The East Carolinian, July 17, 1985






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 NcmH �C
Wednesday, July n, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Kinsey Re-elected
ECU Trustee Chair
TONY IUMPLI - BCU MCWS luinu
Trustees Welcomed
ECU C hancellor John Howell, left, greets new Board of Trustee of Raleigh and Max R. Jovner, right, of Greenville. The three were
members William E. Dansey Jr. of Greenville, Ms. Sandra P. Babb sworn in last Friday at a board meeting and all are graduates of ECU.
From Staff Reports
Two ECU graduates were
recently named to serve on the
ECU Board of Trustees, and
once again C. Ralph Kinsey was
re-elected chairman.
Kinsey recognized former
trustees John F. Minges of
Greenville and Clifton H. Moore
of Point Harbor, for their service
to the board. A resolution of ap-
preciation cited Minges' "skill
and dedication" in helping to
strengthen "every major area of
University activities" during his
eight years as a trustee.
Another resolution was passed
citing Moore for his "superb
leadership, skill and understan-
ding" which "assisted the
University in achieving outstan-
ding growth and progress" over
the past four years.
Kinsey welcomed newly ap-
pointed Board members, Sandra
Babb of Raleigh, Thomas A.
Bennent, William E. Dansey and
Max R. Joyner, all of Greenville
and ECU graduates.
In addition, the Trustees ap-
proved appropriations to update
a computer at ECU, repair roof-
ing of Belk Building and the
Financial Aid Building.
Bennent reported to the Board
that athletic officials are "look-
ing at expanding" Ficklen
Stadium because ECU cannot ex-
pect to continue a major football
program without more seats.
"We can't make it on 35,000
seats he said.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
told the Board that faculty pay
raises averaged around 11 per-
cent. "We're in a lot better posi-
tion he said.
Howell also said more new
money will go towards improve-
ment of new or existing pro-
grams. Some of those areas in-
clude maintenance a science and
math center, University library
network, and other monies going
towards various fields of
research.
Increase In Black Profs Unlikely Trend Across Campuses
(CPS) � There are slightly
fewer black faculty members at
the nation's colleges than in 1975,
according to new figures released
by the National Center for
Education Statistics and the
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission.
But the declining number of
black profs could help
financially-strapped black col-
leges across ihe country, as black
students seek out schools with
sizable black faculties.
Black profs numbered only
Take Caution
With Summer
Water Sports
Waterskiing, swimming, surf-
ing, sailing and windsurfing are
representative of the water sports
available to us in eastern North
Carolina. In order to prevent in-
jury to yourself or others,
remember the following points to
make your fun safe and en-
joyable:
� Never dive into water without
knowing what is underneath.
Tree stumps may be present or
the tide may shift causing the
water to be more shallow.
� Always use the "buddy
system Take someone with you
when swimming or surfing and
make sure someone knows where
you will be while in the water.
Don't drink alcoholic
beverages if you plan to drive a
boat, ski or windsurf. Your reac-
tion time will be delayed and
possibly result in a greater
chance of injury to yourself or
others.
A study of boating accident
deaths conducted in North
Carolina from 1981 to 1984
found that more than one-half of
the 99 deaths reported were legal-
ly impaired. In addition, North
Carolina legislation is recommen-
ding that the driving while im-
paired laws be extended to cover
boat drivers as well.
� Always do stretching excercises
before engaging in any water
sports to decrease the chance of
sprains and other injuries. Don't
overdo it. Many sore muscles
don't appear until eight to 48
hours after the activity.
Wear life vests when skiing and
sailing, even if you know how to
swim. If you loose consciousness
due to an injury, the vest will
keep you afloat.
� Stay away from boat pro-
pellers, sail boats and other water
vehicles if you are swimming.
Boat propeller injuries can cause
serious injury or death.
19,300 � or 4.2 percent � of the
nearly 450,000 full-time college
professors employed in 1981, the
latest year for which statistics are
available, the NCES reports.
That represents a drop of over
400 black profs � from 19,746
� from when the last count was
taken in 1975.
"We don't really know if this
is a trend or not says NCES
research analyst Susan Hill.
"The decline corresponds to a
similar decline in college enroll-
ment among black college
students she notes. "And since
the pool of Ph.Ds is not increas-
ing, we don't expect any sudden
increases
"We do think (the decline) is a
trend laments Sarah Melendez,
associate director of the
American Council on
Education's Office of Minority
Concerns.
"At many universities over the
last five years � ever since the
recession forced many colleges to
retrench and cut back � very
often the people who were laid
off were those with the least
amount of seniority and those on
'soft' (non-tenured) salaries
she explains.
"This has affected blacks more
than whites, since the 1970s were
a period of great increases in the
number of both black professors
and black students. Many of
these people weren't around long
enough to get tenure, and were
the first to go with the cutbacks
The decreasing popularity of
black studies classes � at many
schools such departments have
been completely phased out �
also has fueled the exodus of
black profs.
"There are many fewer of
those kinds of programs around
now than there were in the seven-
ties, and those were the main
departments for black professors
on many campuses she says.
At the same time, the number
of black students who go on to
graduate schools has dropped
steadily, Melendez notes,
creating a shortage of black
students who would have become
professors, especially in more
popular disciplines like computer
science and engineering.
"We have seen a steady decline
in the number of blacks getting
Ph.Ds, which is where you get
your new profs from she says.
"That is beginning to show itself
in a shortage of blacks to fill new
faculty openings
Melendez blames much of the
black prof shortage on "the
whole mood of the country vis a
vis affirmative action, especially
the messages coming out of
Washington and the Reagan Ad-
ministration that they will not en-
force affirmative action stan-
dards
Among other things, she says,
the government is requiring less
reporting of race and gender
statistics from college personnel
offices, "which plays an impor-
tant role in making sure colleges
know their responsibilities and
obligations
As a result, "many schools
have only one or two black facul-
ty members out of a total faculty
of hundreds or even thousands
Indeed, of over 1,300 fulltime
faculty at the University of
Missouri-Columbia, only 20 are
black, and of Texas Tech Univer-
sity's nearly 1,000 profs, only
five are black, the NCES reports.
Such low blackwhite faculty
ratios, though, may actually help
the nation's struggling black col-
Program Totally Revamped
Student Notetakers Beneficial
leges by infusing them with new
students who want black teachers
and mentors, Melendez
speculates.
"Since the minority popula-
tions are the only ones that are
showing increases in their college
age brackets � among whites,
the college age population is
predicted to continue to decline
through the end of the decade �
this could mean a big Doom for
black colleges and a real problem
for white schools with all-white
faculties she explains.
To find more black profs,
Melendez says schools need to of-
fer more opportunities for blacks
to complete graduate studies, and
re-invigorate affirmative action
programs.
"If institutions are really com-
mitted to diversity, it will take a
number of physical and financial
commitments she says.
By BRETT MORRIS
Suff Writer
The ECU Center for Hearing
Impaired Students, in coopera-
tion with the Office of Handicap-
ped Student Services, is offering
a new scholastic service to
students with hearing problems
and other disabilities.
This service, which was piloted
during the first summer session
of 1985, is offering a more in-
volved system of notetaking and
tutoring for disabled students in
order to help better establish
them in their fields of study.
According to Tony Schreiber,
director of the program, students
in the past had difficulty inter-
preting notes that other volunteer
classmates had taken for them.
"The average student in each
class would not pick up notes that
they already had knowledge in
Schreiber said. Therefore, han-
dicapped students would not get
a full understanding of the re-
quirements for their courses.
The new service will be hiring
students to take notes during
their free time. In the past, the
hearing impaired students relied
on fellow students to volunteer
their time and notetaking skills in
each separate course they were
enrolled in. This meant that the
disabled students were required
to interpret different sets of
notes.
Schrieber also stated that in the
fall, the Center will be training
people on how to take notes in a
certain way, along with a par-
ticular subject.
The volunteer service that
previously existed did not work
out, he said, and a new program
was developed to benefit hearing
impaired students academically.
Students who take notes during
the upcoming semester will also
be meeting with disabled students
separately and working together.
Applications are offered to
students who are interested in
working for the Center. The ECU
administration will then choose
the best applicants. Schreiber
said "the center will be looking
for students with good human
relations skills and who enjoy
helping people He said the stu-
dent must also maintain an ac-
ceptable grade point average.
Schreiber stated that someone
with a background in a particular
subject would be helpful in plac-
ing them with a hearing impaired
student, but that it would not be
required. "We will be trying to
match notetakers with students
and work out cooperative time
schedules between the two
Schreiber said.
Schreiber added that the
notetaker will play a vital role in
the education and academic suc-
cess of the hearing impaired stu-
dent.
Police Arrest Extortionists
By WARREN BAKER
Special To The East (iroHilu
Greenville police arrested two
ECU students and later charged
them with extortion last Wednes-
day night. Eric Skinner, an ECU
Cheerleader, and Kathy Mae
Wells were placed in custody
outside Fleming Dormitory, and
both students are currently out
on bond, Greenville police
reported.
Det. Willie Reid and Sgt. Cecil
Hardy of the Greenville Police
Dept. said the students tried to
extort $400 from the manager of
Chico's Mexican Restaurant. The
manager called the police when
he received a typed letter deman-
ding $400. If the payment was
not met, the letter stated, accor-
ding to police, that certain
damaging information about the
manager would be released.
The letter further said the
money was to be dropped off in a
phone booth located behind Jar-
vis Dorm. The manager followed
the letter's instructions and left
the money at the appointed spot,
Reid and Hardy said. The of-
ficers later arrested Skinner and
Wells when the money was
discovered missing from the
booth.
Reid and Hardy said Skinner
had $400 on his person at the
time of the arrest. The officers
said campus security was inform-
ed about the situation after the
case moved onto the ECU
grounds.
Solitude
With the last few days of
some students may find the w
when it's jast you ami your
some of nature's "study hall
school finally wiadiaf dowa,
studying goiag by a little faster
This studeat seems to eajoy
aaaaaaats'v4
� w- �





IHt �AS1 C AROI IN1AN JULY I?, 1985
NOTES
13 Village Green Lawsuits Dismissed
EXAM HELP
1 he ECU Counseling Center will offer free
felp in preparing for final exams from 3 5
pm m 302 Wright Annex on July 17 Topics
which a ill be covered include time manage
ment studying effectively how to approach
essay versus obiective exams and coping
with test anxiety Students will be offered in
dividualued attention tor specific problems
'hev mav have with test preparation or test
fad v) Fo� 'urffier information tali the
� w HI Centet al 661 or stop by
Wright Annex �0"
B DOD DRIVE
There Mil te a Blood Drive Wed July 17
that s today from 10 a m to 4 p m in
Vendenhali Room 244 Sponsored by AED
and ECU Biology Club Summer blood
donors are desperately needed Please
STATE GOVERNMENT
POSITIONS
Women and minorities are encouraged to
apply tor CO OP positions in state govern
ment tor the tall of 198S Needed are students
maionng in lournalism and accounting, with
lun.or status for these positions in Raleigh
For more information lontact. Cooperative
Education, Rawl 313
WRITERS
Long hours, low pay hard work, great
company Call 7S7 6346 to find out how you
v an become a part of ECU'S finest medium
USHERS
Come see the shows1 Usher and see the
ECU Summer Theatre Shows free Come by
the Theater Arts Dept for details and sign
up sheets
Eighteen lawsuits against
Reginald Fountain and Samuel
A. McConkey � the owners of
Village Green Apartments
have been settled out of court, a
Greenville attorney announced
Friday. The suits were filed in
connection with the March 1983
explosion at Village Green Apart-
ments, which killed one person -
an ECU student � and injured at
least a doen more.
According to Kenneth Haigler,
who is representing 13 of the
plaintiffs, "an agreement was
reached with the owners of the
apartment complex that was
satisfactory to all parties
Haigler declined to reveal the
amount of monev in the settle-
ment in the telephone interview
Other defendants in the suit, he
said, include Solon Automated
Services, International Drer
Corp. and Pargas of Farmville.
"We're shooting for June of
next year for the trial of the
case, Haigler said, although it
may be longer. "The case is com
plicated and when u have this
many defendants involved if
make things drag on and on
on
Eleven units ol the apar
complex were destroed. a
as nearb buildings, when a spar)
ignited gas leaking from a dr
in a basement laundrv room
30
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 17, 1985
issed
I and when you have this
lefendants involved it can
hings drag on and on and
ts oi the apartment
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igs, when a spark
k nig from a dryer
tundry room.
ML
IX) 18 TS.
mTE
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on
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99
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UBLE
MFG'S
UPONS
WE WILL DOUBLE 5
! T0 50 FACE VALUE)
Y $10 PURCHASE
All
Sometimes
ATLANTA (UPI) � The
Coca-Cola Co. proved con-
clusively this week that when
enough angry customers say
jump, even a corpora. - giant will
reply, "How high?"
Almost as soon as Coke an-
nounced April 22 that it plannned
to change its 99-year-old formula
to produce new Coke, consumers
began rebelling. "Coke Was It"
buttons appeared. Loyalists
began hoarding old Coke. Pro-
test rallies were held.
Fearing they might be tarred
and feathered � or worse, lose
market share to Pepsi-Cola �
Coke officials asked for
forgiveness and announced
Wednesday they will bring back
old Coke as "Coca-Cola
Classic
"We are not in business to
make a large segment of con-
sumers mad at us said Donald
Keough, president of Coca-Cola,
which earned $7.3 billion last
year and held 21.7 percent of the
$23 billion-a-year U.S. soft drink
market, compared to No. 2 Pep-
si's 18.8 percent.
"The simple fact is that all of
the time and money and skill
poured into consumer research
on the new Coca-Cola could not
measure or reveal the deep and
abiding emotional attachment to
original Coca-Cola felt by so
many people said Keough.
Everybody is happy now. Coke
customers have their drink back,
Coke officials have their
customers back and Pepsi has
more ammunition to escalate the
already intense cola war.
"Consumers across the coun-
try have clearly voted new Coke
the Edsel of the '80s crowed
Roger Enrico, Pepsi president.
But Pepsi's jabs had no effect
on Coke officials, compared to
the outpouring of disgust,
distrust and outright hate ex-
hibited by irate Coke customers.
The phone calls and letters
roared in � thousands of them
� and most were not complimen-
tary.
"Changing Coke is like God
making the grass purple one
letter-writer stated.
Stories of wounded, longtime
Coke drinkers abounded. They
called the new Coke wimpy and
particularly disliked the idea that
the original formula was gone
forever.
A Seattle man filed a lawsuit �
thrown out of court � and form-
ed a club demanding that Coca-
Cola return old Coke to super-
market shelves.
A Dallas woman threatened a
protest march. Others said they
would boycott Coke.
All were thrilled with the news
of old Coke's return.
"Thank God, I knew my
prayers would be answered
said Carol Rizzo, a Dallas
woman who described herself as
a "Coke-aholic
One woman called Coke head-
Barkeeps May Keep Tabs On Patrons
RALEIGH (UPI) � Bar and
I lquor store owners who sell
spirits to drinkers who have had
one too many would be liable for
accidents the drunks may cause
under a bill the House passed Fri-
day.
House members approved the
bill 72-18 after about an hour of
debate. It must go to the Senate
for approval before becoming
law.
The bill would force bartenders
and clerks at stores that sell beer,
wine or liquor to refuse to sell
drinks or bottles to anyone
noticeably drunk or be liable for
any injuries he might cause.
"Any person who has worked
in a bar doesn't need a
theological or law degree to know
when somebody is drunk said
Rep. Coy Privette, R-Cabarrus,
the bill's sponsor.
Privette, a Baptist preacher
and director of the Christian Ac-
tion League, worked in a
Statesville tavern when he was
young. He said Friday that his
bill is not designed to punish
responsible bars or liquor stores,
just irresponsible establishments
"similar to the one I worked for
several moons ago
"I was never given instructions
to check ages Privette said. "I
was never told to cut anybody
off. I worked at a first class
watering hole
State laws already forbid
establishments to sell spirits to
minors or drunks. It already
makes any establishment who
breaks the law and sells to minors
liable for any accidents they
cause under the influence of the
alcohol.
Privette said state courts have
ruled already that anyone selling
alcohol to a drunk should be held
responsible for actions he causes.
He said his bill merely turns court
precedent into law.
"There ought to be a degree of
responsibility on those who are
selling it (alcohol), making it
available said Rep. George
Miller, D-Durham, chairman of a
judiciary committee that gave the
bill unanimous approval. "Those
who are selling ought to make it
their business to know (if so-
meone is drunk)
But Rep. Sidney Locks,
D-Robeson, said adults who
drink should be the only ones
responsible for their actions �
not bartenders and clerks.
"If I am an adult, do make
decisions, should other people be
responsible for the actions I
take?" he said. "I don't sell
alcohol, don't plan to ever do it.
But it's dangerous what we're do-
ing to some small businesses
He said he would vote for any
bill to jail drunk drivers or take
away their licenses, but, "I don't
think we should hold somebody
else responsible
cApp�e cofids
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quarters in Atlanta and told
Keough, "I can live again" and
then broke down crying.
"This was a lesson in
humility admitted Keough,
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back old Coke and started
discussing such a move in early
June. The decision was made
Monday to bring back the
original product, now called
"Coca-Cola Classic
As for market research that
showed the new taste of Coke
was favored over the old, Keough
said: "It certainly wasn't suffi-
cient and it certainly wasn't ac-
curate. It couldn't measure the
passionate loyalty consumers
had
Could all this upheaval � the
formula change, the angry con-
sumer reaction and the Coke ad-
mission � have been a Coke
public relations ploy?
Emanuel Goldman, a beverage
analyst for Montgomery
Securities in San Francisco,
agreed. "What you're witnessing
is the power of consumers flexing
their collective muscles he said.
Which is not to say Coke won't
benefit � perhaps handsomely
� from all this.
Wall Street investors already
sent their signal, raising Cke
stock to a 12-year high after the
announcement.
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Stye �a0t (Earoifnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
John Peterson, (�����
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ����
HAROLD JOYNER. s,� tdllt� jQM LuvENDFR
Daniel Maurer, l, e�, Anthony Martin. �,� �
Rick McCOrmac, se� emot John Peterson, o,rf� �anaiier
Bili Mitchell, c�� .����� bill Dawson, p, uunuKer
Debb.e Stevens. DeChanile Johnson, �
July n, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Summer Theatre
Lower Ticket Prices
Just about everyone associated
with ECU is perfectly willing to :d-
mit that the East Carolina Summer
Theatre is a good thing. It affords
residents of eastern North
Carolina an opportunity to see
professional productions of ex-
cellent plays and musicals � an
opportunity many people would
not otherwise have.
However, for a lot of ECU
students, summer theatre is a case
of a good thing being too much.
Most (although certainly not all)
students are not the uncouth,
culture-deficient slobs portrayed in
most movies or even parental ac-
counts. Many of us would
welcome the opportunity to see
plays and musicals instead of the
nsual diet of the $1 movie. Unfor-
tunately, though, many of us can-
not afford to see a movie at post-
matinee prices, much less shell out
$12 per ticket for Summer Theatre
productions. And when you con-
sider the fact that this is the kind of
event to which many students
would like to take a date, you're
talking close to $25.
This cost is just too prohibitive
for many students to bear and it is
unfair for theatre events of this
caliber to take place on a university
campus and exclude students who
are, after all, the reason for the
campus' existence.
According to Summer Theatre
General Manager Scott Parker,
student ticket rates were offered
two or three years ago, but not
many students took advantage of
them. It's surprising that they
wouldn't, although surely some
did.
In any case, student ticket rates
should available even if they aren't
widely utilized. Currently, the onlv
way to see a Summer Theatre pro
duction without paying $12 is to
serve as an usher. Parker said
many students do volunteer to
serve as ushers, but for those of us
who would like to have our own
seats throughout the play, lower
rates should be offered.
We would suggest that next
season student ticket prices be re-
introduced and advertised exten-
sively to make students aware of
their availability. Additionally,
these tickets should cost half or
less of what regular tickets cost.
The University of Illinois has one
of the major theatre programs
which use this system successfully.
After students have been made
aware of the decreased ticket
prices, they should remain in effect
even if there is not a mad rush to
the box office.
Those students who want to see
Summer Theatre productions,
even if not great fn number, should
be able to see them at a price which
they an afford.
ntrp�mocxfAm�wtTzpamjee-sw
A (Shiite) Star Is Born, Part 2
By Fred Barnes
Th Nr� Republic
"Spin control" is the ability to shape
the way the media covers a story. In
American politics, it's the cherished fan-
tasy of every candidate, campaign of-
ficial and consultant. But despite all
their schemes for setting the right stage
and raising the timeliest issues, poliFi-
:ians rarely control the slant (or spin)
reporters put on a story.
What the Shiite terrorists in Beirut
achieved was spin control beyond the
wildest dreams of any politician. True,
they didn't succeed at every juncture;
the unprovoked murder of Robert
Stethem could not be glossed over. But
they had their way enough times to en-
sure that the well-being of the 40
American hostages merged as virtually
the only consideration of the media on
covering the hijacking. National pride
and America's position in the middle
East and deterring future hijackings �
such overarching but abstract concerns
were brushed aside in the media's obses-
sion with the hostages. And this put
pressure on President Reagan to concen-
trate on only one option: getting the
hostages out unharmed at all costs.
How did this happen? Easy. The ter-
rorists exploited the normal lust of the
media � particularly TV � for break-
ing events of international impact, high
drama, and a human dimension to the
news. When all these occur together,
there is a "crisis Wall-to-wall
coverage follows. Media competition,
always brutal, is especially fierce in this
atmosphere, partly because the public is
more attentive, partly because media
stardom may be at stake. (Recall the
sudden fame of ABC's Ted Koppel in
the Iranian hostage crisis of 1979-80.)
Given this, how could the TV net-
works pass up any chance to get the
hostages on film? Whatever qualms they
may have had about coverage that might
play into the terrorists' hands or clash
with the national interest were stifled.
ABC got the first break, as correspon-
dent Charles Glass arranged, reportedlv
through Shiite leader Nabih Berri. to in-
terview the pilot, copilot, and navigator
of flight 84 still held at gunpoint
aboard the plane.
The effect of the extravagant coverage
oi families was to make the hostages
more than simply someone's relatives.
They became America's missing fathers,
sons and brothers. "This coverage in-
evitably tilts the scales toward making
he hostages' safety the key, if not the
nilv issue reported ABC's Jeff Green-
field.
What's the cure for the flawed
.�overage'7 For starters, the networks
should stop congratulating themselves
tor their moments of restraint. Russert
said NBC has sat on three imnortant
stones at the request of admi:
officials. ABC officials point
they abstained from using the ole
from the days of the Iranian h
mess � 'America Held Hostage Big
deal. Journalists should also q .
so defensive.
Most of the self-examinations � �
average of the hostages have an . ted
to self-absolution. NBC got a h 8
wife, not exactlv a disinterested
observer, to chip in. On the "Todav"
show June 21 (Dav 8), B . .be!
asked the wife of Tom Cullins: "A
know, critics are saying that media
pie. people like me. are using poepl I
you. that we're making m orse.
Do you have some feel . ke that
"If we like it or not. television � a
wa of putting forth vour .
put pressure where pressure needs I
put she said.
Nor should the press create
choice between praising its coverage and
promoting censorship. That
Dan Rather of CBS portrayed
media's options. "Journalism is not a
precise science he said "Til s s a
crude art even on its best aav
all. I'll take the free press to the vonrroil-
ed media, which some of the sel f-serinf
political types in this country seem
really prefer. It's a totalitanar
where they say, 'We'll tell you ur.at tc
say and when to sav it
Southern Voting Fraud Incidents Continue
By Ken Bode
Bullet holes scar the front of Jimmie
Lee Jackson's gravestone; passing riders
sometimes fire into the cemetery. The
brick wall protecting the gravestone was
built by Albert Turner, who was along
that night in February 1965 when Jim-
mie Lee became the first martyr for
Southern black voting rights.
Albert's wife, Evelyn, keeps scrap
books of photos; Albert, then an aide to
Martin Luther King Jr marching at
Sclma just before all hell broke loose on
Bloody Sunday, 1965. Evelyn, watching
the King funeral on TV, perhaps wat-
ching Albert help drag the mules pulling
King's coffin.
Now the federal government has pic-
tures of Albert and Evelyn Turner �
"ordinary mug shots in Albert's
words. Civil-rights and political leaders
for more than two decades, the Turners
have been indicted by a federal grand
jury on charges of conspiracy, vote
fraud and mail fraud. They have been
accused of gathering absentee ballots of
their elderly, illiterate and infirm sup-
porters, then altering those ballots to
favor candidates of their choice: in
short, stealing the vote.
The Turners are not alone. Several
Alabama counties were targets of FBI
vote-fraud investigations following the
September 1984 primary. All are in the
Black Belt, which is one-third to three-
quarters black. Blacks have won ma-
jorities on county commissions and
boards of education. Some have won
key county jobs. But in most of these
counties, total control is within reach of
black voters only if they remain united
� and if their leaders can now stay out
of jail.
Sumter County is two-to-one black,
and last year blacks won total control of
the school board and county commis-
sion. Board of Education Chairman
Wendell Parrish claims that local white
factions have engaged the services of the
Doonesbury
Reagan Justice Department to settle the
long struggle over the area from Mon-
tgomery to the Mississippi border.
"That's the real conspiracy he says.
Jack Drake, a white Democratic
Tuscaloosa attorney, says, "AH elec-
tions in the Black Belt are racial Drake
suspects the investigations indeed were
inspired by local whites: "Their motivia-
tion is to maintain power, maintain con-
trol of the counties. I'm sure in their
minds they're fighting for their lives, the
way they live their lives. You're talking
about people who in their emotional
outlook toward the situation are really
quite desperate
Nevertheless, the government believes it
can prove to a jury of eight whites and
eight blacks now sitting in trial in Selma
that Albert and Evelyn Turner, who
marched to win the right to vote in the
1960s, are fraudulently abusing the right
today.
The work of the Public Integrity Sec-
tion, a division resuscitate by Attorney
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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A
General William French Smith, has pro-
duced a string of investigations, trials
and convictions. Coached by the Public
Integrity Section, Republican-appointed
U.S. attorneys are on a tear, ripping up
the pea patch on vote fraud, Republican
and Democrat alike.
But is clean government the point?
Black Belt politics are fought out largely
in Democratic primaries. Now the white
faction ticket often includes black can-
didates � as, say, for tax assessor, John
Kennard of Greene County.
Blacks here constitute 78 percent of
the population; civil-rights veterans
began winning a share of county control
as early as 1970. Now a new coalition of
whites and "responsible blacks" has
banded together to unseat the all-black
county commission and to elect Ken-
nard.
What are the stakes besides a "way of
life"? Well, 132 jobs are on the Greene
County payroll, with only 8,000
registered-voters. There is the right to
decide who allocates school funds, sets
property assessments and drives the
sheriff's car and hires the deputies. The
spoils, especially when mixed up with
race, make local elections a high-stakes
deal.
Perry County, where Albert and
Evelyn Turner live, is one of the state's
smallest. Yet in a typical election, more
absentee ballots will be cast in Perry
County than in Jefferson County, where
the population is nearly 50 times'larger.
In Perry County, also, there was a voter
re-identification program: Every voter
had to re-register or be purged from the
rolls.
"At least in Perry County they're
voting live bodies in the absentee box
syas Republican U.S. attorney Jeff Ses-
sions, who heads the team prosecuting
the Turners. Voter rolls in other coun-
ties, like Wilcox, have not been purged
for years and include more names than
there are men, women and children in
the county.
Black leaders admit they gather
absentee votes. "No question about it
says Albert Turner, "we've been doing it
for six or seven years since we've learned
the process. Most elections here are won
by 50 to 100 votes. Every day 35 percent
of the work force leaves Perry County
for jobs. In Lowndes County, it's even
more. If we don't vote those people, and
the elderly, there's no way to win elec-
tions
But black leaders also charge that
whites systematically gather absentee
votes, that some of those votes come
from longtime non-residents, and that
authorities have been indifferent to
repeated complaints about the practice.
On condition that he not be named, a
white Democratic county chairman saw
'They're doing what we always did. The
blacks learned from us Speaking on
the same basis, a Justice Department of-
ficial acknowledges, "We know both
sides are abusing the absentee process in
those counties On the record, the
department says it has had no com-
plaints about white vote fraud.
At the first sign of an absentee ballot
operation by the Turners in 1984. the
FBI was called in. When Albert Turner
mailed 504 absentee ballots at the
Marion post office the night before the
election, FBI agents were inside. If the
ballots were altered by the Turners,
mailing them was mail fraud, and the
government says it will prove that bet-
ween 25 and 30 were changed.
Everyone whose absentee ballot was
altered was interviewed by the FBI
Voters who said their baliot did not
square with how they marked it (mostly
elderly, all black) were bused more than
200 miles to Mobile to testify.
"Some of those people were so scared
they'll never vote again says Albert
Turner. Turner's attorney, J.L.
Chestnut, warned the Selma Times-
Journal: "Every nigger who said
anything to the FBI is going to be put on
the stand. They are going to have to say
it out in the open where you can hear
them and you can see them
Considering the tactics, timing and
politics, Black Belt leaders believe they
are targets for the administration's new,
conservative, Republican U.S. at-
torneys. They charge that the indict-
ments are designed to render them inef-
fective in opposing the re-election of
Republican Sen. Jeremiah Deruon next
year.
Justice Department and local officials
counter that civil-rights leaders have
become arrogant in the treatment of
their followers, high-handed in their
disregard for the law and have attemp-
ted to use threats and intimidation to
avoid the consequences. Jack Drake, the
Tuscaloosa attorney, recognizes the
ultimate political stakes, saying, "The
outcome of these trials will determine
who controls the Black Belt for the next
30 years
The
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ing the tactics, timing and
ick Belt leaders believe they
n the administration's new,
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ppartment and local officials
ft civil-rights leaders have
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attorney, recognizes the
itical stakes, saying, "The
these trials will determine
the Black Belt for the next
THfcfcAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
1ULY 17, 1985 �'�t 5
They're Back!
The Barroom Brothers and 'Bridegroom
B DANIEL MAURER
and
ANDRF.WJOYNKR
I
l contained "a rousing
southern flair for comic
adventure said a New York
theatre critic. Another wrote that
the show was "sparkling,
unusual and an immeasurably in-
vigorating musical However,
the East Carolina Summer
Theatre's production of The
Robber Bridegroom, based on
the Hudora Welty novella about a
gentleman bandit and his less-
m-brilliant bride-to-be, was
met with mixed opinions from
The East Carolinian's dynamic
duo of drama and critics-at-large,
Daniel Maurer and Andrew
iovner.
Theatre patrons can catch a
preview of their reviews by sear-
ching any one of the local gin
mills and taking up a seat beside
them. One theatregoer did hap-
pen upon our pickled pair in just
that way, and from his astonish-
ed report we were able to
reconstruct their drunken
dialogue.
That, thai
Girl, Andrew.
Yes, thank you, Daniel. That
girl forgot to give us our com-
plimentary drinks this week.
Shall it he the firing squad or
hanging?
To err is human, to forgive is
divine. Speaking of divine, what
did you think o' Bridegroom? I
found it quite entertaining
overall. Especially that Salome
character, what's her real name?
honestly couldn 7 say, Daniel.
Lift up your glass a second and
hand me my program, will you
Andrew?
Certainly.
Andrew, you've gotten water
rings all over my program. Let's
see. it says Susan Marrash
Minnerly Yes, that's it, Susan
Marrash-Minnerly. That woman
was funnier than you were last
Saturday night when you ran
drunk and naked through the
nunnery.
Damn it, you promised not to
tell anyone about that!
And I haven't, but I do have to
say something about Susan; her
hilarious character acting truly
made that show. She over-
shadowed most all of her fellow
performers.
dunno, Killer. I thought she
was a bit overblown � she was
trying too hard to be funny, I
believe. Also, her screaming
didn't do anything for the old
migraine.
Tell me, who d'you think
thought up the asinine idea of
putting olives in martinis?
I don't know, but I'll bet
they're related to the damned
choreographer. I really didn't
care for it at all.
swear those people couldn't
dance worth an airborne act of
fornication. The choreography
seemed better suited for a bloody
Harvard Hasty Pudding show
than it did for a Broadway
musical.
It just seemed a little too con-
trived.
Speaking of contrived, how
about Sean McGuirk's portrayal
of the gentleman bandit? His
southern accent is about as real as
the possibility of our getting a
love letter from the cast after last
week's review.
Yes, I do admit his perfor-
mance was lackluster, but I'm
sure that's due more to the gruel-
ing Summer Theatre rehearsal
schedule than his acting talent.
Famous last words, mate.
No, no, I have every reason to
believe that once he's had time to
slip into the role � Wednesday at
the latest � the production as a
whole will benefit.
If you say so, O Great Sage of
the Feature Page. Tell me, why
the hell do these people serve iced
tea in Mason jars? I'm going to
order another breakfast of cham-
pions. Want one?
Another what?
Breakfast of champions.
See DRUNKEN, Page Six
HOTSPOTS
On Campus
The Cars That Ate Paris, a
regional premiere film,
comes to big screen at Hen-
drix July 17 at 7 p.m.
Directed by Peter Weir
idallipoli. Picnic at Hang-
ing Pock), This film deals
with the destruction of
Paris by its own marauding
youth. The film emerges as
a deeply moving moral
fable of corruption and
evil, and as a scathing satire
on a society dominated by
automobiles. Admission is
free to all with current ECU
IDs but only ECU students
may bring a guest.
American Gigolo stars Richard
Gere as Julian Kay. Boyish
and sensual, he is on the
prowl looking for a trick,
a companion, someone to
please. He speaks five or six
languages, and he might be
a chauffeur for a wealthy
woman or translator for the
lonely wife of an executive.
Lauren Hutton plays the
dutiful, decent wife of a
state senator. Slowly, but
irrevocably, Julian falls in
love with her. Screening Ju-
ly 22 at 7 p.m. in Hendrix,
courtesy of the Student
Union Films Committee,
American Gigolo is free to
all with current ECU' IDs
but only ECU students may
bring a guest.
Casablanca, one o' the most
memorable of all movie ex-
periences, is playing July 24
at 7 p.m. in Hendrix. War-
time refugees gather in
Morocco to obtain scarce
exit isas to Lisbon. Hum-
phrey Bogart and Ingrid
Bergman star in this legen-
dary film. Admission is free
to all with current ECU IDs
but only ECU students may
bring a guest.
Nightclubs
The Attic starts this weekend
with PG-13, which was for-
merly Pegasus Rocks. The
mainstream rock 'n' roll of
PG-13 starts Thursday. Fri-
day, The Attic continues
the summer fun with
Strange Angle's female lead
and their brand of commer-
cial metal. Winding up the
weekend is the power rock
of Sidewinder on Saturday.
The all bands begin at 9:45
p.m.
Corrigans continues its popular
I adies Night this Wednes-
day with the music of
Lahnn and Loftin. This
popular local duo starts its
crowd - pleasing music at
9:30 p.m. Doors open at
8:30 p.m.
The Loft presents Tom Jones's
contemporary music July
18-20. Each night Jones
begins at 9:00 p.m.
Premiums starts the weekend on
the Thursday with the new
wave sounds of Persian
Gulf. The rock 'n' roll of
the Three-Hits continues
Premium's party weekend
on Friday. Finally, One-
Plus-Two's original new
wave rock winds up on
Saturday night. Each night
Doors open at 5:00 p.m
and the bands start at 10:30
p.m.
TW'S Nightlife presents the
Blues Other Brothers Julv
17-21. The Blues Other
Brothers play 50's and 60's
style rock and begin each
night at 9:30 p.m. On Fri-
day the Peter Adonis male
fantasy show will be at
TW's. Doors open at 6:30
and the show starts at 7:30
p.m. Also, every Tuesday
night TW's presents the on-
ly comedy show in eastern
North Carolina, The Com-
edy Zone. This Tuesday
Mark Klein and Amos
Chang will be the featured
comedians.
Sean McGuirk and Tracey Edwards star in The Robber Bridegroom.
Madonna Nudes Made Public
Playboy, Penthouse Claim Pics
CHICAGO (UPI) � Fans will
be able to see nude photos of
Madonna, the rock singer known
for hit songs including "Like a
Virgin in Playboys September
issue that goes on the newsstands
July 16, the magazine says.
Tuesday's announcement
means the magazine will beat
Penthouse to the public with
nude pictures of the songstress.
Penthouse publisher Bob Guc-
cione announced earlier this week
his magazine had obtained nude
photos of Madonna and would
publish them "very soon
Playboy said the pictures to be
featured on 14 pages were taken
by photographers Lee
Friedlander and Martin H.
Schreiber when Madonna was
working as a nude model in New
York in 1979 and 1980.
Playboy would not disclose the
amount paid for the photos or
the source.
Arthur Kretchmer, Playboys
editorial director and acting
publisher, said there is no ques-
tion the photographs were in-
tended to be published.
"We think Madonna will love
them, he said.
Playboy said it and not Pen-
thouse was offered first choice of
the pictures of Madonna, who
skyrocketed to fame with her
Like a Virgin album.
"What we're publishing are
the most artistic and erotic
photographs from Madonna's
modeling days and we paid for
them fairly Kretchmer said.
In New York, Guccione said he
does not care who First prints
discuss whether he had additional
pictures besides the 22 he g
from Kulkens, saying, "All I
tell you is that Penthouse will
pear with 1" pages devoted
Madonna in the nude. I
guarantee it, but I can't tell you
how, why or under what cir-
cumstances
The Penthouse publisher sa
Madonna alone, fully nude, very explicit with
everything in full view�
� Guccione
nude photographs of Madonna
because he got the "cream of the
crop" and will go ahead with his
plans for a layout featuring the
singer "very soon
Guccione said a $2 million
lawsuit Filed Monday in U.S.
District Court in Manhattan by a
photographer who took at least
some of the Penthouse photos
would not stop him either.
The photographer, Herman
Kulkens, says he never gave Guc-
cione permission to use the
photos. Guccione claims Kulkens
was paid $25,000.
But the publisher declined to
the pictures were of "Madonna
alone, fully nude, verv
explicitwith everything in full
view
The photos have been-
displayed in a gallery, but have
never been published in a
magazine, Guccione said.
The young rock singer, born
Madonna Ciccione, who recenth
became engaged to actor Sean
Penn, seems unaffected by the
furor. Her publicist said Mondav
Madonna has admitted posing
nude and feels she has done
nothing to be ashamed of.
'Peter Pan' Prepares For Takeoff
Tracey Edwards plays the less-than-brilliant bride-to-be in the Sum-
mer Theatre's production of 'The Robber Bridegroom playing
through July 20th. Tickets are available at the McGinnis Theatre box-
cttce iu Greenville, call 757-6390.
The American musical com-
edy version of Sir James
Barrie's celebrated fantasy Peter
Pan will be presented by the East
Carolina Summer Theatre as the
finale to its 20th anniversary
season.
The story of Peter Pan, the lit-
tle boy who wouldn't grow up,
has not been altered from the
original novel by Barrie; it is the
same Broadway musical in which
Mary Martin starred as Peter in
New York during the 1954-55
season, and in the first television
spectacular on a nation-wide net-
work in the spring of 1955. The
Darling children still sly right out
their nursery window to partake
of high adventure in Never-Never
Land populated with fearsome
pirates, renegade Indians and in-
credible animals. Tinker Bell, the
entrancing little fairy who speaks
only with blinking lights and
tinkling sounds, is till on hand to
save the children from a terrible
fate. Wendy mothers the little
lost boys, Peter does noble battle
with the wicked pirates, the tick-
ing crocodile pursues Captain
Hook and good still triumphs
over evil.
The epilogue written by Barrie
for his book "Peter and
Wendy not normally used in
stage productions, is presented in
this musical version of the fairy
tale. "It's the perfect way to em-
phasize Peter's immortality
said Director Edgar Loessin. In
addition, there are such popular
songs as "I'm Flying 'Tve Got
to Grow the nonsensical Indian
number called "Ugg-A-Wugg
and the rebellious theme song of
the motherless boys, "I Won't
Grow Up
Babs Winn returns to the East
Carolina Summer Theatre for her
fourth season and will perform
the role of Peter, the impish boy
who soars hither and yon, with or
without his shadow, whichever
suits his convenience. Miss Winn,
a native of Greenville, now
makes her home in New York Ci-
ty where she enjoys a very active
career on stage and network
television.
With this production of Peter
Pan, the East Carolna Summer
Theatre welcomes back the
talents of John Sneden who will
play the dual roles of the testy
Papa Darling and ferocious Cap-
tain Hook, "the dirtiest dog in
this wonderful world The
original scene designer for the
Summer Theatre twenty years
ago, Mr. Sneden also performed
a number of character parts dur-
ing his nine years with the
theatre. He is now the Dean of
Design at the North Carolina
School of the aits.
Light and shadow also play
very important roles in the
musical. The important shadow
is Peter Pan's own, and at the
beginning of the show, he is in
search of his lost shadow. But
one character in the fantasy is on-
ly light. This is Tinker Bell, the
elusive good fairy who befriends
children despite the fact that she
is only a light beam dancing
about the stage. This effect will
be achieved by a $10,000 laser
beam, shipped in from New York
specifically for this purpose.
The feats of flight have always
been one of the features of Peter
Pan ever since this happy show
for grown-ups and children was
first produced in London in 1904.
Peter and all the Darling children
will be aeronautical indeed in this
Summer Theatre production as
they start for Never-Never Land.
They will owe their success at sw-
inging through the air to the in-
genuity of Peter Foy.
Peter Pan is the last Broadway-
style musical to be offered by the
East Carolina Summer Theatre
this year. Tickets are still
available for all performances
(July 24-27, 29-31 at 8:15 p.m.)
and (July 29 and 31 at 2:15 p.m.).
and may be purchased at McGin-
nis Theatre in Greenville, corner
of Fifth and Eastern Streets.
Monday through Saturday, 10:00
a.m. until 8:15 p.m or may be
reserved bv calling in Greenville
757-6390.
A - A






I HI ! sU Roi MAN II I 1 7, 1985
Doonesburv
)
( ontinued From lnt' hour
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MY
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Continued From Page Five
Y'know, a vodka martini.
Ah yes, thank you. While
you're on the subject of glasses,
wasn't it you who said Tracey
Edwards, who plays Rosamund,
could shatter a champagne glass?
Telephone booth, if was.
Same difference. But as they
say, there's a first time for
everything. Hell, you're actually
right. Tracey's got some lungs.
Her voice is rich and honeysweet.
Kind of reminds me of Pat
Benetar on a good night.
You can keep her damned
lungs. I want her neck.
Let's keep this a family review,
Andrew.
To hell with family � want
her neck!
Be quiet, will you? Jesus
Christ, they'll throw us out of
here. Why are you always so loud
when you drink?
come from a long line of
opera singers. By the way, have
you seen my lower lip lying
around anywhere?
Worry not, Andrew; it's still
on your face � for now. But
Tracey is just the olive in the mar-
tini. The singing overall has
greatly improved since Baby (see
review July 10th issue). The
"Two Heads" routine, featuring
Jay Winnick and Vandy Behr as
Little Harp and Big Harp respec-
tively
Respect?! They have no respect
for student wallets. These tickets
cost $12 a shot.
As I was saying, Jay and Van-
dy were great. That scene ranks
tops in my book.
Comic books don't count.
Isn't there anything about this
production that you liked?
Yes. It ended.
Don't get smart, Andrew. We
have a review to write.
All right, J. Edgar Hoover,
take it back. I liked the lighting
k
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and scenery. The technical stuff
was superb as usual, unlike thrse
damned martinis. vermouth is
an enemy to be reckoned with, I
tell you.
And they say lightning I
strike twice in the same place I
wholeheartedl agree.
Designer Robert AJpers
Lighting Designer
Weathersbee created an excel
atmosphere for the sho
Yeah, but two right
make up for a million wt
This show is (iefinitel a pair
can live without.
It wasn't all that bad. In faci
think given time, the cast will
their act together and thiv ;
duction will actually be a
seeing.
wus .rona before
How was that0
Those were your farm .
words. Waiter, the check
will.
Long hours, low pay,
hard work, great company.
The East Carolinian 757-6366
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Greenville, N.C
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HOME COOKED FOOD
Student Special
Free dessert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.2Splus tax & beverage.
5 Free Plates With Purchase of Meal Plan.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM-� PM
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alker has been sc
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Harrison is happv wij
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sPects in summer leal
:amps.
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rtend of people with
backgrounds Harn
"They have all worked
rograms and all of thej
here
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iority for Walker an;
Is not only to find sorm
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e don't want to juj
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Sports
Marketing Promoting ECU Football
Bv l()N BROWN
-Ml�nl Spoil, f tini
Pirate football marketing
- ontinue to be directed
building and expanding
aditionai" events which
established recently,
to 1 ee Workman.
ant marketing directoi foi
athletics.
Great Purple-Gold
Pigskin Pigout Party" lias
wn ovei the last three
he said. " I his eai we
�� 10,000 people attend
course of the two day
We believe it's the largest
otball event in North
a by far "
event, which is held in
ion with the alumni
id each year, is novs eon-
be one of the most
ible tools available to create
si in Pirate football foi the
wing fall. Each year celebri-
? are on hand to host the
and help attract a large
v eai' - stars. former
Oriole Boog Powell
t akland Raider Hen
ion, were no except ion.
arge-sized pan proved to be
� the moo popular players
i attended the Pigout,
mngsters and oldsters
985 1 . was the best
v: d i kman. "We had
. cooking eon
compared to onl 25
v e also sold every barbecue
inkardompany
� sponsored the
e second vear
ana nave been instrumental in its
success rhe tradition being
established with this event is in-
dicative ol the increasing
popularity ol Pirate football,
which was helped this yeai with
the aid of the superstai hosts.
Noi onl) did Davidson and
Powell perform admirably in
then role as hosts, but they,
agieed to appeal in a 30 second
commercial foi Pirate football
without compensation. The clip
(l
fs
lee Workman
features Powell and Davidson
arguing about whethei the home
oi away schedule is the toughest,
as in the "taste great" ads foi a
beet company. Rub Wilson,
1 (. I 's assistant sports informa
tion director, has a cameo spot as
the bartender.
"We'll be tunning that ad
throughout the summer and dur-
ing the football season
Workman said. "We've also got
a clip on Pirate football that is
currently being shown at a
number ol regional theaters, such
as the Plitl and Plaa
The 90 second film highlights
the promotional theme "Pirate
Attack in '85 We're Going
Alter I he Best " It was filmed by
lake Postma, who works with the
ECU School oi Medicine Com-
munications Center. Postma also
shot the Powell-Davidson ad and
does highlight pieces for the
Pirates.
Other regional theaters are car-
rying the theater promo, in-
cluding Tarboro, New Bern,
Edenton, Washington and
others, while Greenville's Buc-
caneer and Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theater will be
running it soon, according to
Workman. Plans are underway
to expand the film's coverage to
Raleigh, the Triad area and other
areas.
The multi-media efforts of the
ECU athletic marketing push in-
clude a large number of
billboards extolling the tough
schedule for the Pirates in '85, in-
cluding visits to Ficklen Stadium
bv South Carolina and Miami.
"We've got a proposal for a
"chicken-pickin promotion for
the South Carolina (Gamecocks)
game which will tie in with our
tailgatmg party said ECU
v Athletic Marketing Directoi
Dave Hart. "We're negotiating
tor a sponsor now
rhe "Ain't It Great to
Tailgate" promotion will be
sponsored for the third con-
secutive year bv last Fare, which
will provide a free package of 12
items designed to appeal to a
wide range oi fans on a first-
come, first-served basis. Items to
be featured include t-shirts with
The ECU soccer team is looking forward to a uirf�fi r�ii �s�i. . L .
k iaru ro a successful fall nitn more wins, after rebuilding last season.
Harrison Feels Program On Track
Bv RICKMcCORMAC
sport, rdilor
Although ECU basketball
ich Charlie Harrison's Pirates
have won only 12 basketball
nes in the past two seasons,
Harrison feels that the basketball
gram is on the verge of suc-
With both of his assistants
eady hitting the recruiting trail
g at rising seniors, Har-
ison took time to reflect upon
cw staff and the direction the
�"tball program is heading.
�1 Walker � who was recently
.noted to full-time assistant �
Mike Dement are Harrison's
� v assistants, along with part-
assistant Leon Talbot.
ilker has been scouting the
Sew York City area since June 15
le Dement has been handling
the Washington, DC. and North
Carolina and surrounding areas.
Talbot doesn't officially begin his
duties until school starts in
August.
Harrison is happy with his new
coaching staff and says they have
been awfully busy looking at pro-
spects in summer leagues and
camps
"I'm real pleased we have a
blend of people with diversified
backgrounds Harrison said.
"They have all worked at quality
Programs and all of them want to
be here
Harrison says that the top
priority for Walker and Dement
's not only to find some big kids,
but also to recruit the best
available players.
"We will have three or four
scholarships available he said,
"e don't want to just fill the
voids with bodies - but we want
to recruit for our specific needs.
All we will lose to graduation
next year are two guards
Harrison feels his next edition
oi Pirate hoopsters will have am-
ple depth and good players on the
perimeter, with inside play once
again being the biggest concern.
"From the perimeter we played
with anybody in the league for a
while, but you cant live from the
perimeter he said. "We have
got to better on the inside. We
can't let people dominate us in
the paint
Charlie Harrison
Among the players that Har-
rison feels can contribute on the
inside this upcoming season are
juniors, Leon Bass and Marcel
Henry.
"Leon has a lot of ability, but
he's still a basketball neophyte.
In high school he played on the
outside Harrison said. "He has
skills you can't teach. Leon can
be as good as he wants to be � it
just has to come from within
Harrison also has high hopes
for Henry, a transfer from St.
Andrews, where he was an all-
conference selection and was
named division III player of the
year as well.
"Marcel is a good offensive
player Harrison continued.
"He can score from both the in-
side and outside � and he knows
how to win.
Harrison feels that the time is
right for Pirate basketball to im-
prove, and that much progress
has been made on many of the
more established basketball pro-
grams in the league.
"We've made long strides in a
lot of positive directions both on
the floor and in the classroom
Harrison said. "We've got good
kids here now and they will at-
tract good people. If we get a kid
on campus now, we have the type
of quality people that will recruit
them and make them want to
come here.
"Unfortunately people judge
everything we're doing by the
won-loss record he said. "I'm
disapointed we haven't won more
games, but I know in my heart
we've gone about everything in
the right way.
"I've made mistakes, I've
given people chances when
maybe I shouldn't have Har-
rison continued. "But you have
to remember I'm dealing with
kids and I want them to be suc-
cessful not only on the court but
in life as well
Among Harrison's players who
have gotten or will be receiving
degrees are Herb Gilchrist, Thorn
Brown and Tony Robinson.
"We've sent some good kids
out of here in the right
direction Harrison said. "They
will never do anything to hurt this
school and can only do good in
the future for ECU
former Pirate star Ferrv I ong, mm
P'Kout last year. The annual event
the "We're Going After the
Best" logo.
Shrine Day will return tor the
Tulsa game, while the Temple
game will be Scout Day . lersev
Day will be directed tow aid
students and Visoi Day will be
sponsored bv Coke. Hart is
negotiating with local cat dealers
to provide a top-of-the-line car as
a prie on a one game basis,
similar to last year's "till the
stadium" effort. Homecoming
will be observed at the Miami
game.
"We're rapidly building a
series oi traditional events
of the PinsbmjSieeleTr
has become the latest sprinu Football affair in the slate.
addition to Miami and South
Carolina, will be rated as one of
the top ten toughest slates in the
country by a number of national
publications.
around Pirate football said
Workman, who has just finished
his Ins; yeai as the assistant
athletic marketing director.
"We're making a lot of trie: I
tor EC! athletit s
"We've certainly g ; iible
schedule he a led d belie
it's the toughest one in the historv
� Pirate football, W look
possible u ol -he
ith arolina game, becan
the Gamecocks have r-cx re
quested 8,000 kets. '
A- � - to Workman,
1985 schedule, which features
Auburn, Penn State and I s(
Now it will be up to ECU fans
till the stadium up and prove
' e financial feasibility of
upgrading Ficklen Stadium. As it
tnds now, the seating capacity
5,000 will always serve as a
"reason" for certain area teams
refuse to travel to Greenville.
But then again, E I is
:r the best
'going
Soccer Team Expecting More
Wins After Rehnilrlino Vor
By MIKELUDWICK
SUff V rtler
The ECU soccer team is look
ing toward an excellent season in
the fall oi 1985 after a year oi
rebuilding, according to head
coach Steve Brodv.
"Even though last vear was a
transition year, there were many
positive aspects to the season
Brody said. "The toughest part
was getting through the season,
but the team stayed together and
the attitude and desire to work
was enhanced. The team's
discipline and professionalism
were also greatly strengthened
As far as this season is con-
cerned, Coach Brody's biggest
question mark is the goal keeper
position. "We now have three
keepers Brody stated, "and
that can go to five. Mark Eliadas,
one of our scholarship players, is
one of them. He loves to work
and has a lot of experience
The other leading candidates
are Matt Kendall and George
Podogorny. "Matt was an all-
Met ro keeper dnd is very good al
that position Podogorny
been here before He is very vocal
in a positoe way - he com
municates
As for backs this year, Brodv
has three placers returning, in-
cluding Pat Golden Palmier

Stephen Brody
Grossi and Mike Murray. Brodv
said he would have Rkk Spmskv
and Dav id Skefington up front
The two co-captains will be a big
factor in generating offense, ac-
cording to the coach.
Freshman candidates have a
chance of breaking into the line-
up at two or three positions, the
coach feels. �I'm definitely going
to be looking for freshmen
starters he stated.
1 he season will be rough on the
Pirate booters this year, because
most oi the travelling will take
place on the weekends in order to
prevent the players from missing
too many classes. ECU also faces
a tough conference schedule this
fall.
Brody points to the fact that
even though the conference
doesn't have an automatic bid to
the NCAA tournament, three
conference teams were invited to
the post-season event last year.
"It's going to be a hard season
Brody said. "We're going to have
to exert ourselves and show other
programs that ECU has a pro-
gram to be reckoned with.
"With the skill and talent of
our players added to our tenacity,
we will be recognized Brody
added. "ECU finally has a team
of winners
Local Bodybuilders Do Well;
Gain Competitive Experience
By DAVID McGINNI ESS
Staff W nirt
Bodybuilding is one of the
most demanding sports in terms
of time, energy and dedication
put forth by an athlete.
Bodybuilders go through intense
daily workouts of several hours
each while on a 800 to 1,000
calorie per day diet.
Bodybuilding is also different
from many sports in that it is not
performance oriented. While
powerlifters are concerned with
increasing strength, bodybuilders
are only interested in weight lif-
ting for its cosmetic effects.
Weightlifting is the backbone
of bodybuilding. It is the best
type of exercise for building size
and definition in muscles.
However bodybuilders also use
extensive stretching both before
and after their weightlifting
routines. They may also use run-
ning, swimming andor aerobics
to burn calories and give them a
"cut up" look.
Diet is another extremely im-
portant aspect of bodybuilding.
Proper diet is necessary both to
build muscle mass and to limit
body fat. Bodybuilders also often
use inariv vitamins and diet sup-
plements to help give them
necessary nutrients without lots
oi calories.
Building a muscular, striated
(cut up) body is only half the bat-
tle though. In order to win in
competition, one must be able to
show off those muscles in such a
way as to emphasize strong
points while concealing weak
areas. Bodybuilders must spend
hours practicing posing routines
in addition to their other train-
ing.
As in nearly all sports, proper
technique is best learned by hav-
ing a good coach. While some
bodybuilders are able to employ a
full-time coach, most begin by
using the advice of friends,
magazines and books.
Last Saturday, several
Green vi lie-area bodybuilders
competed in the first annual
Gold's Gym Classic
Bodybuilding competition in
Fayetteville. Former ECU inside
linebacker Glenn Morris placed
fourth in the novice and open
categories.
Although he has placed first in
three powerlifting meets, this was
Morris' first bodybuilding com-
petition. "I'm looking for ex-
perience said Morris before the
competition, "to see what the
competition is like, what they see
as readv, and to see what 1 can
do
ECU student Jim Gaskill plac-
ed first in the novice division.
Gaskill, a former powerlifter, sh-
ed approximately 90 pounds for
the competition, to weigh in at
about 200 pounds. Clint Jordan,
another ECU student, placed
third in the open division.
"I'm hooked said ECU com-
petitor Charlie Daughtridge after
his first competition, "The crowd
response really gets your
adrenalin going Although it
was not what he had expected
Daughtridge said he would not
have traded Saturday's ex.
perience "for anything
In addition to trophies and ap-
plause, competitors gain a lot in
experience. That knowledge can
help them in future training in
composing and performing their
routines, and give them the con-
fidence needed for further com-
petition.
�� -Bu.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 17, 1983
M-W
M-F
M-F
Sat.
Sun.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
-F 7a.m8a.m
12noon-l:30p.m
Minges Pool
4 p.m7: p.m
1 p.m5 p.m
1 p.m5 p.m
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9a.m7 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5: p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
r-Th 10a.m12 noon
T"Tn 1 p.m4 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 11 p.m7: p.m.
Friday 11 p.m5: p.m.
SatSun. lp.m. -4 p.m.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
MTh 11 a.m7 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m5: p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m4 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
Nl-F 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
F-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
M-Fl 1:30 a.m3 p.m. (in person)
M-F 12noon-3 p.m. (phone in)
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
�"� � � � � � �- � �
PERSONALS
I NEED A RIDE TO D.C If you are
headed toward the Washington DC
or northern Va. areas after second
session, please give me a call. I will
have very little gear and will help
with gas. Call 757-0430 after 2 p.m.
and ask for Betty Jo. Also can be
reached at 757-6366. Leave name and
number.
SALE
FOR SALE: 3 CU. FT Sears
refrigerator. Great for dorm or
small apt. $89 negotiable. Call
752 6671.
FOR SALE: AMFM Cassette car
stereo w 5 band EQ. Good condi
tion $60. Call David at 757-3554.
FOR SALE: Fire-engine red tandem
bike,with foot brakes and headlight.
Great for families. $50 negotiable
Call 757-0430.
WANTED
EARN EXTRA MONEY WHILE
ATTENDING CLASSES: Students
wanted to provide notetakingtutor-
ing services for disabled students on
campus. For an application contact
Handicapped Student Services Of
fice, 212 Whichard, or Program for
Hearing Impaired Students,
Brewster A-114.
HELP WANTED: Paid positions
now open for news writers at THE
EAST CAROLINIAN. Apply early as
number of openings is limited. Call
757 6366 or stop by 2nd floor Publica
tions Bldg. to fill out an application.
HELP WANTED: Paid positions
now open for feature writers at THE
EAST CAROLINIAN. Apply early as
number of openings is limited. Call
757 6366 or stop by 2nd floor of the
Publications Bldg. to fill out an ap-
plication.
HELP WANTED: Aerobics Instruc
tors for the fall Experience re
quired. Contact Cathy at 758 9584.
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED: Ex
perienced photographer needed to
take black and white photos. Call
758 4844 for details.
FOR RENT: One bedroom unfur-
nished with kitchen, utilities furnish-
ed, two blocks from campus, male
students. Required deposit, $160
monthly. Call:752 5778 after 5:30
p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Profes
sional relocating to area. Is seeking
a graduate student or med student to
share 2 bedroom apartment. Please
contact by postcard or phone: Lou
Fillman, 1521 16th Ave, Apt. U, Bir-
mingham, ALA. 35205.
Work (205)934-4407 or
home-(205)930-0527.
ROOMS FOR RENT: 2 room fur
nished apt. Call 752-7212 or 756-0174.
ROOM FOR RENT: Room for rent
with Christian couple. Call 752-7217.
IRS A ction Comes
ByJENNETTEROTH
Staff Writer
It's almost a wrap-up for this
summer's intramural activities.
Only two events are left on our
summer schedule: the softball
tournament and the completion
of the men's tennis singles. Both
sports are filled with top com-
petitors making the end of this
summer's activities, one of the
most exciting finishes ever.
In recent basketball action
Sneaker Sam, the intramural
talent scout, blew the record
book away again with another
top-ranked pick in Percy Ed-
wards. Ranked No. 1 according to
Sam, Percy defeated Mark
Brown and second-ranked Ling
Sirarman in one-on-one basket-
ball. Siraman fell to the loser's
bracket but came back up the
ranks after defeating David
Howell, a former Siraman oppo-
nent.
Ling then headed to the courts
against the powers of Percy. But,
Ling was unable to match the
speed and versatility of Edwards
who left the courts of Memorial
with a summer championship
under his belt.
The second summer Putt-Putt
tournament was once again a suc-
cess as seven linksters teed off at
Greenville's Putt-Putt Course.
David Howell, former IRS
basketball star, left his mark of
70 on the course record books,
walking away with first place.
Landing in the runner-up posi-
tion was Ling Siraman with a
score of 74, while James Russo
captured third with a 77. Other
contestants were Chip Bunn,
Mark Brown, John Peterson and
Ed Knight.
Exciting End
In the latest tennis action, top
seed Tom Kiehl gets the first bye
in the IRS men's open division
tennis tournament. The victor of
the Mike Ludwick Cary Lawson
match will meet Kiehl in the semi
finals. In the other bracket, Chris
Heyde wins the bye and will meet
either Randy Meetre or Rich
Stallard in the semi's. The tennis
championship match will be held
by Wednesday July 24.
And now back to the softball
diamond are the Basebenders �
our first summer session cham-
pions. Out to rekindle their
cnampionhip fire, the
Basebenders hope to remain No.l
as they face the bats of the Pi
hupps, Commandos and Harry
Night and the Days The softball
games will be held on Tuesdays at
6:00 and 7:00 p.m. behind the
Allied Health Building.
Be sure to tune in Thursda at
2:30 to the Tennis Shoe Talkshow
on 91.3 WZMB (fm, I, ,�
our time to share with you the ex
citement and highlights of ,n
tramurals.
HOMOGENIZED
Silverbrook Milk
OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN SUNDAYS 8'
N MONDAYS 7 AM
E SATURDAY
12 MIDNIGHT
Art,�10'
PW
DPcPcLcSAE ' C0RN � GREEN BEANS
BEETS � PEAS � MIXED VEGETABLES
POTATOES � SAUERKRAUT
FRESH MARKET STYLE
a&p Vegetables Ground Beef
6 oz. H
:ans mm
,f

71C
3 lbs. or
more
Ground
Daily
lb.
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
Bottom WH0LE
.�
& Eye
Round
22-26 lb.
avg.
WAREHOUSE PRICES
DIET COKE � SPRITE - TAB
Coca Cola
l SAVE
160
2ltr.
btl.
FRENCHS
Instant Potatoes
MUELLERS
Elbow Macaroni
REGULAR � THIN
Muellers Spaghetti
A 4 P TRADITIONAL
ITALIAN STYLE
Spaghetti Sauce
LEMON-LIME � ORANGE � FRUIT PUNCH
Gatorade -X
Drink J
25-OFF
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FROZEN
A&P Lemonade
129

'V,
SAVE
- 20cor
4
6oz.
cans
WAREHOUSE PRICES
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Cubed Steak
BANQUET
Cream Pie
A4P GRAPE OR
Apple Juice
GREEN GIANT NIBBLERS
Corn on the Cob
FROZEN
Morton Dinner
joo

X
SAVE
CHOICP'
uipi
i
lb.
98
14 o
pkg
12 oY
can
6ct
pkg
11 o
pkg
89cfr;lj
65cIv3
99cyTij
99cE3
PRODUCE SPECIALS
FRESH
Jumbo
Cantaloupes
SAVE 5
50�u1
DELICIOUS
Palmolive Liquid
REGULAR
Lysol Spray
GENERAL MILLS
Cheerios Cereal
SMORES
Granola Bars
REGULAR � LIGHT
Coors
Beer
ctn. of
6
12 oz.
cans
24
9
MORTON
Pot
Pies
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Dannon Yogurt
SQUEEZE
Kraft Parkay
P4Q IMITATION
Cheese Slices
CITRUS HILL SELECT
Orange Juice
CALIFORNIA CELLARS
Taylor
Wine
2
8 ox
ctns
1 lb
pkg
1202:
pkg
64oi
ctn
Fresh
Blueberries
SAVE
50��
�2.
each
pint
99
99
0
0
Health & Beauty Aids Special
�� OFF LABEL
Listerine Mouthwash
30 OFF
5 Toothpaste
32 ox
btl
6�OS
tube
249
1"
DELI SPECIALS
3ltr
5
49
LONGACRE TURKEY PASTRAMI OR
Turkey Ham
SANDWICH CUT
Swiss Cheese
CREAMY
Cole Slaw
1"
3s
87�
h!BW�"
�im�
"t�n m, m ��
0t 111 -mt
mm





Title
The East Carolinian, July 17, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 17, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.416
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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