.
phen
Shook I ;� .
Th
love
comeb �
the way
ana I
were ol

the end
tern
its new
becan e i
a
We've Taken t






II
ations
ustrv
FILM
Word
Pajit 11
Award Nominations Overlook Spielberg
i ontinued Krom Page 10
ai . the
time award
k, 10 in
� oopi
.1 up
nne Bancroft lias had five
nominations and won the Oscar
in W62 foi �' Miracle Worker
lessica 1 ange has been
nominated foui nines, winning
host supporting actress foi Toot-
sie in 1982
Meryl Streep, a two nine win
net foi best actress in Sophie's
( hone in WH2 and besi suppoi
uiii: actress in Kramer vs. Kramer
in 1979 has six nominations.
Whoopi will be able to shout
"Whoopee indeed it she can
�vercome hei heavyweight com-
petition
Page is liable to win the sym
th vote i'i academ) members,
been nominated eight
iev since 1958 Inn always com
awa empty-handed. She is
sue :h other oft
m nated losers as Petei
the late Richard
were nominated
on who
seven times without winning
Otheis m the also ran hall ol
tame with si nominations but no
Oscars are Paul Newman.
Deborah Ken and I helma Ritter.
But Page isn't uptight about
winning this year. She said being
nominated is almost as much fun
as getting the Oscar, adding.
"You don't hae the horrible
responsibility to make a big
speech
1 he besl actot category suffers
from the blahs this yeai
lack Nicholson lias become,
justifiably, a perennial nomii
with eight nominations. He's
won two Oscars foi besl actoi in
One Hew (her the Cuckoo's
'est and best supporting actoi in
Ierm of Endearment
He belongs to a special Oscai
club, a handful ol per
who have won awards in both a
line categories I he others are
lack 1 emmon, R I teNiro,
Helen Hayes, Meryl Streep, Mag
gie Smith and Ingi id Bergman
Jon Voight, who won the
iolden (ilobe last w - his
heroics in Runaway I ram,
formei Ainnei wit
c ham e
I �
the r
I lai rison I
1 ame in t and
as Indiana ; nomina
foi his H ilrit'w !
iai nei (sui
foi hi
turph " s Rom ana I h e
brood � H
non
his "i in, Spidei I oman
Hi I 11's 111
mini
Most iiiieic ' n �
minated supp ri
njelii a Huston, -
hemiiij i'n
Honor
It is possil
fathei �
f si I
lohn I In '
Honor
Oil u
� I'n- i
V
mal
i
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Ireusun t the Siera 1adrt


0NS0LIDATED
�HEATRES
.Adults S2 oo 5T
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
Is Television Taking Over?
.4 houi s a dav
m's fantasy
m's nightmare.
H eel the home
Pre
; - cassettes
ation's lead
dium b 1995
yeai we'll be wal
Hits ol
to the
t" Wilkol
. ites, Inc.
- . �
imes will have
ideo casset te
v . pend a
time
PCs,
an 4
olume
� � as net
than motion picture '
revenue, and 10 Mines moi. " -
pav I
"S ithin a decade the structure
ol the American entertainn
industry will be revolutionit
said David V ilkotsky, print,
authoi ol the repoi i
dd it up vouisell.
i little while we'll be d
nothing but watching
network, local, independ
pav per iew. cable or vid
cassette. Even musn.
be "watched
rhis mean- ���
mote severeh addicted tele

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Nkvs Plavmi;
14
The Color Purple
pi; i i
Held over Wailing time is over.
'i m
Nightmare -i Kim St
Part 11

selve
11 be a cryinj
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talking the sti
glue them
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foi I .v
Vnonymous.
Help ft I iinl
ways dow n the line
In the meantime.
looks grim M

It's Easy To Misunderstand
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&&4?&&&&4?&&&&&&&&&'h
Debate Scheduled
( ontinued Krom Page 10
will he undeimined.
irable worth completely
� the supply
d Astern ol the United
of a comparable
gram has been
he $300 billion
between
.urn
parable worth opponent, Schlal
lv, and advocate, Weddington.
promises to be emotion filled
With the question ol comparable
worth and othei issues to be
discussed, the debate will surely
provoke both participants and
the audience
rickets are selling rapidly ai
the Central Iicket Office
Mendenhall.
a man
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3. Take his word for it when he tells
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4. Laugh at his jokes, even when he
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5. Avoid, at all costs, letting him see
you reapply your lipstick.
6. Order something more exotic than
a white wine spritzer.
7. Compliment him on his taste
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J





I Ml I AS I .KM INIAN
FEBRUARY 13 8(
11
) mi nations
I n
iustrv
FILM
II . . JLMil ���� ��l��.l I ��
r. � � �. � �� T �"I
A
. Harvey in
�f M . Page 11
�� orrf
I the
ved
' : Sput
I
I ' �: I R I
War pui a serious
is tune, love literally
a rd synonomous
:essive drinking and ja.
tnd early sixties, rock 'n'
a meaning to love The
v IT'S, Page 11
Award Nominations Overlook Spielberg
Continued From Page 10
Qumc lones there arc a
il ol 12 nominees. It Jones
company win the Oscar, they
will break the all time award
�rd in a single category, 10 in-
.iduals foi an direction in
( leopafra back in lV
nothei oddity too is Whoopi
dberg, a w lime stand up
dian, who is in the tunning
best at 11 ess in hei mo ie
ui as a pei formei.
Goldberg, ol course, had nevei
n nominated before and finds
sell in the running against a
midable bunch ol veteran
, ampaigners w ith an in
aggregate ol 23
redii
(. iei a Page has been
tted a whopping eighl
as ne ei won an
ai
Anne Bancroft has had five
nominations and won the Oscar
in 12 for The Miracle Worker.
Jessica l.ange has been
nominated four times, winning
best supporting actress for Toot-
sie in 1982.
Meryl Streep, a two time win-
ner � for best actress in Sophie's
Choice in 1982 and best suppor-
ting actress in Kramer vs. Kramer
m 1979 � has six nominations.
Whoopi will be able to shout
"Whoopee indeed if she can
overcome her heavyweight com-
petition.
Page is liable to win the sym-
pathy vote of academy members,
having been nominated eight
times since 1958 but always com-
ing away empty-handed. She is
ahead o such other oft-
nominated losers as Peter
O'Toole and the late Richard
Burton who were nominated
seven times without winning.
Others in the also ran hall of
fame with six nominations but no
Oscars are Paul Newman,
Deborah Kerr and Thelma Ritter.
But Page isn't uptight about
winning this year. She said being
nominated is almost as much fun
as getting the Oscar, adding,
"You don't have the horrible
responsibility to make a big
speech
The best actor category suffers
from the blahs this year.
Jack Nicholson has become.
justifiably, a perennial nominee
with eight nominations. He's
won two Oscars foi best actor in
One Hew (her the Cuckoo's
Nest and best supporting actor in
Terms of Endearment.
He belongs to a special Oscar
club, a handful o performers
who have won awards in both ac
ting categories. The others are
Jack Lemmon, Robert DeNiro,
Helen Hayes, Meryl Streep, Mag-
gie Smith and Ingrid Bergman
Jon Voight, who won the
Golden Globe last week foi his
heroics in Runaway Train, is a
formei winner with an outside
chance.
There are three newcomers in
the best actoi race
Harrison lord, who gained
fame in the Stat Wars trilogy and
as Indiana lones, was nominated
for his cop role in Witness, lames
darner (surprise!) was nominated
foi his amorous druggist role in
Murphy's Romance Ihe
brooding William Hun won his
nomination playing a homosex
ual in Kiss Oj the Spider H omun
1 he supporting categories of
fer mostly new faces with a few
oldtimers thrown in. Ml 10
nominees are in the race for the
first time
Most interesting ol the
nominated supporting players is
Anjelica Huston, who played the
scheming daughter in Prizzi'i
Honor
It is possible she will become
part of a father daughter com
hi nation it she wins the Oscai and
John Huston wins the award I
best director, again tor f'rizzi's
Honor
An Anjelica victory would
make her the second person evei
to win an Oscar tor a role in a
tilm directed bv a family
member. Ihe first time involved
her father, who directed his
father, Walter Huston, to a sup
porting role Oscai in The
Ireasure of the Sieru Madre I
m 1948
� rv i! talgii tout h was provided
bv the inclusion ol Don meche,
a roi � ' td i man in almost
50 mo ies in the '30s .met 4k,
who was nominated tor his comic
oldster role ini (ton
Saul me ' � f his nomii
. I really wa
n the pa weeks I've
: 1 2
pounds Maybi i ub
cons � re ai ing tu all
tills
Hi ippi i ite numl
(pral Winfrey 'l
Theolor Purple
. erv
; tilm
Is Television Taking Over?
tw
I PI) b�dv is saying
not so
�n, but
e watchii
1 ele iBu ea
U COI
N

h m 1985 ol
10 minutes a
fascinating is
�1 and cable
1a hile nei
i
I H 1

�la � i V
o mil�'s4 and
hv
5 Americans
tand in
� 1. i � at means
we'll be
watching the tube 24 hours a da
surely an adman's fantasy and
a librarian's nightmare.
But let's not forget the home
video viewing factor. Pre-
recorded home video cassettes
will become the nation's leading
entertainment medium bv 1995
the same year we'll be wat-
ching more than eight hours o
IV a day � according to the
business analysis firm o Wilkof-
skv Gruen Associates. Inc.
Wilkofsky Gruen reports that
nine years from now. 85 percent
ol all American homes will have
at least one video cassette
recorder, Americans will spend a
fourth ol their total viewing time
watching pre-recorded tapes.
Americans will rent more than 4
billion video cassettes, and the
home video software industry
will reach an annual retail volume
ol $20 bUhon � the same as net-
work IV advertising, greater
�an cable, three times larger
than motion picture box office
revenue, and 10 times more than
pay TV.
"Within a decade the structure
Of the American entertainment
industry will be revolutionized
said David Wilkofsky, principal
author of the report.
Add it up yourself.
In a little while we'll be doing
nothing but watching television
� network, local, independent,
pay-per-view, cable or video
cassette. Even music will have to
be "watched
This means there will be many
more severely addicted tele-holies
stalking the streets (if they ever
unglue them selves trom the
tube). There will be a crying need
for T.W.A. lube Watcher-
Anonymous
Help for the IV junkies is a
ways down the line.
In the meantime, the future
looks grim Marriages will be
marked bv identical his and her
dents on the couch, children will
surface from theii rooms (and
R-rated HBO movies) only to
secure the lat tble guide
magazine, satellite dish, owners
will be branded as freaks, placed
in cage- and studied like : I
But hope spi ings forth in this
gloom d iom scenario. Bv 1995,
Billosby should be filthy rich
enough to buy NB . change the
name to "Nothing Butosby"
and prescribe the proper
medicine foi our addiction once
and for all.
0NS0LIDATED
HEATRES
Adults s2 oo
TIL
5:30
CHILDRE
ANYTI
REN, I
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greanville Square Shopping Cantar
1-4.7.9:45
Now Plaing
The Color Purple
Held (her Waiting time is over.
im; 13
2-4:30
7-):2l�
v �i�J:
Nightmare .i Elm St
Part II
5-3:13-5:15
7 15-9:1
It's Easy To Misunderstand
( ontinued from Pane HI
of
vocabulai mply
d its
ind more
��� �.
i . Need is
. ccepi
Vv � at ce I
illy p
P '��
tuts,
unders. h
i
bad ' Love was
ay oul ' problems,
and il I t find love, you
. �b iously '
h the ad ent of the 70s and
end ' ' � War,
nained popular, and wit!
tew connotations, love
u e a hip w I PI like
. : "love that spoon
good ivin" were com-
monplace, mostly because ol the
limited vocabulary o people who
quented discos and Shoney's
r estaurants.
In the 80s, the majority o the
population has grown cynical ol
the word love. s people reflect
on previous years, they find the
� fferenl meanings of love and,
in turn, gel contused. You hear
songs like "1 Want to Know
What I ove Is" and you can see
the complexity ol a society com-
ing to grips with a simple word
that holds wav too many mean
ings.
Ihe confusing aspects ol love
have turned the world on its eat
and back into the time of "The
Beginning of the End Age
rhink about it When was the last
time someone whispered in vour
ear, "1 wuv you
Honestly, do
dinosaur meat
sou teel
like
Bcww w4
Debate Scheduled
(untinued Krom Page 10
prise system will be undermined.
Comparable worth completely
denies the success of the supply
and demand system o the United
States. Ihe start of a comparable
worth p r o g r a m has been
estimated around the S300 billion
mark.
I he debate between com-
parable worth opponent. Schlal
lv, and advocate. Weddington,
promises to be emotion-filled
With the question o comparable
worth and other issues to be
discussed, the debate will surely
provoke both participants and
the audience.
Tickets are selling rapidly at
the Cen'ral Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
We've Taken the Guilt Out of Fast Food
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306 Greenville Blvd. Plaza Mall Phone 757-7769
2. Seem unimpressed when he tells
you he scored a hat trick in the third period.
3. Take his word for it when he tells
you that 1984 was a very good year for
Chardonnays.
4. Laugh at his jokes, even when he
forgets the punch lines.
5. Avoid, at all costs, letting him see
you reapply your lipstick.
6. Order something more exotic than
a white wine spritzer.
7. Compliment him on his taste
in colors, even if he arrives in jeans and
a T-shirt.
8. Tell him you'd ask him up for
a Suisse Mocha, but you only do that on
second dates.


Celebrate the moments of your life
with General Foods' International Coffees.
9? www wwwwwww wwwwflPVwwwwwww ww wwww wwwwl
)





12
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By BRYAN'
Man-O-Stick
MGM Releases Fellini Film
Bv JARRELL & JOHNSON
0 ���
(inger and rred, the new mo
ire from Academy
Award-winning director Federico
Fellini and producer Alberti
Grimaldi, has been acquired by
MGM I A for distribution in all
Jia throughout the United
States and English-speaking
Canada, it was announced b
Alan I add Ji . President and
Chief Operating Officer o!
MGM I A I ntertainment i
"MGM I A is proud to an-
nounce our association with, this
outstanding, entertaining film
and its talented creators com-
mented Mr. Ladd. "We look tor-
ward to sharing Ginger and Fred
with audiences in 1986.
Starring Marcello Mastroianni
and Giolietta Masina, Ginger and
Fred blends a biting satire of con-
temporary television variety
shows with a bittersweei
about two retires
once found fame thi
interpretat; I Fred V
and (unger Roger- ! I
first appearance n televis
late gives 'hen i
recapture a momei
Rights to ' m were ac
quired fron producer Grima
yn behaif ol P E A (Produz
Europee Associate) k 1 SI
on locations in tal during 1985,
the film celebrated its he-
world premiere on Jan. I3tl
the Palais De Chaillot in Pas
Both Giulietta Masina and
Marcello Mastroianni attended
the standing room-only showing
?1 'he film, which was re
b) continual applause
throughout and a ten-minute
standing ovation at its conclu
'

nationa v it 1

' iteUoni,
'� I a Strada I
Im whic h was resj
Giulietta M
itai
Best
I In His second I scai
winner. Sights oj abiria, a
cd Ma ;ina am
in 195
C.inger ami hred wjj be
all n
is.
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Walkiri' The Plank
Bv A GUY
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Assassinc3Ton
Came

:
The Assassination
Game By AOII is
Back!
Sunday, February 23 -
Thursday, February 27
$100,00 First Prize
irSunday, February 16: All entires must be in to
the AOII House no later than 9:00p.m.
Sunday 23rd � All participant Happy Hour to start I
the game. Kick Off party at Lambda Chi House
Sunday, Feb. 23.
� Kill Cards will be given out at this time (It is to
your avantage to pick up your kill card early.
All participates must be Greek affliated
The Assassination Game is sponsored by:
BUD LIGHT

i
!
:
:
i
i
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I
SSSSSSS5SSSSsss�ss j
Vif �k
y
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:
(he lov
and
Richmon
Plus For
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B l)W ll M
1
Pii
is
club
fresl
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Mar
Univ
fel: thai E
her
" R � K
.
-
CAA Basl
Men's( on
Richmond10-oJ
Navy10-1.
George Mason7-4,
East Carolina6-5,
UNC-Wilmington4-7,
James Madison2-8,
American2-9,
William & Man2-9,
.
J
.1





& Cherry
ANT
llini Film
.ea-c:
(linger an it tred
The
Assassmalion
Game
a
AOll
'es must be in to !
p.m.
app Hour to start

da Chi House
us time (It is to
card early.
ek affliated
Sponsored by:

.

ssssssssssssssssssssss
IHJ t AS1 CAROl INI AN
Sports
I l HRl ARY 13, lh Put 13
I
Ihe addition ol 2f new Pirate football recruits should help to offset
the l��s t this war's seniors and provide needed talent for Art Baker
and his staff.
Richmond Native
Plus For Tankers
Bv 1 ll)U(.INM lSS
:� � i ��
954! hi


a.cc es s
(
� Besi' "
.
r d.
4&
( avcee Poust
o the
pi . in it ECU
� 0-6.
li ! feel � I
lout
I more consis-
year and I've
e fastet each Mine I've
peted
Poust is a special education
:�! her third year at ECU,
� e has shown outstanding
. and dedication as a 1 ads
swimmer,
si s the girls' top all-around
said Pirate coach
Rick Kobe. "She's one ol the
dented athletes oar
i has had, and she puts out a
endous amount i l effort
P i Richmond, area
ve who swam foi John
Schauble oi the Briarwood swim
club. That is the same club thai
ned out Pirate men star
Bruce Brocksch m i d t and
man Lady Pirate Angel.
VYinstead.
Coming out of high school
Pousl was recruited by Willian .v
Mary and James Madison
L niversity as well as 1(1.
fell that ECU was the school for
her.
"Rick (Kobe) impressed me as
being the nicest coach I'd talked
Poust said. He was very
honesi with and supportive ol his
swimmers. Also, a loi of people
from Virginia thai 1 swam with
during high school came here
What's u like swimming foi
ac h Kobe'
"It's fun Pousl added. "A
: hes will just tell you,
'ok. gel in there and swim 6000
,1s oi whatever but coach
Kobe makes ii less of a drudgery.
He jokes around with us, and
its us like individuals. lso,
� ted in our lives outside
a miming. He'll ask about our
school, oui boyfriends, things
like that.
"For instance, some ol the
girls on the team and I formed a
y this year. Now sonic
would probabh say
'whal are sou doing wasting your
e with that but coach Kobe is
very interested and supportive
Swimming is probably one of
most exhausting and time-
consuming sports in college, and
sometimes it can be tough to jug-
gle athletics and academics.
"It's real tough (to schedule
my time) during the season. I had
a tough time in high school, but
college is a lot tougher
But now the I ad Pirates'
dual-meet season is over, and
Pousi, along with the rest of the
Bucs, will soon get a well-
deserved test.
I'm kind o giad it's getting
near the end Poust admitted,
"but I'm also ecited about the
(conference) tournament
Beginning today, the ECU
women (and men) will be lighting
it out at the first annual CAA
See POUST, page 15
Sports Fact
Thur. Feb. 13, 1983
On the final hole oi the
Hawaiian Open, golfer Isao Aoki
pitches a 128-yard wedge shot for
an eagle three to snatch victory
from Jack Renner. At the
scorer's tent, Renner remains
seated for several minutes in a
state oi complete disbelief; it is
poetic justice that he wins the
Hawaiian Open the following
year.
New Recruits For Gridiron
By SCOTT COOPFR
Spurtv i dlloi
Art Baker and the ECU foot-
ball staff had a big day recruiting
as they signed 26 newcomers to
the 1986 Pirate football team.
The new recruiting class in-
cludes 17 high-school seniors,
eight junior-college transfers and
one transfer student (Carl
Barkers, from Wake Forest
University). The 26 Pirate
newcomers (and possibly a 27th
from Florida) should prove to be
a factor in helping the Pirate
squad next year, according to
head coach Art Baker.
"1 think we have enough
players to make a difference for
us next year Baker said. "The
coaches have worked very hard
and very well.
"Dr. Howell, Dr. Volpe, the
faculty and our placers also
helped a great deal � so main
people got involved Baker ad-
ded, "that's the best feeling
With the Pirates not having the
success they had wanted in '85 (a
2-9 season), coach Baker feels
thai the staff accomplished what
they set out to do.
"We had some major goals to
accomplish. We wanted im-
mediate help, m needed areas �
and we accomplished that
Baker stated. "We got (some)
vital areas � defensive backs, big
tunning backs, wide receivers �
we filled in these areas, we're
really pleased with that
Ihe Pirates did get some top-
notch talent, according to coach
Baker, including ihe likes ol run-
ningbacks Brian McPhattet and
Anthony rhompson.
"We got some top people.
McPhatter's an outstanding pro-
spect Baker said smiling.
"Thompson, he's as outstanding
on offense as he is on defense.
"Recruiting is a tunny thing
Baker continued, "but based on
the immediate goal, you have to
NAME
POS
give us high grades
With eight of the recruits com
ing as junior-college transfers,
Baker realizes that he is gaining
experienced talent, but possiblv
sacrificing some elgibihtv.
"We're bringing in eight junior
college people Baker said.
"They have had the experience
thai will make them valuable im
mediately, but they won't have as
many years ol eligibility.
HI
"Ideally I would like to bring a
player in (out of high school) and
give him one vear to learn the
game Baker added, "and then
bring him in as a ted shirt
freshman the year after
1 he following is a li .ting ol the
newest E I football recru
along with their position, height,
weight, hometown and high
school or junior college:
Jackie ArmstrongWR6:
Carl BarkersWR5-10
Ben Billings116-2
Fd BrogdenQB5-9
Mike Donohue1)16 3
�ndre fieldsW k5 10
Denell Hai perRB5-9
Y es JohnsonOI6-3
drain I owtOl6 5
Chad Martin116-4
Robeit MartinDB5-10
Joey Maddox1)16-1
Brian McPhatterRB6-2
Billy Michel1 B6-4
John O'Driscoll1)16-4
Ken PortisI B6-2
nthony rhompsonRB6-2
W alter WilsonW k5-11
A! WhitingWR5-10
Broderick GravesRB5-11
Bill MaxwellOI6-2
Mike 1 eggetl1 B6 3
Ernie 1 ogan1 B6-3
BoJack Daven ri k DB6-1
Junior RobinsonRB DB5 li
Charlie I ibrettoQB6-2
v 1HOMETOWNHIGH SCHOOL J
19(1South Bend. IN1 : worth 1
195Hampton, V Hamj '
22(i harlotte, NCI ees Mc( rae
1651 .larendon, S1 as! Clarendi
2601 evitown, MNassauomm. Co
175Portsn AI at: l
170c hesapeake, ADeep C reek
245i ilumbia, SBrookland-Cay cee
260Greensboro, N(1 enn. Military Ins;
240Palmoast, 1 1Fork I nil in Pi
185Dublin.GAraft J(
240Shelby, NShelby
195Fayetville, NDouglas Bvrd
24sGreenville, Nrafl K
260Chicago, IIHarper K
230( olumbus, ()HEh is
190 Ison, (1 ike
175Baltimore, MI)S inherit
170Dalzell, S(Hillcrest
180Charlotte. N
240Ware Shoals, SWare Shoals
210Williamsion, Williamsion
205Fay " He, N1 oresi
175Fay NCPine forest
185High Point, N(Andrews
190Middleburg, 11Middlebui a
Bethea, Mabry Spur Bucs To Victory
B 1 IMC HANOI FR
1 he Lady Pirates continued to
keep pace with league leading
James Madison, as they posted a
65-53 win over William and Mary
on the road Monday night.
1 he Pirates moved to 8-1 in the
CAA, and J?-6 overall. James
Madison is a half game ahead at
B-0 in the conference.
The Bucs shot 50 percent from
the floor in disposing oi the In-
dians.
According to Assistant Coach
1 ilion Barnes, the Pirates jumped
out to a quick eight-point lead in
the first five minutes. The In-
dians got as close as three points
in the first halt before the Bucs
regained their composure to take
a 35-24 halftime lead.
Barnes stated that Alma
Bethea and Delphine Mabry were
the kev players in the first half
for the Pirates. Mabry grabbed
six of her eight rebounds in the
first half from a guard position.
Barnes stated that William and
Mary managed to gain a tie in the
second half before the Pirates
took control o' the game and
rolled to their final total. Barnes
added that Lisa Squirewell came
on very strong in the second half
to score a team-high 18 points
before fouling out in the last five
minutes of play.
According to Barnes the
Pirates played very aggressive
defense. "In some cases we were
too aggressive stated Barnes,
"we sent them to the line 28
times, that's entirely too many
For the game the Pirates held a
45-34 edge in rebounding. Barnes
said that the edge in rebounding
could be attributed to good of-
fensive boardwork.
Following Squirewell in scor-
ing w e Sylvia Bragg with 13,
and Loraine Foster with 11.
Alma Bethea and Delphine
Mabry each chipped in nine
points, while Pam Williams and
Gretta O'Neil added two each.
Monique Pompili rounded out
the scoring for ECU with one
point.
The leading rebounders for the
Pirates were Squirewell and
oui game- ference
tournament to have a
Bethea w ith eighi board ea
Coach Barnes said thai the
Pirates still have a sho "mg stated Barnes.
into the NCAA tournament. rhe next game for the Bucs will
"We will have to win the res- ol be Saturday al I N -
W In ing! � 1 I e Pirates won
ir Mrs; n with the l.adv
Seahawks earlier this year in
Minges Coliseum by 83-67
score.
Big Weekend For Buc Hoops
Pirate fans should be ready, as
this weekend's Pirate Seahawk
basketball game is one ol the big-
gest m ECU history
The Pirates, aftei defeating
William a. Mary Saturday 52-47
in Minges C oliseum, picked up
their sixth league win. This marks
their best conference record since
being associated with the I t c
South (now C I heir
previous besi was a 3 1 con-
ference record foi the ivs: s'
season.
With the Bucs having one ol
their best season's ever, a win
ovei I nc -Wilmington Saturday
night would be a clincher � in
more ways than one. In fact,
11 could guarantee a a! least
fourth place finish in the CAA.
Although the Pirates lost to
I N W on the road Ian 18
(68-54), an ECU victory would
also: 1 i be the first tune that :
ECU has finished in the upper
half ol the conference Hop four),
2) give them the home-court ad
vantage in the opening round ol
the CAA lournamem on March
1, and 3) be the first time '
ECU lias gone .500 or better in
conference piav during an entire
season.
Pirate tans should also
remember that the halftime show
will be full ol excitement and en-
jovmeni for all.
The Pure Gold Dancers will
make theii se ast-
appearana Minges Coliseum
(the dancers conclude theii v" B5
halftime appearances a:
1 t I 'senti al Conner ime
on Feb. 19i. Also, six guests will
be chosen to try their skill at win-
ning a new c hryslei in th
, enue shoot out
Correction
t y? rts staff would like to
apologize for a misprinted error
thai appeared in Tuesday s
paper. Richmond defeated LCL
71-52, not "1-42 as was indicated.
lit' reert I the error.
CAA Basketball Standings
Men's
Richmond
Navy
George Mason
East Carolina
UNC-Wilmington
James Madison
American
William & Mary
Con Overall
10-0, 19-3
10-1, 19-4
7-4, 13-10
6-5, 11-12
4-7, 13-11
2-8, 4-18
2-9, 8-14
2-9, 6-16
Women's
James Madison
East Carolina
American
UNC-Wilmington
George Mason
Richmond
William & Mary
ConfOvera
8-0,20-2
8-1,18-6
5-4,15-6
4-5,13-9
3-6,9-14
2-8,5-17
2-8,6-16
The Pirates will determine their own destiny this Saturday in Minges Coliseum when they host the UNC-
Wilmington Seahawks. A win will clinch at least a fourth-place finish in the CAA and a home-court advan-
tage in round one of the conference tourney.





14
I Ml I AM K l 1
Hill"
New NCAA Academic Regulations
�� 'N College coaches and support program at th I �
lirectors predict the t ol Michig i
N 's new academic re
freshmen athletes here's definiteh
' football and a whitening I
� hall teams and give iargei Waltei said "N �u �
� - i :�� i re ruiting edge othei s�. hools hr�
� �� � � '� movement ol mil
few schools
Me"ibers ol the V. - - e rcquiren �il
x etl: Xs affet t NCAA Divisioi i
� � ed 206 4 to adopi a schools, eventuaih w
pla o requin freshn
700 � h
s on colleg ptitude I esi (SAT) or 17
' av� a - 0 men ' . , ,
� in ! 1 exam, and
SP . irse�
avei age 11 hig
acad �
rhe
ins. b u �
hai the sta
v
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New i
j �
easui e uill el
keep
u
i : .

Jwe
s associated a i
NCAA I ad .
per
S I sCOl
Cs
aseu,
id con

NCAA
fi
.
I

Daytona Surf Championship
V
e i astei



:
i ai
, inemeni
a ill have
i t i ve
new
A ill
:�
' ,i' A ill
'
freshman athletes on a limited
basis.
"II there were a teal blue �
athlete, we'd consider that she
says, estimating the s I uld
award one out ol ever.
scholarships to promising but
academically deficient athh
Michigan's Waltei think
an he avoided I .
quiring "universities to -upph
support programs Don't k
students out. rha ad
ministrator's wa and an
' appioach
.r
Valentine's Dav Cards
STUDENT STORES
WRIGHT BUILDING
S Dk V7 OPPORTl MTESrr res ill
fi e arc looking ' terested in being r hi � or.
at tivtt) instrm
irIs utnt lot aled i' Hi � " sonville, Nf fnstrw
ed espet iull in fW Sy. Horsebat -nis, Ha- kpc � � anoeing, G mnasli Also, Bast Drama, atunt
The IRS
we ��. quirn ' Morgan 1 tin 400 1' von V(Stephanie i-

Poust O
EC Soccer
Tourney
T Vi e r � � ' � �
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ncr gi es
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das Inn Surl
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204 1 � 758-1427
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�:�&�� �r��-�&�&��&�Csc- c �
A Sweetheart of a
Deal
� 1
p w Valentine
? Week Special
2 S-oz. Rib Eye Dinners
Veei it � �� teei
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3005 East 10th St
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Family
8TEAKH0VSE
Home of Affordable Feasts
Co Krogering
WMIIfc PINK
OflCOCDOUCK
Andre
pagne
FRESH CUT
Long Stem
ll'II
24�?
S?!sS
FRESH CUT
Mixed
Bouquets
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
756-7031
1

lltVV-
Deli-Fresh
Pizza
M
ts �t
&
Polar
B'ars
m
CUSSC
Coca
Cola
b
Large
Eggs
jc
� � ����
nA,
M

ft
Sami
4iiA
Whitman's
; Sampler
s399
-
s rj r-
KROGER HOMOGENIZED OR
Sealtest
Whole Milk
Effective ��
Roses Kroger's Floral Shop balloons
$24.99 doz. wi.h free Gin Box Valentine's Dav SDecial ?n Sale Also
starting at 99$

- �
������
������
4 Floral B.
355-7.
Man
arr
Valen
Friday,
Don't





New NCAA
14
I HI- I AS1AROl INIAN
UMAKY 13,1986
(CPS) - College coaches and
athletic directors predict the
NCAA's new academic re
quirements for freshmen athletes
will create "whiter" football and
basketball teams and give larger
schools a sharper recruiting edge
over smaller schools.
Members of the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association
recently voted 206-94 to adopt a
controversial plan to require
freshmen athletes to earn certain
minimum scores on college en-
trance exams, and have a 2.0
grade-point average in 1 1
specified high-school courses.
At the NCAA convention in
New Orleans, black educators
objected that the standardized
test score measure will effective!)
keep minorit) students oft teams
and out o college
Educators have long argued
that standardized test questions
tend to be "culturalh biased
dwelling on experiences and con
cepts associated with middle-class
upbringings.
"The NCAA had good inten-
tions and a lous) product says
Iimothev Walter, supervisor o
the student athlete academic -
support program at the Universi-
ty ot Michigan.
"There's definitely going to be
a whitening of major schools
Walter said. "You might see
other schools breaking off and a
movement oi minorit) kids m ,t
tew schools
The requirements, which will
at fee! NCAA Division I and I A
schools, eventually will require
freshmen athletes to score a; least
700 on the combined Scholastic
Aptitude lest (SATI or 17 on the
American College resting( 1
exam, and earn a 2.0 grade-point
average in 1 1 high school
academic courses.
The requirements will be phas
ed in over three years io allow
freshmen athletes to offset low
test scores with high grades oi
v ice versa
In 1986-8 freshmen must
have high school GPAs ol ! .8,
SAI scores ol 740 oi U I scores
ot 17 to be eligible to play oi even
practice on NCAA varsity teams.
- freshman scoring only 660
on the SAI or 13 on the AC I
must have a 2.2 high school GPA
!o qualify.
1 lien m 198 88, a freshman
with a 1 .9 hiih school (iPA must
score 720 on the SA I or 16 en the
M I . Ol have a 2.2 GPA with
H'Hi'v i 680 oi 14 on lus oi hei
entrance exam to be eligible.
Freshn t i athletes not netting
minimum standards must sil out
both practice and play until theii
sophomore yeai
"Smallei - ho �ls w ill be m u e
upset b (Ins, says Nelson
' �wnsend, athletic directoi at
Delaware State ollege, wl
"Smallei in .titutions can ill
'� ' in .i athlete, give
: �lai ship and watch
i he explains "On
itions can take
adva I policy
! ' �� be doubly
is because
't its students
areas
'1 students
�a lowe;
exams, as
area students, he
the new academic requirements.
"I may have an ideal perspec-
tive, but I don't think it will have
an effect except in a positive
way she says of the new
freshman requirements.
"A smaller pool oi athletes will
be available she concedes,
"But I don't think that will
necessarily give an edge to bigger
schools, h will be who's better
able to recruit
She does conlu in one of I ow n
send tears in adding Michigan
State may stockpile ineligible
freshman athletes on a limited
basis.
"If there were a real blue-chip
athlete, we'd consider that she
says, estimating the school could
award one out of every five
scholarships to promising but
academically deficient athletes.
Michigan's Walter thinks the
problem can be avoided by re
quiring "universities to supply
support programs. Don't keep
students out. That's an ad-
ministrator's way out and an
elitist approach
S TVDENT OPPOR TUM TIES
We are looking for girls in
teresled in being counselors �
activity instructors in a private
girls camp located in Hender
sonvile, C Instructors need-
ed especially in Swimming
fWSI), Horseback riding. Ten
nis, Backpac king. Archery,
Canoeing, Gymnastics, Craft1
A Iso, Basketball, C Ompulers,
Drama, ature studv, hield
Hockey IJ your school offers a
Summer Internship program,
we will be glad to help In
quiries: Morgan Havnes, P (
Box 4(H). Tryon 28


v
- : iron,
�st a
- it),
nina

M
o
Daytona Surf Championship
The Inaugural National Col-
legiate Surfing Championship
conducted bv the Eastern Surfing
Association is set to gel underway
March 24-28, in Daytona Bead
Florida.
This surfing championship,
scheduled during the height of
Daytona Spring Break, will be
open to all college students. The
competition date and site was
selected bv the E.S.A. for the ex
posure � �� e thousands ol col-
legians who will be visiting the
Greatei Daytona Beach area dur-
ing Spring Break. The Eastern
Surfing Association and several
other organizations are providing
organized events in the area to
give our 1986 college visitors
more constructive outlets for
their youthful energies.
This National Collegiate Surf-
ing Championship will feature
three surfing disciplines with five
divisions. (Men's and Women's
surfing, open I ong Board, and
Men's and Women's Bo
Board). The Boogie Board i
petition will be sponsored by
Morev Boogie Board. Inc -V
with five individu i
ships being contested, a N :
Collegiate Sui fing I earn will
crowned.
Several othei event' are I
planned in coi
event Morey B ogie Boai
division ol Kranso Industi
planning derm nstra ns
"Boogie Boai
ssible dei
f risbet � Hai ky Sack.
Monday, March 24 will be late
registration day I
petitors who have not p
registered. Monday evening, a
social evem will be held in the
Holiday Inn Surfside's tides
Room, 2700 V Atlai Uenue,
Daytona Beach, rhere will be a
surf expo sponsored by local -
shops, and a surfing movie I i
the evening's entei
204 E 5th St 758-1427 Mon-Sot 10 9
Latest Release Albyms and Cassettes on Sale
699 $6.99 $7.99
� S3s
REM
Dire Srra I
Clarence Demons
Do-
Blue Ovs?er Cu
John Cougar MeHoncamp
Pa' Benatar
Armored Saini
Nontu � ���
The Other v ��
Aeros" tfi
Tecs �
Asia
Loverbov
-
;
$r
&L
&
Special Maxwell Cassette Sale �
MAXELL XLII 90 (high bias) 2 pack $5.99
Rexuiar price 5 4V
� hile supplies last!
NEW compact discs arriving daily now in stock
Stevie Nicks "Rock A Little" $14 99 Many more'
arriving daily - Check our growing selection of Compact
Discs
Happy Valentine's Day
A Sweetheart of a
Deal
p Valentine
r Week Special
2 S-oz. Rib Eye Dinners
$9
Valentine Week at Western Steer-
celebrate with specially pneed all time
favorite Rib Eye Dinners Just for the two of
you. 8 oz choice cooked-to-order Rib Eyes that
include choice of potato and hot baked bread
It's a meal to remember at Western Steers
sweetheart of a price
Valentine Week Special good Monday Feb 10
thru Sunday Feb 16 only at
With Beverage
3005 East 10th St
Greenville
1985 Western Steer-Mom n' Pop's, inc
Home of Affordable Feasts
Ma
I
s ii
ir!
-

Cards
' - - �
STUDENT STORES
WRIGHT BUILDING
Go Krogering
ffOfr
1
WHIlt PINK
OR COLD DUCK
mm
�1
A
Sl c
GRADE A
UMl
DOZEN
an's
'tis ano Prices
?etive thru sat
0 15 1986
Jug
"�� �3 �wj
Roses
$24.99 doz. with FREE Gift
Kroger's Floral Shop balloons
box Valentine s Day Special ���a

i
IVrestll
Attention athlete
the 1986 Wrestling
sponsored .
Recreational Sen
cancelled
lack ol faciliti)
duct ihe tourna
The IRS H ord
by
Stephanie be
But while .
your sun
to swimw
The IR
17 23 has bee:
Poust Cc
( orttinut-d trom p
( nferenc
pionships
l.ads Pirat
Mar and -
"I
declare
swum JMl
but thej
e beat
hav�
to M
-
our fi
pul
P �
-

Her
chan :
EC Soccer
Tournev
Minges (
again plaj
do
the sec
underwa Sa: Feb 15
The one-da) I
start at 8 a.m with 16
scheduled to ;
Morning, ihe team wiU I
into four dr
division competing in
robin format.
Atternoon compel
' the iop two teams fi
m playing in a s
elimina irnamen
mine an overall wii
Among the
compete are: ECl
1 and 2. ECl V
Beach Club team. Ml
Jerse). Greet
N rth Carolina
2. Elon, Atlantii
lege. Wils
Charlotte Pembrol
Pembroke Club tean at d
Rock) M
Admission
is tree. r:u the acti
going on until late in
noon oi evening.
Floroi B
355-7.
Many
am
Valen
Friday,
Don't






THF FASTAROUNIAN
Fl BRl.AKY !3, IW
15
MO 1J M
MTIES
li.
. private
Hendei
need-
s .
Ten
I
hery.
- �ers,
� �� a
� �

nes PO
-
Cards
3RF.S
DING
1
cilci.au.ic
Large
Eggs
DOZEN
� 'V
-rW
�Whitman's
sm- Sampler
399
terns ana Prices
Effective tnru Sat
' -����
r - -
- , -
op
ecial
BALLOONS
On Sale Also
Starting at 99 y
Wrestling Tourney Cancelled
�M tent ion athletes and tans:
1 he 1986 Wrestling Tournament,
sponsored by the Intramural
Recreational Services, has been
cancelled. The reason is due to
ack of facilities needed to con-
duct the tournament.
The IRS Word
by
Stephanie Dew
But while your stepping out of
voxxt sumo suits, wh not step in-
swim wear.
The IRS swim meet for Feb.
23 ha- been postponed, giving
you sufficient time to register
before the new captains' meeting
date, Feb. 13. The meeting will be
held in the balcony of Memorial
Gym at 6pm. Go by 204
Memorial Gym and pick-up your
packet today!
We encourage those interested
in joining a sports club to contact
the Sports Club Office, room 105
Memorial Gym. Just to name a
few, the IRS includes: surfing,
tnsbee, ice hockey, cycling,
lacrosse, racquetball, karate,
women's soccer, water skiing and
scuba clubs. Surely one of these
must tickle your fancy!
With Spring break just around
the corner, why not turn that flab
into muscle by working out at
one of the two IRS weight rooms
located at Memorial Gym and
Minges Coliseum.
Each weight room provides a
variety of equipment to meet the
needs of everyone! Just listen
Memorial Gym weight room
provides a system of single sta-
tion fixed weights. This system
provides an opportunity for
quick and easy workout without
the use of 'spotters' or the fre-
quent changing of plates and col-
lars. These fixed weight machines
provide an excellent opportunity
for weight lifting and strength
training by males and females.
Poust Contribution Crucial
Continued from page 13
nference Swimming Cham-
nships in Wilmington. The
l Pirates will be battling a
ng James Madison lean as
well a- contenders William &
Man and Richmond University.
"It's going to be tough
declared Poust. "We haven't
swum JMl during this season,
but they beat us last year, after
we beat them the yeai before W e
ave a lot of depth, so (in ordei
vin it) our depth swimmers are
going to have to jus! pull out, and
our front-line people uill have to
pull ofl some upsets
Pousts' strongest events are the
100 and 200 backstroke and the
200 and 400 individual medleys.
Her personal goal for the CAA
championships are to win both
EC Soccer
Tourney
Minges Coliseum will once
again play host to the ECU In-
door Soccer Invitational, when
second annual event gets
underway Sat. Feb. 15
The one-da tournament will
start at 8 a.m with 16 teams
scheduled to participate. In the
morning. The teams will he spht
into four divisions, with each
division competing in round-
robin format.
Afternoon competition will
consist of the top two teams from
each division playing in a single-
elimination tournament to deter-
mine an overall winner.
Among the teams scheduled to
compete are: ECU varsity teams
1 and 2. ECU Alumni. Virginia
Beach Club team, MESC (New
Jersev), Greensboro College.
North Carolina Wesleyan 1 and
2. Elon, Atlantic Christian Col-
lege. Wilson Club team.
Charlotte Club team, Pembroke,
Pembroke Club team and the
Rocky Mount Club team.
Admission to the tournament
is free, and the action should be
going on until late in the after-
noon or earlv evening.
the 100 and 200 backstroke
events.
Along with the whole team,
Poust is getting psyched up for
the tournament, and savs she
feels she's near her peak form.
I feel pretty good in the
water Poust said. "We've had
a lot of rest, now it's just a matter
of getting my head together
This tournament will be the
first post season competition for
the women's team, (now in its
ninth season) and all the girls are
looking to make a big contribu-
tion to the team effort.
"All the girls and I are excited,
maybe even more than 'he men.
This is the best girls team ever
and we want to do something for
I CU. We want to really do well
and be able to say, 'Look what
we've done
Poust thinks that 1985-86 has
been her best season, which gives
her that much more motivation.
"This has definitely been my
best year Poust said. "That's
one of the reasons I'm so excited
about swimming conferences
I ike the rest of the team, Poust
is concerned right now only with
the conference championships.
But when asked what she would
like to accomplish next year, she
replied, "1 would kind of like to
go out (at the beginning of the
season) breaking varsity
records
That seems likely, considering
the fact that she already holds the
ECU varsity record in the 100
backstroke, and has been im-
proving every year.
With her continued dedication
and leadership, the ECU
women's swim team should go
nowhere but up.
General body conditioning in-
cluding the development of
strength and muscular endurance
can readily be obtained through
the use of these machines.
Minges Coliseum weight room
houses mainly free weights
augumented by a nine-station
universal fixed-weight machine.
The use of free weights provides a
better opportunity for the isola-
tion and development of specific
muscles andor muscle groups.
By changing the individual plates
one can also achieve a wider
range of resistance during each
exercise.
Regardless of the room or type
of weight which is used, the IRS
provides quality equipment and
time for students faculty and
staff.
The number to call for heaw
breathy action is 757-6562. The
Intra-Action hotline is a service
that informs you of daily facility
hours, major team sport games,
and cancellations due to incle-
ment weather.
The following is the IRS hours
for intramural activities in
Memorial Gym and Minges Col
iseum.
Pools: Memorial Gym
12-1:30,3:30-7:30; Minges
8- 10pm. Weight Rooms:
Memorial Gym 9am-9pm;
Minges 3pm-7pm. Memorial
Gym Free Play: 2 - 5 p m .
Memorial Gym Equipment
Check-Out: 9am-9pm.
A HEART OF
DIAMONDS AND GOLD
MAKE THIS VALENTINES DAY A SPECIAL ONE FOR HER1
1 00 CARATTW
FREE FORM
DIAMOND $
HEART
PENDANTS AL
- BEAUTIFUL T f
1.00 CARAT
TW
A
V.
$
1200
895
50 CARATTW
s637
25 CARATTW
s349
BEAUTIFUL HEART SOLITAIRES
62ct $1940 rose, J3720
9sci J2750 i.Mc J2765
se a. 3760 n2c. J2750
A GIFT FROM BARNES SAYS IT ALL!
You Never Pay Full Price At Barnes!
" S 10 BU' Cs- CWft Ljy�, � M��� MO'kmtt i- lis-fsi'Bj'ofs Cii-e Ci
Barnes
The Ploxo
756-6696
And Diamond Gallery
HOURS Monday-Saturday 10:00-9 00, closed Sunday
Greenville Kinston & Jacksonville
Jv
Best Prices In Town! !
r"1
Floral Boutique
355-7469
s
Carnations
79C each
Many arrangements to pick from!
Valentine's Day r:
Friday, Feb. 14, 1986
Don't Forget To Order
Early
You 'II soon agree once you take advantage
of the delectable
All You Can Eat & Drink Specials
featured at
The Arbor
Restaurant
(Serving Dinner Mon-Sat 5 pm-10pmj
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
SPECIALS
Your Choice
Alaskan Crab Legs, Shrimp CIO O
J & Choblis I X.73
Sweet and succulent Alaskan I ruh Legs Tender Shrimp y
Shrimp and Chablis � 2.95 y
lender shrimp tried, boiled, r bruited f�
Beef & Burgundy $1 2.T5
The best Prime Kih ever!
All specials include a stuffed or baked potato and a ti u 40item Salad Bar
Come and taste the extraordinary'
He promise you won 't be disappointed
VALENTINE SPECIAL
Dinner for Two
featuring all you can eat specials
plus a carnation for the ladies
$25.00
Located at the Ramada inn 301 Greenville Blvd
756-2792
Tuesday is
Ladies Nite
with Doug Jerry
$1.25 highballs
2.75 pitchers
Ladies Admitted Free
'C0&
s �i
l
&.
i

- Is ?f
. V ' -
THURS. Hot Buffet
featuring: Roast Beef
macaroni & cheese
chicken casserole
lasagna
6 vegetables & rolls
$2.99 $3.50 wSalad Bar
Margarita nite
$1.50 each
$7.50 pitcher
One Of the Nation's
Leading Employers Is
Now Interviewing
On Campus.
One of the largest employers in the U.S. is accepting applications
and scheduling
appointments for
interviews. The
Department
of the Navy is offering
management
opportunities in
electronics, engineering
nuclear propulsion
, systems analysis and
other vital fields.
These positions provide strong
technical and general management
training, rapid professional growth and
immediate executive responsibility.
To apply, you must be no more than 28 years old, have a BS or BA, pass
aptitude and physical examinations, and qualify for security clearance. U.S.
citizenship is required.
To make an appintment for an interview, sign up at your Career Placement
Office, or call:
Naval Management Programs
Suite 120, 801 Oberlin Road
Raleigh, NC 27605-1130
1-800-662-7231
Get Responsibility Fast.





16
I HI I s I . K( )1 INI
I 1 HKl K1 11, !�
Classifieds
PERSONALS
ROSES Send a rose to someon.
a Bi � them Feb 4 5 10 11
. $4 50 ea h trom the ZBT lit
He sistei �� � n front of the Studenl
SPRING BkEAK MEXICAN
CRUISE1 5 ts 6 days i ruising
Ae Onl � S44S includes
ties CALL NOA ! No'
� 1 78
SUZANNE
la IB '
a greal one' We
pam i- � i great bir
. . ou The
NEW SORORITY �' ai
pha! W

S!G EPS AND PI KAPPS �
ett( � I Thi
Natura
� � iate
SIG EPGOLDEN HEARTS Our
MDAY
� �
ALEX.

�� ' � �
SPIES 1k U j���
�A� � �� ;

;k. �
KAPPASIGMA
�'LEDGES C�'
, � � �

O AZD S ��
-�'OUR
SPC
. " �-
- ;ppa PH !
i ou r boozi

members to meet our aumm,
T G i F
PORTRAITS
-
Bucc -
ALPHA DELTA PI :
j r new
Han V heile
L r Bei � eti
a ���
V � �.��.����
P� ���� v � , Betf Car
�'��� Lisa Pei jerson,
� -� joanne Ransdi
�aaar Wency Con .
Russ Beth iupto �
Bailey - � v � � and Ellen jone
made wonoertu- pledges but
ik even oe"er s sters

ZBT Sister Brothers8. Pledges
t forget about our . dentine's
pay Party on Fr.da S'as at 6 30
Balloon Deliveries
n Valentine's Dav
Balloon In A B
Mood .nderwear
Hand-Painted,
Personalized Items
Plus Other Gift Ideas
For Friends & Lovers
Gandalf's
Carolina East Mall
756-7235
ZBT: All Brothers and Pledges meet
f day at 7 15 n Mendenhall room
221 Lil Sisters be at Mendenhall at
1 45 Dress nice!
DEAR BIG D I'M JEALOUS
ABOUT THE WEEKEND BUT
HAVE A WONDERFUL TIME! I'M
ALL SMILES YOUR VALEN
T INE. MAY
AT Roses are red Violets are
Blue you hate my Oldsmobile but I
love you S Z
B F L. Have tun this weekend and
TRY not to get arrested! Love,
S.K.S
G.H6: Love is expressed in a thou
sand ways, but at times it must find
words So when I say you'll always
be the greatest ioy in life for me, i' s
tusf my way of saymg that I love " i
. we share Happy Valentin
Day LAS
Hi! j BODDY This Valentine's for
you Hope to see you soon, the PB1?
From A ttOO
BUY YOUR FRIENDS A SPECIAL
VALENTINE TREAT On Thurs
Feb 13 from 8am 4pm. Ca-
ms and baked goods will b
� e outside the student book store
Piease stop by ana support the ECU
Occupational Therap, Sti l
LOST Gold nugget necklace ai
Massage Clinic Tuesa.i- � b 4
Any information pase �
757 0635
TIGERTAIL STOLEN Fron
Gold rrans Am You know .�. �
- � turn 'o where ou I
problems But a be v� IOR �
CHAF ED When ; f t on y
pei son
LOST Navy pocketbook .�. tl
� � � � � � nside Not n
naii . sentimei ta '� n i
� � � 125 reward N
iskec Just PLEASE ;i
I URN Can 752 264 � , � �� �
R �, r Brewstei
LOST: Burgandy leather coat
(Chess King) Prescription
sunglasses m pocket Lost m Wmn
Dixie parking lot at Rivergate shop
ping center. Reward $50 Please call
Bill at 752 4171 or 758 9484
LOST Beige colored purse
call Yusoff 758 6285
Please
LOST. Burgundy Saddlebred
keycham in asr in the area of
Mendenhall parking lot, ioynr
Library and the Art Bldg Reward
Call 753 3917
SALE
WORD PROCESSING We Offer ex
; , � ei e m typing resumes theses,
hnical documents, and term
papers We n anage and merge your
addri sses into mei
ftei � s or rolOde
ardS Our prices arv extremely
reasonable and we always offei a is
'to ECU students. S
8. F Professional Computer Co
115 E 5th St
4
SENIORS! SENIORS! SENIORS'
� , �' � �St pi �;�-� I . IUI
��' S&F Com
putei �� package pi el
es in
ling a f the 1 ��� i � Lettei
�. �. '�" �
. � ettei imi and ad
mpany a
ettei . � "�" I ility ty
envi ; i ��� " mpany address
rel - on
erythmg I tuft
l even si I of om
sent 1 - � . ' follow ups
� a I writtei
ettei and the
" � ipply 1
lo the est I �
stuff
� � �
lamp) $1 90 (i e prici
ihtly highei FT � �
. �� V H ' ' 1986 S&.F Com
puh . � '
� 27834
TYPING SERVICES Resumes,
term papers, theses Low rates
Spelling and grammatical correi
tions included Cmdy 757 0398 after
5.30 pm
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
758 6011 and leave a message
HOUSE FOR RENT Near universi
ty 2602 Tryon Dr 3 bedrooms, living
room, den, large eating an a
Available immediately $420
758 5299
BEDTIME ENTERPIRISE B
Scott Hall We will read a bed'
story to a girl friend (she must live
in an ECU Residence Hall) for $2
from 10 p m 12 midnight Men . Feb
17 Wed, Feb 19 Make reservations
now by calling 752 1081
STACKS OF WAX F unk I ii
beach, soul, mid 60s, mid 50s
rock and roll Contact the
TRASHMAN Best ratc-s in I
752 3587
FOR SALE Math Stal ' 5 1228 All
problems worked in rurre
and workbook Mat ai A" Call
Bob at r52 2579 or ?5H 14
APT FOR RENT: 2 rooms N I
nette bath No lease Neai
pus $140 a mi ii " plus �' posit
Available n .615 days
FOR SALE: i'i refridgerator �
� . liable Call 758 8019
ITERATIONS Thrifl Shop
r ans St. Special of � will
be i oats $2 won ens ackel
ladies blouses p ' lo $1 mei �
shirts 3 pcs for $1, skirts $1 Of S2
leans $1, ladies pants $1, beautiful
suits $5 $10, lad" $5
HOUSE FOR SALE (��� �
ment opportunity rhrei blocks
from campus on corner of
and Jarvis Great pla e for a si
ive Call Overl m rs Real
Esta'i ai 155 650( ask I
POW'
TYPING A . .
i by a ecrel
Call Dor
PROFESSIONAL TYPING I l
��' �
rate; Ca ii i it 3 . � after
TAXES
a Dore at I5S 2f
m
FOR SALE New I , Ex
� enl hi is � . j.
talk about a job that
can take you places!
Any ECU co-eds ho
would like some realh
great company, come
by The hast Carolinian
between 1:00 and 2:00
a.m Monday anil
Wednesday evenings.
Ask for the boys from
Thrill Hill. No ex-
perience necessary.
WANTED
ONLY MALES NEED TO APPLY
str ippei
��' � ���
ROOMMATESNEEDFD I
WORD PROCESSING
BECKY lATham 752 5998 Sam!ROOMMATENEEDED
�. i- � � s. . . .
til port!phoi -
, .
'LOST Grei E C .�
Invaluable
NEED A D.J'
i D J " I ' " �
�op 40. bea l and dar �
� .���
. . . � . �
� request
TYPING ;
per ii n i tl ta ti f T hi
A r 1 Eli ' � � : p m e n 1
TYPING
by a profi � � � �
Ca : �� . ifter 6 d
Stop hurting
the trees
vou love.
How do I ss thee?
Let me count the ways.
Greensboro seems a
thousand miles awy
Work It!
Don't
spoil nature
leave only
footprints.
Before you make
a long distance commitment,
make sure you know
what you're getting into.
It Fletcher Christian and Captain Blih had known
what being stuck in the same boat would mean, chances
are neither would have set foot aboard.
And if you're stuck in the same boat with a long
distance company that doesnl give you all the services
you need, it's easy to harbor mutinous thoughts.
But when you pick AT&T as your long distance
company, you know you're in for smooth sailing. You'll
t't trouble-free, reliable service. Immediate lon
distance connections�even at the busiest hours. And
lon distance operators to assist you with immediate
credit for wrong numbers and collect calling.
Andyoullget discounts off our Day Rate on your
state-to-state calls. With sa ings of over 50 during
weekends until 5pm Sundays, or nights trom 11pm to
Sam. Sunday through Friday. And 40 discounts eve
ningsbetween 5pm and 11pm, Sunday through Friday.
So when you're asked to choose i long distant e
company, sign aboard with AT&T. With AT&T Long
Distance Service, you'll never be left stranded. Just call
1 800 222-0300 for more information or to
choose AT&T Reach out and touch someone
AT&T
The right choice.





Title
The East Carolinian, February 13, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 13, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.456
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57801
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