The East Carolinian, June 5, 1985






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(Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.60
Wednesday, June 5, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
System Successful
On-line Registration Benefits A11
Shapin' Up
Bryan Humbert � ECU Photo Lab
Even though summer .s not until later on this month, the recent record-breaking temperatures in the area
have brought some people inside, such as this graduate art student. While taking advantage of tne cool air
conditioning of Jenk.ns Art Building, the sculptor seems to be shaping up the looks of ECU
By RANDY MEWS
C a-Ncwi Kdllor
Associate Registar Bobbie
Alston has termed ECU's new
on-line registration system a
"success" after evaluating its ef-
fectiveness during pre-
registration this spring.
"We're very happy with the
way the entire process went
Alston said, "and we hope the
students and faculty were pleased
as well
The system was implemented
in March when 50 computer ter-
minals linked to a Sperry-Univac
mainframe were distributed to
various academic departments
across campus.
This allowed students to
choose their own schedule while
in from of a terminal rather than
select a course only to have the
old computer choose another one
for them.
Alston said the new system vir-
tually eliminates long lines
because the average student can
determine their schedule within
five minutes. However, if a stu-
dent isn't satisfied with the
courses available at the time, he
or she can continue to come back
until they have adjusted their
schedules accordingly.
Alston also felt that a smaller
percentage of students would
have their schedules cancelled
because of the ease at which fees
and tuiton could be paid through
the mail. "Paying tuition will be
less complicated she said.
"Students receive a computer
printout sheet which contains
their schedule, activity card and
bill all on a single sheet of
paper
Also, the new system has
allowed a policy change concern-
ing the cancellation of schedules
to avoid disasters such as the one
earlier this year when many
students could not attend school
because they failed to pick up
their schedules on time.
Schedules will now be mailed
back to the student's home ad-
dress if they are not picked up
before the beginning of the
semester, rather than holding
them in the registar's office.
Since a student has the option
of accepting or rejecting their
schedule, once entered into the
computer as final, all schedules
become permanent. There will be
no opportunity to add a class,
and courses may only be dropped
for one of the following reasons:
� If a student is failing a course
at the time he wishes to drop.
� If a prerequisite for a course
has not been successfully com-
pleted.
� If a student becomes senoush
ill and has a legitimate medical
excuse.
An additional feature of the
system is that it has been catered
to fit ECU's needs. "The univer-
sity developed this system instead
of using a packaged system
Alston said. "At times the system
has to be readjusted, but it can be
upgraded as well � it's a con-
tinious learning experience
For those students who did not
register in the spring, the on-line
registration process is extremely
easy to follow:
� Fill out a schedule form with
your advisor with no more than
18 hours of primary courses and
no less than 15 hours of alternate
courses.
� Have your advisor sign the
form.
� Determine when you are allow -
ed to register (days are designated
according to your class rank).
� Go to the department in which
you are majoring or the registar
office and wait until a terminal iv
free.
� Work out a schedule with the
terminal operator with which you
are comfortable.
� Once you have decided on a
schedule, tell the terminal
operator to enter it as your final
class schedule.
Archaeologist Begins Search For Roanoke's Lost Colony
(UPI) � An underwater ex
ploration to find the Lost Colony
is finding some unbelievers, but
one North Carolina archaeologist
says his August project is more
than a fishing expedition to solve
the 395-year-old mystery.
"This idea was not any one day
revelation said Gordon Watts,
director of underwater research
in the East Carolina University
maritime history graduate pro-
gram.
Seven years ago, Watts found
evidence the Lost Colony now
may be within three miles of
Manteo, offshore on the bottom
of the Roanoke Sound. His
discovery was made independent
of work by three scientists at the
University of Virginia, who in
1972 suggested the same theory.
In August, Watts and other
scientists will spend a week
aboard a 25-foot motorboat us-
ing sophisticated electronic
equipment to peer at the sound's
bottom for clues to the settle-
ment's disappearance. The
mystery of the Lost Colony has
puzzled historians since the settle-
ment's governor, John White,
returned to Roanoke Island from
England in 1590 and found little
remaining of the colony he'd left
three years before.
About 100 colonists were gone.
Ail Governor White thacovered
were the remains of a crude, fort-
like settlement and the word
"Croatan" carved on a tree.
"My personal belief is that the
site of the colony is on land, not
in the sound said Phil Evans, a
ranger at Fort Raleigh, a state
historical site on Roanoke Island.
"But I certainly applaud Gor-
don's effort, and I'd be happy as
a clam to have him find
something.
"It's possible he will find
Groups Prepare Freshmen
something, and whatever anyone
finds will certainly help us here
Evans said.
ECU got an S8.000 grant from
America's 400th Anniversary
Committee to make a preliminary
search of two areas in the sound
north of Roanoke Island. Each
site is about a one-half mile by-
four miles in area, from 800 feet
to 2,500 feet offshore and under
3 feet to 12 feet of salt water.
Watts said three environmental
factors � erosion, the slow sink-
ing of the north end of Roanoke
Island and a rise in the sea level
� during the last 400 years led
him to his "one inescapable con-
clusion Watts estimates the en-
vironmental changes have shifted
more than one half miJe of the
island's northern end under-
water.
"So I feel the colony is pro-
bably underwater Watts said.
"There's got to be more. It can-
not have just disappeared
Watts said the artifacts found
during Fort Raleigh's reconstruc-
tion were not enough to sustain a
community. Watts said the fort
"could have been part of the Lost
Colony, but by no means all of
it
By HAROLDJOYNER
C o-Num Editor
"Almost every club (at ECU)
that is funded by SGA, and even
a lot that aren't, has already sign-
ed up to become a part of the
New Student Initiation to Cam-
pus Organizations said SGA
President David Brown Tuesday.
"I think it's fantastic that
almost all of the campus
organizations have signed up. It
really shows they are concerned
about the incoming freshmen
Brown said.
NSICO is one of the SGA Ex-
ecutive Council's primary pro-
jects this summer. The program
was organized, Brown said, in
order to give campus groups an
initial exposure to freshmen
orientation students, who will ar-
rive next week.
Brown explained that during
the time freshmen are waiting to
have their ID cards made, the
multi-purpose room on the se-
cond floor of Mendenhall will be
open for students to find out how
to become involved with campus
groups.
"I think that a warm hand-
shake and a smile mean a great
deal more than receiving a manila
envelope stuffed full of pam-
phlets Brown said.
An pre-NSICO meeting will be
held Monday June 10 at 4 p.m.
for groups planning to attend.
Brown said it is very important
for one or two representatives
from each group to come in order
to be informed of last minute
details and giving table
assignments.
Other groups, he said, that
have not already registered may
notify the SGA office by June 10,
but space can't be guaranteed.
The program will be offered
once to each of the freshmen
orientation groups beginning
June 13 at 1 p.m. and ending July
10 from 7-9 p.m.
"The participating groups can
be assured that they'll have a cap-
tive audience. I can't think of a
better way for the freshmen to
become involved with student
organizations he said.
Renovation On Schedule
By RANDY MEWS
Co-News Editor
After suffering the abuse of
student living for more than 60
years, Cotten Hall is finally get-
ting a facelift.
Renovation began on May 13
in an attempt to restore one of
ECU's oldest dormitories before
it resumes normal operations in
the fail.
"We felt it was necessary to
improve the dorm's
appearance said Dan Wooten,
ECU's director of housing opera-
tions. "We're completely
renovating the entire building
According to Wooten, trouble
with the electrical system
necessitated the renovation. The
entire building will be rewired
with new light Fixtures, while all
incandescent lights will be replac-
ed with fluorescent ones.
The other major underatking
of the renovation process in-
cludes the installation of a new
heating and air conditioning
system. "We have learned
through our experience with Jar-
vis and Fleming (residence halls)
that air conditioning is in great
demand by the students
Wooten said.
Jarvis (opened 1909) and Flem-
ing (opened 1923) are the only
two dorms on campus that are
older than Cotton. Both dorms
have been renovated within the
last decade, and both had air con-
ditioning installed when
renovated.
Cotton will be repaired much
in the same way that Jarvis and
Flemming were, thus completing
work on all central campus
dorms overlooking the mall area.
Other renovations for the
dorm include:
� Wall-to-wall carpeting in the
corridors.
� New carpet and furniture in the
lobby.
� Refinishing the furniture in
each room.
� Painting the rooms and cor-
ridors.
Renovation is still in its
primary stage, but Wooten is
confident that the dorm will be
ready for the influx of dorm
students this fall. "We set a com-
pletion date of Aug. 12, but at
the present time we're running
ahead of schedulede
The dorm will retain its policy
of only accommodating female
students, although it is still ex-
pected many will request Cotton
because of the air conditioning.
Although exact Figures will not
be known until renovation is
complete, Wooten estimated the
total cost of the project at
$700,000.
"They (colonists) were loaded
for bear he said. "A hundred
people would have left potterv.
buttons, foundation structures,
iron bars, bricks, trunk.
Firearms, projectiles I feel
there's not enough evidence there
for 100 people to have staved a
year or more
This month, archaeologists will
test excavations on land about
200 yards from the site of the
reconstructed fort that equip-
ment similar to what Watts' crew
will use this summer has in-
dicated showed promise.
Counselor
Answers
Sex Charges
A retired counselor at EC L
pleaded guilty last Tuesday to
three charges of engaging in ll
legal sex acts with three teenage
boys, The Sews and Observer
recently reported.
Hosea Dewood "Woody"
Lambeth, 61,of Route I. Elon
Collet. )leaded guilty as part of
a plea-bargaining arrangement to
two charges of taking indecent
liberties with children and one
charge of crime against nature.
As part of the arrangement, ap-
proved in Pitt County Superior
Court, one charge of crime
against nature was dismissed.
Lambeth was a counselor in
the ECU Counseling Center from
1967 until June 1983, when he
retired. Indictments returned by a
Pitt County grand jury last
month charged that the incidents
occurred in 1979 and 1981 with
youths who were 13, 14 and 16 at
the time.
Director of the Student
Counseling Center Wilbert Ball
said that Lambeth "had carried
out his duties in a professional
manner while a counselor at
ECU.
Ball also added that the inci-
dent was not related to
Lambeth's work with students
seeking counseling at the center.
Smokescreen
The warm weather offers many advantages, such as escaping the
heat of the kitchen. Seems this ECU student recently bought a few
chickens, some brew and a fresh pack of cigarettes and headed out for
Bar-B-Que heaven. When does the band arrive?
� The television networks have
fine tuned this fall's schedule.
See Lifestyles, page 5.
� ECU trackster is named All-
America. See Sports, page 7.
m, - , ���- 4
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 5, 1985
Announcements
Camp Starlight
interested in working with children and
young people in a beautitul setting? Camp
Starlight is located in the Poconos Mountains
of Pennsylvania They need counselors and
water skiing instructors For more informa
tion contact Cooperative Education, 313
Rawl, 757 6979
� uction Management
Positions Available tor construction
management maiors with Eastern North
Carolina Building Corporation For more in
formation, contact Cooperative Education
Office. Rawl 313
Forum On University
Athletics
How are a University and its athletic pro
gram related to one another? is there a dif
ference between how it is and how if should
be? Program and discussion by Graham
Nahouse, sponsored by the ECU Campus
Ministry, Wednesday, June 5, at 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 244.
INDT
Positions exist with such companies as
Northern Telecom, Burroughs Wellcome,
Perdue, Inc. and Yale Materials Handling
Corporation for the 1985 86 academic year
Start gaining experience now for your career
by contacting Cooperative Education, 313,
Rawl, 757 6979
National Teacher Examination
There is a special National Teacher Ex
aminatlon scheduled for Saturday, June 23.
Candidates must contact the testing center
prior to June 5 to register for the test. To
save candidates travel time, you should be
aware that tests . also being given at
Atlantic Christ'i .allege. Wilson, N.C
Weslyan, Rocky Mount, Fayetteville State,
and New Bern High School.
Ambassadors
We will have a meeting Thursday at 4 p.m.
in room 247 MSC
Environmental Health
Position available for Environmental
Health student in INOT with background in
safety with chemical company in Wilm
ington re�. Salary of S6 per hour and
assistance in finding housing. Excellent op
portunlty for summer. Contact Co-op Office,
room 314 Rawl Bldg
Frisbee
Attention Feesh and Bison and anyone in
terested in playing frisbee this summer in
Greenville The ECU Frisbee Club and the
Ultimate Irates extend their warmest (hot)
invitaion to everyone to come out and whip
it. If you don't know how to whip it, we'll
teach you Bottom of College Hill, Tuesday,
Thursday and Sunday al 5 30 Be there or be
oblong!
Crossover
For the latest and the best in Contem
porary Christian music, listen to
CROSSOVER this Sunday morning from 6 12
noon. This weekend's special features Chris
tian Jazz from 11 to noon, with artists like
Phil Oriscoll and Kieth Thomas Also, two
CROSSOVERWZMB t shirts and two Pizza
Hut pizzas will be given away, so don't miss
the great giveaways and music on
CROSSOVER. 6 12 each Sunday on WZMB
SLEEPING BAGS
BACKPACKS TENTS COTS SHOVELS nAW
MOCKS MESS KITS CANTEENS EaTiGuES .
BOOTS RAINWEAR I SHIRTS ENAMElWARf
DrSHES WORK CLOTHES 2'OC CHFfEREN' TtM
Bro wieri Welcome
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S. Ivans
, tndgkon's
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Serving the Entire Family
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Join the adventure.
STEVEN SPIELBERG Presents
PUTT
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756-1449
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THE GOONIES"
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Any Complete
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(excluding sale items)
Offer expire 62885
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Offer Eipires 62885
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Phone (919) 757-1559
Owner
T. Anderson
114 Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
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756-4204
703 Greenville Blvd. (Across From Pitt Plaza, Next To ERA Realty!
Gary M. HarrisLicensed Optician Open 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mm Fit
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NO PROBLEM!
Relax .no need to nftMIIIAC
change1 Domino's Pizza VIVI11 V O
is only a phone call away Dl f A
Serving Mr. Greenville DELIVERS
e) Campus:
758-66BO
1201 Charles Bl.d.
Serving Ernst
Greenville:
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Mall
Hours:
11AM-1AMSunThurs.
11AM-2AMFri.&Sat.
Limited delivery areas.
Drivers carry under $20
�1985 Domino's Pizza. Inc.
33945530.5534
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(tit) 751-3114
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Live entertainment each & every Wednesday night. No admission
charge for LadiesHappy Hour prices for ladies. Doors open at 8:30
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Wednesday, June 5, 1985 9:00-2:00 A M
Admission $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies $1 00 18 yrs
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Presents
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Thursday, June 6, 1985
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SLEEPING BAGS
� ' AM
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� rEMS
Browsers Welcome
ARMY NAVY STORE
'SOI S Evans
3fi'S
Lcuna:
B 30-6 00
s Sot
r57 1559
Owner
T Anderson
114 Evans St.
envle IMC 27834
'anon Style
fu plastic
teach Totes
5.99
na
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admission
en at 8:30
r all
:00 A.M.
SI.00 18vts.
TE
ITE
A.M.
r Ladies
Ultraviolet Rays Dangerous
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 3. .983 3
rhe perfect suntan is a su
ertime goal for mam of us-
�owever, before you spend all
7HH IIITlt' soaking up the rays
there are a ten things thai are
;ood to know.
fr to avoid tanning from 10
am. to 2 p.m. when the sun is
most intense. The burning com-
ponent of sunlight and uitravioH
� is not filtered b clouds, so
is possible to get tanned and
also burnt on a cloud day.
There are now sunscreens that
can block out harmful IV light
I he PABA (Para-Aminobenzoic
-Kid) compounds range from I
powei to 21 powei rhe 21 power
will total.) block the UV light.
hile 1 powei lets your skin ab
-orb most of the sun's ras.
1 he powers are also referred to
Sun Protection factors which
resents a multiple of the time
n takes to get a minimal sunburn
on your skin. You should
remember that often sunburn
does not show up until hours
attei you've gotten out of the
sun.
HEALTH'
C0LUM
Everyone has different skin:
� Fair complexions and red
heads have a skin type that is
easiL burned and should use a
SP1- of 8-15.
� Dark haired and darker skinn-
ed people burn rarelv and can use
a SPF of 2.
� For those who have a normal
skin color and complexion, a SPF
South Park
Amoco
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756-3023 24 hrs.
liOGreenville Blvd.
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Eyeglass Frame S
30 to
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All
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VU1E �I- :
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CALL US FOR AN
EYE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
OF YOUR CHOICE
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Phone 7521446
Other Locations In Kinston, Goldsboro & Wilson
Open Mon. Fri. 9 AM til 5:30 PM
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E6-5
Carolina East Mall 756-6078
(North entrance � Near Belks)
Open MonSot. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sundays 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
1 Hour Photo Lab
between 2-8 is recommended.
Many of the sunscreens are
now waterproof and stay on for
up to 80 minutes. If you are in-
volved in water sports such as
water skiing, wind surfing or
swimming, these sunscreens are
also advised.
Medication can cause reactions
when exposed to sun. Women on
oral contraceptive pills have in-
creased sensitivity to sun and get
splotchy tans due to estrogen ef-
fects. Tetracycline, an antibiotic,
can cause sun sensitivity so a type
of allergic reaction can occur in
sun exposed areas. Other drugs
that can cause sun sensitivity are
valium, benadryl, and com-
pazine. If you have any questions
about medication you are taking,
ask a pharmacist or other care
provider.
The worst thing about sun ex-
posure is that damage to the skin
builds up. Physicians are now
seeing the effects of sun exposure
for 10-20 consecutive years. Skin
becomes leathery and tough after
many years of sunning. UV
radiation can cause recurrence of
herpes both oral and genital
which can be prevented by using
lip sunscreen and avoiding pro-
longed exposure. Also, UV ex-
posure can cause solar keratosis
which is a noncancerous growth
on skin but has a low chance of
becoming malignant. Enjoy your
time in the sun but please
remember to use moderation.
The Student Health Center has
a brochure on "sunning" that
provides more detailed informa-
tion about medication sensitivity
and sun protection factors. Call
us at 757-6841 if you need more
information.
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Spacious Affordable Luxury Apartments
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Limited Time Only Offer For New
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� 2 Bedroom Townhouses & 1 Bedroom Garden Apartment,
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� Fully Carpeted
� Private Laundry Facilities
� Large Pool
� Cable T.V. Included
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� Convenient To Shopping Centers & Restaurants
� tCU Bus Service
� Security Deposits Negotiable
Directions: 10th Street Extension To Rier Bluff Road
Next To Rivergate Shopping Center.
PHONE 758-401S
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Gtlje EaHt (Earnlttrtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Norton, (w�.�,Mr
Jennifer Jendrasiak, mm fcd�0,
Harold Joyner, Co- ��, Tom Luvender, oir�-ror mmu�
Randy Mews, cv.� ��, Anthony Martin, MwMr
Rick Mccormac. srom�,wr John Peterson, cru Manager
Bill Mitchel l , n�to� m,� Bill Dawson, produce Manager
Daniei Maurer. iStyles Fdiwr DeChanile Johnson, Ad rtetmam
June 5. 1985
Opinion
Page 4
Seat Belts
Wear Should Be Optional
Legislation which would legally individual's home or car, he should
enforce seat-belt wear for drivers in be responsible for deciding the
the state of North Carolina is one degree of risk he exposes himself to,
way of dealing with the problem of as long as he is the only one who will
car-accident fatalities. It is, directly suffer the conseauences.
however, not the most effective way
and is a violation of the adult's right
to make his own decisions.
Bowdlerization Business Booms
On the other hand, legislation re-
quiring seat belt wear for children is
an excellent idea. In this case, the
It has been proven in many cases decision is being made for someone
By Dorothy Wickenden
TW New RrpabUc
It was a studious ninth grader, not an
anti-censorship brigade, who set off the
most recent flurry about what kids
ought to be reading in school.
The culprits were not fervid fun-
damentalists but staid corporate
that seat belt wear greatly increases who does not yet have the ability or publishers. And the object of censor-
� � InJiir4rl -1 � i I. .I ��� . chin uror n-t -� r;� C U - �
an individual's chance of surviving maturity to decide on precautions to
an automobile accident with less take against a possible accident,
severe injuries. Most Americans are This legislation should extend not
aware of this fact, if not through only to infants, but to all children,
constant media exposure, then including those riding in school
through common sense. How they buses,
choose to act on this information,
however, should be left to them.
While the government has a cer-
tain responsibility to protect in-
dividuals from each other, their
responsibility to protect individuals
North Carolinians are aware of
the fact that wearing seat belts saves
lives Positive reinforcement for
wearing seat belts has far more
potential for being effective than
no
And
from themselves should be limited, penalization for not wearing the
In a case such as suicide, someone is belts. People should be given the
intentionally trying to harm facts, made to think about the con-
himself, usually while in a disturbed sequences of not wearing seat belts,
mental state, and should be pro- and left to decide for themselves,
tected. However, it is difficult to Government intervention has
equate not wearing a seatbelt with place here.
an intentionally harmful act such as
suicide. Seat belt wear is a precau-
tion against a probability, not pro-
tection from a certainty. If an adult
does not feel the need to take
precautions against his own injury,
then he should not be forced to do
so.
Furthermore, it is an infringe-
ment on individual rights to legally not so bad as the headline stated
enforce seat belt wear. This is Instead, he meant to convey that the
similar to saying television sets must problem of apartheid should be
be unplugged during an electrical dealt with in perspective with the
storm to prevent against possible seriousness of other international
electrocution. In the privacy of an problems.
ship was not a science of history text or
an obscene novel, but the work of the
most revered playwright in the world.
Daniel Blum, a student at Madison
High School in Vienna, Va had seen a
Folger Theatre production of Romeo
and Juliet, and when he sat down with
his Scott, Foresman "America Reads"
textbook to write a paper about Mer-
cutio's "Queen Mab speech, he
noticed some of the lines were missing.
For example, the "fairies' midwife"
who gallops by nightThrough lovers'
brains" is no longer characterized as
the hag who "when maids lie on their
backspresses them and learns them
first to bear,Making them women of
good carriage
Around the time the story broke in
Virginia, a parent in Minneapolis
discovered that the same anthology had
been altered as well as abridged.
Romeo's line in Act V, "Well, Juliet, I
will lie with thee tonight was changed
to "Well, Juliet, I will be with thee
tonight
Investigations by a Fairfax County
textbook advisory committee, school
boards, columnists, and People For
East Carolinian columnist Dennis The American Way revealed not only
Kilcoyne would like to clarify the that. mtor,e lfhan 3�? !mcs-had bee,n
fot �iL u � ru- �7-im: �� V eliminated from Scott, Foresman's
fact that the point of his "The Right "R0me0 and Juliet" - most of them
Word column, which appeared sexual allusions � but that high-school
May 29, was not that "apartheid is textbook publishers routinely expurgate
Shakespeare. Some, including Scott,
Foresman, note in teachers' editions
Doonesbury
that "abridgements" have been made.
Most do not.
The overwhelming reaction was one
of astonished indignation. Scott,
Foresman has received over 2,000 let-
ters deploring the practice of "self-
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
SHE'S GOT SOME
SORT OF SUMMER
JOB AT AN ART
INSTITUTE IN
5HAN6HAI
THAT DEAN
HONEY'WAT
A PRIMO
EDUCATOR i
BECAUSE OF PENG'S MODERNIZA
TIONS OUR SCHOOLS OFARTARB
met AGAIN .FLOURISHING. MANY
COMRAPES CONTENPED FOR MY
POSITION AT THE INSTITUTE
"I FEEL VERY LUCKY, THOUGH THE
JOURNEY FROM REP GUARD TO
AVANT-GARDE IS PERILOUS AL
RBAPY, THERE S MUCH CRITIQUING
OF COUNTER-REVOLUnONARy AEG
- J- THBTICS"
HOUJ'S
THIS,
COMRAPE?
NO, IT'S STILL
DECAUEHT TRY
PROPPING YOUR
SHOULDER
GOW MORNING, CLASS,
AND UUELCJOME TO THE
SHANGHAI ART INSTTTUTE'S
FIGURE STUDIES PROGRAM
PUB TO A REGENT RELAXATION OF
CULTURAL AUTHORITY, CLARES SUCH
AS THIS ARE ONCE AGAIN POSSIBLE.
I URGE YOU TO MAKE THE MOST OF
IMS PARTICULAR UPSWING OF THE
' fPENDULUM
I AM ASSISTED TODAY BY COMRADE
WAN, UJHOUJILL BE STRIKING THE
NEW STATE-APPROVED POSES. F YOU
WILL GO TO YOUR EASELS, UIE CAN
BEGIN. READY, COMRADE?
NO, NO, YOU'VE OVER-
WORKED TT COMPLE TEVY1
YOU'RE NOT LOOKING AT THE
MODEL' YOU'RE NOT REALLY
5BEIN6!
BUT I'M
TRYING 70
MAKE A
STATEMENT
COMRADE
INSTRUCTOR
UJHY? HAVENiYOUBEEN
LISTENING 17$ ART FOR
ARTS SAKE NOV. ITPOES
NCfT HAVE 70 SERVE THE
PEO
PLE
SOSHE
SHOULDNTBE
BAY0NETTIN6
AN EVIL
LANDLORD?
OF COURSE
NOT' LET THE
DRAWING
BRSATHBl
censorship Yet there is nothing new
or surprising about the bowdlerization
of Shakespeare. On the contrary, the
current batch of "censored" textbooks
is resolutely faithful to the traditions of
Dr. Bowdler and his sister Harriet, who
published their first edition of Family
Shakespeare in 1807. And publishers of
literature anthologies for the public
schools have always felt constrained to
abride and excerpt � keeping in mind
both the sophistication of the students
who will be reading them and the re-
quirements of parents and school
districts that will be buying them.
Marlene Blum, a member of the Fair-
fax County textbook advisory commit-
tee and the mother of Daniel, complain-
ed to Sandra Sugawara of the
Washington Post, "it's as if (the
publishers) have become the arbiter of
what children are to read and not
read Yet, if anything, textbook
publishers have become more fearful
over the years about making their own
determinations of what children are to
read and not read. They have found
that they cannot afford to dismiss the
clamoring of countless political,
religious and ethnic groups to cleanse
their books of sexual and racial
stereotyping.
Jane Bachman, an editorial vice
president of Scott, Foresman, guarded-
ly told me: "Textbook publishers an-
ticipate what may be a troublesome
matter. We might be a little paranoid
when we put a book together
Clearly some things have changed
since the heyday of bowdlerism. There
is no comfortable consensus, as there
was in the Victorian era, about matters
of propriety, church and state. In its
absence, the public schools have
become a stage for various special-
interest groups to perform their
political dramas. As the requirements
for textbooks have multiplied,
publishers have honed their marketing
skills, and the role of the editor has
dwindled. No single sentinel trims the
text and upholds moral and literary
standards. Indeed, it is almost irrele-
vant what the editor believes.
Before a textbook comes into being,
surveys are conducted, focus groups are
convened, and outside consultants are
hired. As the book is prepared, armies
of reading specialists, instructional
designers, teachers and computers
zealously watch over it. They guard
against unattractive book covers and
ethnic slurs; they monitor "curricular
congruence" (text, workbook and
teachers' guide must complement each
other) and "readability" levels
(vocabulary words and number of
syllables per sentence are tabulated ac-
cording to grade).
When the book is finally published, it
is subject to review and complaint by
concerned citizens and put up for
"adoption" by state and local textbook
advisory committees equipped with
complicated checklists of requirements.
In this Byzantine method of patching
together textbooks, the integrity of an
single story or play � not to mention
the needs of students � often gets lost.
Certain particularly troublesome items
have been virtually abandoned �
among them Shirley Jackson's famous
short story, "The Lottery" (too
violent), and "the Merchant of Venice"
(anti-semitic). Publishers have gone to
absurd lengths to accomodate disparate
interest groups and varying state
guidelines. Elsa Walsh reported in the
Washington Post that in a chapter from
"Tom Sawyer which appears in Ginn
and Cos sixth grade reader "Flights of
Color the colloquialisms have vanish-
ed; the grammer has been cleaned up;
Tom's oath of "honest Injun" has been
removed, and most references to boys
or men have been changed to children
or people.
A story called "A Perfect Day for Ice
Cream" was included in Scott,
Foresman's 1985 eighth grade an-
thology only after the words "ice
cream" had been deleted from the title
and a scene about a trip to the ice-cream
parlor had been eliminated. The reason,
apparently, was California's "social
content guidelines" for textbooks,
which warn against references to junk
food. McGraw Hill's seventh-grade
"focus" anthology has expunged from
"Rip Van Winkle" not only difficult
vocabulary words here and there such
as "dismembered but the reference to
"obsequious and conciliatory" men
who go home to "shrews" and "ter-
mangant" wives.
Textbook publishers and school
boards have become so accustomed to
coven bowdlerization that they ap-
parently came to forget it was even go-
ing on. The Virginia state board of
education, for one, had been happily
buying the disputed Scott, Foresman
textbook series for years until a ninth
grader and his mother objected to its
cavalier treatment of Shakespeare. As
for teachers, the good ones have always
had more faith in their own judgment
about what is suitable for their students
than they have in the prepackaged selec-
tions of mass-market textbook,
publishers. Some have even taken ad-
vantage of their books' flaws.
After Daniel Blum's discovery, his
teacher supplied the students with the
full text of "Romeo and Juliet and
discussed the anthology's cuts in class.
Covert or open, censorship is a doomed
enterprise, for it stimulates precisely
that dangerous urge it set out to crush:
curiosity.
Greenville Summers:
Innovation Needed
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Good afternoon boys and girls and
welcome to summer in Greenville, a
wonderful experience designed for
testing the limits of boredom and its
partner of necessity � creativity.
Picture this scenario: A small town in
the vast desert of rural North Carolina,
a town which in the summer is kept at
the comfortable temperature of 95
degrees (and 90 percent humidity). The
nearest entertainment is either in
Raleigh or at the beach � a two-hour
drive in either case � if you have access
to a car. I'm sure this sounds familiar to
you.
Now is the time for all students to
organize. It is bad enough to be in sum-
mer school. It's worse to be in summer
school in a town where the biggest
entertainment on Friday afternoons is
driving by the dollar theater to see if the
movie has changed. Entertainment
choices are limited to movies or drink-
ing. Since Greenville does not exactly
have a plethora of movie theaters, and
bars in the summer have a lot in com-
mon with extremely noisy saunas,
something needs to be done.
The solution? Demand some enter-
tainment. If Greenville does not pro-
vide the amenities of life in an exciting
city, they should be imported � this is,
after all, the 20th century. No ocean?
Let's build one. Maybe someone could
get the surplus roadsalt from all the
snowstorms we've never had, dump it
in the Tar River and acquire one of
those wave-making machines they use
at Arizona's beaches.
Greenville also needs more people.
Maybe some sort of culture exchange
would be a good idea. Students who
wanted to spend a week in New York
City could change places with residents
�2ST�� Villagc for "� weeks.
It would add a whole new dimension to :
ate here (and in New York)
The heartache of summer in Green-1"
2l?l? dcfcatcd- important
Amg is that we all work together - be'
Sg, absUrd - but do
Sylve
A Re
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NEW YORK (I p
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m mom.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
7
kVSSk.
ooms
u and complaint by
s and put up for
e and local textbook
ees equipped with
� sts v: requirements.
e method of patching
ks he integrity of any
- not to mention
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rticularlj troublesome items
rtually abandoned �
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d the Merchant of Venice"
Publishers have gone to
to accomodate disparate
s and varying state
Walsh reported in the
at in a chapter from
i hich appears in Ginn
grade reader "Flights of
oquialisms have vanish-
has been cleaned up;
"honest Injun" has been
nd most references to boys
ten changed to children
Perfect Day for Ice
ncluded in Scott,
1985 eighth grade an-
il after the words "ice
n deleted from the title
about a trip to the ice-cream
been eliminated. The reason,
was California's "social
ndelines" for textbooks,
r against references to junk
Graw Hill's seventh-rade
ithology has expunged from
Winkle" not only difficuit
words here and there such
bered but the reference to
us and conciliatory" men
me to "shrews" and "ter-
wives.
k publishers and school
e become so accustomed to
wdlerization that they ap-
ime to forget it was even go-
fhe Virginia state board of
for one, had been happily
disputed Scott, Foresman
leries for years until a ninth
his mother objected to its
;atment of Shakespeare. As
s, the good ones have always
faith in their own judgment
is suitable for their students
e in the prepackaged selec-
mass-market textbook
Some have even taken ad-
their books' flaws.
aniel Blum's discovery, his
iplied the students with the
"Romeo and Juliet and
he anthology's cuts in class.
pen, censorship is a doomed
for it stimulates precisely
rous urge it set out to crush:
rs:
d
summer have a lot in com-
extremely noisy saunas,
needs to be done.
ution? Demand some enter-
If Greenville does not pro-
lenities of life in an exciting
should be imported � this is,
the 20th century. No ocean?
" one. Maybe someone could
irplus roadsalt from all the
is we've never had, dump it
r River and acquire one of
le-making machines they use
Ys beaches.
lie also needs more people,
me sort of culture exchange
a good idea. Students who
spend a week in New York
change places with residents
hch Village for several weeks. -
dd a whole new dimension to 5:
fmd in New York),
tache of summer in Green- l
e defeated. The important-
it we all work together � be �
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Lifestyles
JUNE 5, 1985 Page 5
Sylvester Stallone:
A Real-Life 'Rocky'
B JAY & ELLIOTT KRAVETZ
InlmatloBaJ Photo new,
In Rambo: First Blood Part
II, Sylvester Stallone
returns to the character of John
Rambo, the tough and determin-
ed etnam war hero which he so
excitingly portrayed in First
Blood. His next project will be
another return to an old
character, Rocky Balboa in
Rocky IV.
"Rocky IV will take on inter-
national overtones rather than
more or less the Philadelphia
area Stallone told us on the
Vancouver set of Rocky IV. "I'll
be fighting a Russian. In the
Rocky movies we tend to simplify
the complexities of getting two
men into the ring. In a movie I
just write it and he shows up into
the ring. It's wonderful
A week after this interview,
Stallone began a publicity tour
for Rambo, which ended with the
actor being hospitalized in St.
John's Hospital in Los Angeles
with a sever case of the flu. Pro-
duction will resume on Rocky IV
shortly after his release.
As Rambo, Stallone is again
reunited with his former com-
manding officer, Trautman,
played by Richard Crenna.
Released from prison, Rambo is
asked to embark on a dangerous
mission to locate American
P.O.Ws in a Vietnamese jungle
prison. In the aciton-packed
adventure, Stallone has ample
opportunity to demonstrate one
of his pricipal fortes-the ability
to get his audience rooting for the
success of the underdog.
"I've never been pushed to
such a physical limit before in a
movie said Stallone. "I insisted
on doing my own stunts in the
movie bacuse life without
challenges would certinly be bor-
ing
A consummate actor, writer
and director, Stallone, in less
than ten years, has amply
demonstrated his considerable
and varied talents to the delight
of the general public as well as his
motion picture peers.
"I think the day of the one-
dimensional performers is draw-
ing to an end he explained.
'Today, actors have to be involv-
ed in everything. The actor may
turn in a fine performance, but
six months later, when he sees it
on the screen, it isn't the way he
did it � a wretched misinter-
pretation of what he thought at
the time. An important actor has
to have the power to impose his
ideas about the film to anyone
connected with the filmmaking
process
Rocky, his first major role, not
only set box office records, but
won an Academy Award as "Best
Picture of the Year also bring-
ing Stallone Oscar nominations
for "Best Actor" and "Best
Screenplay Only Charles
Chaplin and Orson Wells had
ever been so honored.
"I have a certain philosophy
about movies he said. "I think
we'll have even more of a revival
of good, old-fashioned movies.
There's a definite formula in
reaching audiences: provide them
with heros and heroines who pull
themselves up by the bootstraps
and out of the depths of
despair
Since that blockbuster,
Stallone has continued to show
his versatility in such films as
Rocky II, F.I.S.T Paradise
Alley, Victory, Mghthawks,
Rocky III, First Blood and
Rhinestone. He also directed
John Travolta in Staying Alive,
and co-wrote the screenplay for
Rambo: First Blood Part II.
'The use of the word superstar
is the industry's, not mine he
said. " I don't walk around
thinking I'm a star. Webster's
Dictionary describes a star as a
ball of gas, and I think the word
is inappropriate to describe ac-
tors. Anyway, it's not me
Born in New York City,
Stallone grew up in the tough
Hell's Kitchen area where self-
reliance was the mark of survival.
When he was only 11, his parents
were divorced. As a youth, he
was expelled from three schools
as a troublemaker. At 16, he went
to a special school for boys in
suburban Philadelphia. Here, he
began acting and became a star
football player-thus embracing
two of the things which have sus-
tained him: sports and drama.
"I was not an attractive
child Stallone recalled. "I was
sickly and even had rickets. My
personality was abhorrent to
other children, so I enjoyed my
own company and did a lot of
fantasizing. I didn't have a
suitable artistic outlet.
Everything came out in physical
challenges, like leaping from roof
to roof. I had all the sensibilities
of a Quasimodo in those days
After high school, Stallone
spent the next two years instruc-
ting at the American College of
Switzerland. It was here that he
became serious about his ambi-
tion to become an actor.
'T was told by my teachers that
my brain was dormant, and I
took it to heart and channeled a
tremendous amount of energy in-
to my physical development he
recalled. "My father once told
me, 'You weren't born with
much of a brain, so you'd better
develop you body "
On his return to the U.S he
enrolled as a drama major at the
University of Miami, gaining ex-
perience as an actor and ten-
tatively taking his First steps as a
writer. Only three credits short of
graduation, Stallone left school,
determined to seek an acting
career in New York.
"I knew 1 was a natural actor
when I came on stage and truned
a tragedy (Arthur Miller's
"Death of a Salesman") into a
comedy sensation he recalled.
"I was very comfortable and for
the first time I was doing
something not illegal and soul-
satisfying
But, it was not as easy as he
hoped. Although he landed a few
stage parts, Stallone found he
had to support himself with such
odd jobs as cleaning the lion
cages at the Central Park Zoo
and theatre usher.
"I had been flatly rejected by
every agent in New York City and
lost out on what seemed like
5,000 auditions Stallone recall-
ed. "I still can't laugh about it; it
was a cruel experience.
"When I didn't think I was go-
ing to make it as an actor, I
though I'd better start learning
about writing he continued. 1
kind of educated myself. Part of
it was just to kill time, but I was
broke then, living in New York,
and the library was warm and
there were plenty of books to
read
Increasingly he turned to
writing, churning out screenplays
at a phenomenal rate and waiting
for his big chance. That oppor-
tunity Finally came in 1974, when
he was cast in The Lords of Flat-
bush, along with other unknowns
such as Henry Winkler, Susan
Blakely and Perry King.
"Before Rocky, I cleaned out
lion's cages he explained. "I
wanted to be shepherd, and if I
found an opening for Viking, I
would have loved to do that. So
you can see, fantasy is very im-
portant to me, but reality has a
way of intruding in my life
With the money earned from
that film, he left New York for
Hollywood, where he began once
again the incessant rounds of
casting offices, managing to get a
few small parts in films and on
television. During that period,
every spare moment was spent
writing.
"Writers are the ones that have
more insight than anyone else
about their scripts he said.
"Unfortunately, writers tend to
Sylvester Stallone
be more introverted than anyone
else, and it is their point of view
that tends to get lost. You
couldn't call me an introverted
writer. I try to write things that
are colorful
On his 29th birthday, in 1975,
Stallone's wife presented him
with a small birthday cake and
told him to make a wish on it.
"My wish was to get us out
he recalled. "I suddenly realized
that the only way I was ever going
to accomplish that was through
creative discipline
To that end, he turned once
more to writing. He had recently
seen the Muhammad Ali-Chuck
Wepner Fight in which Wepner,
widely regarded as a second-rate
contender, held on for 15 rounds,
becoming one of the few to go the
JAY KRAVETZ
Intertat'onai :3no,o Nen-
distance with Ali. Stallone took
the fight and created a stor
around it, complete with a
character for whom "going the
distance" meant more than
winning a fight.
"Because I'm an extrovert. 1
don't have to run around in
circles, torturing myself wonder-
ing if I have a good idea he
said. "I just throw it out there
and see if it works
Several producer- offered to
buy his screenplay but wanted a
big name for the title role.
Stallone refused.
In spite of a bank : . . . e of
barely SI00.00, Stallone held out
for himself and won.
"I make my living with mv
mind he said "My muscles "i
consider merely machinery to
carry mv mind
Networks Prepare Fall '85 Line Up
NEW YORK (UPI) � The
three networks have announced
the new lineups for the 1985-86
season, which gives them all sum-
mer to make changes in the bat-
ting order.
Before the networks indulge in
what the industry calls fine tun-
ing the schedule, here is the basic
outline.
Monday: The entire schedule
remains the same as last year - the
only unchanged night of the
week. CBS has a strong lineup
with "Scarecrow and Mrs
King "Kate & Allie
"Newhart" and "Cagney and
Lacey but these shows can be
beaten by a stronger movie on
NBC, which is preceded by
"TV's Bloopers and Practical
Jokes ABC has "Hardcastles
and McCormick" and football.
Tuesday: This is one of NBC's
strongest nights - "The
A-Team "Riptide" and "Rem-
ington Steele" - so the lineup
stands pat.
FUm producerdirector Stephen Spielberg, is set to produce �
weeUy half-hoar anthology for NBC called "Amazing Storks
CBS has scheduled
"Hometown" from 8-9 p.m. - a
1980's comedy series, inspired by
the movie The Big Chill, about
what has become of some people
who went to college in the Ws.
It may be too sophisticated for
the 8 p.m. time slot. CBS follows
with a Tuesday movie, which will
be pitched to appeal to women.
ABC has imported "Diff'rent
Stokes" from NBC at 8 p.m a
move that drew a cool reception
when announced at the ABC af-
filiates meeting in New York. It is
followed by "He's the Mayor a
new sitcom about a black mayor,
"Who's the Boss? "Growing
Pains another new sitcom, with
Alan Thicke as a psychologist
practicing at home so he can care
for the kids while his wife works,
and "Moonlighting
Tuesday night looks safe for
NBC unless CBS mounts a really
good movie.
Wednesday: This is ABC's
night, thanks to "Dynasty" and
"Hotel which get a new 8 p.m.
lead in next fall with "The In-
siders an action-adventure
series about two maverick under-
cover reporters.
NBC presents its 'two-hour
sermon" - "Highway to
Heaven" ana Robert Blake's new
"Hell Town followed by "St.
Elsewhere The sermon shows
have appeal, but aren't in a class
with "Dynasty
CBS has an all new Wednesday
lineup: "Stir Crazy loosely
based on the film of the same
name; "Charlie and Company
starring Flip Wilson and Gladys
Knight in a middle class black sit-
com ripped off from "The Cosby
Show "George Burns' Comedy
Week an anthology spiced
by Burns' monologues, and "The
Equalizer a stylish adventure
starring Edward Woodward. The
network can't do worse than last
year's weekly Wednesday
disaster.
Thursday: NBC sticks with
"The Cosby Show "Families
Ties "Cheers "Night Court"
Mr. T
and "Hill Street Blues CBS
sticks with "Magnum "Simon
& Simon" and "Knots
Landing ABC goes with "The
Fall Guy "Dynasty II: The
Colbys" and "20-20 The
"Dynasty" spinoff will be an ex-
pensive gamble.
Friday: CBS owns Friday,
thanks to "Dallas" and a
weakening "Falcon Crest The
night has a new 8 p.m. opener
with great possibilities � "The
Twilight Zone NBC opens with
Knight Rider followed by
"Misfits of Science about some
bizarre superheroes, including a
rock star who can shoot lightning
out of his fingertips. NBC's Fri-
day winds up with "Miami
Vice
ABC offers a comedy lineup �
"Webster "Mr. Belvedere
"Benson "Mr. Sunshine" �
followed by a new cops and
gangster series, "Familv
Honor "Mr. Sunshine" is
about an irascible blind professor
� a funny show but a hard com-
edy premise to sell.
Saturday: CBS caters to the
Saturday night movie habit,
following "Airwolf' with movies
geared toward a male audience.
ABC has moved "Love Boat" to
10 p.m reserving the 9 p.m. slot
for Robert Wagner as a jet-
setting insurance investigator,
"J.G. Culver At 8 p.m
there's "Hollywood Beat a
"Miami Vice" ripoff gone west.
NBC opens with "Gimmie a
Break "The Facts of Life
then a really funny new sitcom
called "The Golden Girls starr-
ing Bea Arthur, Betty White and
Rue McClanahan, and "227
another black middle class com-
edy, starring Maria Gibbs.
"Hunter" ends the evening.
Sunday: CBS sticks with its
high-rated "60 Minutes
"Murder, She Wrote "Crazy
Like a Fox" and "Trapper John,
M.D ABC has "Ripley's
Believe It Or Not a new
action-adventure show called
"MacGyver and its Sunday
movie.
NBC also has a Sunday movie.
It starts the evening with "Punky
Brewster" and "Silver Spoons
Next come two new and intrigu-
ing half-hour anthology shows �
"Amzazing Stories produced
by Steven Spielberg, and an up-
dated version of the original
stories from "Alfred
Hitchcock
That's the new season as an-
nounced in May, but as surely as
April showers bring May flowers,
May schedules give nay to revised
editions.
For entertainment this week.
Hendrix Theatre is once
again the place to be. Wednesday
night the movie Shampoo will be
playing, and the following Mon-
day night, The Jerk is the
featured film.
The movie Shampoo is a com-
edy based on the world of an ac-
complished high style hairdresser
in Hollywood who is just as ac-
complished in seducing women
and romantically juggling his
clients. Warren Beatty stars as
the seductive hairdresser named
George.
The climax of the story occurs
when Beatty's clients (Julie
Christie, Goldie Hawn, and Lee
Grant) converge at a party he
happens to attend. At that point.
he learns of the true perils of Don
Juan-ing and his fashionable
world begins to crumble.
On Monday night, the cool,
sophisticated comedy of Sham-
poo gives way to the outrageous,
off-the-wall antics of The Jerk.
Steve Martin is hilarious in this
rags to riches to rags to you
guessed it riches again story.
He plays the simple minded
Navin Johnson who is the white,
adopted son of a black
sharecropper.
The fun begins when he recon-
ciles himself to the fact that he
must stay this color forever and
sets out to find his identity.
Along the way he bumbles
himself into creating a fortune
for he and his girlfriend (Ber-
nadette Peters).
Both films are at 7 p.m. and
are free to ECU students �d
guest with a valid ECU ID and
ECU faculty, staff and
dependents with their ECU ID's
ytm �n �ct� iu nim
M I

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 5, 1985
HOWS YOUR VV'
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INS UN' THERE COMRAPE
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ANATOMY 15 FLAWLESS
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IN FACT I THINh
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START PRAlAllNb COMRAPt
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YOU HOW NATURAL
W6MC&Vll
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THANK YOU.
COMRAPt
I'VE SEEN A LOT OF WESTERN
MOVIES LIKE LASHPANCS"
ANP"SPRIN6BREAK" SO THAT'S
HOW I KNOW HOW TO PUT MY
30PYINTO POSITIONS OF TOTAL
HARMONY '
7
YOURL SORT OF
A LOVE 60PPESS PONT
AREN'r YOU. 1ELL lHE
COMRAPt'? OTHERS
C5&'ri&a-
Man-O-Stick
BY JARRELL & JOHNSON
Walkin' The Plank
BY A GUY
VtCY.SAHDY.CooL,
PAtNflNfr
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T2? PAuOT KDCV.
Classifieds
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Room
mate wanted as soon as possible to
share a two bedroom apartment at
Oakmont Square. Private Room,
pool, tennis courts, laundry
facilities. Call 756-8503 after 6:30.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
2 tedroom townhouse with 1 other
person. mile from ECU on 5th St.
$145 per month plus utilities. Heat in-
cluded in rent. 830-1306.
NEEDED: Art student with silk
screen-print background. Call
756 8801.
ROOMMATED WANTED: Need
female roommate. Private room,
AC, near campus, $107, one third
phone, utilities, cable. Must be neat.
Nonsmoker. No pets. Call Lori or
Diana: 752-1001.
NEEDED: Seeking responsible
roommate to share B unit at Ring-
gold Towers for the summer. Com-
pletely furnished, AC, accessories
included. Call weekdays before 3 PM
757-6366. Ask for Dan.
NEEDED: Part-time instrument
man-party chief and draftsperson
for local surveying company. Ex-
perience required. Call 752-5998 for
appointement.
NEEDED: America's largest inven-
tory co. needs H.S. graduates to take
inventory in the Greenville area.
Work 10-20 hours per week.
Weeknights and weekends. Start at
$4.50 and hour. We will train. Call
collect on May 30th between 10 AM
and 3 PM, 787-0591.
HOUSE FOR RENT: House for
rent: 6 bedroom house near univer-
sity, 305 E. 14th St. Summer or long
term rental. To be renovated. $350.
758-5299.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Needed for 2 bedroom Apt. Call
after 3 PM, 757-3131.
VIDEOS, VIDEOS, VIDEOS: Want
to videotape a party, wedding, or
other memorable occation& Call
Tamara after 3 PM at 758-9016 for
more information.
SALE
MISC
BICYCLES PAINTED: CALL JIM
FOR MORE INFORMATION.
758-3861.
FOR SALE: Men's 23 " Univega
10-Speed. 9 Months old excellent con
dition, $120. Call 757 3517 after 3.
FOR SALE: RCA VHS VCR for $200.
Pioneer sx-780 receiver-55 wch
$125. Hitachi HT-405 turntable, DD
with new ADC cartridge- $110. I
negotiate. 752 8483.
FOR SALE: Commodore VIC20
computer with all hookups and some
extras including: 6 game tapes,
cassette storage recorderplayer,
joystick, modem with terminal pro-
gram cassette, Programer's Aid,
memory expansion cartridge and
reference manuals. $200. Call An-
thony at 757 6366 or 752-0291.
Tooth
i4cnmv a iT�s.
wai, iic mh fmmartMnmiSt
RiAMG W? COMIC1 $HlF$, ST0UN AM G0LP,
SOT f(X 15 UWS OR FOUGHT MN0Nf CT
a6V w V6W smr, mm, m m? isrr
mi nm arm
ov RPOOKS
Summer Student Specials
MonToeWed.Thur.Fri.&Sat
SpaghettiCountry Cookin'LazagnaSeafoodRib
$3.95$3.95$3.95$3.95$595
All specials include 2 vegetables and fresh baked rolls.
Other daily specials available.
Show student I.D. and recieve 50C off.
The Plaza
Deli
w
The Plaza Mai!
Greenville, N.C.
756-4024
The Plaza Deli located at
THE PLAZA
Offers a New Concept In Deli Foods
We Offer
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade and Orangade
Daily Specials Orders to Go
Happy Hour 5 til Closing
Good Music Good Times
10 AM-9 PM Mon. thru Sat. 756-4024
Are We Having Fun Yet?
������ - � � � �)� � ��
B3S3S3SSS3S3S3S38S3S3S:
ww
HOME COOKED FOOD
3
Student Special
Free desert
with purchase of any regular size plate
LARGE PLATE with all you can eat vegetables and
a big serving of meat for $4.07 plus tax.
DAILY SPECIALS $2.25plus tax & beverage.
512 E. 14th St. Near Dorms
Call for Take Outs � 752-0476
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM - 8 PM
'yvsy'yyxyyj
SSSsSsSSSS
�'��"���� n



Movie: Shampoo
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Movie: The Jerk
7:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
I.Ds Made
11:00 a.m. - 12 noon Multi Purpose Rm
Wed. June 5
Mon. June 10
Tues. June 11
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU



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' McNeil finish
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10.2"
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Scott of the Ui
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Thoma- Jefferson
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ECU finish d
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Finishing
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Local
B DAVID McGIM
Mmf� Unlr
Thi
difficult. gru
ing sports in existence
bine- swimming,
running in an al
race to the finish.
It take- a sp.
cept the demand-
make- upon the human
and p-che. The ersi
quired for the -port d
tremendous amount
willpower and stamina.
One of the unique thij
ding the -port is that j 04
compete against the
ticipant ou competj
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much pain and suffer
bod can take.
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swim one mile. A- soa
exit the water, thev hoi
and ride 20 miles. If th;
kill them, they finish
kilometer (6.2 miles) ru
People compete in
on different lex els. For
goal is merely to finis
strive to cut their times
possible and hopefully
rank among the world'
Barry Scott and NolaJ
are two Greenville
from the latter categol
who is a junior at Q
Gaubert recently comp?
Youth Unlimited Trial
High Point, NC, wl
finished second an;
respectively in their agt
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June 5
June 10
June 11





THE EASTCAROI IN1AN
Sports
JUNE 5, 1985
Page 7
ECU Paces All-EC AC Team
With Four Players Selected
Kl's Mike
I eague learn
Christopher, who went 10-3 this season, was one of four Pirates to make the ECAC-South All
The other Pirates honored were Chris Bradberry, Greg Hardison and Winfred Johnson.
ECU placed four players on
the 1985 all ECAC-South
baseball team announced yester-
day, the most of any school in the
league.
The Pirates earning all ECAC-
South honors were junior out-
fielder Chris Bradberry, junior
infielder Greg Hardison,
sophomore pitcher Mike
Christopher and junior first-
baseman-designated hitter Win-
fred Johnson.
Johnson, who earned a spot on
the all-league team as a
designated hitter, finished the
season hitting a school record
.432 while also setting season
school records for hits (73),
RBI's (75), home runs (22) and
total bases (150).
Bradberry, from Wilson, NC,
also ended the season batting
over .400 (.405) as he and
Johnson became the first two
players in ECU history to hit over
.400 with 97 or more at bats.
Hardison, from Farmville,
finished the season hitting .316,
as the Pirates' shortstop set a
season standard for doubles with
18.
Christopher, from Dinwiddie,
VA, paced the Pirate pitching
staff with a 10-3 record. His 10
wins equalled the school mark for
wins in a season. Christopher
also set a school record for most
consecutive wins as he won his
first 10 starts of the season.
This was the second con-
secutive vear Johson and Har-
dison have earned all ECAC-
South honors. The selection of
Christopher and Bradberry to the
all-league team was the first time
for both players.
All four players were in-
strumental in leading the Pirates
to a 32-14 record, and their se-
cond consecutive ECAC-South
regular-season championship.
The Pirates' 32 victories was the
second highest total in the
school's history, and could be im-
proved upon next season as all
four should return.
Bradberry, Hardison and
Johnson all will return for their
senior seasons, while Christopher
will be back for his junior cam-
paign.
McNeil Runs to Fourth In
NCAAs; Named All-America
B RICK McC ORMAC
sports r ditor
ECU trackster Lee McNeil, a
freshman from St. Pauls, NC,
look fourth place in the
100-meter dash in the NCAA
Division 1 track meet held last
weekend in Austin, Texas.
His fourth place finish ovei-J
earned him All-America honors
as the top six finishers in each
event are named to the All-
America squad.
McNeil finished second in his
qualifying heat with a time of
10.2" seconds.
In the finals McNeil improved
to a 10.11 finish, which was good
for his fourth place finish. Terry
Scott o the University of Ten-
nessee finished first in the
JOO-meters with a winning time
o 10.02 seconds. Chidi Imoh of
Missouri captured second place
with a time of 10.04 seconds.
Thomas Jefferson of Kent State
edged Mcneil by three tenths ot a
second, capturing third place
with a time of 10.08.
In the overall team competi-
tion. Arkansas ran away with the
title with 61 points. Washington
State was second with 46 points,
followed by Baylor with 37
points.
ECU finished in a tie for 43rd,
with a total of five points.
McNeil was the only ECU
trackster competing in the event.
1 inishing in fourth place in the
NCAAs, as well as being named
America is something that
doesn'l happen to very many col-
late tracksters, and even fewer
in their first year of competition.
McNeil said he didn't expect to
do so well, especially in his first
year at the college level.
"It has really suprised me
McNeil said. "The older guys on
lee McNeil
the team have helped me out all
year, to keep me running right
Going into the finals, McNeil
and Pirate coach Bill Carson felt
the key to his (McNeil's) perfor-
mance would depend on how well
he got out of the blocks.
"Coach Carson told me that if
I got out of the blocks pretty-
good, I would place high
McNeil said. "1 was a little ner-
vous in both races, but 1 got a
good jump out of the blocks, and
just ran pretty good
Saying he ran "pretty good"
has to be one of the
understatements of the year.
McNeil's 10.17 finish in his quali-
fying heat was not only a school
record, but was the fastest time
ever turned in by a collegiate run-
ner in the state.
McNeil then lowered his new
record by six more seconds in the
finals. The previous best was
10.18 run by N. C. State's
Harvey McSwain.
"It was an outstanding effort
on the young man's part ECU
coach Bill Carson said. "I really
felt, given the right cir-
cumstances, Lee could have even
done better. The runner in lane
seven next to him in lane eight
false started, so he (McNeil) real-
ly didn't have anyone to run
against. His first 40 (meters)
might not have been as good as
they could have been � but he
reallv turned it on the rest of the
way
Carson was extremely pleased
by McNeil's record setting per-
formance, especially after the
team's tragic auto accident early
in the season.
"There were 41 sprinters there
and Lee finished fourth. It was a
great performance Carson
said. "He was the only who kept
running after the accident and
was forced to practice by himself
� he deserves all the credit
Next on the agenda for McNeil
is a chance to compete in the
Track Athletic Conference meet.
A good performance there would
land him a slot on the South team
in the National Sports Festival
later this summer.
Boyette, Young And Graves
Make Academic All-America
Three members of the 1985
ECU softball team have been
selected as Academic Ail-
Americans by a vote of the Col-
lege Sports Information Direc-
tors of America. The ballot was
an at-large selection including
several spring sports.
Junior Stacy Boyette was the
only repeat performer among the
trio. The native of Hopewell, Va,
copped first team honors for the
second consecutive year. Boyette
had a record of 6-7 during the
year and was also the third
leading hitter for the Lady
Pirates. Boyette has maintained a
3.98 grade point average while
majoring in chemistry at ECU.
Pam Young, a Senior from
Ferndale, Md, was named to the
honorable mention category.
Young led the Lady Pirate pit-
ching staff with a 16-5 record
while finishing fifth on the squad
with a .210 batting average.
Young is a physical education
major with a 3.78 grade point
average.
Robin Graves, of Chesterfield,
Va, was also named honorable
mention. Graves is a pitcher and
first baseman for the Lady
Pirates and compiled an even
.200 batting average. She drove
in 16 runs during the season, the
second highest total on the team.
Also a physical education major,
Graves has a 3.97 grade point
average.
The Lady Pirates are coached
by Sue Manahan and finished the
vear with a 24-17-1 record.

v
f
4
4
c
J
Lady Pirate pitcher Pam Young was selected honorable mention
Academic All-America for her performance this past season.
Local Triathietes Training Hard For USTS
B DAVID McGINNESS
stiff Writer
The triathlon is one of the most
difficult, grueling and challeng-
ing sports in existence. It com-
bines swimming, bicycling and
running in an all out continuous
race to the finish.
It takes a special breed to ac-
cept the demands this sport
makes upon the human anatomy
and psyche. The versatility re-
quired for the sport calls for a
tremendous amount of individual
willpower and stamina.
One of the unique things regar-
ding the sport is that you not only
compete against the other par-
ticipants, you compete against
yourself as well to see just how
much pain and suffering your
body can take.
In the first leg, competitors
swim one mile. As soon as they
exit the water, they hop on bikes
and ride 20 miles. If that doesn't
kill them, they finish with a 10
kilometer (6.2 miles) run.
People compete in triathlons
on different levels. For some, the
goal is merely to finish. Others
strive to cut their times as low as
possible and hopefully, one day
rank among the world's best.
Barry Scott and Nolan Gaubcrt
are two Greenville w.a. �
from the latter category. Scott,
who is a junior at ECU, and
Gaubert recently competed in the
Youth Unlimited Triathalon in
High Point, NC, where they
finished second and fourth
respectively in their age groups.
The event is one of the largest
and most competitive in the state.
Triathietes came from all over the
United States to compete.
Scott Molina, of San Diego,
ranked tnathlete in the world.
Scott and Gaubert finished
with times of 1:50 and 1:54
Nolan Gaubert (left) and Barry Scott, are two local triathietes trying
to make it to the United States Triathlon Championships.
California won the race in a time
of 1:36.55. Molina is the No. 1
respectively. In a field of 670 par-
ticipants, Scott placed 24th and
Gaubert 48th.
They averaged about 10 miles
per hour in the run, 22.5 mph in
the bike race, and completed the
one half mile swim in 14 minutes.
Both Scott and Gaubert come
from athletic backgrounds. Scott
began running while in the
Marine corps, while Gaubert was
a swimmer and ran track during
high school.
Thanks to their different
backgrounds, each man has a dif-
ferent "best event Scott is
strongest in the running event
while Gaubert is prefers the
swimming.
The two train together every-
day. They swim about four miles,
bike 100-125 miles and run
another 25-30 miles per week.
"Training together helps us to
improve our weak areas
Gaubert said, "Since we each
have different strengths
However, while they work
together in training, in competi-
tion � it's every man for himself.
"In the race we treat each
other just like any other com-
petitor said Scott. "One of the
things 1 like most about the sport
is there is less luck involved.
"Not only do you compete
against yourself, you compete
against others
In addition to requiring a great
deal of training, the monetary
costs of being a triathlete is also
high. Some of the major expenses
which must be met are the cost
and maintenance of very expen-
sive racing bicycles and the equal-
ly exhorbitant cost travel.
To help with the expenses,
both men are sponsored by area
businesses. Scott is sponsored by
Pantana Bob's and Gaubert is
sponsored by the King and
Queen.
In addition, both are now
sponsored by Peeler's Sports and
Trophies. Both Scott and
Gaubert wish to express their
thanks to their sponsors, whose
support make their training and
competing possible.
Diet is another important fac-
tor in triathlon performance.
Both men eat a well balanced diet
of highly nutritional foods, and
apparently it is working. Both
haiP rating heart rates of under
eludes a one-mile swim in the
Neuse River, a 20-mile bike race
and a six-mile run.
Soon after, they will race in
one of the more prestigious
events in the country, The Dan-
ville, Virginia Triathalon. This is
a qualifying event for the United
States Triathalon Series (USTS)
championships held in Hilton
Head, SC, as well as the Iron
Man Triathalon in Hawaii.
"Our next big goal is to do well
enough in Danville to qualify for
the USTS championships in
Hilton Head said Scott.
This is a lofty goal indeed.
So� afthp Bmj hMcjp in th
' 7n the race we treat each other just
like any other competitor. '
� Barry Scott
50 and are about five percent
body fat.
Prior to a race they load up on
carbohydrates and fluids. The
carbohydrates help give them the
long term energy they need for
the exhausting race. The fluids
help prevent dehydration.
While some athletes rely on
special nutrient fluids during the
race, Scott and Gaubcrt drink
water.
"The electrolytes in those
other drinks are not absorbed
quickly enough to be used in the
race Gaubcrt said, "and water
quinches thirst better anyway
Scott and Gaubcrt will both
compete in the upcoming New
Bern Triathalon. The event in-
world will be competing against
them.
With over 500,000 triathietes in
the U.S and paychecks of one
million dollars plus, competition
will be incredible.
In addition not all triathlons
are created equal. The Iron man
in Hawaii consists of a 2.2-mile
swim, a 112-mile bike race and a
full 26-mile marathon.
It takes even the best triathietes
well over eight hours to complete
this race and many do not finish
at all.
If training and dedication are
good indications of success, Scott
and Grubart should not only
finish, but finish among the top
athletes in the race.
-





jTHE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 5. 1985
SEE DETAILS
AT GREEHV1LL
E a&P STORE
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WANTMOST
WALI � WALL PRICE
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P&Q BRAND
KELLOGG S
Sandwich Bread Com Flakes
3100
SAVE -
31� 3 i
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� loaves
LIMIT THREE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORc PURCHASE
REGULAR-UNSCENTED
25c OFF LABEL
Tide Detergent
swt
Tt : . t
VW 9,ant
N size
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
DIET COKE-TAB
Coca Cola
?-
2ltr.
btl.
plus
deposit
Vienna Sausage
BEEF -CHICKEN � SPANISH
Rice-A-Roni
Coffee Creamer
A-1
Steak Sauce
SAVE
89-io
69cio
SAVE
7920
SAVE
WELCH PURPLE
179
42c
10c i
SQUEEZE
French's Mustard
DECORATED-ARTS N FLOWERS
Scottowels
HEAVY DUTY
Trend Detergent
16 oz
btl
big
roll
42 oz
pkg
834?
SAVE
20c
SOS
Soap Pads
99c3Ao
1�S
REGULAR
Busch
Beer
SAVE
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4 pkg.
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
MARKET STYLE
MORE THAN 73�o LEAN
Ground Beef
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71c
4 lbs. or
more
lb
REGULAR BEAN
Eight
0'Clock
Coffee
, 1 lb.
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LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL 10 00OR MORE PURCHASE
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FROZEN
Fox Pizza
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
B0H�ra Round
IB
V wyx
Boneless
Whole
20-26 lb. avg.
lb.
save V
WAREHOUSE PRICES
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
Cubed Beef Steak
Family Pack 400
in
PACKER S LABEL
10 oz.
Pkg.
Frozen Potatoes
ALL VARIETIES
Lenders Bagels
APPLE � BLACKBERRY � STRAWBERRY
Pet Cobbler
GREEN GIANT NIBBLERS
Corn on the Cob
PET REGULAR
10 oz
pkg
26 oz
pkg
1aS
69C20
17920
99C20
PRODUCE SPECIALS
LARGE TEXAS
Cantaloupes
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SAVE
20c
Pie '
Shells
SHARP-EX SHARP
A&P Cheddar Bar
IN QUARTERS
Shedd Spread
SEALTEST
Sour Cream
SEALTEST
Cottage Cheese
i SAVE
X 100 EA
12 oz
pkg
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each
only
SAVE
10c
12 oz
ctn
11Q SAVE
15c
39
SAVE
20
GENERAL MERCHANDISE SPECIALS
MR COFFEE
Coffee Filters
JOHNSONS
Baby Powder
DELI SPECIALS
TAYLOR
California
Cellars
SAVE
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1 5oz
btl
BUY ONE POUND OF BAKED
Virginia Ham
GET ONE LOAF OF
French Bread FREE!
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 5, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 05, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.410
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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