The East Carolinian, July 3, 1985






�he
(Earfllintan
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No5- (f
Wednesday, July 3, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000

Exchange Program Initiated
J B HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lab
Dr. kenneth Wilburn, Coordinator of ECU's African Studies Com-
mittee, is in the process of implementing an exchange program with
uniersities throughout the continent of Africa.
By RANDY MEWS
Co-Newi Kdllor
Students may soon have the
opportunity to study on the other
side of the Atlantic because of a
proposal for an African exchange
program blossoming under the
direction of ECU history pro-
fessor Dr. Kenneth Wilburn.
Coordinator of ECU's African
Studies Committee, Wilburn, 38,
has already received a favorable
reply from six African univer-
sities and hopes ECU students
will be able to attend these in-
stitutions no later than the spring
semester of 1987.
"The initial links have already
been established Wilburn said.
"I'm in the process of raising
financial assistance to talk with
each school on a personal basis. I
have some of the money right
now, but am still seeking external
grants and student government
assistance
Those schools which have
shown an interest in establishing
an exchange program with ECU
include: the Univeristy of Dar es
Salaam, Tanzania; Kenyatta
University College, Kenya;
University of the Ivory Coast,
Ivory Coast; University of
Ibadan, Nigeria and the Univer-
sities of Witwatersrand and the
Western Cape, both of South
Africa.
Wilburn said each school that
was selected is unique in its own
way, and each one will provide
students with encounters they will
never experience at any other
time in their lives:
� Dar es Salaam and Kenyatta
are both located close to the In-
dian Coast of Africa. These
schools give students a flavor of
the African-Islamic culture, as
well as enable them to view
wildlife on the nearbv Serenghetti
Plain.
� Ivory Coast is a French-
speaking university and offers an
excellent opportunity for those
who are majoring in that
language.
� Ibadan is situated in a city ap-
proximately the size of New York
City, allowing those students the
experience of a black, African-
urban environment.
� Witwatersrand is located in the
mining community of Johan-
nesburg and is within a short
distance of one the finest animal
safari parks in the world, Kruger
National Park.
� Western Cape is located on the
tip of South Africa near Cape
Town, a city Wilburn describes as
the most beautiful he's ever
visited.
Although there has been recent
protest in the United States con-
cerning South Africa's govern-
mental policy of apartheid (a
policy which considers blacks in-
ferior to whites), Wilburn still
feels it would be advantageous
for students to attend one of the
South African universities.
"We are a nation that has ex-
perienced over 400 years of
racism Wilburn said. "Those
ECU students who live in a
revolutionary environment like
South Africa will better unders-
tand how racism occurred in our
country
Wilburn made it clear,
however, "that ECU would not
have an exchange program with
any African institution that
restricted admission on the
grounds of race, color, religion
or ethnicity.
"Apartheid is a government
issue, not a position supported by
the Universities of Witwatersrand
or the Western Cape Wilburn
continued. "The schools of
South Africa very much en-
courage a multi-racial policy
Although apartheid is a topic
of national concern, Wilburn
said just experiencing the dif-
ferent cultures in "the birthplace
of humanity" would be more
than enough to broaden students'
perspectives of their own society.
The initial thrust for forming
the African exchange program
came from Dr. Eugene Ryan,
Dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Last fall, Ryan sug-
gested that members of the
African Studies Committee begin
establishing links with African
universities.
At that point, Wilburn took
Ryan's idea and developed it into
a solid exchange program pro-
posal. Once he receives the
necessary funds, Wilburn says he
will draw up a plan of action with
other ECU administrators that he
can use to negotiate with when he
actually visits Africa. A trip he
expects to make next summer. ,
Once the program is im-
plemented. Wilburn says the only
extra cost involved will be that of
travel. Also, any student of good
standing is eligible to participate.
Vacationers Should Be Aware Of Preventive Theft Measures
By HAROLD JOYNER
(oSe�s Kditur
Summer is here and prowlers
are afoot. Students and faculty
heading for the beach for the
weekend, or just a night out, may
not be aware that they have left
their homes for burglars.
Common sense is the best pro-
tection against illegal entry into
your home, but a few simple rules
must be followed for those who
live both on and off-campus.
Burglars do not like delay, noise
or risk, so any entrance to a
residence should be difficult
enough to make the burglar go
elsewhere in search of an easier
victim, said Gene McAbee,
ECU's Crime Prevention officer
in the Dept. of Public Safety.
Become more acquainted with
your neighbors and make them
aware of who comes and goes at
your home, and when. Dorm
students should always be on the
lookout for people who are not
living in the dorm and wandering
around, checking to see if doors
are unlocked, he said.
Locking all outside doors with
deadbolt locks, securing windows
with window locks or bolts and
installing track locks on all
sliding-glass doors will ensure
difficult entry to your home for
the burglar. "Dorm students
should always be reminded to
keep their doors locked said
McAbee, "even if they are stepp-
ing out of the room for a mo-
ment He also said most
larcenies occur within eight
seconds after a burglar has gain-
ed entry.
A light in the house at night is a
sure giveaway to the burglar that
you may be home, and chances
are he'll be on the look out for
the home with no lights on. If
you plan to be gone longer than
one night, use a timer to turn
your lights on and off.
Also, if a burglar hears voices
coming from your house, he's
probably going to stay away. So,
leave a radio on, preferably to a
talk show program, to create the
impression of conversation
within your home.
Ask your neighbor, or some
other responsible person, to col-
lect your mail and newspapers
while you're gone. Any notes left
for the paper boy or mailman will
clue the burglar in that you're not
home. Don't forget that your
grass is going to keep on growing
while you're gone, so make ar-
rangements to have it mowed
during your absence.
"Dorm students should not
leave notes on their doors,
McAbee said, such as writing to
someone that you'll be back at
3:30. People who leave notes on
doors make it very easy for the
burglar to see that no one is in the
room
Don't leave spare keys in ob-
vious places like the mailbox,
under the doormat or in a potted
plant. Once the burglar finds
your house key, there is no need
for him to break your windows to
get in. Play it safe and give the
key to whomever will be looking
after your house. McAbee also
added that lending your dorm
room key to a friend is also un-
wise.
If you return home and find
that your house was burlarized,
call the police from your
neighbor's house and wait there
until the police arrive. If you've
kept an accurate listing of your
belongings, police will probably
have a better chance of recover-
ingyour stolen items. For televi-
Freshmen Program
Substantial Impact
Bv BRETT MORRIS
Suff Writer
The SGA, along with other
campus organizations, establish-
ed an added dimension to the
orientation program for the sum-
mer of 1985, and SGA President
David Brown said the program
will have a substantial effect on
freshmen students returning to
ECU in the fall.
In addition, Brown announced
that the New Student Initiation to
Campu Organizations program
will be available in the fall to all
students and continue to provide
needed information about dif-
ferent types of organizations and
groups on campus.
Brown said NSICO is
beneficial to ECU because cam-
pus organizations sometimes
have trouble getting freshmen in-
volved in programs and organiza-
tions due to the lack of informa-
tion available.
In previous years the SGA
would set up a seminar and ver-
bally present organizations to in-
coming freshmen. Brown said,
"Instead of us telling the new
students about organizations,
why don't we let them tell
themselves And so began the
birth of NSCIO.
NSCIO takes place during each
orientation session and each
group presents information
about a particular organization
to interested students. Represen-
tatives are also on hand to answer
questions students may have.
New students were able to find
out information about all areas
of the SGA, campus media and
various political organizations.
Also in attendence were Army
and Air Force ROTC, the Am-
bassadors, Intramurals and
Recreation Services and service
organizations. Brown stated that
this is a chance for all incoming
students to meet upperclassmen
and gain information from a dif-
ferent perspective. "An involved
student is a responsible student
Brown said.
Students became acquainted
with many of the organziations
just by frequenting several
booths. Assistant Refrigerator
Rentals Manager Jeff Humbert
said "NSICO gives us our first
chance to make initial contact
with those who will benefit from
a servcice like ours
Freshmen orientation student
Angela Dormar of Erwin said she
was pleased with the program
and added that "it makes you
feel more at home and a part of
the school because when you are
a freshman, you don't seem to
know much at all she said.
sion sets, stereos, guns and otner
valuable items, have a list of
serial numbers ready to give to
police.
ECU's Public Safety offers
students a chance to mark their
valuables by borrowing an
engraver. "Operation ID lets the
student properly identify their
possessions McAbee said. "If
something is stolen, the engraved
serial number or driver's license
number will help us identify their
possessions
The marking of a serial
number is very important in fin-
ding stolen property, he said. The
serial number can be entered in
the FBI's national crime iden-
tification computer and if the
reported stolen property turns up
anywhere in the country, there
won't be any problem in recover-
ing the stolen goods.
Bicycle theft is also another
problem that plagues the ECU
area. McAbee suggested that
students should invest in a high
security lock, either a three-
quarter inch chain lock or
U-shaped locks. "Small chain
locks and cable locks can easily
be cut with lock or wire cutters
McAbee said.
Another prevention students
can do to reduce the risk of
larceny is to with ECU. The one
dollar fee covers the registration
costs and the serial number is
kept on file indefinitely. The bike
never has to be registered again.
Registering your bike is one of
the best deals on campus he
said.
"As long as the student is
aware of what he can do to pre-
vent crime, that extra step will
definitely pay off in the long
run McAbee said
r
On The Inside

� To find out how opening night went at ECU's Summer Theatre's
"A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum" see
Lifestyles, page 5
� Assistant Sports Editor Tony Brown examines the issue of
� whether athletes should be paid. Find out more on page 7. I
iiiiiiiiiiiiwMiiiiMrtwwMi
J.B. HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lab
For those of you who don't have any reading to catch up on, July 4
should be an exciting, fun-filled day. Listed below is a list of ac-
tivities.
Don't be left out during Greenville's 4th of July activities, spon-
sored by the Greenville Jaycees. All Greenville residents, including
the ECU campus, are invited to attend the full day of activities. All
events will take place at the Town Commons, located by First St. A
canoe race will begin at the Falkland boat landing, with trophies
given to winners of the race. Make your 4th an exciting, but safe
day.
1 p.m. � Bubble gum blowing contest
1:30 p.m. � Frog jumping competition (bring your own frog)
2 p.m. � Egg toss competition I
2:30 p.m. � Team greasy pole contest (cash prize offered)
3:30 p.m. � Greasy pig race for children under 10
4 p.m. � Breakdancing finals
4:30 p.m. � Popsicle eating contest
5 p.m. � Tricycle race (bring your own)
5:30 p.m. � Ring toss competition II
6 p.m. � Watermelon seed spitting contest
9 p.m. � Fireworks display
Journalism Director
Praises New Major
By RANDY MEWS
Co-N�w, Mi lor
UNC Journalism professor
Jane Delano Brown was on cam-
pus June 28 to exchange ideas
with those professors who will be
involved in the implementation
of ECU's new communications
program this fall.
Brown, director of the Center
The entire
communications field
is beginning to
merged Dr Dcano
for Research in Journalism and
Mass Communication at UNC,
said she felt ECU's journalism
department was emerging just at
the right time. "What's happen-
ing now in journalism education
is that the entire communications
field is beginning to merge, and
that parallels exactly with how
the program here at ECU was set
up
Under the guidelines of the
new Communications Depart-
ment, students will have the op-
tion of majoring in one track �
print journalism or broadcasting
(radio and televison).
"The program is similar to the
one we have come up with at
Chapel Hill Brown said. "It
satisfies the medium of what the
students and university's stan-
dards should be
Brown felt the most difficult
task in achieving that medium is
choosing an appropriate cur-
riculum. "As a maximum, com-
munication students should only
take 25 percent of their courses in
their major Brown said.
"Communications is advancing
so rapidly, the way to write a
news story today might not be ap-
propriate 10 years from now.
"For that reason, the most im-
portant objective for a student
should be to get a general educa-
tion Brown continued. "A
liberal arts degree is extremely
important in obtaining a basic
understanding of society
Another important issue
discussed at the meeting was the
primary objective of the cur-
riculum. Should professors con-
centrate on specialized
undergraduate courses so
students can get a job right out of
college, or should educators em-
phasize the "general education"
concept.
Despite what path is chosen.
Brown emphasized two impor-
tant factors in building a strong
program from the start. "The
university needs to make the
course work rigorous enough so
that the students will be able to
distinguish themselves once they
have graduated.
"Also, you must have faculty
doing research. This allows pro-
fessors to gain a reputation for
themselves and their university,
keep abreast on the latest hap-
penings in their field and im-
proves the quality of their
teaching
Although ECU is a long way
from achieving the national
recognition that UNC's jour-
nalism department has enjoyed,
Brown said she talked with
several administrators while on
campus and feds ECU is headed
in the right direction.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JIT V ?, 1985
THE I
College Students In Religous Turmoil Announcements I i�L?I
(CPS) � Many college
students appear to be in some
form of religious turmoil, and are
more prone to change religion
than other people, a variety of
religious leaders say.
"(College) has to be four of the
most important years in a
person's life, when they form
main of their moral and religious
beliefs observes Sister Alice
Gallion, executive director of the
ssociation o Catholic Colleges
and Universities.
Most students cither solidity
their past beliefs, adopt new
ones, or break from established
religion altogether while they are
in college, Gallion and other ex-
perts note.
"College is a time when
students are away from home, on
their own, and have a chance to
play out their religious beliefs
says Kenneth Green, associate
director of UCLA's Cooperative
Institutional Research Program,
which annually surveys the at-
titudes of entering college
freshmen nationwide.
"Students are also, often for
the first time, exposed to a varie-
ty of intellectual and social
stimulation giving them a
chance to compare different
religious ideas, Green notes.
"Emotionally, students are
looking for some kind of
guidance during their college
years adds Steve Scroges, assis-
tant pastor of Lake Lansing Bap-
tist Church near the Michigan
State University campus.
"There's probably a
significantly higher number of
people who change religious
denomination (while in college)
than at anv other time of their
life
College is also a time for
students "to stand up for what
they believe in says Dave
Dressel, pastor of MSU's Martin
Luther Chapel. "For some peo-
ple that means changing from the
religion they were raised in
Sociologists and others hope a
number of studies now underway
� including a longitudinal study
of Notre Dame students' beliefs
when they enter and when they
exit school � will further explain
how students form their beliefs.
EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE
E rnpioy rren s a - SI " ' � ' '
students enrolled for fa semestef � are
interested m t � . oersonai cae �
dants �
proofreaders Of �
contact OFFICE Ol I
DENT SERVICES ?M �'�
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20 Off all
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Offer good through
July 31, 1985 for all
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(North entrance � Near Belks)
Open MonSat. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
formerly
PAPER
Uj� .i Good look
1 Hour Photo Lab
Throw a party - any party'
Then get on the Domino's
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When you hang up. we
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And we deliver to your
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IS
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items ana :
Effect Sat
SOL-
DIET PEPSI. PEPSI FREE.
DIET PEPSI FREE OR
HAVE A SAFE & HAPPY 4
Surf & Turf for the 4th!
PREVIOUSLY FROZEN
50-70 CT MEDIUM
Headless Shrimp
USDA CHOICE (9-11 LB AVG )
SLICED FREE-WHOLE
Boneless Rib Eye
HEADLESS. DRESSED
6-8 LB AVG WGT WHOLE
Alaskan Salmon
1
SUN COUNTRY ORIGINAL.
ORANGE OR TROPICAL
Wine A $039
Cooler 4 nrb O
COST CUTTER
HAMBURGER OR
PRE v
Coors
ASSORTED VARIETIES
KROGER
B-B-Q
WISHBONE
Fried
Chicken
69
RED WHITE OR BLUE
v t California
Grapes
88
Red Seedless
White Seedless
Blue Exotic
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Jeno's
Pizza . �2
Pkg
89
AOVERTiSED ITEM PCXiCV
Each of these advertised items is
required to Be readily avaiiaoie
for saie in eacn Kroger Sav on e
cept as specificauy noted in tms
ad if we do run out of �r itemwe
ln oHer you your choice Of �
comparaoie item yyhen avaiiaoie
reflecting the same savings Of a
ralncheck v�hlch vylli entitle you
to purchase the advertised item
at the advertised pr'ie yvlthln 50
days Only one �endor coupon
win oe accepted per item
'
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Creenvil
ilej
DOUBLE
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COUPONS
all week we will double 5
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P'aak ��� tfatails in stor
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Fire
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JTHEJAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 3, 1985
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Fireworks Create Dangerous Hazards
The Fourth of July signifies
different things to different peo-
ple. For many it's a time for
fireworks and picnics. For
others, it's school as usual.
Regardless of what your plans
are, there are several principles
that are important on July 4th
and the rest of the summer, too.
Fireworks are illegal in North
Carolina. In addition, the ex-
plosives can be extremely
dangerous and can lead to the
loss of fingers, hands, arms and
other body parts, as well as cause
blindness, hearing impairments
or death. "Sparklers which
are usually thought to be
harmless, can ignite and cause
severe finger and hand burns. If
fireworks are part of your July
4th ritual, it is safest to watch an
organized display such as the one
sponsored by the City of Green-
ville.
Picnics are a fun and inexpen-
sive way to enjoy the 4th as long
as foods served do not harbor or
promote the growth of bacteria.
Contrary to popular belief, store
bought mayonnaise does not pro-
mote food poisoning. In fact,
mayonnaise may actually retard
the growth of bacteria because of
the vinegar it contains.
Salmonella organisms cause
food poisoning and
gastroenteritis. The best way to
avoid Salmonella infections is to
make sure cold foods, such as
fried chicken and deviled eggs,
are kept cold and hot foods, like
baked beans, are kept hot until it
is time to eat. Meats and eggs
should be thoroughly cooked.
Drinking (or eating) raw eggs like
champion-fighter Rocky does in
the movies is thought to be a
prime method of getting a
Salmonella infection. So, be sure
to cook your eggs first.
Symptoms of food poisoning
include diarrhea, usually occurr-
ing within 8-48 hours after in-
gesting the organism, fever,
nausea, vomiting and headaches.
If you should develop these
symptoms, you should try to
drink as many liquids as possible
to prevent dehydration and eat
only foods that are bland.
Food poision symptoms may
indicate other illness as well, and
if they do not clear up within
24-48 hours, you should consult
your health care provider for
treatment.
For more information, contact
the ECU Student Health Service.
Have a safe and happy 4th of
July!
'Experts' Redesign International House
ECU News Bureau
When a major remodeling of
ECU's International House was
announced last year, ECU of-
ficials called on a team of
specialists to help re-design the
building, which is used as a
residence and meeting place for
students from many nations.
The experts assisting the
renovation planners were
students in ECU's Environmental
Design Program, an expanded
curriculum in the ECU School of
Art, which involves student
designers in "real world" pro-
jects as part of their preparation
for a wide range of careers.
The program's title, "en-
vironmental design is signifi-
cant of the broadening emphasis
from contract (commercial) in-
terior design to include studios
and seminars in urban design;
product, display and furniture
design; historic and
neighborhood preservation; and
general environmental design (in-
cluding some architectural and
landscape-architectural studies),
as well as contract interiors.
The studios provide oppor-
u ies for students to solve
space design problems for par-
ticular settings; in the seminars
they study the theories and prin-
ciples of the Field, such as the
relationship of environmental
design to people's feelings and
behaviors, or to the natural en-
vironmental, while learning
about materials for use in the
built environment.
Internship arrangements with
actual clients needing design help
with actual projects � such as
the ECU International House �
give students valuable experience
while providing assistance to
fledgling businesses or to public
or non-profit agencies.
"The students are expected to
work with the clients as if they
were already professionals ex-
plained Mindy Machanic, assis-
tant professor of art and coor-
dinator of The ECU En-
vironmental Design Program.
"They solve design problems
through applying the kinds of
design skills, interviewing and
research techniques, and business
skills they would have to use after
graduation, while on the job
Last year's student design
teams were involved in a variety
of "real-world" design projects.
Among these were drawing plans
for a proposed revitalization of
downtown Greenville, a space
planning project for the Green-
ville Planning and Community
Development Department; design
of interior space and play areas
for the local Boys' Club;
schematic designs for a minority-
owned business in nearby Rocky
Mount; phased plans for the
campus Regional Development
Institute building; space plans for
county United Way offices; and
an exhibition module design pro-
posal for a science and nature
park at River Park North on the
Tar River.
The student interns' design
8
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�le Saat (KarDlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
John Peterson, o�,� �����
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ��$ wior
Harold Joyner, co-Nm &� Tom Lu vender, ovtao, of a
Randy Mews, co-n &� Anthony Martin, �� Manager
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Bill Mitchell, cr�jMo� Mm��r But Dawson, product�
Daniel Maurer, .��m� e� DeChanii e Johnson, 4d r����w
July 3, 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Athletic Violations
Stricter Penalties Needed
New NCAA rules to help curb
cheating in college athletics are a
step in the right direction � it's
about time someone stopped the
college athletics monster from over-
taking the real purpose for the ex-
istence of schools.
Lately, it seems that all the
negative aspects of college athletics
have finally been surfacing. This is
good because it allows officials to
deal with the fact that college
athletic departments have become
cutthroat businesses, not extracur-
ricular activities.
Let's get one thing perfectly clear.
Contrary to popular belief, an
athletic program does not make or
break the reputation of a school.
When ECU had an excellent foot-
ball season in the fall of 1984, many
people were quick to say that was
the reason for the next spring's
jump in applications and maybe it
was.
But, there's a difference between
filling a campus with warm bodies
and filling it with warm intellectual
bodies.
If the only reason students choose
to attend a school is its football pro-
gram, then most likely they aren't
the kind of students that school
needs.
So, while athletic programs serve
as good attention-getting devices,
it's important for school officials to
realize that thev should be
marketing an education, not televi
sion rights.
If the purpose of college really is
to expose students to higher educa-
tion and supposedly higher stan-
dards of value, this should not be
diminshed by athletic departments'
unscrupulousness.
People complain that this genera-
tion is concerned only with making
money. Since one of their examples
is set by the athletic departments
and their boosters � many of which
are willing to cheat, swindle and
steal to make money, it's almost
understandable.
The punishments for those who
don't play fair should be stricter.
The public should be made aware of
the fact that schools care more
�bout their academic reputations
than recruiting athletes.
It's not fair to students or
student-athletes to have the world
of academia worship at the locker-
room altar. The purpose of school is
education, not competition.
So far, fortunately, ECU has
been able to avoid implications of
recruiting or other violations,
possibly due in part to the fact that
the football program is just now-
beginning to expand into one that is
more nationally-oriented.
We can only hope that ECU of-
ficials retain a perspective of what
we are really here for and don't
hesitate to sacrifice athletics for the
sake of academics, not vice-versa.
f't'l-r'tt
60IN6 OUT TO WWACK A KANE,
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BRUfAUZE INNOCENT VICTIMS AAIP
VSSSSF �mST
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3H
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IV. v.
Liberals May Be Tax Victims
By Michael kinslev
Tlw Nn Republic TRB
What does a "liberal" look like? When
conservative idealogues refer with con-
tempt to this virtually extinct beast,
they may well imagine a middle-income
person with a working spouse, living in
a Northeast industrial state or perhaps
in California.
As it happens, this is the one iden-
tifiable group of people � � apart from
outright exploiters of the current system
� who would pay more taxes under
President Reagan's "tax-reform" plan.
As a resident of a high-tax state, our
typical liberal gets hit especially hard by
the end of deducibility for state and
local taxes. With both spouses working
and the kids in day care, the liberal cou-
ple suffers twice. First, they lose the
two-earner deduction designed to
reduce the "marriage penalty" that
results when two incomes join in holv
wedlock and suddenly move up to a
higher bracket. Second, the couple's
child-care credit is turned into a deduc-
tion, which is less valuable for all but
top-bracket taxpayers.
Finally, just about the only new per-
sonal tax break to be added to the code
does our liberal couple no good: an in-
crease from $2,250 to $4,000 is the max-
imum a one-earner couple can sock
away, tax-free, in an IRA. This billion-
dollar revenue loser only helps families
that can save more than $2,250 a year
even though one spouse isn't employed.
Although even tax-reform purists see
the deduction for state and local taxes
as an expeciaily abusive form of special
treatment, the Reagan administration is
adamant that this is one reform it will
not compromise on. One reason is
money.
Ending the deduction is expected to
bring in $40 billion a year by 1990. Thiv
is more than half the $72 billion ex-
pected to be lost through reduction of
individual tax rates. Ending the "mar-
riage penalty deduction" is expected to
bring in another $9 billion. These are by
far the two biggest revenue raisers
among all the proposed reforms of the
individual income tax. In fact, these
two changes, along with an envisaged
shift of $27 billion in taxes from in-
dividuals to corporations, add up to $76
billion: $4 billion more than the propos-
ed rate cut. These three changes are the
essence of Reagan's reform of personal
(non-business) taxes. Everything else is
trivia.
Is it fair? New York politicians and
media are mounting a near-hysterical
campaign against this aspect of
Reagan's plan. "2-Salary Peril" was
the headline over a recent story in The
en- York Times. On close inspection,
though, the peril looks quite modest.
According to the story, the median-
income two-worker family of four in
New York, making $35,160, would owe
$3,044 in federal income tax under
Reagan's plan, compared to $2,913
now. That's a perilous difference of
$131. This couple currently deducts
$3,640 of state and local taxes � more
than their entire federal tax bill � thus
supporting the White House's
tion that this deduction is a rathei
subsidy of high-tax states
What's more, restoring the de
would make the tax code ie
not more so. At typical S20l
taxpayer deducts more than SI O
state and local taxes each
S30,0O0-$50,0OO taxpayei
about $2,000. Non-itemizei
lower-income, don't gel
anything.
But White House Commun
Director Patrick Buchanan
confirmed suspicions that simp
the tax code was
administration's only motive i
particular proposed changes H
cused high-tax states like New V �
"neo-socialisi appro a.
government and said Reaga
"will force people to take a
look
Buchanan also braes that the
has "a bias toward the trad
ly built into it meaning
with two parents, one of then
with the kids.
This is government social ei -
of the soi v Reagnaites are sur
eschew in general and especia
done through the tax code I
power of the centra! governmc
pressure on the state is anothei
ture from ostensible Reaeanite
ciples. Cuomo and company.
furthermore, that different states beat
varying shares of what arc by rig
national burdens
Military Buildup Coalition Disintegrates
The s.c� Republic
Last year, the coalition for continuing
Reagan's military buildup was robust
and thriving. Even a few months ago it
was alive and seemingly well. Now it's
all but shattered.
In the Reagan budget unveiled in early
1984, military spending was projected at
$356 billion for 1986. By March 1984 the
White House had agreed to pare it to
$325 billion. Then in the 1986 budget
proposed in January, the president ask-
ed for $314 billion, or 5.9 percent in real
growth. In April this was slashed to $302
billion, or 3 percent. Last month, when
the Senate passed its budget resolution,
military spending dipped to $293 billion
� zero real growth. And Reagan will be
luckv to get this, since the House budget
resolution calls tor a flat freeze, without
even a modest boost to account for in-
flation.
Why the swift collapse? The easy
answer is the shift in public opinion. In
1981, a ew York Times poll found that
61 percent of adult Americans supported
an increase in military expenditures; in
the Times poll last February, the number
was 16 percent.
But the numbers beg the larger ques-
tion. What caused the shift in public opi-
nion? The answer is who, not what. In
large measure, Reagan and Caspar
Weinberger are responsible; they are vic-
tims of their own success. They succeed-
ed in getting funds for a massive buildup
in Reagan's first term. Real growth in
military spending soared 12.5 percent in
1981, 12.1 percent in 1982, 7.5 percent in
Doonesbury
1983, 4.4 percent in 1984 and 5.9 percent
this year. That's big bucks, the spending
of which gave the public the idea, rightly
or wrongly, that the United States was
catching up with the Soviets in military
strength.
Three months after Reagan was in-
augurated, an ABC News poll found
that 41 percent of Americans thought
the Soviets had a military edge and 36
percent saw the two powers as even.
Four years later, 55 percent said a
military standoff had been reached and
only 22 percent rated the Soviets as
ahead.
Folks got another, slightly contradic-
tory idea about defense spending �
namely, that money was being routinely
squandered. Two years ago, a cycle of
stories began to appear in the press
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
SUREBEEN
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about waste, fraud and abuse in the Pen-
tagon � $7,622 coffeepots, $748 pliers,
$640 toilet seats, $44 light bulbs, plus
millions in overcharges by defense con-
tractors.
Weinberger, who saw liberal critics
exploiting the issue to attack his
buildup, was painfully slow to react. By
the time he took strong steps � in May
he punished three Navy officers for
allegedly spending $600 on an ashtray �
he was accused of casting about for
scapegoats.
Reagan has been no more effective in
counteracting the sting of Pentagon
waste stories. He had a few throw aw av
lines in his April 24 budget address �
"men who illegally line their pockets
with dollars the American people have
contributed to our defense are stealing
from the arsenal of democracy the very
weapons our young men need to defend
freedom" � but these didn't help.
Reagan has also put himself in what
one aide calls "a hellacious dilemma"
by pursuing arms talks with the Soviets
and seeking summit with Mikhail Gor-
bachev at the same time he wants to pro-
long his military buildup.
Reagan sees no inconsistency, believ-
ing buildup is needed to force the Soviets
to negotiate seriously. But by forgoing
assaults on the Soviets as the "focus of
evil he may have made them appear
less demonic, and thus less the goad to
greater defense expenditures. When a
Soviet soldier shot Maj. Arthur
Nicholson in East Berlin in March,
Reagan stifled his instinct to lash out.
The shooting, he told reporters, only
made him "more anxious" for a summit
meeting. It was left to Weinberger to
voice sharp criticism of the Soviets.
Inadvertently, Reagan has also made
defense spending a ripe target for deficit
reduction. "Once you declare war on the
deficit and say you don't want to cut en-
titlements or raise revenues, it's almost
inevitable that you will turn to defense
argues Republican Sen. Willian Cohen
of Maine. Democrat Les Aspen, chair-
man of the House Armed Services Com-
mittee, says the move to trim defense
spending "started with the deficit and
was driven by the toilet seats To really
reduce the deficit, some of the military
buildup had to be lopped off
Oddly enough, the chief loppe:
been Senate Republicans, including Ma-
jority Leader Bob Dole a:
Committee Chanman Pete Dome
Both have lost patience v
Weinberger's insistence that cuts
defense would jeopardize nationa
security. They were infuriated wh
after telling them that zero growthi
would hamstring the nation's defer
Weinberger suddenlv found another $4
billion in extra funds.
1 he collapse of the defense coal
has caused repercussions at the v
House, none to Weinberger's benefit
Aides dismiss rumors that he is be
forced out, but are quick to poke holes
in his arguments for more spending
Senior officials mockingly point out that
the Senate's proposed drop in militan
spending is achieved without curtailing a
single major weapons program.
The president too is less beholden to
Weinberger. A year ago Weinberger's
advice was golden. This year Reagan re-
jected his initial request for 9 per.
real growth, later halved the $5.9 billion
hike in a compromise with Senate
Republicans, then agreed to have no real
growth at all.
The irony in the crumbling of the
defense-buildup coalition is that it might
have been averted if Walter Mondale
had been elected. Mondale, remember.
called for real growth of about 4 per-
cent, this being roughly the 1984
Democratic position. He would have
been hard put to renege, because
Republicans would have attacked him
mercilessly as an appeaser and as wimpv
on defense.
"Mondale would have fallen on his
sword to get 4 percent savs Aspin. "if
he had even breathed less than 4 percent.
Republicans would have been all over
him. If he'd settled for less, his presiden-
cy would have been over
With Reagan, it's different. He's im-
bued with the same kind of impunity
that President Richard Nixon, the old
anti-communist, had when he went to
China in 1972. It's all the same, whether
military spending is 6 percent or 3 per-
cent or zero or even less. The Gipper, his
hand on the trigger, still stands tall
against the world in the public eye.
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uns
ise's conten-
5 a raiher large
the deduction
ess egalitrian
i S200,000-plus
.An $20,000 in
each year. A
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rs, generally
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man has now
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tive in these
He has ac-
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race with
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j I ze national
P infuriated when,
j em that zero growth
- the nation's defense,
uddenlv found another $4
e defense coalition
rcussions at the White
Weinberger's benefit.
� imors that he is being
quick to poke holes
imenh for more spending.
rials mockingly point out that
proposed drop in military
achieed without curtailing a
r weapons program.
Idem too is less beholden to
f. A year ago Weinberger's
golden. This year Reagan re-
Initial request for 9 percent
, later halved the $5.9 billion
compromise with Senate
Is, then agreed to have no real
r
ly in the crumbling of the
lid up coalition is that it might
Taverted if Walter Mondale
lected. Mondale, remember,
peal growth of about 4 per-
being roughly the 1984
position. He would have
put to renege, because
would have attacked him
an appeaser and as wimpy
le would have fallen on his
t 4 percent says Aspin. "if
breathed less than 4 percent,
would have been all over
settled for less, his presiden-
i'�e been over
kgan, it's different. He's im-
the same kind of impunity
cnt Richard Nixon, the old
rnist, had when he went to
72. It's all the same, whether
fnding is 6 percent or 3 per-
or even less. The Gipper, his
le trigger, still stands tall
?�orld in the public eye.
THthAST CAROLINIAN
Lifestyles
JULY 3, 198:
'Forum' Overcomes
Flaws With Comedy
B ANDREW JOVNER
Spnial to ihr t mtarolinun
Smashing, wasn't it?
Well, not quite, but the East
( arolina Summer Theatre's
producton of A Funny Thing
Happened on the Hay to the
Forum was a success on its
opening night, as well as being
the first offering of the Summer
theatre's 20th anniversary
season.
First, the good news.
A Funny Thing did play to a
theatre packed with delirously
laughing people. The cast gave a
rather spirited performance and
the audience responded
favorably to their antics, so the
original play by Bun Shevelove,
Larry Gelbart and Stephen Son-
dheim was done justice.
The timing was excellent as
well. Gregory ZitteFs portrayal
of Pseudolus the slave had the
theatregoers rolling in their
seats. Hero, played by John
Kaczynski, came through with
his appealingly simple honesty
and innocence. Jim Brill's
Hysterium almost stole the
show, as did Jack
McCutcheon's Senex. Tracey
Edwards also did well in her
limited, one-dimensional role as
Philia. the object of Hero's af-
fections. The rest of the cast did
nearly as well in filling out then
stock character parts.
Now for the bad news.
Most of the players simply
could not sing worth a tinker's
damn. Oh. believe it, thev reallv
tried gamely, but they just did
not make it. While it may be
true of burlesque comedy that
the players aren't expected to
sing very well, these people
couldn't even meet that low
standard.
Also, the dancing left a little
something to be desired. The
courtesans (with the exception
of the sensuous Vibrata, played
by Jami Wilkerson) moved
woodenly through their
routines, as did almost everyone
else.
Finally, the orchestra got off
to a slow start, but made up for
it soon after the play began, set-
ting the mood and supprting the
songs wonderfully.
In all likelihood, the pro-
blems with the singing and dan-
cing arose out of sheer ner-
vousness, this being the opening
night of the first production of
the Summer Theatre's 20th an-
niversary season, and theplayers
will have probably worked out
the kinks by the second night.
A notable exception to the
bad singing was Tracey Ed-
wards (Philia), who has a startl-
ing range and delivery. Ella Fit-
zgerald may be able to break a
champagne glass with her voice,
but this kid can knock over a
telephone booth!
The technical staff has ab-
solutely nothing to be ashamed
of. The costumes were great and
the set was almost gorgeous.
The lighting was perfect as well.
And yes, the play is definitely
worth seeing. A Funny Thing is,
Page 5
Gregory Zittel with Tracey Edwards and John Kacynski
ly better than that.
after all, a classic. A melange of
spastic dogs couldn't ruin the
priceless script with its slapstick
antics, double entendres, one-
liners and mistaken identities,
and the Summer Theatre's
talented performers are certain-
Go see A Funny Thing Hap-
pened on the Hay to the
Forum. It made me smile and
laugh, and it'll do the same for
vou.
Loggins Tries Hand
At Producing LP
By MATTHEW GILLIS
Staff Writer
Kenny Loggins has un-
doubtedly met with success
as a rock-and-roll star � first
with his legendary partner, Jim
Messina, and then as a solo artist.
His albums and singles have sold
millions as well as his songs for
others artists such as Anne Mur-
ray and the Doobie Brothers.
Recently, following on the heels
of his two successful songs
featured on the Footloose sound-
track and his contribution to
USA for Africa, Loggins tried his
hand at producing in his latest
solo LP.
The effort, entitled Vox
Humana (Latin for "human
voice"), is quite different from
his other LP's � not quite as
good as it should be, but if you're
into up-tempo rock V roll
music, this might be the album
you're looking for.
The first song, also the album's
title track, is a bit catchy and
upbeat, somewhat reminiscent of
Loggins' Footloose theme. This
song gives listeners a pretty good
idea of what the rest of the album
has in store. Of course, there are
some fairly decent tracks such as
"No Lookin' Back which is co-
produced by Michael Omartian.
Omartian boasts some impressive
credentials and has worked with
artists like Rod Stewart and Don-
na Summer. Also, the slower-
paced tunes "At Last" and
"Love Will Follow" work well.
The real standouts, however,
are as different as night and day.
The best of the fast-paced tracks
has to be "I'm Gonna Do It
Right featuring a calypso-
flavored beat and two nice sur-
prises � a terrific vocal backup
from popsoul stars the Pointer
Sisters and a percussion solo
from Shiela E. to round things
out.
However, Loggins, along with
co-producer David Foster, also
score high marks with the power-
ful rock ballad "Forever This
cut combines the intensity of
both a sensitive voice and a
power-packed backdrop. In
addition to his own band, Log-
gins has a multitude of help on
this LP � Foster, Omartian,
Steve Lukather of Toto, Philip
Bailey, and the Pointers, just to
name a few. As it turns out. this
lineup helps make up for some
notable flaws in Vox Humana,
such as the need for a little more
intensity and a little less upbeat
material.
Loggins' first album as pro-
ducer and artist doesn't catch fire
like some of his earlier work,
such as Celebrate Me Home or
Keep The Fire Still, yox
Humana does have some promis-
ing material. And maybe, just
maybe, it will do well enough for
Kenny Loggins so as to give him
another opertunity at producing,
then perhaps he'll learn from his
mistakes.
East Carolina Summer Theatre Delivers 'Baby'
The newest arrival at The
East Carolina Summer
Theatre will be the bouncing
Broadway musical Baby,
scheduled for delivery at 8:15
p.m. on Monday, JuK 8, in
McGinnis Theatre.
Baby is the 2nd of 4 Broadway
musicals to be presented by The
East Carolina Summer Theatre as
it observes its 20th Anniversary
Season. It is a musical celebrating
maternity. In light of that, Baby
probably qualifies for the Guin-
ness Book of World Records as
the world's first obstetrical
musical. "More than 25 per-
formers sing about things that
people haven't ever sung about
before said Director Robert
Caprio. "One character tells in
song how, now that she is preg-
nant, women � perfect strangers
� keep asking if they can touch
her stomach. It's probably safe to
call that a first said Caprio.
Set in an unidentified college
town, Baby focuses on three pro-
totypical couples as they progress
through the nine longest months
in any family's life. The youngest
parents-to-be are undergraduates
who find it easier to commit to
parenthood than to marriage.
The eldest are middle-aged mar-
rieds who have already raised
three kids when the stork unex-
pectedly comes knocking again.
In between is a couple whose
desire for a child is thwarted by
the mathematics of infertility.
The composer and lyricist,
David Shire and Richard Maltby,
are veterans who between them
have an Academy Award (Shire
for best song in the movie Norma
Rae) and Broadway's Tony
Award (Maltby for best director
� Ain't Misbehaving. The two
men spent many months
relentlessly quizzing women and
men friends about their emotions
involved with pregnancy. Of the
more than 50 songs on the subject
written by Shires and Maltby, 17
survived and are in the show; it is
those songs that have caused
Baby to become the most often
produced musical in 1985. One
number, called "Fatherhood
Blues sung by the men's
weekend baseball team, may be
the last word on panic mixed with
exaltation as fatherhood looms.
When New York Times
Theatre Critic Frank Rich printed
his review of Baby, he pronounc-
ed the songs, "the best Broadway
has heard in seasons. They are
notable for sophistication, verbal
flash, sincerity of feeling � and
yes, melodic life Rich went on
to say that Baby is "reminiscent
of that bygone era when Broad-
way musicals wooed us with
charm instead of earthshaking
spectacle
This production of Baby is also
notable in that it marks the return
of Director Caprio to Eastern
North Carolina. A native of New
Bern and a graduate of ECU's
Theatre Arts Department, Mr.
Caprio is the co-founder of the
off-Broadway Studio 56 Acting
Company. Now a resident of
New York City, he divides his
time between new play develop-
ment, writing screenplays for
Columbia Pictures and working
as a casting director.
Appearing in Baby will be
several Summer Theatre
veterans, including Maureen Ker-
rigan, who returns for her third
season on the boards of McGin-
nis Theatre. Last July she was
seen as Roxie Hart in Chicago,
and in 1983 she debuted with the
Summer Theatre as Sally Bowles
in Cabaret. A resident of
Washington, D.C. Kerrigan has a
number of theatre credits in New
York City and Washington, and
her films include Protocol, Diner
and Best Friends. Also returning
from 1984 will be Barbara Gulan
who was featured in all four
musicals last year; Tracy
Donohue, a veteran of the
Berkeley Shakespeare Festival
who appeared as Grace Farrell in
Annie last season; and area
favorite Joey Pollock, who
created the role of Charlemagne
in the 1983 Sunner Theatre pro-
duction of Pippin.
Rounding out the ranks of
principals in Baby will be
newcomers Sean McGuirk, a
veteran television actor whose
credits include Ryan's Hope,
"Search foR Tomorrow" and
"As the World Turns and John
Kaczynski, who recently com-
pleted a tour of Oliver which
played in 40 cities in the US and
Canada.
Tickets are still available for all
performances of Baby, Monday
through Saturday (July 8-13),
and may be purchased at McGin-
nis Theatre in Greenville, corner
of Fifth and Eastern Streets,
Monday through Saturday, 10:00
a.m. until 8:30 p.m or reserved
by calling in Greenville 757-6390.
Culinary Comedy Hits Home
Kacynski and Gregory Zittel (left to right) in 'A Funny Thing Hap-
pened on the Way to the Forum July 1-6 at 8:15 p.m.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI) �
Henry Beard, a founder and
editor for six years of the Na-
tional Lampoon, can be expected
to make fun of just about
everything, including Southern
cooking.
Since he left as editor of the
Lampoon in 1975, he has written
four "dictionary" books, all
making fun" of topics close to
some people's hearts.
He has written about fishing,
sailing and gardening and now
has turned his attention to cook-
ing.
"Cooking ($5.95) is worth
the price even if one wants to use
it to start the Fire in his barbecue
grill.
But Beard isn't all that bad.
His father was from the South
and he likes country ham.
"My father was from Birm-
ingham, and he lived in
Louisville. He was always a fan
of hominy grits � which I think
should be used to caulk windows.
And I'm bending over backwards
saying that' Beard said in an in-
terview from his New York City
kitchen, uncluttered from non-
use.
"Southern cooking has started
making an appearance up here.
I've tried lots of things, black
eyed peas, red eye gravy and pot
likker. The key is the grease. You
could give the car a lube job with
what you get out of the pot
Beard said
Making fun of something like
cooking has not made Beard
popular in some circles.
"I think we take it too serious-
ly. When we had the manuscript,
we had half a dozen cooks, many
of whose names you would
recognize, take a look. When we
got their reaction, many said
cooking is not something you
make fun of. They said 'I take
my cooking seriously, go jump
into the lake
Beard said cooking has become
a status thing.
"Suggesting to some people
that they are lousy cooks is like
telling them they can't drive or a
little light in the loafers. You are
liable to get into a Fist fight. A lot
more people who didn't use to
cook are now cooking seriously.
To my mind it's become
serious
Beard said his favorite food is
that which is served in a
restaurant.
"I eat out as much as I can.
Cooking is a pain. When I have
to cook, I cook pasta because it is
so easy Beard said.
He added that many who go in
for cooking do it as a fad.
"The most overated thing now
in New York and Los Angeles is
grilling with mesquite chips.
Nobody is willing to admit that
this tastes funny and they won't
ask, "Why am I doing this?"
Beard is just as hard on Texas
cooking.
"It's their Texas attitude.
Texas food is just terrible. They
just don't have the touch. Great
Texas food comes from New
Mexico
The book's definition of
Southern Cooking:
"American regional cuisine
featuring dishes like hush pup-
pies, hoppin' john, hominy grits,
okra gumbo, chitlin's, po' boys,
pot likker and pone. Cooks
without roots in the Deep South
rarely serve these unique foods,
and that is a serious culinary
omission since the occasional
presentation of an authentic
Southern meal gives the home
chef the option at a later date of
announcing an accidentally burn-
ed heap of black, greasy, crusted
goo as the traditional Gulf Coast
treat, Fuddah, Crudlins, Po'
Nuff and Mumbe Grunny with
Spacklins and Shmuh
The Sandwich: "Credit for the
invention of this classic lunch
item, composed of one meat or
other Filling between two slices of
bread is correctly given to its
namesake, John Montagu,
fourth Earl of Sandwich
(1718-1792), who, as the story
goes, wanted a meal that could be
eaten without interrupting his
gambling, for which he had a
passion. But his equally creative
betting companions from
throughout the royal houses of
Europe were apparently inspired
by his burst of culinary genius to
contribute their own refinements,
and they deserve mention here as
well: Prince Luigi Pastrami; Graf
von Pumpernickel; the Marquise
de Mayonnaise; Vidkund Gustaf
Smorgasbord; Jean Buffet;
Vicomte de Casserole; Don An-
tonio Saladbar; and Archduke
Bakonyi of Lettusky-Tomatoff
Porridge: "Thick oatmeal
rarely found on American
breakfast tables since children
were granted limited standing in
federal courts to sue their
parents. The name is an
amalgamation of the words
�putrid 'horrid and 'sludge
And a chef is one who "swears
in French
What serious cook could ob-
ject to that sort of treatment?
�nj �fmmemmm m mmp�� ' i - mmmm � i �
m
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6 1 HI EAS1 CAROLINIAN JULY J, 1985
Doonesburv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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Oakwood Mobile Homes Inc.
Sales Positions
O.M.H. Inc. has positions for career-oriented sales
individuals who desire to become established with a
growing co. that is a leader in the industry. Com-
petative compensation, excellent co. benefits, and a
comprehensive sales-training program. Interested per-
sons should send resume to:
Garry V. Moore
Director of Human Resources
Oakwood Homes Corp.
P.O. Box 7386
Greensboro, N.C. 27417-0386
E.O.E.
Join the Team and ' 'Feel the Pride9'
HOTSPOTS
On Campus
Kelly's Heroes is the film
scheduled for the Hendrix
Theatre movie screen
tonight. A disrespectful,
humourous but competent
Army outfit decides to take
on the Germans for its own
reasons � to steal
$15,000,000 in gold. Comic
routines are complimented
by action sequences as Telly
Savalas and Clint Eastwood
attempt to penetrate enemy
lines to steal the gold. Show
time is 7 p.m. Admission is
free to all with current ECU
IDs but only ECU students
may bring in a guest.
A Watermelon Feast, sponsored
by the Student Union
Recreation Committee, is
slatted for Monday, July 8.
The feast, featuring 50 ice-
cold melons, is scheduled
for 3 p.m. on the University
Mall.
Mainstream, sponsored by the
Student Union Special Con-
certs Committee, will pre-
sent thier high-energy brand
of top forty rock 'n' roll on
The
Monday, (uly X at 9 p.m
The concert will take place
on the Mendenhall Student
Center Patio In case ol
rain, the location will be
move to Hendrix rheatre
Blues Brothers, featuring
comeo music appearances
b James Brown, Ra
Charles, Aretha franklin,
and Cab Calloway, returns
to the Hendrix rheatre
movie screen on fuesday,
July 9 at 7 p.m. Jake Blues
(John Beluslu) leases foliet
prison and. with his brother
Elwood (Dan ykroyd),
isits the Chicago or-
phanage where they were
both raised. After discover
mg the orphanage is closing
because of unpaid raxes,
they decide to put then
band back together to raise
the money with a bei
concert. Admission is tree
to all with current EC! 11)
but onl 1I students n
bring in a guest
Sightclubs
The Attic will rock this Wednes-
da with the sound-
Nightwatch. July 4th
patrons will be treated to
the southern rock of Doc
Holliday, and closing out
the weekend with a bang is
the high energy rock n' roll
ol Sidewinder. All shows
are scheduled to begin a?
9:45 p.m.
( orriyan's will celebrate the In-
dependence Da season on
their usual ladies night with
the moderate rock 'n' roll
sounds ol Robert Starling
on ednesdav, lui ;
show is scheduled !
at 9:30 p.m.
Premiums will be holding a "Mi
Night" this Wednesday a:
H p.m. patron-
welcome t appn ach eitl
0 1 the two available
microphones and sing or
rell jokes tor a self-made
J time. Premiums kick
�� it Independence da
w eek end with t he new w a e
musk ol Lifeboat 1 :
. July 5 at 1" 30 p.m.
1 he Phantoms will follow
up on Saturda. luly 6 �
: brand I hard-
blu . ib
�SSS,
SS
'�' ,
. HOME COOKED FOOD
Student Special
Free desert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.2Splus tax & beverage.
Semester Meal Plans Available
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM-8 PM
wyssssssssjvsssssss
SSS?AWfSSSSSSs
The Plaza
Deli

The Plaza Mall
Greenville, N.C
756-4024
fr
The Plaza Deli
located at THE PLAZA
The New Concept In Deli's
We Offer:
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Daily Specials Orders To Go
New Sandwiches
Pita Wabbit and English Knight
Happy Hour 5 til Closing
Good Music Good Times
10 AM-9 PM 75624
Are We Having Fun Yet?
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The Plaza Mali
ireenviile. N.C.
756-4024
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Go
THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Sports
JULY 3. 1985 Page 7
Could a CFA proposal to give scholarship athletes $600.00 a year in ex-
pense money lead to a situation where plaers would be dunking for
dollars rather than for just the thrill of victory?
McNeill Second In
W. German Meet
B RICK McCORMAC
Sports tailor
ECU'S Lee Vernon McNeill ad-
ded another impressive finish to
his list of accomplishments by
finishing second in the
100-meters in the USA-West Ger-
many track meet held over the
weekend in Bremen, West Ger-
man).
- McNeill, a freshman from St.
Pauls, finished second to team-
mate Michael Morris in the
100-meter dash. Morris, from
Syracuse University ran a 10.16
to capture first place with
McNeill's runner-up time being
10.25.
McNeill suffered a pulled
hamstring coming out of the
blocks in less than ideal condi-
tions for a track meet.
'The weather was awful
ECU coach Bill Carson said. "It
was only about 50 degrees and it
had been raining, which made for
a slippery track
According to Carson, McNeill
was in good shape to defeat Mor-
ris going into the final 20 meters
of the event, but just couldn't
overtake him due to the injury.
"Lee's leg was holding up and
he was doing well Carson said.
"He was in good position to win
at the 80-meter mark but just
wasn't able to give it that push he
needed to catch Morris
McNeill had defeated Morris
earlier in the year in the NCAA
meet in Austin, Texas by one-
hundredth of a second, and has a
4-4 record against Morris in
head-to-head competition.
McNeill will return to Green-
ville on July 16 to continue train-
ing. He will train with N.C.
State's Harvey McSwain, a team-
mate of McNeill's on the South
team in the National Sports
Festival to be held in Baton
Rouge, La July 27-28 for track.
Crimson
Coach Carson feels that
McNeill will be over his hamstr-
ing injury in time to prepare for
the sports festival.
"He has three weeks to get bet-
ter Carson said. "It was really
a radical change in the weather
for him with it being so hot here
and so cold and damp over there
� he will be all right
McNeill has compiled a lengthy
list of credentials so far in his
freshman year. He finished
fourth in the NCAA meet in
Austin, Texas which earned him
All-America honors. In addition,
he finished second at the USA
Championships where he
defeated seven Olympic medal
winners including Carl Lewis.
McNeill also captured second
place in the Pacific Conference
Games held in Berkeley, Calif
and ran the first leg for the vic-
torious USA 4x100 meter relay
team as well.
Carson was equally impressed
by McNeill's finish in the USA-
West Germany meet.
"He ran a good race Carson
said. "He got second place and
defeated all of the West German
runners.
Equally important to Carson is
the experience McNeill receives
by competing overseas.
"I talked to him last night and
he's having a good time Carson
continued. "He's having a real
good experience, he's become
friends with Terry Scott and
Harvey Glance and is just ex-
Potential Problems Seen With CFA
Idea To
By TONY BROWN
AsiislMt Sports Editor
The next major issue to face
the NCAA rules convention in
1986 could be the College Foot-
ball Association (CFA) proposal
to give scholarship athletes
$600.00 a year for "incidental"
expenses.
The main impetus behind the
idea is the fact that these athletes
are currently prohibited from ob-
taining jobs except during
designated holiday periods, such
as Christmas and summertime,
thus causing great hardships on
those from impoverished
backgrounds.
The prohibition was a result of
abuses where athletes were paid
abnormally high wages by alum-
ni, sometimes even in "no-show"
jobs. Players were once given
$15.00 a month for "laundry
money but this was discon-
tinued in about 20 years ago.
Since full scholarships only
cover tuition, room and board
and books, the current rules
make it very difficult for athletes
whose parents are unable to pro-
vide much financial support. It
can be very hard for them just to
pay their phone and gas bills and
travel back and forth from home
to school, not to mention other
expenses.
This has apparently caused
some athletes to violate NCAA
rules by accepting money from
overzealous alumni, which the
CFA suggests can be mostly-
eliminated by their proposal to
pay players a monthly sum for
expenses. Many people, however,
question the wisdom of opening
Mone
j
up such a new area of potential
problems.
If the sentiment of ECU ad-
ministrators, coaches and
students are any indication, the
CFA proposal has little chance of
success at the NCAA convention.
The general consenus here finds
little sympathy for paying players
any amount of money beyond
what they are currently receiving.
"I haven't really considered
the question said Chancellor
John Howell, "but it does seem
some players need something to
live on because summertime is the
only time they can work. We're
not enthusiastic about the idea
though, because we'd either have
to raise the extra funds or cut the
budget somewhere else.
"I support the rule against
scholarship athletes working
because they don't have time to
work in addition to practice and
studying he stated. "There are
a lot of problems in this area
which haven't been discussed
"I think it would open up a
Pandora's Box of problems
said assistant football coach
Mike O'Cain. "I would rather
see the rules changed to allow
scholarship athletes to work. I
don't think it would be good to
give athletes the impression that
everything would just be given to
them
Basketball coach Charlie Har-
rison also would like to see
players work for extra money,
but links that with the NCAA re-
quirement that athletes pass 24
hours in a year. "Many players
have to go to summer school just
to meet that requirement he
said. "This eliminates the
possiblity of getting a good sum-
mer job
"Athletes ought to be allowed
to work instead of getting paid
said ECU track coach Bill Car-
son. "Once you start paying you
open up a whole new can of
worms. It wouldn't change a
cheater anyway. You'll always
have a sugar daddy who's willing
to spread money around.
"Abuses led to the ban on
athletes working Carson said,
"but the penalties are much
greater now and I think there
would be fewer abuses if scholar-
ship athletes were allowed to hold
jobs
Former ECU linebacker
Donald Reid is one of those who
supports the idea of giving the af-
fected players expense money. "I
think they should get it because
they're giving up a lot to the
school and deserve it he said.
"A hundred dollars a month to
those who need it would help a
lot
ECU student Dave Lockett
feels the university was founded
for academic reasons and so the
athletes should be treated like
everyone else, which was a
popular viewpoint among those
interviewed on the subject.
Among those who supported
the proposal it was obvious that
little consideration had been
given as to where the money
would come from for such an
enormously expensive program.
Even if only revenue-producing
sports were included, several
hundred scholarship athletes
would be eligible at each institu-
tion.
It would also raise the question
of what is a revenue sport. If it
was limited to basketball and
football, what about baseball and
other sports? In California,
volleyball produces money, while
in some areas sports such as
lacrosse, ice hockey and even
rodeo are money-makers.
Who's to say an underprivileg-
ed scholarship athlete from
another sport doesn't merit the
same amount?
These last two points in
themselves will probably be
enough to negate any positive
aspects involved in the CFA pro-
posal if it comes before the
NCAA convention in January.
Even ECU would be hard-pressed
to find or shift additional fund
to meet this new cost.
The effect on small and
minority colleges would be
drastic. It is doubtful that many
players would opt to attend a
school that couldn't afford such
a stipend for players if they had
the chance to play at one that
could.
The money players received
would also probably have little
effect in controlling payments
from alumni to some stars, since
those amounts are so much
greater than the fifty or a hun-
dred dollars a month proposed bv
the CFA.
As one coach put it, "It's bet-
ter to have some abuses with
players working rather than just
giving them money
Pirate Sports Network Expands Beyond
Eastern Carolina; State 9s Third Largest
By MIKE LUDWICK
SUM Writer
The Pirate Sports Network on
radio is the "official radio outlet
for all sports activities at East
Carolina said Ken Smith, who
is the Assistant Athletic Director
for Public Relations at ECU.
However, Smith qualifies that
statement by adding before a par-
ticular sport is broadcast there
are a number of factors involved.
One such factor is the willingness
of a station to broadcast the
sport.
Also, can the broadcasting sta-
tion, or ECU, find sponsors for
that program, and finally, is
there sufficient interest in the
sport. With these factors in mind
the four major sports that have
been broadcast in the past are
football, basketball, women's
basketball, and baseball.
Smith pointed to a four-fold
purpose behind the Pirate Sports
Network. "Our purpose is to
provide a service to the fans
Smith said. "They should have
the opportunity to hear what
their major teams are doing and
how they are doing Smith also
Carolina in terms of the number
of affiliated stations. "Thirty-
one stations were affiliated with
the Pirate Sports Network last
year, and hopefully more are
coming on this year Smith said.
periencing the benefits of a really said that the Pirate Sports Net-
good thing
After the National Sports
Festival, McNeill will run in the
World University Games in
Kobe, Japan, Aug. 29-Sept. 4.
He may also run in the 100 meters
at the World Cup meet in
Canberra, Australia Oct. 4-6.
work is a publicity wing for ECU.
"It's a visible program in front of
the people" he continued. Third-
ly, Smith sees a consumer need
for the Pirate Sports Network,
that there is a demand for such an
operation. He points to the fact
that the Pirate Sports Network is
the third largest network in North
Ken Smith
"The fourth purpose is to
make money, but only to a
limited degree at ECU. We would
be content to break even, but we
are making money on the Pirate
Sports Network, which is almost
phenomenal because of the
obstacles ECU must overcome
In fact, the Pirate Sports Net-
work is a "self-sufficient net-
work according to Smith.
"More importantly he stated,
"We have not lost money over
the last nine years
According to Smith there is go-
ing to be a new format for the
Pirate football games during the
upcoming season. "Previously
we have had a twenty minute pre-
came show. This season we will
have a 30 minute pre-game show,
which will be involved with set-
ting the stage for the game and
the line-ups Smith said.
However, the biggest change
will come at the end of the game
with a twenty minute post-game
show. "The post-game show will
include a live segment from the
Pirates' lockerroom with com-
ments from Coach Baker. Also,
we will have comments from the
opposing coach Smith said.
"Also, within the post-game
show we will have a scoreboard
segment with an emphasis on
those games that are of an in-
terest within the region
According to Smith, a feature
that the Pirate Sports Network
will be continuing this year is live
breaks to other games of interest
to ECU fans. "We might go live
to a Penn State game if ECU was
going to play them the next
week he said. "There is an ob-
vious interest there in how Penn
State is doing and what we can
expect
The future of the Pirate Sports
Network is bright, but not
without challenges. "Our main
objective is to move the football
network further west Smith
said. "We are constantly trying
to push westward
Also, he would like to expand
the network carrying Coach
Baker's talk show across North
Carolina, transmit more sports
information throughout the
week, and expand their basket-
ball coverage.
Overton Signs Recruit
ECU baseball coach Gary
Overton has announced the sign-
ing of a second recruit since the
end of the '85 season.
Devlon Brooks of Southern
Wayne led his team to the state
4-A championship with a perfect
13-0 record and five saves.
Brooks struck out 141 batters in
only 83 innings pitch with an 0.76
earned run average.
Brooks has compiled some im-
pressive stats thus far in
American Legion for Goldsboro
with a 2-0 record and a 0.00 earn-
ed run average.
In the state playoffs this past
spring, Brooks struck out 17 bat-
ters in the first game en route to
the win. In the final game of the
series, Brooks came on in relief to
pick up the save by striking out
five of the six batters he faced in
the final two innings.
Coach Overton is very high on
Brooks, saving "He's the type of
kid who can step right in and
play
Brooks joins Paul Hill of D.H.
Conley as Overton's first two
recruits since taking the head
coaching position last year.
les
ATLANTA (UPI) � ABC
went with tradition when it decid-
ed to crank up its telecasts of the
1985 college football season with
Georgia versus Alabama on
Labor Day night.
"It will provide tremendous
national exposure said Georgia
Coach Vince Dooley, explaining
the schools' willingness to move
the game up from its originally-
scheduled Oct. 5 date to Sept. 2.
"It's a game with great national
appeal
That's been true for ncmj half
a century. You can go back all
the way to 1941 � the year
Alabama, which went to the Cot-
ton Bowl, handed Orange Bowl-
bound Georgia its only loss.
Georgia fans like to recall the
'65 game when underdog
Georgia, using a controversial
still
any
flea-flicker play that will
raise an argument in
Alabama saloon, upset the defen-
ding national champion
Tidemen, 18-17.
But the game which wound up
attracting the most national at-
tention was Alabama's lopsided
35-0 victory in 1962 � an
understandable result during that
period since the Crimson Tide
won 32-6 the previous year and
by scores of 32-7 and 31-3 the two
years after.
That '62 game became the
focal point of a "fixcharge
story in the Saturday Evening
Post, a story that caused the
magazine to pay $460,000 to then
Georgia Athletic Director Wally
Butts, who won a libel suit, and a
$300,000 out-of-court settlement
to Alabama Coach Bear Bryant.
Johnny Griffith, who succeed-
ed Butts as Georgia's coach in
1961, took the stand during that
trial and testified that he didn't
give it a lot of thought when
Alabama scored its first three
touchdowns � but became
"suspicious" when the Tide kept
on scoring.
That's all history now. Dooley
succeeded Griffith after the '63
season and Ray Perkins became
coach at Alabama when Bryant
retired in December of '82, just a
month before he died.
Alabama, in its second season
under Perkins, suffered through
its first losing campaign (5-6) in
27 years last fall. But the Crim-
son Tide returns 16 starters, nine
on defense, and Perkins is op-
timistic.
"We have a chance to be a very
fine defensive football team he
says. "We'll be thin from a depth
standpoint at several positions,
but we appeared to have out best
recruiting year and it would be a
blessing if freshmen could help us
this fall
"Alabama's overall record last
year is misleading says Dooley.
"Ray started out with a very
young team and at one point was
only 1-4 (after Georgia beat the
Tide, 24-14). But they won four
of their last six games and those
last two losses were by just one
(Tennessee, 28-27) and two
(LSU, 16-14) points respectively.
"Alabama will be picked
among the top teams in the SEC
this year after coming on strong
at the end of '84 (closing with a
17-15 win over Auburn)
Alabama and Georgia have
dominated Southeastern Con-
ference football over the years.
Alabama has won or shared 18
league titles, winning eight in
nine years from 1971-79, and
Georgia has done it 10 times �
including 1981 when the two
didn't meet and wound up as co-
champions.
We're also talking about two
of the top bowl teams in the na-
tion, Alabama having appeared
in 37 post-season contests and
Georgia in 24.
While Dooley, who has a tradi-
tion of down-playing his team's
prospects, is less optimistic than
Perkins, Georgia, coming off a
7-4 season, has 14 starters return-
ing, eight on offense.
"I think we are in somewhat of
a down cycle, compared to where
we were in the 1980-83 seasons
Ope
(when tne Bulldogs lost only two
regular-season games in four
years) says Dooley. Our record
of last season, that included a
bowl trip (to the Citrus bowl
where Georgia tied Florida State
17-17), is not too bad by normal
standards. But by the standards
we set in the previous seasons, it
was certainly a letdown.
Georgia's most pressing pro-
blems are finding a quarterback
and replacing fullback Andre
"Pulpwood" Smith, who flunk-
ed out of school.
"The loss of Smith definitely
hurt our team said Dooley
"It's not very often when you see
the best player on a major college
football team flunk out, but I
think that is a tribute to our
academic program at Genr�i� i�
� �jk
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8
I HI S1 CARPI INIAN jt'l V J i
M5
National Old Timers
WASHINGTON (DPI) �
Many years removed from
major-league baseball, such
legendary players as Hank
Aaron, Hoyt Wilhelm, George
Kell and Early Wynn showed that
occasionally, even time can be
'ooeA.
In the fourth Annual Cracker
Jack Old-Timers Baseball Classic
at Rl K Stadium Monday night,
several doen retired greats got
together for five innings ot chari-
ty, ball and recreated baseball's
past.
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 11 a.m7 p.m.
Inday 11 a.m5: p.m.
Sat Sun.
1 p.m4 p.m.
OlTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
Ml 1:30 p.m5 p.m.
1 Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Ml 11:30 a.m3 p.m. (in person)
M-F 12 noon-3 p.m. (phone in)
� Operational hours adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
WANTED
HOUSE FOR RENT: 6 bearoom
house near university, 305 E. 14th St.
Summer or long Term rental To be
lOVated. $350, 758 5299
COME SEE THE SHOWS Usher
ana see the ECU Summer Theater
Shows free Come by the Theater
Arts Department for details and sign
up sheets
WANTED: Someone to sublet apart-
ment for the month of July only No
compacts No sexual preference.
Call 752 2110, ask for Greg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share two bedroom apt. $135 rent
and utilities etc. ECU bus service.
Poo: Call 757 1614,Toni.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute Time Inc. and other
publications' "student rate"
subscription caras at this campus
Good income, no selling involved.
For information ano application
write to. Riverside Marketing Ser
vices, 816 Orange Drive, Silver Spr
ings, Maryland 20901
BABYSITTERS NEEDED: Needed
at vanous times tor 2 and 8 year old.
Must have experience and a car
Call 756 2684 from 10 10.
PERSONAL
TO BOB SCHULTZ: Thanks
for all your help. You made
our visit alot of fun. Come see
us this summer! Love, Patty
and Chris.
K&T CLEANING SERVICES.
Why waste your summer do
ing household chores? Conve
nient, efficient, reasonable
housecieaning Call 758 8853 or
758 4679. Babysitting also
available
SALE
FOR SALE. Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals $200. Call An
thony at 757 6366 or 752 0291.
SLEEPING BAGS
BACKPACKS TENTS COTS. SHOVELS HAM
MOCKS MESS KITS CANTEENS FATIGUES VW
BOOTS RAINWEAR T SHIRTS ENAMELWARE
DISHES WORK CLOTHES 2!00 DIFFERENT ITEMS
Browsers Welcome
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501S Evan.
??????
jsrrrori
:wed
v.Nigh?Watch
THURS - July 4
ff � � Dot
Holiday
Split Decision
�iSAT
Aaron, the major league
homerun king with 755, parked a
first-inning delivery from Wynn
into the left field bleachers. Kell,
the hot-fielding third baseman,
made two fine defensive plays on
fellow Hall of Famers Enos
Slaughter and Lou Brock.
And crafty Hoyt Wilhelm, the
master of the knuckler, who won
143 games in 21 seasons, allowed
one run in one inning to earn the
win in a 7-3 victory by the Na-
tional League that featured five
home runs.
Aaron, who has been out of
the major leagues nine years, said
he has not lost the mythical home
run stroke feared by pitchers
from 1954-76.
"It's always been there he
said. "It's a God-given gift that
you never lose.
"It was a nice pitch to hit out
of the ballpark added Aaron, a
lifetime .305 hitter who chalked
up 2,297 RBI. "I was being selec-
tive. It's always nice to come out
and do the best job you can do
Wynn, a Hall of Famer who
s
won 300 games from 1939-63,
was tagged with the loss, but he
took it with a laugh.
Wynn said of the pitch Aaron
crushed, "Same one he hit last
time (in last year's game). A high
fastball about letter high �
which he pays me $100 for
He added: "There's no way
you're going to strike anybody
out. It's just so the fans enjoy
it
The AL went up 1-0 on a first
inning RBI single by Frank
Robinson.
Aaron launched his shot in the
bottom of the inning, Bill
Mazeroski and Joe Torre socked
consecutive homers to left in the
second and Tommy Davis crack-
ed a two-run shot in the fifth.
The final NL run came on a Tom
Haller RBI double.
Jim Lemon homered and
Johnny Roseboro sacrificed in
Tony Oliva to account for the
AL's scoring.
Proceeds of the game went to
the Association of Professional
Ball Players of America, which
benefits retired players.
"We've all slipped a notch
reflected Mazeroski, a slick-
fielding second baseman who hit
138 homers in 17 seasons. "I felt
like a miler just getting around
the bases
After the 26,770 who gathered
at RFK had left and the lights had
been turned out, former Put
sburgh great Willie Stargell sum-
med it up for the bunch.
"We probably won't be able to
get up in the morning Pop
(Stargell) said.
jjrWrW
WAKI
�T, TnWALLPWCE REP" �� "��
MSYOUWAJJTMO
PEN 24 HOURS
'PEN SUNDAYS 8am til 10pm
OPEN MONDAYS 7 AM
CLOSE SATURDAYS
12 MIDNIGHT
July 4th Store Hours
Wednesday. July 3 7:00 A.M12 Midnight
Thursday. July 4 8:00 A.M9:00 P.M.
Friday, July 5 7:00 A.M12 Midnight
HUNTS
Ketchup
?.� 32 oz.
btl.
I iMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
DUKES
JANE PARKER HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog Buns
Mayonnaise
�V f
SAVE
70c
32 oz.
jar
LIMIT ONc WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 0� MORE PURCHASE
U.S.D.A. CHOICE FRESH CUT GRAIN FED
Whole Rib Eye
a '
save , Boneless
901 4 9-12 lb. avg.
LB
RC Cola
SAVE V
IN
34c
vu
3100
8 ct. �
pkgs. �
LIMIT THREE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
CASTLEBERRY WITH BEEF
Hot Dog Chili
"
'
- save
30C
2
Itr.
btl.
M
"V
lb.
LIMIT
TWO
PLEASE
MARKET STYLE FRESH 73�o LEAN
Ground Beef
� SAVE
61
LB
i
5 lbs.
or more
ib.
Ground
Fresh
Daily
SAVE
19c �r i
v
v
CARNATION
3
10 oz.
cans
99
C
WAREHOUSE PRICES
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Light N'
Lively
B
WAREHOUSE PRICES
Yogurt
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BONELESS
Rib Eye Steak
SAVE
i 30co?
VV mi
2
6 oz.
ctns.
3 SAVE
1
71
LB
lb.
Evaporated MiEk
KRAFT REG OR HO
B.B.Q. Sauce
FRENCH S
Worcestershire Sauce
QUAKER
SAVE
Instant Grits
VAN CAMP
Pork&
Reans
VAN CAMP CHILEE OR
Beanee Weenee
REGULAR BEAN
Eight 0'Clock Coffee
FAMILY ASSORTED
Scott Napkins
WALDORF
Bath Tissue
13 oz
can
18 oz
btl
15 oz
btl
8 oz
pkg
SAVE
49c 8c
99c20c
1M30C
79 20s
SEALTfcST
Sour Cream
LIGHT N LIVELY
Cottage Cheese
DEANS FRENCH OR GREEN
Onion Dip
KRAFT
Velveeta Slices
TOTINOS
Cti:
12 OZ
ctn
8 oz
ctn
12 oz
pkq
79c20
49c20c
17920c
JUfcitO � JNIA
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Party
Pizza
SAVE
40c i
'7 7SOZ
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300 ct
pkg
SAVE
89c??'
649 70
8920
BEER
Natural
Light
12 oz.
cans
FROZEN
A&P Lemonade
MP
Frozen Pizza
PET DEEP DISH
Pie Shells
Handi Whip
ALL FLAVORS
Paul
Masson
89ro
4 - I00 20'
� cans � i
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U 99c 20
�a? 79c 20�
10 oz
Cantaloupes
99c
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Seedless Grapes
99c
� SWE
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rJ ony
CALIFORNIA RED OR WHITE
5
L3
GENERAL MERCHANDISE SPECIALS
TEXACO 10VV40 � 10W30 � SAE30
Havoline
Motor Oil
5 qts at 99e 4 95
Mail In Rebate 1 25
Final Cost
5 Quarts
170
DELI SPECIALS
MAIL
RFBAl
SAVE .
0
1.5 ttr
btl
Long Acre
Turkev Bologna or
Turkey Salami
Boiled Ham
Lb.
Lb.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 3, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 03, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.414
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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