The East Carolinian, January 29, 1985






SHre lEaat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.35
Tuesday January 29, 1985
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Reagan Proposes
Tighter Aid Rules
A Study In Bicycles: Aerial Perspective
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo Lb
For those of you who have always wondered what a bkyck rack looks and snow have limited their appearance on campus. However. the,
like from above, here you are. Although biocles are usuallv a popular along with flowers and summer clothing, will soon reappear,
mode of transportation year-round at ECU, the recent cold weather
SGA Allocates Funds To Arts Forum
By HAROLDJOYNER
aalsUat New, tdiinr
The SGA passed a bill Monday
night allocating $4,100 to the
Visual Arts Forunxi annual
budget while the Student
Residence Association's attempt
to get SGA funding was cut short
when quorum was called and not
enough legislators were present.
The Visual Arts Forum re-
quested $12,900.50, but that
amount was cut by the Ap-
propriations Committee, which
decided the approved figure was
"an adequate amount and was
not out of proportion to the other
arts" such as the ECU Playhouse
and ECU School of Music, accor-
ding to Teresa Briley. spokesman
for the committee.
Three hundred dollars will go
to increase the School of Art
library holdings. That library is
independent of Joyner Library,
and Briley said the committee felt
this money would be in the best
interests of art students. Re-
quested money was cut from sec-
tions involving extensive travel by
the Forum and fees for proposed
invited guests.
SRA Vice President Juan
ie
-
' HiinAi .
NEIL JOHNSON
ECU Photo Lab
When 9-year-old Junior Walston presented his Michael Jackson
imitation Saturday and Monday nights at the Pirate basketball
games, he brought the crowds to their feet. Kids do the darndest
things.
On The Inside
Announcements2 For those crossword puzzle
Editorials4 afficianados in our audience,
Style7 we've got another one for you.
Classifieds9 See page 3.
Sports1U
�The Pirates lost another one �Sean Penn's latest movie,
Monday, losing to James The Falcon and The Snowman
Madison in Minges Coliseum, is reviewed today. See Style,
See Sports, page 10. P�8� ?�
Velasquez appealed to the
Legislature for $430 to help
defray the cost of sending 50
delegates to a Leadership Con-
ference in Hickory, N.C. He said
the SRA opted for chartering a
bus because it would keep all
delegates together and also
reduce the risk of having several
members in different
automobiles. SGA Transit buses
were not available, he said,
because of the distance involved.
SGA Legislators, following a
lengthy debate, offered to draw
up a bill paying $215, half of the
requested amount. However, the
number of SGA members left at
the meeting was challenged and
the body did not have quorum.
The meeting was immediately ad-
journed. The SRA ha.s the option
of coming before the SGA next
week and proposing a bill asking
the SGA to reimburse them for
the $430.
The 50 delegates attending the
conference are being funded
through SRA or being sponsored
by their residence halls, Velas-
quez said.
r-rom Staff and
Wire Report
President Reagan will ask Con-
gress to deny federally-
guaranteed loans to all college
students with family incomes
above $32,500, a move which
would lock out hundreds of
thousands of students from the
loan program, an administration
source said Saturday.
Reagan's fiscal 1986 budget
will also seek to clamp an overall
$4,000 ceiling on the total federal
aid � including loans and grants
� for any student per year,
regardless of how poor his or her
family is. The ceiling would also
hit graduate students, who now
can borrow up to $5,000 a year,
twice as much as undergraduates,
in guaranteed loans.
And it would restrict eligibility
for Pell Grants � outright
federal stipends of up to1,900 a
year � to students from families
with incomes of $25,000 or less,
according to the source, who
spoke only on condition of
anonymity.
According to Karen Barbee,
acting director of the ECU Office
of Financial Aid, the ceiling on
aid will affect out-of-state
students at ECU more than
anyone else. Although this is
"not a significant number of
students" she said, those who are
not from North Carolina have ex-
penses of approximately $6,000.
Students barred from the
Guaranteed Student Loan pro-
gram � under which loans are
free while the borrower remains a
student and the interest is only 9
percent afterwards � could turn
to an auxiliary loan program for
parents that extends loans under
much less favorable terms.
Under that program, bor-
rowers are charged interest while
they are still in school at rates 3.5
points above the interest rate on
Treasury bills � a total of about
12 percent currently � and
repayments must start im-
mediately.
Reagan will include the student
aid cutbacks in the budget he is
scheduled to send to Congress on
Feb 4. Most of the cuts would
affect loans and grants for the
academic year starting in
September 1986, although
Reagan, in his attempts to cut
domestic spending may also seek
rescissions that could affect the
aid budget for this fall.
Higher education lobbyists
have been girding for an attack
on student aid, the largest c! unk
of the Education Departn mt's
$17.9 billion fiscal 19�5 budget.
More than 5 million ollege
students get some ical help
each year, including 3.3 million
who borrower more tnan S
billion in guaranteed loans last
year. Banks and other private
lending agencies make the loans,
but the government insures their
repayment and pays all the in-
terest while the borrower pursue
their education.
Congress has resisted past
Reagan administration efforts to
scale back the loan subsidies,
although in 1981 it did require
students from families with in-
comes above $30,000 to
demonstrate thay they needed the
loans.
With average college costs ap-
proaching $10,000 at many
private institutions and $5,000 at
public universities, that has not
been difficult for many students
from middle- and upper-class
families to prove. It is not un-
common for families with in-
comes of $50,000 or more to
qualify, particularly if they have
two children in college, experts
say.
The Office of Management
and Budget originally sought to
draw the eligibility line at
$30,000. Patricia A. Smith, direc-
See STUDENTS, Page 6
Student Union Elects President
By ELAINE PERRY
Suff Writer
"Increasing student awareness
of the Student Union" is the
main goal of Student Union
President-elect Michael Smith,
who was elected Jan. 24.
"We had set some goals: more
awareness of the Student Union
and leadership development
said Regina Hardee, the current
Student Union president.
"Michael is an excellent person
for the job. He wants to continue
the goals we've already establish-
ed Hardee said.
Smith said he feels students
need to be more aware of what
the Student Union has to offer.
"Hopefully, the unity of this
organization can be improved
through group interaction he
said.
The purpose of the Student
Union, Hardee said, "is to be
responsible for providing a
balanced program of social,
recreational and cultural pro-
grams for the entire university.
This organization gives students a
chance to work with other
students on issues involving
things they want Hardee said.
"A lot of students don't take ad-
vantage of the opportunities of-
fered. I wouldn't take anything
for the experiences I've had, the
people I've met and the oppor-
tunities gained by being involved
in the Student Union
The Public Relations and
Publicity Committee was recently
allocated money from the Stu-
dent Union budget and "the
committee will be a major force
in increasing student awareness
of this organization said John
Greer, chairman.
A logo contest is being planned
by the Public Relations and
Publicity Committee, Greer said.
The contest will be open to all
ECU students and $200 will be
awarded to the person who
designs a winning logo.
Current information about the
Student Union and its various
programs and committees will be
available to students Feb. 5
Smith
through Feb. 7 in front of the
Student Supply Store. A
Committees offered by the Stu-
dent Union are: Art Exhibition,
Films, Coffeehouse, Minority
.Arts, Special Concerts, Special
Events, Travel, Forum, Public
Relations and Publicity and Pro-
duction.
Roads Act Changes Drinking Habits
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NewiEattlor
When the stricter DWI laws �
coupled with a raised drinking
age � were passed Oct. 1, 1983,
most of the ECU population as
well as most of the state popula-
tion was affected. This is the first
article in a series examining the
effects of the DWI laws as well as
the changes in the laws
themselves. Part I will deal with
drinking habits, Part II with
roadblocks and other methods of
detecting the intoxicated driver
and Part III with the process of
arrest and conviction.
Although it is difficult to
estimate the effect of the tougher
laws on alcohol consumption,
they have changed liquor sales
and nightclub business.
According to William Hester,
administrator of the Alcoholic
Beverage Control Commission,
liquor sales in the state dropped
1,668,154 bottles in 1984, follow-
ing enaction of the law. Hester
said that in dollar figures this
amounted to a loss of $4,133,811.
However, Hester added, those
cities and counties which have li-
quor by the drink showed a
$3,945,443 increase in alcohol
revenues. Hester attributed this
increase to increased taxes on li-
quor, not to increased consump-
tion. "The true mark is bottles
he said. The decrease comprised
approximately 139,000 cases of
liquor, or 319,729 gallons.
"People are clearly drinking
less than before he said, "both
because of increased DWI
awareness and the higher cost of
liquor
According to Jay Hare, ad-
ministrative officer of the
Department of Revenue, the
amount of taxes collected on beer
and wine sales has not diminish-
ed. He said apparently people are
not drinking less beer and wine
since the law went into effect.
The number of bottles of li-
quor sold in Pitt County actually
increased in fiscal 1984, accor-
ding to Joan Respass, assistant
supervisor of the Pitt County
ABC Board. She said this can be
attributed to more mini-bottles
being sold instead of the half-
gallon bottles.
Tom Rice, Greenville super-
visor for the CO. Tankard Com-
pany, a local beer and wine
distributor, said there has been
no drop in total sales, but the
sales distribution has changed.
"The sales in nightclubs have
dropped, but the sales in conve-
nience stores are up he said,
adding that he feels many more
people are drinking at home.
The nightclub business has suf-
fered a definite blow, said Tom
Haines, owner of the Attic and
Grog's and president of Green-
ville's Downtown Nightclub
Association.
Haines said people are not go-
ing out as many nights, are more
selective as to why they go out
and are drinking less. As a result,
he said, more special events are
being planned by local clubs.
Another product of the
tougher laws is the designated
driver program, which designates
one person who does not drink
and will drive the others in his
group home. "It is the hope and
desire of all nightclub owners
that the designated driver
becomes a national
phenomenon Haines said.
Haines is opposed to the raised
drinking age, which he says
"made criminals out of 18-year-
olds. It took drinking out of a
controlled atmosphere and into
an uncontrolled atmosphere he
said. Underage students are
allowed into the Attic, but are
not allowed to drink, a situation
Haines said has resulted in
several arrests. "We will continue
to do that Haines said, adding
that the club's license is at stake if
they violate the rules.
The decline in drinking and
nightclub attendance is "an
industry-wide situation and is not
different anywhere else Haines
said.
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THE EAST CARPI I MAN
JANUARY 29, 1985
'

Announcements
Omtga Psi Phi
Will t� partying at tne unlimited Touch
Thurv Jan 31 Tttara will b� a 11 nappy
hour and all procaads will go to our National
Talant Hunt Schoiarahlp Program There
will be also be a tight leans contest! I 1st �2S.
Jno tlS
Ecconimics Association
The new economics association will meet
Wed , Jan 30 at I p m in room 712
Mendenhall All economics malors and
minors are Invited to attend this meeting and
learn the practical side o economics We
want to help you I
international Student Assoc.
We have a very Important meeting on Feb
2nd at 6 p m In Mendenhall 271 We are go
Ing to vote and we need your opinion Also
the tickets tor me international dinner will
be available to all members Don � torget
It
UGSC
United Greed and Social Council will have a
meeting Wed Jan 30 at I p m In room 1CM
west wing in Joyner Library
NAACP
We are having a membership drive Toes
and Wed trom Jam to 2 p m Jan 2 30 in
the Student Supply Store Lobby So stop by
and discover the roles ot NAACP in your
past presen' and future Then you'll know
why you should become member o? NAACP
today 11
Presbyterian Fellowship
Tues Jan 79 at 7 30 p m will be the tirst
gather'ng o the Westminister Fellowship
we will meet at the Methodist Student
Center 501 East fifth st (across from Gar
rer� dormi Please join us tor singing, mun
ehies. and making plans
Wed. Night Fellowship
Suppers
Are held at the Methodist Student Center at
i 30 p m Cost of the meal is 12 Come ioln us
for food, fellowship end a short program
Please call 7S 2030 for a reservation
Sigma Nu Little Sisters
AH glr!� are invited to join the knights of
Sigma Nu and their little sisters tor their an
nual oalame party Tues at 9 p.m Party
will be at the Sigma Nu house oH Cotanche
St on 3th st
ECU Catholic Newman
Community
invites you to loin us this Wed We 11 be hav
ing worship service, followed by our group
meeting and dinner come by and meet your
nelghoor! whoWho knows.we may have
something you'd Hke to be involved with It
all starts Wed at 5 p m . at the ECU
Newman Center on east 10th st (lust past the
music building)
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship
Looking for something new? Looking tor
something different in vour lite? Maybe we
can help we offer fun faith, friendship, and
even a few surprises' Why not find out for
yourseff? Join us Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship this Wed at 7 p m in the Jenkins
Art Building audltoriulm and you iust might
see things in a new light!
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will have It's first
meeting of the spring semester on Tues
Jan TV, at 7 p m in the multi purpose room
of Mendenhall Plans for the
Washington.D C trip will be discussed All
members should definitely be there For
more Information, call Mike Gardner
mum
Womens Soccer Club
Indoor Soccer tournament to be held March
1517 tor all organize independent teams
Contact Ginger vann at 757 9722 or Vanessa
Hlgdon at 757 6064 If you are interested 15
entry fee
All woman Interested In participating in
th club, must attend an organizational
meeting Thurj , Jan 31 at 7 in 105 B
�I Gym
Hostage Club
Will meet this Thurs, Jan 30,at 5 it will be
held at PI Wilson Acres Ned Jeffries will be
the guest speaker
Kappa Alpha Psi
Will be having It's formal smoker Tues , Jan
??. In that coffeehouse MSC 8 � 10 All In
terested men are Invited
KYF
There will be a meeting of the King Youth
Fellowship on Jan 29 at 7 p m In 238
Mendenhall Anyone Interested contact Jack
at 757 108!
Pre-Med
Attention members, officers and pledges
There is an important meeting Tues , Jan 29
at 7 30 In Flanagan 307 The speaker will be
Mr Canton P Smith, a Curator at the ECU
School of Medicine at 7 There will be an ex
ecutlve meeting in conference room also at 7
in tlanagan 307 there will be a pledge
meeting All are invited Refreshments will
be served
UGSC
Will be having it's meeting Wed .Jan 30 In
room 104 West Wing of Joyner Library at 6
p m
Pirate Walk
Pirate Walk ECUS Student Escort service
is accepting applicants tor the positions of
Assistant Director, and Secretary and
treasurer for spring semester Applications
are available in the SGA office and should be
returned by Wed , Jan 30 by 5 p m
Pirate Walk will have an organizational
meeting on Thurs Jan 31st at 4 p m In 212
Mendenhall All persons interested in the
positions of Pirate Excorts or Night
Operators are urged to attend this meeting
or come by the Pirate Walk office by Frl .
Feb 1st. between the hours of 12 1 30 p m
Fall semester escorts unable to work this
semester should bring their iackets by the
SGA office before fri . Feb 1st
Sign Language Class
A non credit sign language class Is being of
tered every Wed night from 6 to 9 p m
There is no tee for the class and anyone can
attend iust show up tomorrow night at 6 in
B 10 (the media room in Joyner Library)
The only prerequisite is interest and the time
tor class
Early Childhood Education
Club
is meeting today at 5 p m in room 129
Speight A film will be shown Please come!
Summer Jobs
Thomas Nelson inc has positions available
for the up coming summer Students in
terested in having a summer job that will
give valuable ioto experience and good
money should attend one of the following
meetings Thurs Jan 31 in Brewsfer D wing
at 1 3 30 7 in room 102 A grade point
average of 2 5 is required
SNEHA
Attention environmentalists, the Student Na
tional Environmental Health Organization is
meeting Wed Jan 30th at 3 in the 2nd floor
EHLT lab Club members and other in
terested persons are urged to attend
Society for Advancement
Encourages everyone to ioin us on a tour of
the Greenville Athletic Club See manage
ment at its best Join us Wed at 4 A free
guest pass to all who participate For more
info call Wayne 752 0385 or Rick 752 8787
Army ROTC
The latest in Army Technology will be
featured in a color video exhibit entitled
Todays Weapons' at Joyner Library from 9
am 3pm on Tues . Jan 2v The exhibit is
presented by the US Army Material Com
mand. lAMC) headquartered in Alexandria
Va and is sponsored by the Army ROTC
AMC is responsible for supplying the field
soldier the best and most reliable weapons
and equipment Military and civilian AMC
personnel wni be on hand to answer ques
tons about The exhibit weapons systems and
possible career opportunities
Application For Student
Homecoming
Committee Chairperson
The Student Homecoming committee is
responsible for planning, promoting, and
presenting the annual Homecoming ac
tivlfies This festival of events is one of the
largest programs happening at the Universi
ty each year Among the responsibilities of
the committee are the following securing
bands for the parade, conducting the parade,
arranging half time activities at the football
game, securing iudges for the floats and
house and residence hall decorations, and
presenting entertainment
The Student Homecoming Committee
chairperson is the individual who has overall
responsibility for Homecoming Students in
terested in being considered for the position
of Student Homecoming Committee
Chairperson may pick up application forms
at either MSL I iformationDesk or the
Taylor Slaughter Alumni Center The
Deadline tor applying for this position is Jan
28
ECU Student Union
Needs You
Help us plan concerts, trips, movies, dances,
art exhibitions, minority programs, recrea
tlon activities, and other special events! Ap
plications tor committee chairpersons are
available at Mendenhall Student Center's In
formation desk Applications are being ac
cepted from Jan 21 Feb 1 For more infor
metion contact the Student union office at
757 6611, ext 210
The Student Union Visual Arts committee
win meet on Thurs . Jan 24 at 4 p m In room
241 of Mendenhall Student Center All
members and Interested students are urged
to attend
The Student Union Coffeehouse Committee
will meet on Tues , Jan 29, at 5 p m in room
241 of Mendenhall Student Center All
members and Interested students are urged
to attend
Spoleto Festivel
Remember the deadline' for application Is
Feb 17 If you are Interested, please contact
the Co op office as soon as possible
Business. Music. Theatre Arts. English and
Writing, Art and Home Economics malors
are encouraged to applly Salary Is $125 per
week, free housing, S50 paid toward
transportation cost
Banking Positions
Interested In Banking as a careeer? Local
financial Institution seeks career minded
students maorlng in Business. Finance, Ac
counting for Spring and Summer
IvfJS Students should be graduating seniors
Contact the cooperative Education Office In
313 Rawl Building for more information
Air Products
Nationwide producer of Industrial chemicals
and gases offers sumer program with head
quarters and regional offices Rising Seniors
with good GPA and maiorlng In chemistry,
business, accounting, or computer science
invited to apply For more information con
tact the Coopertive Education Office In 313
Rawl Building
Summer Jobs
With major food service corporation having
facilities throughout the Southeast Food and
Nutrition malors Interested in career related
experience paying V4 50 J5 per hour Contact
Cooperative Education office in 313 Rawl
Building
Foreign Students
Individual and group tutoring in English as a
second language will be offered In the
English Writing Center, A 309 at noon on
Mon, Wed and Frl and at 2 on Mon Inten
slve work on writing and speech are also
avallavle for more info -come by the center
Army ROTC
There will be a Marauder meeting on Wed
Jan 30 at 8 in room 221 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Up coming events wil' be
discussed
Law Society
The ECU Law Society would like to extend
an invitation to all members and the general
public to attend Irs first meeting this
semester We will be meeting on Tues , Jan
29 at 7 p m in the multipurpose room at
mendenhall Plans will be discussed tor our
spring trip to Washington D C For more in
formation, call Mike Gardner 7S8 1640
Scuba Diving Adventures
Spring Break Dive in the fabulous Flonaa
Keys with Ray Scharf and Captain Slate
ECU graduate class of 1971, from the Atlantis
Dive Center on the only coral reef in the con
tinentai united States
Dive program includes five days of diving,
dally boat trips, lodging and fun breakfost
For registration and information call Ray
Scharf, Director of Aquatics at 757 6441 or
756 9339 Total cost s �35 and includes a 1100
non refundable deposit Non diver cost is
$182
Blood and Organ Drive
There will be a Red Cross Bloodmobiie and
Lions Club Organ donor drive held on the
campus of ECU on Tues . Jan 29 and Wed
Jan 30 from 12 noon to 6 p m in Mendenhall
244 There will be a representative from the
Lions Club on hano to answer ar.y questions
you may have on the subiect of organ dona
tions and be accepting eyewili and other
organ donor committments on these days
The Bloodmobiie and Organ Drive are spon
cored by the ECU Biology Club Please
students and faculty, give the gift of life and
support this worthwile cause
All Teacher Education Students
Applying for Upper Division
The department of Speech Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro
vidlng the speech and hearing screening for
all students eligible for admission to the up
per division of teacher education on Mon ,
Jan 28 Jan X
The department will be testing from 5 7 on
the days listed above No appointment is
needed Do Not call their office for an ap
pointment The LOAP department is located
In a trailer adjacent to Belk building on
Charles St
Again.no appointment is needed
Assertiveness Training
Workshop
A three part workshop offered to students at
no cost by the University Counseling Center
Thurs , Jan 31. Feb 74,14 All three sessions
will be conducted from 3-4 p.m. in 306 Wright
Annex (757 6661)
The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asser
tivc, aggress've. and nonassertive
behaviors Participants can learn how to ex
press themselves directly and openly, and
respond to Interpersonal situations In a man
ner which neither compromises individual
beliefs nor offends others Please call
Counseling Center tor registration
8z iEaat Ear0liniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
We are now taking applications for typesetters.
Persons possessing skills in typing or computer
typesetting should turn an application to The East
Carolinian office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. The job
involves working Sunday night, and on Monday and
Wednesday afternoon between 12 p.m. and 7p.m.

Honor Board
There will be an Important mandatory
meeting tonight after the honor board cases
All alternates are required to attend The
meeting Is at 6 p m sharp
Div. of Continuing
Education
Continuing Education Non Credit Courses
Speed Readlng-Thurs , Feb 14 Apr II; 7 9
p m 8 sessions
Beginning Italian Tues , and Thurs , Feb
14 Mar 26, 7 8 30 p m 10 sessions
Camera I Tues . Feb 19 Mar 26 7 9 p m 5
sessions
Register at Erwln Hall or call 757 6143
Math and Computer
Science Jobs
Deadlines for many of the math and CSCI
lobs In Co op for summer and fall are soon
One of best lobs for someone who has com
pleted COBOL has Jan 25 deadline! If you
have not registered with Co op. come now to
Rawl 313 to register if you have registered,
make appointment to see your coordinator
as soon as possible!
Calenders
The ECU Biology Club In association with
the Department of Biology are offering for
sale Scanning Electron Microscoput for the
department These calenders are not only
functional pieces of Biological Art the pro
ceeds will also raise mor.ey for Research
Presentations and for the publication of a
Pre Professional Handbook authored by
members ot the Biology Club The calenders
are available through the Biology Depart
mental Office or at the Student Supply Store
and UBE Thank you for your continuing
support
NAACP
The NAACP Text meeting will be held on
Mon , Jan 28th in mendenhall student center
in the coffeehousse at 5 30 p m Everyone is
urged to attend
Swim Meet
The annual IRS swim meet will be held In
early ,(, Register Feb 2 7 Get your squad
together nnc poo, rniir ruor, Sign up in 204
memorial gym
Weight Training Clinic
im rec services will offer a free weight train
ing clinic on Jan 294,30 from 89 pm To
become a part, register in room 204
memorial gym The limit is 15
Amabassadors
We will have a general meeting Wed Jan 30
at 5 p m in the mendenhall multipurpose
room This is a very important meeting
Mope To see everyone there
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
Greensboro
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the Arts in The Work) i � n � I I 61
"(� � M . Carowinds
Mush . tav. fetxuary
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists
Technicians � Variety Performers �
$190 $270 week

KINGS ISLAND � KINGS DOMINION
CAROWINDS � CANADA S WONDERLAND . ��
GREAT AMERICA � HANNA BAPBERA LAND
Nightclub
Wednesday
THE ALL NEW
LADIES'
With the
Kappa Sigma
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Legislator:
B GKEG RIDEOIT
The S(jA Legislature v.as ad-
vised Vlonda night b) Vice
Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer of proposed student
fee increases for the 1985-86
school year If the fee increases
ere passed, combined student
fees would be $35-� per sear up
SI8 from S336
The major increase would be
S16 in the athletic fee, bringing
the total to $101. The onlv other
increase Ls S2 for Mendenhall
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rei
Right Win,
B GREGRIDECM I
���r�t Jailor
The SGA Legislature Monda
rejected the constitution of the
ECL Wolverines, a group
sluden' .ording to the
constitu tied to the '
Legislature. ' provide
opportur �. for righi
student 0use their
and eel.
corr mil ' about the prorr.
conser. Ids Approval
a constitution makes a .
eligible foi -
un r.eeung roc
Disapproval of the
tion, by a voter-
School Leadel
CHAPEL HILL
boul 80 percent of the I
ty of North Carolina �
campu- . stude:
four of the sch
mitonc
demanding change
Paul Parker, itudei
president, said
government leader a; a r
conference last spring "were
amazed" t:
. ritural schism at the
"The) could sec -nee
immediately. The; were
shocked Parka a I
"We can have white -
on this campus who never ha1
interact with black
they don't want to r.J
not fair he said. "B act
to associate w
There is an incredible dichotomy
on thi campus
The university has agreej I a
project this fall to house 50 :
cent white and 50 percent n
ty students in a North Can-
dormitory, if at least 100 student!
volunteer. Parker said 88 pe
l
I
i
ACROSS
1 Mr Premmger
5 Vipers
9 Lock opener
12 Metai
13 Der,
14 Mineral
15 Note of scale
16 Send forth
18 Ventilate
20 Negative vc:e
22 Girt s name
24 Arm meal
27 Former Russian
ruler
29 Weakens
31 Unit of Siamese
Currer
32 Ascends
34 Game played on
hor setae
36 Sun god
37 Be present
39 Unit of currency
41 Execute
42 Nobleman
44 Peci
dir
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47 Poel
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of
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 29, 1985
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ES ALIVE
Legislators Advised of Fee Increases
By GREG RIDEOUT
Maaatfag Editor
The SGA Legislature was ad-
vised Monday night by Vice
Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer of proposed student
fee increases for the 1985-86
school year. If the fee increases
were passed, combined student
fees would be $354 per year, up
$18 from $336.
The major increase would be
$16 in the athletic fee, bringing
the total to $101. The only other
increase is $2 for Mendenhall
Student Center.
Director of Athletics Ken Karr
told the Legislature the increase
was needed to keep tli. athletic
department on schedule in a five-
year plan that would increase the
athletic budget from its current
$3.3 million to between $4 �
$4.4 million in 1987-88.
Karr said the money is needed
to keep the athletic program in
NCAA Division I-A. Athletics
will be required to add two
women's sports under NCAA
regulations, and the addition of a
fifth home game will require ad-
ditional funds.
The SGA makes recommenda-
tions to the chancellor about the
fee increases, which are non-
binding. The chancellor then pro-
poses increases to the Board of
Trustees, which submits them to
the UNC-Board of Governors for
approval. The SGA did not act
on the fee increase Monday
night.
Student fees provide about
$1.1 million of the $3.3 million
athletic budget. Other revenue
comes from private sources, such
as the Pirate Club, and gate
receipts and guarantees.
Concern over the amount of
money the athletic department
allocates to the Cheerleaders and
Marching Pirates expressed in the
meeting will result, according the
Chairman of the Student Welfare
Committeed, in a forum on the
issue.
Dorm rent will also be increas-
ed $15 per semester under the
proposal. The total bill for an in-
state dorm student would now be
increased to $851.
Check Out
The
Library
Right Wing Group Rejected By SGA
By GREG RIDEOLT
Muiflag Mitor
The SGA Legislature Monday
rejected the constitution of the
ECU Wolverines, a group of
students which, according to the
constitution submitted to the
Legislature, "shall provide an
opportunity for right-wing
students to espouse their values
and educate others in the ECU
community" about the promise
conservatism holds. Approval of
a constitution makes a group
eligible for SGA funds and
university meeting rooms.
Disapproval of the constitu-
tion, by a vote of 13-5, came after
Legislator Rich Wynne pointed
out a section which stated: "All
members will be of sound conser-
vative mind and will truly believe
in the ways of Dr. Laffer and
Newt Gingrich and Jack Kemp.
They may be required to van-
dalize pictures of Sandanistas,
and to own at least one weapon is
highly encouraged
Wynne, who later added an
amendment which would have
made the group abide by all state,
university and SGA rules and
laws, eventually voted in favor of
passing the constitution.
Gordon Walker, 20, a junior
economics major and president
of the Wolverines, was upset over
the action. "I'm kind of upset
he said. "I think they
misunderstood us Walker said
the constitution was meant to be
taken seriously, but the group
will rewrite it and bring the con-
stitution back before the
Legislature.
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne, a
member of the Wolverines, said
the Legislature's action was
"shameful" in light of the other
groups that the SGA sanctions.
The group, which got its name
from the band of freedom
fighters in the movie Red Dawn,
was started to get students to
"think Walker said. He said
the group plans to petition the
SGA to stockpile survival kits in
case of a nuclear attack. Walker
said this was a response to Brown
University students who voted to
ask their administration to stock
cyanide tablets in case of a
nuclear war. Walker called the
Brown students' actions
"wimpy
The group's constitution calls
for an advisor who will be "con-
servative in nature (which
eliminates 98 percent of the pro-
fessors) and a member of the
faculty, such as it is
School Leaders Want Dorm Changes
CHAPEL HILL (UPI)
About 80 percent of the Universi-
ty of North Carolina's on-
campus black students live in
four of the school's 29 dor-
mitories and student leaders are
demanding change.
Paul Parker, student body
president, said visiting student
government leaders at a national
conference last spring "were just
amazed" at the racial and
cultural schism at the university.
"They could see the difference
immediately. They were
shocked Parker said.
"We can have white students
on this campus who never have to
interact with black students if
they don't want to. And that's
not fair he said. "Blacks have
to associate with white students.
There is an incredible dichotomy
on this campus
The university has agreed to a
project this fall to house 50 per-
cent white and 50 percent minori-
ty students in a North Campus
dormitory, if at least 100 students
volunteer. Parker said 88 people
have already volunteered.
But black leaders said they fear
an evenly split black-white dor-
mitory would lead to integrating
the campus by computers ran-
domly assigning rooms, when the
emphasis should be on enrolling
more black students.
Of the 6,808 students who live
on campus, 1,133 are blacks,
most living on the South Cam-
pus.
"The root of the problem lies
not so much in where black
students live but how many black
students are at school here. The
way to integrate this on-campus
situation is to have more minority
students said Sherrod Banks,
Black Student Movement presi-
dent.
"It's been my opinion that you
will not achieve integration by
dispersing an 8 percent popula-
tion all over campus. What you'll
have i5 a white campus peppered
with black students.
But Parker said the project is
more of a "symbolic effort
"We're not saying it'r in any
way a solution to racial pro-
blems Parker said. "We would
hope that it would lead to people
bringing an awareness to other
backgrounds, that the white
Anglo-Saxon background is not
the only background on
campus
Evelma White said she did not
want to feel black students are
"diluted among the white majori-
ty
"As a black student, if you ask
me am I willing to move to North
Campus so 30 or 40 white people
can come in contact with one
black student � is that fair to ask
of any one minority student?"
White said.
Diane Miller said she knew of
only one black student in her
North Campus building and that
"just doesn't give each race the
exposure to the other that they
need
"As far as anything in my liv-
ing environment, I don't see that
many blacks Miller said. "It's
not like we're all students here
together
ACROSS
1 Mr Preminger
5 Vipers
9 Lock opener
12 Metal
13 Den
14 Mineral
15 Note of scale
16 Send forth
18 Ventilate
20 Negative vote
22 Girl's name
24 Army meal
27 Former Russian
ruler
29 Weakens
31 Unit of Siamese
currency
32 Ascends
34 Game played on
horseback
36 Sun god
37 Be present
39 Unit of currency
41 Execute
42 Nobleman
44 Piece of
dinnerware
45 Bitter vetch
47 Poet
49 Wine cups
50 Changed color
of
52 Bubble
54 Symbol for
silver
55 Permit
57 Region
59 Printers
measure
61 Shoemaker's
tool
63 Assistant
65 Crippled
67 French plural
article
68 Defeat
,69 Time gone by
DOWN
1 Lubricate
2 Fleeting
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
3 As far as
4 Unit
5 Assumed name
6 Petty ruler
7 Greek letter
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10 Teutonic deity
11 Old pronoun
17 Manuscript:
abbr.
19 Negative prefix
21 Kiln
23 Footless
25 Ruses
26 Looks fixedly
27 Bartered
28 Walk unsteadily
30 Soft mud
33 Supercilious
person
35 Spanish pot
38 Colorless
40 Tibetan priest
43 Fears
46 Trades for
money
48 Challenges
51 Prefix: down
53 Wholly: prefix
56 Hindu cymbals
58 High mountain
60 Seine
61 Baseball league:
abbr.
62 Pronoun
64 Maiden loved by
Zeus
66 Cooled lava
� 1984 United Feature Syndicate

� - m �� � t m immmm
m m �.
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Wnt femt (Hatalinxan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
I v A" V TON, Ommtt Ujnuger
GREt Rl OEOUT. Mew E
TOM LUVENDER, DWitwo fehwrriSMg
Anthony Martin. �wa Mmp,
John Peterson, o� u
Bu i Mitchell. onim. ��� bu l Dawson, p.����
Doris Raskins, h rICk Mccormac v i
�� vjl , (jrriifl�f Inuv pi cr .
Jennifer Jendrasiak. v, (,
Scott Cooper. c� ��� e� -
Tina Maroschak, ���� .��
9MrraneocMiteK�(jrrccpatuurau.
Januarv 29. 1485
Opinion
Page 4
Vigilante
Response Can Breed Anarchy
Bernhard Goetz is being called a
hero. Letters to editors across the
land have been heavily pro-Goetz.
What has this man done? Has he
saved burning babies from roaring
tenement fires? Did he single-
handedly capture an enemy bat-
talion? Did he bravely go where no
man has gone before? Well, in a
word, no. What he did was shoot
four black teen-agers in a New
York City subway car last month.
The 37-year-old electronics ex-
pert has achieved celebrity status.
"Thug Buster" T-shirts are ap-
pearing on New York City street
corners; a rock group wrote a song
in his honor; The subway-
patrolling Guardian Angels are
collecting money for his defense.
All this because he shot some sub-
way thugs. All this because he
flagrantly took the law into his
own hands and replied to a request
for five dollars from four rowdy
youths with bullets from a ,38-cal
handgun, shooting two of them in
the back.
Why is our country, the land of
law and Tightness, bestowing ex-
alted status on a frustrated man
who was taking revenge for earlier
incidents in his life? Why is this
vigilante fascinating to our
nation's citizens? Well, maybe it's
because he did what we all want to
do. Maybe his fighting back
against the crime that runs so easi-
ly through our city streets is a way
to tell the law enforcement of the
land that we're tired of being
scared.
The president, who in a press
conference was asked what he
thought of the incident, said he
sympathized with the public's
frustration, thus off-handedly con-
doning Goetz's style of justice.
Some say it's a way of society tell-
ing authorities that they are failing
to protect its citizens. Maybe it's
easy for those of us who live so far
away from the violence that in-
habits our cities to abhor the
methods this man took to combat
the lawlessness he perceived. But
we have to believe that even those
who shout this man's praises
secretly know what this man did is
wrong.
Goetz committed attempted
murder, pure and simple. This is
not a case of a man protecting
himself in a hostile subway tram.
No, Goetz not only tried to ward
off the four teen-agers who tried to
fleece him for five bucks, he turn-
ed on them in a premeditated man-
ner and ended up shooting two of
the youthful thugs in the back. He
broke the law and should be
punished accordingly.
But, he is not going to be, it
seems. The charges against him
have been downgraded to carrying
an illegal weapon. This seems to be
an attempt by New York city to
placate its citizenry. But that is not
the function of a municipal justice
system. They are to be the bringers
of the law. they are to lead the ci-
ty's populus in the right manner.
They are failing.
Sure we understand the frustra-
tion. But not to the extent that we
condone acts of violence and
lawlessness. Some have said the
shootings have racial overtones;
black citizens have even shown
support for the action. It seems
everyone is afraid and groping for
a way to cope with inner city
violence.
What we ask is that everyone
remember that when citizens take
the law into their own hands, there
is no more law. Those who do so
should suffer the full penalties re-
quired for their action. If everyone
advocated this kind of justice, our
system would fail and our nation
would be plunged into anarchy.
This man is no hero. He is no mar-
tyr. He is no savior. He is a
criminal. Just keep in mind that he
shot two men in the back next time
you walk away.
mn,t�QMW�mMWm�OFlHE$e REA&AN
COTS ID WARTS CAN) W WB Z�
Campus Forum
Abortion Editorial Disturbing
The column, "Minority Without
Support" by Greg Rideout was in-
teresting but disturbing. Greg, 1 care
not to comment on the political aspects
of your article. That was interesting. I
do care to comment on the biological
aspects of your article That was
disturbing. I mean, Greg, how do you
know �'at a fetus is not human? In
your statement, "But it is not (human).
A fetus is the unborn, the unliving 1
did not know whether that knowledge
was self-authoritative or somehow
revealed.
The fetus is either dead or alive, is it
not? Are not all things either living or
non-living9 So, because a fetus is in the
womb and is not a completely
developed human being, it is unliving"1
1 myself, though out of the womb, do
not consider myself a completely
developed human being. I am pro-
choice, but not at the expense of
human life.
But my purpose was not to discuss
abortion. Man has not yet been able to
decide for himself when life begins, but
God knc ws. All that I ask of you is to
please be sure that you are sure without
a doubt before you make such
authoritative statements about life, lest
you lead someone astray.
Let's thank God though that we live
in a country where we can express our
ideas without fear. And I thank God
that we have a government which
acknowledges that all men are created
equal and endowed by their creator
with certain inalienable rights; that
among these are life, liberty, and the
pursuit of happiness
James Blake Eudailey
Senior, Engl
Wrong, Greg
According to an editorial by Greg
Rideout, human life begins when one
can speak and maintain affectionate
and close relationships. One must re-
main cuddly in order to be termed
"alive
I refuse to make a statement dealing
with Mr. Rideout'scuddliness, but I do
wish to say that his writing, which
seems to lack proper reasoning and
good taste, should not be allowed to
live.
Let us consider two different
scenarios. First, the anti-abortionists
win and abortion is outlawed. Later we
find that fetuses are actually lifeless,
friendless lumps. What is the result"1 A
lot of people will be living that other-
wise would not be. But, what if the
pro-abortionists win and abortion is
still legal9 What if after ha: we find
out that, indeed, fetuses are just small
people beginning to develop? What we
have is wide-spread mass murder like
none other in the history of man. 1 pro-
pose that we not risk the possibilil �
mass murder as long as there is the
slightest chance that abortion is wrong.
As far as I know, most medical
research has proven that a fetus is quite
living and quite responsive to pain and
outside stimulus. When a couple con-
ceives, whether by accident or plan, a
new life is begun. That life must be
cared for whether it is an accident or
not. It is no longer just the woman's
own body. It is a woman with another
being in her womb. It is its parents
responsibility to bring it into the world
and raise it or give it to someone else to
raise. Taking responsibility for one's
actions has never killed anyone.
Rather, it makes for a stronger person.
Abortion, however, ignores respon-
sibility and kills babies. Everyone
loses.
If Mr. Rideout's criterion for human
life (friendliness, speech and cud-
dliness) is correct, then what about
newborn babies who have no friends,
cannot speak and are too wet to be
cuddly? Should they die, too?
Bill Green
Senior, Finance.
Marx Wrong, Too
Fay Stone . .
� �. escalating del i
worsening environmem i
structural change whi
flawed nature of current -
stitutional arrange-
ly two possible irses I tion. We
may stick with
adds will lead to d He I
make the a!?ere clear, b
fen some clues and one suggt
Like a straw man he sets ip
"conservative"
magic ot the markei - trial
blems sirnp ,� disapj :ar V
realize a sound econon c
panacea. But, the markei d c
vital information betwec pi
and consumers. When
to work, shortages and waste ai
evitable.
The next "conservative" h
aim a; is the "freedom of :he
proper: y to di :
he sees fit Property rights a
basic a freedom that the 1
Constitution took them for gra
When the state owns all
gains enormous power
Mr. Stone's -
sion of democracy into the e
sphere The individual .
the free market decide wh
ed by voting with :ne:r He
gests our politicians and
could do a better j
These are not new ideas; Marx and
Lenin suggested them many decades
ago. They have been tried, found lack-
ing and rejected country by country.
Don't you have some new ideas, Mr
Stone.
Alan Jones
Greenville
H
Forum Rules
Running Of Multinationals Contribute To Economic State
By JAY STONE
A phenomenon that has received a lot
of attention lately is the globalization of
the economy. The issue is usually couch-
ed as follows:
Before 1965, foreign trade did not
figure significantly in the American
economy. This situation has changed
dramatically. By 1980, more than 70
percent of all the goods produced in the
United States were actively competing
with foreign goods. More to the point,
while in 1980, 19 percent of the goods
Americans made were exported, more
From The Left
Jay Stone
than 22 percent of the goods Americans
used were imported. Thus, America has
become very much a part of the world
market, but American producers have
not fared particularly well in this new
context relative to foreign producers.
The U.S. trade deficit is projected to
reach SI SO billion next year. Without a
coherent approach to our trade pro-
blems, the foreign trade deficit could
soon be as big � and possibly
troublesome � as the budget deficit.
This analysis, as far as it goes, is cor-
rect. Yet it fails to shed much light on
the causes of our current economic
malaise. To be properly understood the
trade deficit must be seen as the symp-
tom of a structural crisis that has its
roots in the collapse of the Bretton
Woods system and the way the
American corporation is run. This struc-
tural crisis is also caused by other fac-
tors, which will be examined later in this
series.
Barry Bluestone and Bennett Harrison
offer a provocative analysis of tht
development of the modern corporate
economy in their book The Dein-
dustrialization of America. According
to them, after the United States emerged
from WWII it possessed the most
powerful army and more than half of all
the usable productive capacity in the
world. In addition, it became the banker
and creditor to both former allies and
former enemies.
America's domination of the global
economy was cemented by the establish-
ment of the dollar as the capitalist
world's principal reserve currency at the
1944 Bretton Woods Conference.
In this environment, American cor-
porations were able to make massive in-
vestments abroad in new plants and
equipment, producing commodities for
foreign markets and, later on, for re-
importing back into the United States
itself. These direct shifts of private
American capital became truly enor-
mous during the 1960s.
The widespread plants, mines,
distribution centers and offices of the
multinational corporations made up en-
tire production systems linked on a
global scale. Their creation changed the
very meaning of "competition By
1970, close to three quarters of total
U.S. exports and upwards of one-half of
all imports were transactions between
the domestic and foreign subsidiaries of
the same multinational conglomerate
corporation.
As a result of this unprecedented
global expansion, the proportion of
total after-tax profits of U.S. corpora-
tions earned abroad rose steadily from
about 10 percent at the beginning of the
1950s to more than 20 percent at the
beginning of the 1970s.
During the 1960s the productive
capacity of the American economy near-
ly tripled, even after accounting for in-
flation. This meant uninterrupted, un-
paralleled and unprecedented economic
expansion from the end of the 1961
recession to the 1969-70 recession.
The "Golden Age" of the '50s and
'60s, however, was not to last.
Challengers to the global hegemony of
American corporations began to emerge
from behind every tree. In one industry
after another � steel, rubber, textiles,
automobile, electronics and footwear �
Japanese and European competitors
arose to challenge U.S. dominion. In
support of their own multinational cor-
porations � many of them state-owned
enterprises � the other capitalist
governments of the world refused to
abide any longer by the Bretton Woods
accords. Thus, Bretton Woods essential-
ly collapsed in 1971 when Nixon took
the United States off the gold standard
(necessarily so).
The fallout which resulted from these
developments was ominous. In 1959 the
United States was "home" for 111 of
the world's 156 largest multinational
corporations, a share of 71 percent. Bv
1976 only 68 of the 156 largest (43 per-
cent) were American-based.
The story that is often told of this
dramatic turn of affairs is how efficient-
ly the Germans and the hard-working
Japanese labored, albeit with aid from
the American government, to build
economies that were able to successfully
compete with the United States. What
that story leaves out is just how much
these economic miracles owe to the
direct involvement of American cor-
porations in their affairs.
The fact is that from the early 1950s
American corporations fequently pur-
sued their objective of gaining access to
overseas markets by granting licenses to
foreigners to enter the industry, using
technologies developed by the American
pioneer in return for a royalty. On other
occassions, the American corporation
moved abroad by implementing a joint
production arrangement with a foreign
firm, sometimes involving the construc-
tion of a "turkey plant" that would
subsequently be turned over to the host
country. Direct investment in the stock
of foreign firms by American companies
constituted still another form of global
interdependence between ostensibly in-
dependent, competing firms. Indeed, in
all three cases, it is no exaggeration to
say that American corporate manage-
ment policy during the 1950s and '60s
actually helped to create its own future
competitors.
Ironically, even while the managers
American corporations complained ol
decreased profits due to foreign com-
petition, they feverishly shifted the
production facilities abroad to escape
high labor costs and the cost of govern
ment regulation. All told, betweeen 150
and 1980, direct foreign investmen
U.S. businesses increased 16 times, from
about $12 billion to $192 billion. Over
the same period, gross private domes: c
investment grew less than half as ra
ly, from 554 billion to about S400
billion. In addition, corporal,
dismvested in the nation's productive
capacity by shifting capital away from
productive activities (modernizing plants
and equipment and training workers).
which produce jobs and increase pro-
ductivity and competitiveness, toward
unproductive activities such as corporate
mergers and speculative investment
Decisions came to be made exclusively
in the interest of enhancina or protecting
the bottom line without regard to
whether goods were produced, jobs were
created or the public interest was
enhanced The fact that each successive
recession since 1970 has resulted in
higher unemployment percentages than
the recession before it is a grim
testimony to the results of this policy.
Hence, it is clear that economic elites
pursuing private profit exclusivelv often
fail to serve the interests of the public.
Some means of protecting the public in-
terest in economic matters must be
devised.
Other
WASHINGTON (UPI) -
Almost 31 years after the
Supreme Court outlawed
segregation in America's
classrooms, racial, sexual and
class discrimination persist, a
private report concluded today
The study found that
discrimination has taken new and
subtle forms, although equally
potent, that can be seen in stu
dent placement and school fun-
ding policies that favor white
over black, male over female and
rich over poor
"The doors of schools are
more open than they were
years ago" to minorities, said
Harold Howe 11, who co-chaired
the tw .� ,?udv "But we
found a lack of commitment
making these students sue -
"State and local financing of
schools add up to a conspii i
spend more money on rich
and less money on poor kids to
provide services that are sup-
posedly fair to all students he
sajd
Howe, who headed the old
Education Commission in the
Johnson administration ai
helped win congj a) ap-
proval of landmark civil rig
measures, authored the studv.
"Barriers to Excellence Our
Children at Risk with Mar
Wright Edelman president of the
Faculty Print
Purchased By
Library
s.r� Bureau
An intaglio print by an ECU
School of Art faculty member
Michael Voors has been purchas-
ed by the Library of Congres
Washington.
Yoor's print, entitled "Vene-
tian Nocturne will become par-
of the library's permanent collec-
tion. The Library of Congress
print collection, one of the major
collections of graphic art work-
in the U.S was estabiisned in
1812 to house the works of the
old masters as well as contem-
porary artists.
Voors is a graduate of the
Indiana-Purdue Department of
Fine Arts and received his Master
of Fine Arts degree from Eastern
Michigan University in 1980.
Since joining the ECU art
faculty he has been an active ex-
hibitor in art shows throughout
North Carolina. He has also been
represented in major exhibitions
including the International Print
Society competition show in
California.
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I HI I v I ' R( l INIAN
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N
Other Discrimination Seen
VSHington (l
H years afte. the
Court outlawed
' i ii mer i i .1 �
s racial sexua and
"mination persist, .1
concluded today
dy found
iken new and
although equally
an he seen in stu
nent and school fun
avoi white
'lack.mal. ale and
ai e
than the vsert
��. said
Howe Ii. u
ud But we
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-
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Faculty Print
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Children's Defense fund, a
public interest group
I he studs was initiated h the
National Coalition ol Advocates
foi Students, a s eai old net
work ol child advocacy groups
that visited 10 cities and inter
viewed more than 280 people
I he studs ottered more than
100 recommendations, including
tougher enforcement of
desegregation and se discrimina
tion laws, as well as increased
funding ol programs tor the
disadvantaged
li also proposed thai localities
nut ease taves on private
businesses to help fund educa
tion, noting that businesses get
the schools' final product
educated youngstei s
I n Mas 17, 1954, the Supreme
Couri struck down the doctrine
ol "separate but equal" in the
nation's schools.
But contrary to that ruling, the
studs found
Racial Discrimination
�63 percent ol black students
;id predominantly minority
us! 8 5 percent
ei are minorities
,vs' idem placemen: policies
c' e a t e p r e d o m mantis s h 11 e
1 p pe r -1 e vel
dommantly black lowet le
ses
�Black students ha ree
tunes the suspension rate and
double the dropout rate of
whites
i law Discrimination
�Mans school districts allocate
substantially more money to
schools in rich neighborhoods
than in poor neighborhoods
�The average child from a pooi
family receives tour fewei seats
ol education than a youngster
from a wealthy family
�A disproportionate number
ol children from poor families
are enrolled in vocational rathet
than in educational courses
Sex Discrimination
�Males and females have equal
achievement in must majoi sub
jetts ai age 9, but bs 11 female
begin a foui seat decline that
puts them behind males in math,
readi ng scienc e and s 1
studies
� Vocatii mal education pro
grams are segregated, with
females in programs preparing
them tor the lowest paying jobs,
a secretaries and
cosmetologists
�W omen are less likely to
plete tour sears ol college and
much less likely to g on to � I
tarn doc ti irates or professii �
degrees
�� � �'
ECU - LET PIZZA HUT
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6
1 Ml I S1 l'Ko llN
IANUAR1 29, 198S
Businesses Encourage Input From Managers
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Many chief executives should
avoid issuing long-range,
strategic business plans and turn
a more attentive ear to middle
managers to identity those pro-
jects that can really pay off, a
Stanford scholar said.
"The CEO is ultimately
responsible for the corporation
and its divisions, but the size and
complexty of the business make
it impossible for him to know and
understand all the strategic and
operating situations facing these
divisions said L. Jay
Gourgeois, an assistant professor
at the Stanford Graduate School
of Business.
Bourgeois and a former stu-
dent, David R. Brodwin, discuss-
ed the situation in a recent article
they wrote for Strategic Manage-
ment Journal.
Instead of issuing business ob-
jectives from a corporate suite of
Students Can Expect
Early Rebel Arrival
By JtNMKFRJhNDRAMAK
Nf� frdlluf
A new. unproved Rebel, the
literary and art magazine of
FCC, went to press yesterday, ac-
cording to Rebel Editor Ellen
Moore.
Moore said the 1985 magazine
will follow the same format as
previous magazines, but will have
"better stones, poems and il-
lustrations We had a good staff
this year she said.
The 88-page magazine should
be back from the printers by the
beginning of March. Five thou-
sand copies will be printed, a
number which is "more than last
year Moore said.
Moore said she is pleased with
the cover illustration, an airbrush
illustration done by Mike Tatsis.
In addition, she said more ar-
tists are represented in the
magazine this year and there is "a
centerfold piece Victor Van-
quished by David Lewis.
This is Moore's second year as
editor of the Rebel and "the
earliest the magazine has ever
been sent to the printers she
said.
The magazine, which contains
four stories and 25 poems, will be
available at the Rebel office and
in Mendenhall Student Center.
Student Loans May Be Cut
Continued From Pae 1
tor of legislative analvsis for the
American Council on Education,
estimated that "probably 500,(X)0
would lose eligibility" if the line
were drawn at $30,000.
A $32,500 ceiling "might
reduce that 500,000 by 30,000 or
4).000 at most she said.
She also estimated that "about
150,000 students from families
with incomes over $25,000" now
get Pell Grants, although they
usually are at the iower range of
awards, which start at $200.
Uit
offices, Bourgeois said the CEO
should encourage input from
middle managers and other
employees along the chain of
command who are closely involv-
ed in the company's daily opera-
tions.
"We're talking about a level of
individual beyond the shop
floor the business policy pro-
fessor said in an interview. "Mid-
dle managers have access to
resources that allow them to do
this
The authors call this strategy
"crescive" or "growing from
within the firm
"It's one thing to say you want
ideas Bourgeois said. "It's
another thing to choose when you
start getting too many ideas,
choosing among them so you
don't discourage other people
That is the key to this type of
management, according to
Bourgeois.
"A lot of consultants talk
about rewarding failure he
said. "That's one suggestion
that's hard to take, but sensible.
"When you're going to initiate
crescive management, you've got
to be prepared to accept some
ideas that aren't going to work
he said. "You know, the best en-
trepreneur to put your money on
is the one that has failed two or
three times
The professor cited universities
that concentrate on research as
good examples of crescive
management.
"An organization that does it
almost exclusively is a research
university he said. "You have a
lot of people doing things in-
dependently and they somehow
wind up doing things of
greatness he said.
For-profit firms of the same
mold would include think tanks
and companies like Hewlett-
Packard, the Silicon Valley high-
tech corporation.
"H-P is a quintessential exam-
ple Bourgeois said. "Their
strategic approval process is very
decentralized and only has to go
through two or three leveh ind
it's usually sold from within.
Bourgeois drew an example
from an episode he observed
while working as a consultant for
a large, foreign mining company.
"They were diversifying
through acquisition because com-
modities metal prices had gone
down the professor said.
"The chief executive was com-
plaining that since the downturn
there had been little creativity
and new ideas
It turned out that the flow of
new ideas dropped off
dramatically at about the same
time the CEO took command.
Bourgeois said he learned the
CEO was giving the impression at
monthly meetings that he was
more concerned about perfor
mance compared to the budget
than new, possible risky con
cepts.
Bourgeois suggested the CEO,
at the next meeting, turn to
whoever was sitting next to him
and casually ask how many new
ideas his division had in the last
month.
"You know what's going to
happen out in the hallway after
that meeting?" he asked. "These
guys don't want to be embarrass-
ed at the next meeting, so they're
going to ask subordinates abou'
new ideas.
"By the fourth meeting, thev
had to create a new agenda to
control flow of new ideas coming
through he said. "The whole
place was buzzing � just from
asking that one simple question '
Me And My Shadow
Just once, our photographer wanted his image and not just his
name in the paper. So, we bring yon Jon Jordan, or a close fac-
simile thereof. And for Jon we say, "Hi Mom
�WAWMV.
xs
n a
G7
"Specializing In Chinese Gourmet Cuisine'
Luncheon Specials of the Day $2.75
Sunday Buffet $3.95
(all you can eat)
DINNER SPECIALS
Shrimp and scallops
with Chinese vegtables
$6.95
Beef with Cauliflower
and broccoli
$5.95
This one's for you
the STUDENTUNION
NOW is the time to apply for the positions of chairperosns
and committee members. We've got a place for you!
MAJOR CONCERTS
SPECIAL EVENTS
MINORITY ARTS
COFFEEHOUSE
RECREATION
TRAVEL
FILMS
FORUM
PRODUCTIONS
VISUAL ARTS
SPECIAL CONCERTS
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND
PUBLICITY
Come by room 234 in Mendenhall Student Center to apply!
INFORMATION: 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline to Apply: Friday, February 1, 1985.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
ADVENTURE
EXCITEMENT
ROMANCE


For the Spring Break to remember
Travel Associates puts your right in the middle of the
hottest action in Florida � Daytona Beach.
( Specials come with: hot and sour soup, chicken corn soup, or
house special soup, steamed or fried rice, hot tea and fried
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Mon -Thurs 11:30-9:30
100 E. 10th St FR1 11:30-10:30
1Q1Q SAT. 5:00-10:30 TAKEOUT
57-HJlO SUN. 12:00-9:30 ORDER
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Round-trip transportation via deluxe motorcoach
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A volleyball tournament with prizes
Optional transportation services to Disneyworld
and EPCOT
All hotel taxes
Services of Travel Associates' on-site Sunbreak
vacation staff
$190.00
DATE: March 1-9
CONTACT: Dean at 752-5588
or
Kevin at 752-9732

X
x
i

X

Timothy
B 3W & El I IO! KRW r 1
�.l ���� �"���� V
Nhen he first read Rob-
Lindsey's book. Th? Falcon and
the Snowman, Academy a
winning actor Timothv Hutton
was fascinated with its central
character, Christopher Bt
"Chris Boyce thought of
himself as a patriot Hutton
said during a recent interview
"He genuinely behevr
CIA was pererting American
principles, and that by sell � I
secrets to the Russians, he
some strange a. -
country
That a bright, well-b' !
man, the son of an ex-FB! .
raised in an ultrm-consei i
California commui
subvert his idealism from n �
to treason was a shov
"Boyce wa eager I
Hutton recalled "W
the phone almost evci
ing through the script
I'd ask what he was thinking
feeling at a certaii
time, and he'd open
got into his head, r
resist the tcmptal
mannerismv There ha I
point where I toc�
tor
That Boyce would
forces with a
smuggler, who'd been
friend in high school,
the most braze-
since World War II, �
dramatic clincher as fai
ton was concerned
"I think it's rare for son
that young to ha e su
and take such steps
said. "Clearly what I
wrong, but the mind tl
such a radica. -
taken seriously
Hutton was. eae-
Boyce in the film er
Falcon and the Snowman
thusiasm shared b
Award winner Jol
who'd been signed
project for Orion Picture
"I wanted :
ambiguit) of som
thougl
his country was tc beti
Hutton said
Hutton made h - c
debut in television's "Fi
Fire :n which he pla
of Carol Burnett arj Ned B

H1
I
B
Carlos saura" I armen �iH
'Carmen' To 5r
b usa McDonald
M�fT Vkri!r
Carmen. Caro v
tense film of dance and emotic
is coming to Hendnx Theatre
tomorrow. Jan. 30. at 8 p.m.
The story centers on celebratec
Choreographer Antonio Gades,
who, playing himself, creates the
dance version of Carmen and
searchs for a young woman to
play the leading role opposite his
Don Jose.
Complications begin after
Gades Finds his young woman
(Laura del Sol) and falls in love
with her. His love for the woman
(W
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I
I
H
I
I
ho
m:
SpJ
inn
I
da
'

4
OAM
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liev high
I am
" Their
anagers
CEO was giving the impression at
monthly meetings that he was
more concerned about perfor-
mance compared to the budget
than new. possible risky con-
cepts
'HI EASTCAROJ INIAN
thin
ample
?sen ed
I
am
rgeois suggested the CEO,
i the next meeting, turn to
whoever was sitting next to him
casual!) ask how many new
ide vision had in the last
month
v know what's going to
?pen out in the hallway after
that meeting1" he asked. 'These
guys don't want to be embarrass-
ed a: the next meeting, so they're
going to ask subordinates about
new ideas
"Bv the fourth meeting, they
create a new agenda to
flow of new ideas coming
he said "The whole
vas b .ving � just from
simple question
NION
f chairperosns
2 for you!
TIONS
tRTS
CONCERTS
ATIONS AND
rtiter to apply!
MANCE

mber
iddle of the
each.
0.00
March 1-9
ean at 752-5588
or
evin at 752-9732
!

J
JANUARY 29, 1985
Page
TimothyHutton TurnsTraitor In Spy Thriller
By JAYELLIOTKRAVETZ
lumiaMU rtoio Nmh
When he first read Robert
1 indsey's book. The Falcon and
the Snowman, Academy award-
winning actor Timothy Hutton
was fascinated with its central
character, Christopher Boyce.
"Chris Boyce thought of
himself as a patriot Hutton
said during a recent interview.
"He genuinely believed that the
CIA was perverting American
principles, and that bv selling it's
secrets to the Russians, he was, in
some strange way, serving his
country
That a bright, well-bred voung
man, the son of an ex-FBI agent,
raised in an ultra-conservative
California community, could
subvert his idealism from religion
to treason was a shocker.
"Boyce was eager to help
Hutton recalled. "We spoke on
the phone almost everv day, go-
ing through the script line by line.
I'd ask what he was thinking and
reeling at a certain moment in
time, and he'd open up to me. I
got into his head, but I had to
resist the temptation to mimic his
mannerisms. There had to be a
point where I took over as an ac-
tor
That Boyce would then join
forces with a strung-out drug
smuggler, who'd been his best
tnend in high school, to commit
the most brazen act of espionage
since World War II, was the
dramatic clincher as far as Hut-
ton was concerned.
"I think it's rare for someone
that young to have such thoughts
and take such steps Hutton
said. "Clearly what he did was
wrong, but the mind that decided
such a radical course had to be
taken seriously
Hutton was eager to plav
Boyce in the film version of The
falcon and the Snowman, an en-
thusiasm shared by Academy
Award winner John Schlesinger,
who'd been signed to direct the
project for Orion Pictures.
"I wanted to show the moral
ambiguity of someone who
thought that the best way to serve
his country was to betrav it
Hutton said.
Hutton made his co-starring
debut in television's "Friendly
Fire in which he played the son
of Carol Burnett and Ned Beam.
a bewildered, frightened teenager
who watched his parents go to
pieces after the death of his
brother, to errant American
firepower, in Vietnam.
Hutton's memorable perfor-
mance caught the eye of first-
time director Robert Redford,
who cast him in "Ordinary Peo-
ple Hutton's lonely longing for
relief from a guilt he could not
fathom brought remarkable tex-
ture to the film, which won
Oscars for Best Picture of the
Year, Best Director (Redford),
Best Screenplay (Alvin Sargent)
and Best Supporting Actor
(Huton).
In addition, he won the 1980
Golden Globe Award, the Los
Angeles Film Critics Award and
rave reviews. In an approach to
his craft which has characterized
his entire career, Hutton resear-
ched his role in "Ordinary Peo-
ple" by visiting mental hospitals
and consulting psychiatric
specialists.
He was equally conscientious
in preparing his next assignment
as the cadet major who led an in-
surrection at a troubled military
school in Taps.
"My character in Taps was a
golden boy, 1 suppose Hutton
recalled. "He excelled in
everything he did, always had,
probably always will. He was
academically in great shape and
as the cadet leader, as the
regimental commander, well,
that's the best you can do at a
military academy. Everything he
did had always been top-notch.
He was an overachiever
During four weeks of
preproduction at Pennsylvania's
Valley Forge Military Academy,
he explored his character's state
Of mind by reading Pat Conroy's
The lords of Discipline,
Melville's Billy Budd and
William Manchester's American
Caesar, a long hard look at
General Douglas MacArthur.
"It was really kind of
strenuous the first week Hut-
ton recalled. "Everybody was
complaining. You know: Oh,
God! Why do we have to do
this? Why can't we just
rehearse?" But, by the second
day, third day, everybody was
beginning to see how much it was
paying off, how beneficial it
was
After picking up a 1981 Golden
Globe nomination for Taps, Hut-
ton starred in television's The
Long Hay Home, which brought
Timothy Hutton stars as Christopher � in Orion Pictures' �� release 'The Falcon and The Sno
him the Golden Nymph at the
Cannes Film Festival and another
Golden Globe nomination.
"I'm just real happy that I
made it and that I've had the op-
portunity to work with the people
I've worked with and the roles
I've worked on Hutton said.
Hutton added theatre to his
growi-g list of credentials with
The Oldest Living Graduate,
which began as a live television
drama and continued on stage on
Los Angeles.
"I've always been interested
and curious about people Hut-
ton explained. "I've always been
a people watcher and to have the
opportunity to explore different
people through roles and to study
attitude, behavior, ways of life
and circumstance, it's what I
really like to do
Continuing to amass television
credits, "And Baby Makes Six"
and "The Best Place To Be
Hutton kept pace with his soaring
film career.
"If I hadn't been so lucky so
early he offers with a smile,
"I'd probably be an English ma-
jor at Berkeley today
After starring for Sidney
Lumet in the title role of Daniel.
as the anguished, de'ermined son
of the late Ethel and Julius
Rosenberg, he flew to the Arctic
Circle to star in Iceman as a
scientist who befriends a survivor
from our prehistoric past.
"For the first time, I was into
the research from my own point
of view instead of solely through
the character's he recalled his
preparation, which included a
heavy dose of anthropology texts
and several session at Van-
couver's well-know Museum of
Anthropology.
Researching this extraordinary
subject along with his role, Hut-
ton immersed himself in an-
thropology and learned to speak
Inuktituk, an Eskimo dialect.
"I wouldn't want to be doing
anything else he said en-
thusiastically.
Alter I he talc on and The
Snowman, Hutton filmed Turk
IH2! which will be released Feb.
15. In the film, which also stars
Robert Urich, Kim Cattrall.
Robert Culp, Darren McGavin
and Peter Boyle and is directed
by Bob Clarke, Hutton plays an
appealing and contemporary
hero, Jimmy Lynch: a street-wise
young man who discovers unex-
pected resources in himself when
wman
he is compelled to right the wrong
done to his brother
Turk 182! is a contemporary
drama which focuses on a vounc
man's crusade to redeem his
brother's reputation Hutton
explained. "I play Jimmy Lynch,
who wages an impassioned battle
against an indifferent city
bureaucracy that denied his older
brother Terry, a disabled
firefighter, his rightful pension.
"Armed only with his wits,
Jimmy sets out to topple a cor-
rupt mayor and proves that vou
can fight City Hall, as the entire
city thrills to the dare devil ex-
ploits and amazing ingenuitv i
the mysterious crusader known
only as'Turk 182 Hutton add-
ed.
Killing Fields Offers Honesty
Carlos Saura's Carmen' will be showing in Hendrix Theatre on Wednesday at 8 p.m.
'Carmen' To Steu; Up Screen In Hendrix
By DANIEL MAI RER
v.niin! rratarn f�lor
The Killing Fields is an intense,
brutally realistic, and humanly
honest motion picture. Director
Roland Joffe presents a personal
story set in the chaos of Cam-
bodia during the early 70s. In it
he offers a first-hand look at a
war-torn nation and its suffering
people.
In this frightening setting of
political anarchy, Joffe
Chronicles the true story of
Sydney Schanberg (played by-
Sam Waterston) and his Cambo-
dian assistant, translates and
friend Dith Pran (played by Dr.
Haing S. Ngor). Schanberg is a
Sew York Times war correspon-
dent who travels to Cambodia in
August of 1973 to cover
American involvement in the
growing Cambodian revolution.
When the war escalates and
American troops are forced to
evacuate the U.S. Embassy,
Schanberg, along with other
journalists, choses to remain
behind. Pran, given the chance to
leave the country, stands bv his
friend's side. What follows is the
growth of an unbreakable bond
between these two men as they
look into the horrifying face of
an insane war.
Joffe's film pulls no punches,
as he presents the Cambodian
conflict with a journalistic impar-
tiality. He does away with the
usual cinematic license and sensa-
tionalism to produce a gripping,
sometimes frightening story bas-
ed on harsh realities.
What carries the audience
above the bloody maelstom are
the superb performances by both
Waterston and Dr. Ngor. They
develop an emotional thread that
ties their characters and the au-
dience together. They share an
unspoken language characteristic
of close comrades. They are un-
doubtedly an academy award
winning combination.
Meanwhile, Director of
Photography Chris Menges lends
punctuation to Joffe's cinema
prose with several stunning at-
mosphere shots. Utilizing some
beautiful locations in Thailand
and Canada, he is able to show
the degree of devestation brought
upon Cambodia's fertile coun-
trvside.
The Killing Fields is a film that
excites the senses and touches the
heart. It is a story of friendship
hardship, and survival. Killing
Fields is destined to secure a place
for itself in motion picture
history.
By Lisa McDonald
Staff Writer
Carmen, Carlos Saura's in-
tense film of dance and emotion,
is coming to Hendrix Theatre
tomorrow, Jan. 30, at 8 p.m.
The story centers on celebrated
Choreographer Antonio Gades,
who, playing himself, creates the
dance version of Carmen and
searchs for a young woman to
Play the leading role opposite his
Don Jose.
Compilations begin after
Gades finds his young woman
(Laura del Sol) and falls in love
with her. His love for the woman
(whose name, coincidentally, is
Carmen) grows, and the
characters begin to live the
Carmen story while creating the
dance version.
Gades' assistant, Christina
Hoyos, stirs up trouble during a
rehearsal scene, resulting in a plot
full of jelousy and conflict.
Carmen is not just a love story,
however; the greater part of the
movie is devoted to dancing �
Spanish dancing � encompass-
ing all the usual fire and passion.
Carmens uniqueness centers
on the fact that the movie so
closely imitates life. By having
Gades and Hoyos play
themselves in a ficticious manner,
Saura, as director, shows us how
close fiction and reality can
come. Both are playing the parts
they occupy in life � that of
choreographer and assistant.
Carmen, sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Films Com-
mittee, is free to ECU students
and a guest with current IDs.
Faculty and staff must have a
Spring Semester Film Pass,
available for purchase at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office.
By JAMES REID
Staff Writer
At last, a movie has been pro-
duced that zeros in on the tyrany
of war from the truest perspective
� the people. Killing Fields is a
sensitive film that drives to the
heart and shakes the brain-fibers.
Before the film's release, there
was a lack of real-to-life offerings
depicting what it is almost like
when war grabs its victims by the
throat.
Media can never be a replace-
ment for real experiences.
Deerhunter and Apocolypse Now
are two examples. Both films had
outstanding cinematography and
suspenseful scenes, but both lack-
ed an honest display of the emo-
tional and physical elements that
would make the films real to me.
Instead, each was pumped up
with sensationalism to increase
viewer interest.
There was no need for sensa-
tionalism in The Killing Fields.
War is graphic enough. Every
scene presented an honest ac-
count of who would be most af-
fected. It didn't cast blame on
one side more than the other. It
wasn't presented as ammunition
for any political group to use on
another. It wasn't produced to
incite sexual, violent, or
See KILLING Page 8.
Trivia, Trivia, Trivia
1. Who is the only wonm
2. How many U.S. Presidci
3. What is the nation's highc
it?
nn two Nobel Prizes?
orn in Virginia?
lian award and who established
4. What is North Carolina's state bud. mammal, insect and reptile?
fior??0008 l� ,983 eS"mak's- uhkh stale ranks first in popula-
6. What is the world's busiest airport?
7. Who won the Heisman Memorial Trophy in 1963?
8. What are the ideal dimensions of a college basketball court?
9. How much of the Earth's water is drinkable?
10. What is the name of the first James Bond film?

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I HI I AST CAROL 1N1AN
JANUARY 29, 198?
'The Killing Fields' Shows Tyrany, Hardships Of War
Continued From Page 7.
pleasureable responses. The film
was offered in hopes of inciting
thought of how attrocious and
nauseating war is. It affects all
people, but mostly, it affects
those who hae the least amount
of control over life's uncertain-
ties the laymen.
l)ith Pran was a commoner.
He was an assistant for an
American journalist, Sydney
Schanberg Although the movie
vvas, primarily, Schanberg's ac-
count of the struggle of the Cam-
bodian people during the collapse
of their country's government
and his direct involvement with
some of those people, it was Pran
who took the viewers on an emo-
tional journey of those who were
left to the mercy of the Khmer
Rouge and later the North Viet-
namese. There was little mercy.
The viewers were subjected to the
entire spectrum of emotions ex-
cept those associated with hap-
piness.
There was very little happiness.
Even during times when humor
was injected by those who were
trying to momentarily rise above
their malady, Pran rarely was
amused. He was horrified. He
was afraid for Schanberg and
himself, but mostly, he was
frightened for his family. With
Schanberg's help, he arranged
for his wife and children to be
evacuated to the United States.
The audience had a chance to
feel some of that horror. They
witnessed Pran's struggle to flee
the embattled country and join
his family. They witnessed
Phnom Pehn being ripped apart
limb by limb. They also witnessed
Pran's torment after finding out
that he would not be able to
escape with the French press
corps.
It was a movie where the plot
was secondary. A movie where
the outcome didn't matter too
much. Sure, the outcome certain-
ly instigated applause, but it was
the intense realism that kept me
emotionally involved. The evi-
dent concern for family, friends,
and self intensified the realism.
Classifieds
Other elements which aided in
creating the realistic effects were
the superb cinematography and
the excellent sound track. Often-
times, a film can depict a scene's
natural beauty. But rarely can a
film place me within its essence.
For years, I've wondered when
a book or a motion picture would
be produced that would illustrate
the anguish the people of Indo-
China suffered. A depiction
which would show the concern or
hatred one person or group can
have towards another when both
are placed within the raw com-
ponents of war. In essence, I've
been waiting for a true and fac
tual account that would make us
do one thing � begin to think
before we commit ourselves to
war.
Answers To Trivia
BIUiOjlE
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SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE Your own personal
laundry service Professional, full
service laundering including free
pick up and delivery Give "Jack"
the computer answering machine, a
758 3087 DON'T BE
SCARED leave Jack a message
ana save $50 when you have your
laundry cleaned
FOR SALE: Loveseat hideaway
bea Complete with Slipcovers.
Sleeps 2 $75 firm Call 757 3326.
FOR SALE: Coffee table with 2 end
tables $110 Bunk beds $125. Call
at 752 3022
FOR SALE: VW Bug Excellent run
rung condition Call 756 82V4 after 6
p m
FOR SALE Sensory deprivation
soiation tank including pump and
heater Price negotiable Phone
"56 8160 for more info
GUITAR FOR SALE: Fender
Mustang Two pick ups, tremolo,
blue with mirrored pickguard, case
and strap included Call 752 0998, ask
for Robert
FOR SALE. 13 nch Panasonic color
TV great condition $60 752 1487
TYPING Papers correspondence,
reports and resumes Call 355 2165
and ask for Yvette
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE All typing needs. 758 5488 or
758 8241
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Elec
�-ooic typewriter Reasonable rates
Call Janice at 756 4664 evenings or
752 6106 days
TYPING SERVICE: Word pro
cessor 105 N Elm St Resumes, let
?ers theses term papers, etc Ac
curate depenaaDle service Call
Betty iaws at 752 1454
TAXES: Will do your taxes for
reasonable price Reduced rates for
students $5 for state $5 for federal
Call Dons a� 757 6557 or 355 2510
after 6
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Nonsmoker. Unfurnished
townhouse Lexington Square next
to Athletic club. $175 per month plus
deposit, half utilities. Call Janice
Gurganus at 7 57 6650 or 355 6974
after 5.30 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Village
Green Apts. $130 - ' 2 utlities. Con
tact Brad 758 9235
ROOMMATE: Male or female
wanted for Eastbrook share ex
penses 758 7180
ROOMMATE WANTED: Graduate
student desires roommate to share
NICE, partially furnished duplex. Va
rent ($150) and 'a utilities. Im
mediate occupancy! Call 756-6633.
RENT: 2 bedroom apt , fully fur
mshed & access. Ringgold Towers
Excellent location to downtown &
classes. Call 752 8945
ROOMMATE WANTED SOON:
Male preferred. Vi deposit, ,j 1st
month's rent $275, 'a utilities Cable
included 756 9910.
MALE: Dancer
deliveries Serious
Reply to Dancer,
Greenville, N.C.
for balloon
inquiries only
PO Box 1967,
PART TIME PERSON: Tues Sat
10-3:30 for balloon deliveries and to
answer phone Car needed Singing a
plus 355 2961
NATION'S SECOND LARGEST
CO Seeks mature, sharp in
dividuals Work your own hours. Get
full details cail G Jones after 6 p.m.
at 758 4155
COUNSELORS: For western North
Carolina coed 8 week summer
camp Room, meals, laundry,
salary, travel allowance, and possi
ble college credit. Experience not
necessary, but must enjoy working
with children. Only non smoking col
lege students need apply. For
application brochure write: Camp
Pinewood, 19006 Bob O Link Drive,
Miami, Florida 33015.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Cap
tains Quarters Apt. 21, $230 plus
deposit. Call Donna at 758 5901
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
split expenses I block from campus.
Call 758 3720
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $115 a month utilities included.
Great location & great roommates.
Call 758 6224
PERSONAL
PHI TAU KILLER B S Congratula
tions for an awesome display of
basketball skill. You really are "The
Heat
E.C Friday night was jammin'i
Preesh for breakfast. Say HI to the
"flasher
SIGMA NU LITTLE SISTERS:
Would like to congratulate Eric
Weninger and the Brothers for a
great rush, and to welcome the new
pledges. We're looking forward to a
great semester!
YO CHICK: You, Pepe Lopez,
Passout and Flesh are only half and
couldn't be better when shared with
the one who sits beside you in
math .
SIGMA PHI EPSILON PLEDGES:
Get ready for the adventure of your
life!
THE BROTHERS OF ALPHA
SIGMA PHI: Would like to welcome
in the new pledges from Spring
Rush. We look forward to a great
semester See you at inductions
tonight! Congratulations.
NORWEGIAN PETTER: Dump the
girl and come with me; satisfy our
passion, set this love free. Come on
let's get horizal, try it and see Men
need a lot, so come on get next to me
Economical Love.
CINDY: For two who loved each
other so much, it's a hard habit to
break I would never hold on if you
didn't want to be with me. I'll always
love you T.T.
PI KAPPA PHI HAPPY HOUR: The
brothers of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
will be having a jammin' happy hour
at The Elbo Room Wednesday night
ifs Ifx draft night so come out and
party with the Pi Kapps.
COME JOIN: The Society for Ad
vancement of Management on a tour
of the Greenville Athletic Club
Wednesday the 30th at 4:00. A free
guest pass to all who participate!
See management at its best. Info
Wayne 752 0385
HAVE A HEART: The Aerobic
Workshop will be holding aerobic
classes every Sunday in Feb. from 1
to 2 p m. $2 drop in charge for
everyone. Non members welcome
Prizes 8 free memberships will be
given away. All proceeds go to Heart
Assoc. 417 Evans St. Downtown
Greenville. 757 1608.
YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
SCHEDULE: Seniors and faculty
Feb. 4 15. Underclassmen, faculty
and senior makeups March 18 27.
All dates 9 12 a.m. and 15 p.m. Por
traits taken at the yearbook office
and it's all FREE.
GRADUATE STUDENT POR-
TRAIT SCHEDULE: Feb 4 ISatthe
yearbook office (2nd floor publica
tions building). Come by and sign up
now.
GRAD STUDENTS: You haven't
been forgotten Have your portrait
made during the senior portrait ses
sion Come by and sign up now. it's
all FREE
SENIORS: Portrait time is almost
here! The dates are Feb. 4-15 at the
yearbook office. Come by and make
your reservation now. It's all
FREE! Questions? Call 757 4501
FACULTY PORTRAITS: Are back
for the 1985 Buccaneer. Just come by
from 9-12 a.m. or 1-5 p.m. during
Feb. 4 15th No appointment
necessart and no waiting.
GET BACK JACK I. The one thing
left on campus that's FREE. Having
your smiling face in the 1985 Buc-
caneer. Seniors� Faculty portralts-
Feb. 4 15 at the yearbook office
(across from the library).
Beta Chi's: Look foreward to the
best time of your life. Work hard and
you will be rewarded. Chaka Preesh
andS1?
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Yellow gold 3 mm add a bead
necklace lost in the library. Reward
offered. Call Tiena at 753 3256
Greenville
Flower Shop
758-2774
Corner Evans & UThJSt.
GOODYEAR
xn
3 DAY
COUPON SALE
CHp & Save Now On Goodyear Guaranteed Auto Servicw.
THURSDAY. FRIDAY. AND SATURDAY ONLY1
41
pSTflTIDH
$1.00 Off
any 2 large subs
Coupon valid on deliveries
and at Sub Station.
Expires Sunday, Feb. 3rd. Mon Sa(
Corner of 4th & Reade w m m �- i 1 a.m. �1 p.m.
Downtown 752-2183 Sun- nmU Pm
Coupon
X OIL,LUBE & FILTER CHANGE
$11.88
expires 2-2-85
Coupon
'W ENGINE TUNE -UP
i .� �hi Electronic Ignition
- kdir Four Cylinder S29.88
Expires 2-2-85
. w
Coupon
WINTERIZE NOW
$15.95
Flush and refill radiator with 2 quarts of anti-freeze.
Check all hoses & belt expire 2-2-H5
QOODlYEAm
r�'
$$ CAREER ADVANCEMENT
Research Tnongle Pork, NC Employee ore now competing with Silicon Volley
and crther top employers around the country for good employees There are
Hundreds of jobs ovailible for Executives, Administrators. Professionals and
Trainees Companies in RTP represent some of the largest companies .n the
work) rf you would like a listing of these companies ond a statement on their
principle activities with phone numbers ond oddresses.mail $5 00 to
CAREER ADVANCEMENTS O BOX 12656,
RESEARCH TkIANGLE PARK.N C 27709
Money bock guarantee
37 COMPANIES EMPLOYING 23,000 EMPLOYEES
rU T
FRANK'S PIZZA
LOCATED AT THE PLAZA
take outs available 756-8798
i r
1.00 OFF j I .go OFF
Any whole
pizza purchase
I I
I I
I I
Anv whole sub
' Exp. March 1, 1985J Exp. March 1, 1985
ETIRE
CENTER
a

20 ECU Discount
For Students and Faculty
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Parkview Common
Acrow From Doctor Park
t
pucians
Open 9-5:30
MonFri.
752-1446
( orbit I
(Malcolm Danan
age and dis
release
University Center
Ik vv
3Amerudn Optometric Association
Comprehensive Visual Examinations
Optical Shop
Complete Line of Contact Lenses
10 percent Student Discount
on lenses and supplies
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
608 E. Tenth St.
Greenville
7 5 8-6600
By Appointment
Evening Hours
Available
Professional Center
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
G.BJRUDf
!
V servmof hreakfast dcuhj
choose fromz eggs any style
ho.77t, sausage or bacon
grits, hash browns
� fretook toast or pancakes
Mendenhall Snack Bar
mt. enrol VLL
I
HANGOVER SPECIALS
Buy one and get one FREE!
Chicken Biscuits
With Coupon )
expires 2-10-85
cmtriy services
I
K
OPEN 24 HOURS
758-2098
the corner of Charles and 11 rh St
vt the old creamery location
T
D00MESBUB
-
! Tl
Di ss
Prize
long-av.
True-
Door -
than 500
Four previous bestsellini
!
The D
The Pe .
Doom -
The D
Doonesbt
$2.95
� -
-�'���'
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HI 01
R f i.xl MIO f,
iS vq Iuoj paj t� 8
wp 'qosqnvis J-jaoy
1 .iiui 3jh.O f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 29. 1985
i S �Mr
DAY
N SALE
V1
I & FII rER CHANGE
V s
v : P
m
$29 8g
freeze.
2-2 85
� V
U
U Discount
�ni
5 and Faculty
nption
es
ommom
'om Docton Park
MonFn.
752-1446
9
L DENTIST
ed a caring,
onal dentist?
?ne by the doctor
iterative dentistry
tobert Cargill
(Professional Center
St. Greenville, NC
I" 53-4927
BISCUITS
SPECIALS
et one FREE!
Biscuits
mpon )
1-10-85
HOURS
?8
:r of Charles and 11th St
feamerv location
Heaven Help Us
release. u.H be coming to Hendnx Iheatre (his Sunda, Feb. 3 at 8 p.m.
NEW! THE DOONESBURY DOSSIER
'tYou may think the return of
Doonesbury pales in comparison
to the questions of nuclear war,
tax reform or Supreme
Court Appointments. You
do not understand poli-
tics.JJ
� Wall Street Journal
Mew! The Doonesbury
Dossier. Celebrate Pulitzer
Prize-winning Doonesbury s
long-awaited return to newspapers with
Trudeau's 4th major anthology. Three years of
Doonesbury are packed into this collection with more
than 500 daily strips and 80 full-color Sunday pages.
Four previous bestselling Doonesbury collections are still available.
��Order nowh
Please send me the followinq:
The Doonesbury Dossier �12.95 each
� The People's Doonesbury m10.95 each
Doonesburys Greatest Hits 10.95 each
The Doonesbury Chronicles 10.95 -ach
Doonesbury: The Original Yale Cartooi s
Check
Name
Address
City
Motley Order
VISA
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Zip
2.95 each
(Include $1 for postage and handling per book ordered.)
Total amount enclosed
Makes checks payable to Andrews. McMeel & Parker.
Allov. 4 6 weeks for delivery
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Interbank "
Signature as on credit card
Hxpir Date
Mail to Doonesbury Books co This newspaper
4400 Johnson Drive, Fairway. Kansas 66205
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone beginners "in between"
students, and advanced Put some excitement ,nTo your rolleS
BEQINNER Of. ADVANp. Cost ,s about the
same as a semester maUS college $3 480
Price includes jet round trip to Seville from
New York. room, board, and tuition com-
plete Government grants and loans may be
applied towards our programs
F-6
r onege you aiteno
tout ��' � aaare.s
H you would Mfc. mlo. mataon on lulu proorwti, a.
your permanent veer aocves.
Live with a Span.sh family, attend classes
four hours a day four days a week four
months Earn .6hrs of credit (equivalent to4
semesters taught .n U S colleges over a two
year time span) Your Spamsh studies will be
enhanced by opportunities not available .n a
US classroom Standardized tests show our
students language skills super.or to students
completing two year programs in U S
Advanced courses also
Hurry ,t takes a lot of t.me to make all ar-
rangements
SPRING SEMESTER - Jan 30 . May 29
PALL SEMESTER - Aug 29 Dec 19
eac.n year
FULLY ACCREDITED - A Program of Trinity
Christian College
For full information - send coupon to
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
2442 E Collier S E . F6
Grand Rapids Michigan 49506
(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
georges
hair designers
Minimim Maintenance Hairstyling
Free consultation
P 1
Come by and see the latest in Hair Fashion
and the
1 Indoor Tanning System
The Plaza Open until 9 p.m. 752-6200
THE
COUNT
BASIE
ORCHESTRA
LIVE!
Tuesday, February 12, 1985
8:00p.m.
Wright Auditorium
ECU Campus Greenville
TICKET8 AVAILABLE:
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MONDAY - FRIDAY
11:00a.m. - 6:00p.m.
767-6611, x266
ECU 8TU0ENT8 AND QUEST: SS.OO
ECU FACULTYSTAFF AND QUEST: SS.OO
PUBLIC AND AT THE DOOR: S7.00
QROUF RATES AVAILABLE
8PON8ORE0 BY
THE STUDENT UNION SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE
X

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� � " � i�sMB�fc�B�� ,m m m �. m ,m
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"4






I HI I ASI t AKOl INIAN
Sports
JAM AKY 29, IS1' I'd.
Dukes Defeat Pirates
By SCOTT COOPER
Eric Esch scored 19 points to
lead James Madison University
to a 74-65 ECAC South Victory
over ECU.
James Madison had a balanced
scoring attack with four players
scoring in double figures. Along
with Esch's 19, freshman guard
Robert Griffin added 16 points.
Forward John Newman chipped
in 14 points and grabbed a team-
high eight rebounds. Eric Brent
was the fourth Duke in double
figures with 10.
Despite having the poorest
field-goal shooting percentage in
the ECAC South (47.3), James
Madison shot 48.9 percent for the
game. However, the cold weather
rubbed off on the Pirates, as
ECU managed to connect on just
44.4 percent from the field.
Although ECU hit five more
field goals (28-23) than the
Dukes, the Pirates were
outscored 28-9 from the charity
stripe. However, 25 of those free
throws came in the second half,
as the Pirates made a last-ditch
comeback effort by sending JMU
players to the line.
JMU coach Lou Campanelli
knew ECU would give it all thev
had.
"We knew Charlie's kids
wouldn't quit Campanelli said.
"It's a credit to Charlie and his
program. We expected a tough
game and we got it
ECU coach Charlie Harrison
showed the disappointment of
the Pirate's seventh straight
defeat.
"I'm disappointed with the en-
tire team Harrison said.
"Their lack of concentration and
aggressiveness 'with a purpose
Our guys are looking for some
kind of miracle � but it's hard
work that makes things happen
Despite the snowfall, a vocal
crowd was on hand in Minges
Coliseum last night.
Scott H a r d y and Curt
Vanderhorst got the Pirates
started by scoring the first four
points. William Grady made a
steal and used the glass to give
ECU a 6-2 lead with 17.28 left in
the first half. After Esch
answered for JMU, Peter Dam
hit a jump hook to make the
Pirate lead four points (8-4)
The Dukes then outscored
ECU 10-2 behind the sharp
shooting of Griffin and Brent
The Pirates retaliated when Herb
Dixon got an outlet pass and took
it the length of the court to cut
the JMU lead to 14-12. Jack
Turnbill's three-point play with
11:17 remaining gave E I the
lead 15-14.
When Brent hit a 10 footer
with 3:00 left in the first half,
JMU opened its biggest first-half
lead, 25-19. A Turnbill seven
foot jumper cut the lead to 25-21.
Then, Dixon grabbed a missed
JMU free throw ar.d dished a
pass to Grady for a slam dunk.
This cut tlie Dukes' lead to two,
with 1:38 left in the first period
The teams traded baskets as
Hardy's 13 footer sent the team
to the lockerroom with JMl
leading 29-2
Charlie Harrison felt ECl
bench helped them stav in the
contest.
"In the first half, our bench
helped keep us in the game
Harrison remarked. "Thev
helped prevent a blow out.
"Herbie (Dixon) plaved with
assertiveness Harrison con-
tinued. "Jack and Peter (Turnbill
and Dam) also played well �
they've been working really h
in practice. I'm a firm believe: I
'how well you practice is going lo
determine how well vou nlav
In the second half, Leon Be-
lied the game at 29 29 with a tur
naround jumper A Hardv steal
led to a Dixon layup and a Pirate
lead (31-29) with 19:20 remaining
in the contest
I he Pirates lost their steam as
JMl outscored M 1 1f over
the next five minutes. Newman
and Griffin led the way for the
Dukes, but it was Esch's inside
score that gave JMl a 44 56
vantage
Vanderhorst made a steal and
-erted it into a dunk with H 36
remaining, giving ECU -
something to veil about
However, the cheering didn't
long as the Pirates could only
score two points in the next I
and a half minutes Bv now,
JML had taken command 5( -
with 7:24 lei a
The Dukes converted most
their free throw- (17 of 23) down
the stretch ECU matched JM'
ring with their outs
iting However, the Dukes
were able to hold onto their li
and win "4-65.
Charlie Harrison was plea
with the pla reshman gu
Herb Dixon.
"Herbie ke to win and hates
ose Harrison commented
"Ht ne bull bv the hon
He's not afraid to make
mistakes He's goinj e on the
r for � � .jrei. "
Dixon felt that he plaved well
e the teat:
"I penetrated prett) well
Dixon said. "I play with con-
nce We Che team) need to
put evervthing behind us and
king to the future
e Pirates nexi game is
� nst EC AC South opponent
George Mason
Saturday ! eb 2 i I aii fax, �
Darnel Jackon ,22) of James Madison shoots ever ECU'S Kei.h Medge .24) in last niKh�Tpirau' k
Swim Teams Split With ODU
, I ; . s U I, i l v
Lady Pirates Defeat Dukes
For Eighth Straight Victory
By RICK McCORMAC
Hv IOW BROUN
�Mff U ntrr
ECL1 men's swim team
defeated Old Dominion 69-44
Saturday, while the ECU women
. to the Monarch- 59-54.
The ECU men were led bv
Chris Pittelli with two freestyle
- ' Eagle's t:rst place
- in the two diving events.
The men's event also saw a new
shmen record in the
20 .dividual medley for the
Pirates. Bruce Brockschmidt top-
ped the previous record ol
1:56.88 bv clocking in at 1:56.S5.
Scotia Miller performed im-
pressively for the ECU women,
taking three of the four in-
dividual events that the Pirates
won. ECU piled up second place
points, but couldn't quite over-
come the gap that the Monarch-
opened.
The absence of Chris Holman,
the top Pirate woman, hurt E:CT
severely. "Having Chris ill af-
fected us said Coach Rick
Kobe. "I'm really pleased with
how women did without her.
"The whole team swam well
he added. "We continued the
outstanding effort of our last few
meets
The meets brought the men's
record to 5-3, while the Lady
Pirates fell to 3-4. ECU travels to
Chapel Hill to face the Tar Heels
Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Ml S SI ff AR)
400-medley relay:(EC I Robinson.
Hicks, Brockschmidt, Kaut
3:331.
1,000 freestyle: Brown (OD)
9:36.89; Brennan (EC) 9:54.94;
Hoffman (OD) 9:58.41.
200 freestyle: Pittelli (E( I
1:46 60; Cook (EC) 1:47.14;
Cheney 1:48.59.
50 freestyle: Kaut (EC) 22.08;
Hidalgo (EC) 22.51; Purzycki
(OD) 22.58.
200 individual medley: Sargent
(OD) 1:56.25; Brockschmidt
(EC) 1:56.65; Brennan (EC)
2:03.83.
meter diving: Eagle (E ;
Lydecker (OD); Durkin (EC).
200 butterfly: Brown (OD)
1:53.97; Brockschmidt (E
1:57.09; U ray (EC) 1:59.52.
100 freestyle: Pittelli (EC)
48.02; Sargent (OD) 48.46; Kaut
(1 C) 48.58.
200 backstroke: Hidalgo (EC)
2:01.11; Robinson (EC) 2:07.18;
Horton (OD) 2:09.86.
500 freestyle: Brown (OD)
4:41.17; Cook (EC) 4:49.47;
Hoffman (OD) 4:50.96.
3-meter diving; Eagle (EC);
I ydecker (OD); Seal (EC).
200 breaststroke: Hicks (EC)
2:14.8 5; Rock wood (OD)
2:17.65; Smith 2:P.69.
4O0-freestyle relay:(OD) Rogie,
Hayduk, Casazza, Hoffman
3:17.73.
HOMES'SSl VfMARY
400-medle relay: (OD) Parks,
Horvatic, Simpirini, Winters
4:07.85.
1,000 freestyle S. Miller (EC)
11:00.69; Dorn (OD) 11:16.19;
Thomas (OD) 1 1:28.14.
200 freestyle: S. Miller (EC)
1:58.98; Pierson (EC) 2:01.02;
Winters (OD) 2:04.03.
50 freestyle: James (EC) 25.69;
Park- (OD) 25.90; Banasik (OD)
26.74.
200-individual medlcv: Cholish
(OD) 2:14.5; Poust (EC)
2:15.9 Gorenflo (EC) 2:20.86.
1-meter diving: Myers (OD); L.
Miller (EC); Enderson (OD).
200 butterfly: Simprini (OD)
2:15.83; Burton 2:19.01; I udwig
(EC) 2:23.20.
100 freestyle: Cholish (OD)
54.72; James (EC) 55.26; Pierson
(EC) 55.49.
200 backstroke: Winters (OD)
2:15.16; Poust (EC) 2:15.36; Liv-
ingston (EC) 2:17.74.
500 freestyle: S. Miller (EC)
5:20.49; Dorn (OD) 5:31.63;
Thomas (OD).
3-meter diving: Myers (OD); L.
Miller (EC); Kerber (EC).
200 breaststroke: Cholish (OD)
2:29.36; Horvatic (OD) 2:32.26;
Ennis (EC) 2:36.05.
400- freest vie relay:(EC) Poust,
(iorentlo, McPherson, James
3:49.58
Track Team Shines In Florida
By BILL MTTCHELI
SUff Wrllt
The ECU men's track team
took three first-place finishes in
the I lorida Invitational Track
Meet on Sunday.
This has been the third con-
secutive meet that the Pirates
have done well in, in some of the
most competetitive meets on the
eastern seaboard. Through their
success, ECU has proved
themselves to have a good track
program.
In the 55-meter dash, Lee
McNeil took first place with a
time of 6.21 seconds, which
qualified him for the nationals.
Three of his last four races have
been under the NCAA's qualify-
ing time of 6.22.
McNeil was pleased with his
performance on Sunday.
"I felt real good about the
race McNeil said. "There was
some real good competition
there. It was great to win
Teammate Erskine Evans also
did verv well in the 55-meter
dash. Evans finished second with
a time of 6.29 seconds � a per-
sonal best.
Continuing his winning ways
from a week ago, Craig White
took first place in the 55-meter
high hurdles with a time of 7.29.
In the 400-meter run, Julian
Anderson came in first with a
time of 48.53. Anderson showed
great effort in this race. In the
backstretch, an opponent stepped
on Anderson's leg � knocking
his shoe oi'f and making Julian
finish the last 110 meters with one
shoe on. In the same race, team-
mate Phil Estes came in third
with a time 49.04.
In the 4 X 400-meter relay,
ECU finished in third place with
a time of 3:19.40. In the race, the
Pirates were without the presence
of Chris Brooks.
ECU track coach Bill Carson
was happy that the Pirates were
able to compete well, despite the
long trip.
"I would really like to com-
mend the team for doing so
well Carson remarked. "Our
season is really shaping up
o-Sport tdltof
The ECU women's basketball
team defeated James Madison
last night 70-67, to hand the
Dukes their first loss in EC AC
South play and give the Ladv
Pirates sole possession of first
place in the conference.
ECU trailed by as manv as nine
points before tying the score at 61
at the end of regulation.
In overtime, ECU tied the
score at 63 with 4:50 remaining
and was ahead 67 to 63 at the two
minute mark.
JMU trimmed the Pirate lead
to two on a bucket by Alisa Har-
ris. ECU responded with a Mom-
que Pompili free throw for a
68-65 Pirate advantage.
With only 20 seconds remain-
ing in the contest Sylvia Bragg hit
Lorainne Foster on a long pass
for a layup to put the Lady
Pirates up by five (70-65). The
Dukes scored at the buzzer to
make the final margin of defeat
three points.
"We were taking the ball out
under our basket and Anita
Anderson screened Lorainne's
(Foster) defender and Sylvia
(Bragg) hit her for the layup
ECU coach Emily Manwaring
said in describing the key play of
the contest. "That play really-
broke their back
Foster led the Lady Pirates in
scoring with 24 points, with 14
coming in the second period.
Lisa Squirewell scored 12
second-half points to help the
Pirate comeback and finished
with 19 points and 10 rebounds.
Anderson scored 12 points and
pulled down seven rebounds to
increase her consecutive double
figures streak to 13 games.
For the game, ECU shot 30 of
64 from the field for 47 percent,
while the Pirate defense limited
the Dukes to 37 percent on 27 of
74 shooting.
"We pressed them most of the
game but were unable to get
many turnovers Manwaring
said. "They were burning us
when we played our man-to-man
defense. We switched to a zone
defense in the second half and did
a much better job
With the win, ECU has now
won eight games in a row and has
outscored the opposition over
that period 610 to 478.
The win streak is the longest
for a ladv Pirate basketball t
since the 1981-82 season, and this
year's team could match
'81S2 total witl
UNC-Wi 1 mington r hur s J a v
night m Minges Coliseum.
"We plaved a weak defensive
first half Manwaring s
"But, I was reailv proud of the
way our team battled back � v.e
showed a lot o guts and came
back to win
James Madison effectiv civ
defensed the ECl transition
game in the opening halt, limiting
the Ladv Pirates to just three
fast break opportunities.
In the second the JMl
I ' :
he ECl running
� I i j -even fa
opp ring on nine ol
lo for the game.
JML wa b) freshman
center Harris, who had 15 point-
. ds in the contest.
VA " the loss JMU drop- to
13-4 a and 4 in the league.
1 ad Pirate who have
now w � consecutive league
i back to the 1983-84
seas � ire 10-8 overall and 5-0 in
EC Ac South action.
Lady
B RK K Mt OKMAC
The Ladv Pirates got an
outstanding effort from junior
guard Sylvia Bragg fi
23 points, in defeat .
University 78-67 n a n
conference game Saturday night
"Svlvia Bragg nad one ol hci
best game pi
coach Emily M i
"Her shot selecti ellent
and she reall) play
game
Bragg, who entered the
shooting only 37 percent,
blistered the tie hitting run
12 shot- from th
of seven froi
season high 23
The I ady H .
bv onh thn
6:35 mark
Ladv Pirati
12-unan-w�
coming
Navy Dei
In ECAC
By M OT1(M)PrH
David k �
second-ha
Naval
ference v
dav rughi 1 V .
Rot
22 shots fron
11 of 13 fron. � �
with a career .
also manage
high 18 ret
three shots
Vernon B : ���
point-
M;dshipmen Fre
Rees added 1
fouling out
ECl coach
praised Nav � �
formance
"They've got a
team Han s �
have verv few -
keep
lv"
ECU shot
field in the I
the Pirates .oolec:
siderabiy in
shooting 32 3 pet
The 4,22 far y
fired up early as E(
Roy Smith tip
Scott Ha
Vanderhorst Icngl
Pirate lead to 8 - -
in the opening ha
Robinson. Butler
-pearheaded the Navy
ing the Mi
15-13 with 12 54 rema 1 .
first half Keith S
Ba
giving ECl
(17-15)
The two tean
for the next nine n
Dixon then gral
and drove the leng
court - -� g
Pirates withii
36-35. Navy coach Pa
9
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Stud.
Production

The Alpha-
January 31
through
February 2, 1985
ft
6:30 p.m. M:
Anita Anderson (42) -nd Lisa Squirewell (3D are two ver imnortan.
reasons the Lady Pirates are undefeated in the ECAC South th
season. ECU has now won eight consecutive game and hasn't lost to a
conference foe in eight games, dating back to a loss last season t�
George Mason. They will try to extend both streaks Thursday ni.hi �
Minges against I NC-W. 5 ,Rni ,n
Tickets Available at
t
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J All other'
No doc
6���������
ECU Stud.
One guest per

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irates
I eon Bass
w ;th a tur-
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i Pirate
naming
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5 5 over
Newman
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�renames and hasn't losl to a
hack to a loss ast season IO
both streaks Thursday night
in

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 29, 1985
11
By RICK McCORMAC
o-Spon� Mltuc
The Lady Pirates got an
outstanding effort from junior
guard Sylvia Bragg, who scored
23 points, in defeating Radford
University 78-67 in a non-
conference game Saturday night.
"Sylvia Bragg had one of her
best games of the season ECU
coach Emily Manwaring said.
"Her shot selection was excellent
and she really played a fine floor
game
Bragg, who entered the contest
shooting only 37 percent,
Mistered the nets hitting nine of
12 shots from the floor and five
of seven from the foul line for a
season-high 23 points.
The I ady Highlanders trailed
bv onl three points (25-22) at the
6:35 mark in the first half. The
1 ady Pirates then reeled off
12-unanswered points, with eight
coming from Lorainne Foster, to
Down Radford For Ninth Win
take a 37-22 lead with 4:13 re-
maining in the opening period.
"Lorainne Foster is really pla-
ing well now Manwaring
Emily Manwaring
saidShe hit some long bombs
before the end of the half, that
put is out in front
Radford was able to reduce the
Navy Defeats Bucs
In ECAC Contest
By SCOTT COOPER
o-N�xrfi KdHof
David Robinson scored 24
econd-half points to lift the
a al Academy to an 87-68 con-
ference victory over ECU Satur-
day night in Minges Coliseum.
Robinson connected on 14 of
22 shots from the field and went
II of 13 from the line, finishing
with a career-high 39 points. He
also managed to grab a game-
high 18 rebounds, while rejecting
:hree shots.
Vernon Butler contributed 20
points and 11 rebounds for the
Midshipmen. Freshman Cliff
Rees added nine points before
fouling out.
ECU coach Charlie Harrison
praised Navy for their fine per-
formance.
"They've got a very good
team Harrison said. "They
have very few weaknesses, they
keep ou on your toes defensive-
ly
ECU shot 50 percent from the
field in the first half. However,
the Pirates cooled of con-
siderably in the second half,
shooting 32.3 percent.
The 4,22 fans got the Pirates
fired up early as ECU led 2-0 on a
Rov Smith tip-in. Jumpers by
tt Hardy and Curt
vanderhorst lenghthened the
Pirate lead to 8- with 16:16 left
'he opening half.
Robinson, Butler and Rees
spearheaded the Navy attack giv-
ing the Midshipmen the lead
15-13 with 12:54 remaining in the
first half. Keith Sledge and Leon
Bass retaliated with jumpshots,
giving ECU a two-point lead
117-15).
The two teams traded baskets
for the next nine minutes. Herb
Dixon then grabbed a rebound
and drove the lenghth of the
court to score and bring the
Pirates to within one point,
36 35. Navy coach Paul Evans
was hit with a technical foul at
the 2:28 mark. William Grady
connected on one of the free
throws to knot the game at 36-36.
However, the Midshipmen
managed to keep their composure
to lead 43-40 at intermission.
Navy coach Paul Evans was
pleased with his team's play, but
felt that their first-half play
wasn't perfect.
"We weren't patient enough in
the first half Evans said. "We
needed to make more passes and
work the ball around � we ac-
complished that in the second
period
The Pirates stayed close
throughout the second half,
despite the red-hot shooting of
6-11 center David Robinson.
After being down by as many as
nine points (51-42), ECU clipped
the Navy lead to 57-55 on a
Sledge 18-foot jumper with 12:48
left in the game.
That was the closest that the
Pirates could get. As the Mid-
shipmen took command, they
outscored ECU 24-4 over the next
nine minutes of play. During the
Navy scoring rampage, Robinson
accounted for 18 points.
With the victory, Navy extends
their winning streak to 10 games.
ECU had a balanced scoring
attack that was led once again by
sophomore Grady with 15 points.
Vanderhorst and Sledge added 12
points each. Jack Turnbill added
nine. Dixon was 4-4 from the
field for eight points.
Navy coach Evans thought that
ECU is an improved team that
has many capabilities.
"They have got some very
good athletes Evans remarked.
"They've got good shooters and
played well on their outside
game, but it's hard to win with
just that � but I know Charlie
will have his team ready come
tournament time
m
9

o
"Student Unions
! Production Committee mmmm,
The Alpha-Omega Players
In
" M A fe Neil Simon's
California
Suite
January 31
through
February 2, 1985
m



m
m
m
$

9
'
9
. m
�� 9
6:30 p.m. MSC, rm 244
Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office I
ECU Students $8.50
One guest per student $8.50
J All others $12.50
l No door sales M
9
9
9
9
1tmfm� � � i a mm mm
margin by only two points and
went to the lockcrroom trailing
the Lady Pirates, 45-32.
In the second half, ECU led by
as many as 19 points, until Rad-
ford rallied to trim the Pirate lead
to 10 with 9:44 remaining in the
game.
However, The Lady
Highlanders were unable to get
any closer, as the Lady Pirates'
held on to get their seventh-
consecutive victory.
Anita Anderson contributed 16
points and eight rebounds to the
Lady Pirate win, giving her
!2-consecutive games in double-
figure scoring.
Foster was the only other
player in double figures for ECU,
finishing with 10 points.
Bragg, in addition to leading
both teams in scoring, pulled
down seven rebounds and dished-
out six assists.
From the field, ECU was
outscored by two points by the
Lady Highlanders, but the Lady
Pirates scored 13 more points
from the foul line for the
11-point victory.
Manwaring attributed ECU's
dominance from the foul line to
her team's quickness. "We were
quicker than they were and they
were just unable to stay with us
she said. "We were able to work
the ball in for some good shots
and they were fouling us
ECU hit 24 out of 35 free
throws while Radford connected
on only 11 out of 17.
For the game, the Lady Pirates
shot 46 percent from the field
(27-58) while limiting Radford to
only 37-percent shooting (28-75).
The Lady Pirates' used a varie-
ty of defenses throughout the
game to force the Highlanders in-
to 28 turnovers.
"In the first half, we used our
full-court and half-court presses
and we were able to bulid up a
10-point lead Manwaring said.
of 24 shots from the field
The Lady Pirates' also blocked
eight shots in the game, adding to
7 think the girls are really playing
well now. Our confidence has really
improved over this winning streak, we
think we can win every game. "
�Emily Manwaring
SOFT CONTACTS
DAILY WEAR $40.00pair
EXTEND! D
WEAK $60.00pair
IINTLD $70.00pair
(blue aqua.
( green brown)
. 7 STUDENT ID REQUIRED
I h�- .vlo�- prkes do ikm unhide fees for protvsMOfvd � r � �
I rotess&mal fees depend on Wiw type And voui previous son
lens rxpenem i
Call for more information � 756-9404.
OnOMOWC
�Y�CAR�C�HT�Rf:
l)rs Hoihs W Svihai
"In the second half, we decided
to go to a man defense to put
pressure on them. We did a good
job of denying them the ball and
made them shoot from the out-
side. For the game, their starting
guards were only able to hit eight
the Radford offensive woes.
"1 think the girls are really
playing well now Manwaring
said. "Our confidence has really
improved over this winning
streak, we think we can win every
game we play
Kappa Sig
lil sisters
present
DRAFT NITE
TUE. Jan 29, 1985 8:30-1:00a. m
Adm. SI.50 18vrs. $1.00
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PI KAPP
present DRAFT NITE
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NOW THRU FEB. 2, 1985. PLEASE
SEE DETAILS IN-STORE.
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12
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 29, 1985
IRS Wrestling Begins
Bv JKANNETTF. ROTH
M�ff Wrllrt
Registration for the Budweiser-
IRS arm wrestling tournament
will be held until 5:00 p.m. this
Wednesday
All participants will receive a
tree t-shirt so no one loses out on
the action. The tournament will
begin Feb. 4, so start pumping
that iron nou
Racquetball doubles competi-
tion vsill also begin Feb. 4. Be
Mire to register by Wednesday,
Jan. 30. All matches will be
played at the Minges Coliseum
racquetball courts - get out there
and practice before it's too late.
Up and coming activities and
registration dates include: swim
meet, Feb. 4-7; co-rec bowling.
Feb. 4-5; IRS .lobbies weight lif-
ting meet, Feb. 11-13; IRS wrestl-
ing tournament. Feb. 18-20. All
these activities begin in February.
Get your teams readv to par-
ticipate and have fun.
I ast week the annual IRS
ideo games tournament was held
in the gameroom of Aycock dor-
mitorv. A record number of
students entered the one-day af-
fair. Thirty seven students push-
ed, pulled, pressed and joysticked
their way into oblivion. The
leader changed hands many times
while previous machine high
scores were set and reset.
As the dust settled, Tim
Everette won the men's division
with a grand total of 471.600
points - a new intramural record.
Henrod Demby took second
place with 336,410 points. An-
toinette Bryant finessed her way
into the female championship
with a total of 206.800. Kern
Bates finished second with
186,800.
New machine high scores were
set by a number of contestants.
Brett Schechter, Mike Sheard,
Brian Hogan, Tony Sharpe,
Tommy Skenteris. Alonzo Banks
and John Tanner should all be
congratulated for their efforts.
Check out the outdoor recrea-
tion program for Whitewater raf-
ting, backpacking and adventure
trips. These programs are
available to all students, faculty
and staff. Several trips are up-
coming in March and February,
so make your spring break plans
now.
'LIVE'
For more information regar-
ding any aspect of the IRS pro-
gram, call 757-6387 or drop by
room 204 Memorial Gym.
Remember to listen to the Ten-
nis Shoe Talkshow every Tuesday
and Thursday at 2:30 and 5:30
for highlights and interviews of
intramural action on 91.3 fm �
WZMB.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F 12 noon-1:30 p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th
Friday
Sat Sun.
M-F
9a.m8 p.m.
9a.m5:30p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
K & W Productio is
Inc.
Present
The 4 'Cuzzoo Crew 9s Razor 9s Edge
D.J. Service
Featuring the best in Dance Music,
Rock-n-Roll, Top 40, Beach and Oldies
Bose 200 wan "Music Master" amplifier with sound equalizer.
Specializing in mixing and scratching.
Dazling light show and special effects with mirror ball and strobe light,
Five years combined experience as Elbo Room D.Js.
H e Cater all Parties, Socials and Mixers
Specializing in Fraternities, Sororities and High Schools
For All Your Party Needs, Just Call 752-1463 - Ask 4 Watts
Member of Dixie Dance kings' Record Pool
� Relerenccs Available on Request �
STUDENTS y IT
MENS AND WOMENS OVERCOATS 9.95 up
TRENCH COATS 5.95
MEN'S SUIT VEST 2.95
NEW SHIPMENT Just In !
NEW SHIPMENT OF SWEATERS 5.95
-P
CORDUROY SHIRTS (REG.4.95)
BUY 4, GET 1 FREE
SV
3.95
SPECIAL
MEN'S JACKETS (cord,plaid,tweed,solids) 9.95
FREE BUTTON DOWN SHIRT WITH EACH CO A T
SUPER SPECIAL
WOMEN'S BLAZERS (some from 40's and 50's) 9.95
FREE BLOUSE WITH EACH BLAZER
Of course, JEANS, SHIRTS, CAR COATS, WINDBREAKERS,
LONGJOHNS, SKIRTS.SKI JACKETS.AND MUCH MORE.
COIN AND RING MAN
Corner Evans and 4th St.
�vt Recycled Estate Clothing From NYC, Boston, Philadelphia, etc.
AO�(NTISiO
IT POLICY
Each of these advertised ims � required to be read � -� t U
sa1? a' o beio� the advertised price n nc a&p Store en rp' as
spec ific a' v noted n ths ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED. JAN 30 AT A4P IN GREENVII 1 1
I ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
I VOUR LOCAL A&P INgreenwlle) FOR DETAILS!
mfT ' VM "eatseecssle Ta

WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE
IJOf GROUND MEAT SALE
MARKET STYLE
MORE THAN 73�o LEAN
Top Sirloin ag Ground Beef
Without
Tenderloin
Bone-In
16-19 lb.
avg
lb.
Cut Free Into
Sirloin Steaks &
Trimmings
MORE THAN 8' lI AN
Ground -
Beef
MORE TmAN l Lf AN
100o CHUCK
Ground H
Chuck . I
MORE THAN I � JAN
'00. ROUNO
Ground
Round
1
98
lb.
3 lbs
or
more
A&P QUALITY
U.S.DA INSPECTED
Smoked Picnic I Fryer Drumsticks
(SLICED ib 88c
lb.
507
lb.
JUICY
California Oranges
FIRST OF THE SEASON
Juicy Nectarines
lb.
DECORATED OR
aiuroc
m Savings -
ArtsN'FLowers
Scottowels
toiwefc
LIMIT TWO WITH
10.00 OR MORE ORDER
big
roll
JANE PARKER ROUND TOP OR
Sandwich
Bread
�!JJ.
LIMIT THREE WITH 10 00 OR MORE ORDER
24
loaves
HOMOGENIZED
Silverbrook
i
70
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 29, 1985
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 29, 1985
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.387
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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