The East Carolinian, September 18, 1984






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(Earaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday September 18,1984
Greenville, N.C.
Retirement Date
Set For Friday
VPEL HILL (UPI)
C Friday, the only presi-
the University of North
a system has ever had, set
as his retirement date
move that ends weeks of
about his future.
- tor the hoard to have
tunny to take a look at
s and what the state
iday told the UNC
Governors. "This will
interval of time for that
Johnson, the board's
airman, said the board,
session, agreed to ac-
day's retirement notice in
- 11 months after he
a Friday has dealt with
' issues honorably and
ately" over the years,
son asked for and received a
is ratification of the mc-
fted in executive session.
aid he made the deci-
conference
and their
a family
wife, Ida,
children. He said serving until
1986 was in the best interests of
the UNC system.
"We have spent a lifetime try-
ing to act in such a way Friday
said, referring to his family.
Friday could have remained
president until age 70, the man-
datory retirement age for state
employees, but he had said recent-
ly he would probably retire before
then.
Because Friday has been the
system's only president since all
state universities were joined in
1972 to form the UNC system,
there is no precedent for his suc-
cession.
Friday was born in Raphine,
Va and grew up in Dallas, N.C.
He started his career with UNC in
1948 as an assistant dean of
students at UNC-Chapel Hill and
later became president of the Con-
solidated University of North
Carolina. The Consolidated
University included UNC-Chapel
Hill, N.C. State University and
INC-Greensboro.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Students Affected
By Hurricane Diana
When the roof of a house is missing, an interesting view can be ob-
tained from above. This house at Carolina Beach was damaged by
Hurricane Diana.
By HAROLDJOYNER
Aaklul Newt Editor
The lives and property of ECU
students from the Wilmington-
Cape Fear area were threatened
by Hurricane Diana's path along
the North Carolina coastline last
week.
Wlimington resident Howard
Lippman said a tornado touching
down in his area was responsible
for the majority of the damage.
"Four houses in my
neighborhood were destroyed and
a tree fell right through my
neighbors' house. We were really
lucky we didn't receive more
damage he said.
Jesse Knight, a freshman from
Masonboro Beach, said his
parent's house suffered approx-
imately $4,500 in damages. "The
most damage we received was
from a tree falling on our house
and a lot of flooding Knight
also spent the entire weekend
clearing debris away. "I didn't
mind helping everyone, but now
I've got a bad case of poison
sumac he said.
Another Wilmington resident,
Randall Smith, said his father
lives in a trailer. "My dad told me
a twister went right through the
trailer park, but it missed his
trailer Smith said many trees
were down and his father, who
evacuated the area as soon as war-
nings were posted, said he was
without electricity for about four
days.
Sophomore Mary Mulholland
from Holden Beach said her
parents' house received little
damage. "Our screen porch was
damaged by the high winds
Mulholland said, "and some
shingles were blown off our
roof She also said the bridge to
Holden Beach was damaged and
cars were prohibited from cross-
ing it. "My parents had to walk to
their house to assess the damage.
Even though I did not go down
there, I was really worried about
my parents. Fortunately they got
out in time; before the high winds
came "
See STUDENTS, Page 5
Beach Residents Optimistic Following Diana's Destruction
B U.NMFKRJENDRAMAR
Nr� rdllor
igh the damage caused by
Hurricane Diana last week was
as originally expected,
a sub .1 clean-up job remain-
ed residents of coastal
towns hit by the storm.
The majority of structures
escape- ual destruction, but
almost ai! were missing at least a
tew shingles. At Carolina Beach,
the center of the town was flood-
ed, power lines were down and
roads close : i the beach were
covered with sand.
There were more people on top
of houses than in them, as
residents attempted to replace
missing shingles. A curfew was in
effect at most places, and power
and water were not available in
many.
Most residents seemed to accept
the damage and seemed intent on
repairing it as soon as possible. In
Carolina Beach, a drive-in theater
sported a sign reading "No
screen, thanks Diana
Odell Motsinger, a Carolina
Beach resident, said his
beachfront cottage was damaged
only slightly, with broken win-
dows and some flood damage in
the basement.
Motsinger was out on the beach
collecting wood from several
destroyed piers and planned to
build a walkway with the lumber.
During the course of the storm,
Motsinger remained on Carolina
Beach. "I spent one night at a
shelter in Wilmington, but it was
too crowded he said. "I decided
to stay home. I've been through
storms before, and I'm not sorrv I
stayed
Warren Barnes lost a 21-foot
trailer at Carolina Beach to what
appeared to be a tornado. A three
and one-half ton pickup truck was
also destroyed by the storm. The
trailer was situated at a site where
condominiums are to be built.
Barnes said the condos would be
constructed of cement and would
be "designed to withstand this
kind of storm
Another Carolina Beach resi-
dent, Leonard McDowell, lost the
roof of his 23-unit motel, The Sea
Shore Motor Lodge, and at-
tributed the lost to another tor-
nado. "I'm not scared of a hur-
ricane, but tornadoes are what
you can't protect yourself from
McDowell said.
All the units of the motel are
damaged, McDowell said, but he
plans to rebuild. "Down here,
you do what you have to do he
said. "I'll probably get it back in
shape by June or July
"I've been through a whole lot
of storms he added. "But I've
never lost any property before �
that makes it hurt a whole lot
more
A group of volunteers from the
Tennessee Southern Baptist Con-
vention showed up to help feed
the residents of Long Beach, one
of the hardest hit areas in North
Carolina.
Marie Adams said the group
had the facilities to serve about
6,000 hot meals, and she said thev
had served about 2,000 as of Fri-
day afternoon.
Helms Has Slight Lead Over Hunt In Race, Poll Shows
(UP I) � Republican Sen. Jesse
Helms holds a slight lead over
James B. Hunt Jr. in their
ric race for the North
( arolina Senate, a special Gallup
Poll shows.
If the November election had
been held last week, Helms would
have beaten Hunt 48.5 percent to
44.5 percent with 7 percent of
voters undecided, according to the
statewide poll of 1,187 registered
voters.
The Helms lead "represents a
meaningful, though narrow, dif-
ference in the Senate election
the Gallup organization saftl.
The survey, made public over
the weekend, has a margin of er-
ror of plus or minus three percen-
tage points. It was sponsored by
The News and Observer and
WRAL-TV in Raleigh, The
Greensboro Daily News and
Record, The Winston-Salem
Journal and The Sentinel, The
Citizen-Times of Asheville, The
Favetteville Times, The Wilm-
ington Star-Sews and WSOC-TV
in Charlotte.
A similar poll in May showed
Helms leading Hunt 50 percent to
46 percent with 4 percent still
undecided.
The latest survey revealed that a
gender gap exits among the state's
voters, with Helms getting more
support from men and Hunt more
support from women.
"Helms owes his present lead
primarily to his considerably
reater appeal to men. among
whom he is favored over Hunt by
a 55 percent to 39 percent
margin said the Princeton, N.J.
- based Gallup organization.
Questioned about the can-
didates' stands on six major
issues, voters favored Hunt on
four and Helms on two.
Hunt was a decisive favorite, by
53 percent to 29 percent, on who
would do better at getting more
jobs and contracts for North
Carolina. He outpolled Helms by
40 percent to 32 percent on his
ability to keep the United States
out of war in Central America.
Hunt also led, 45 percent to 38
percent, on the question of which
candidate would move North
Carolina ahead, and he edged
Helms 41 percent to 40 percent on
the issue of Social Security.
By a margin of 44 percent to 35
percent, voters regarded Helms as
more supportive than Hunt of a
nuclear arms treaty. By 46 percent
to 37 percent, they favored Helms
over Hunt on the candidates'
stands on a balanced federal
budget.
On the issue of race, black
respondents showed overwhelm-
ing preference for Hunt oer
Helms, at 88 percent to 6 percent.
The gap increased from the
Gallup poll in May, when blacks
favored Hunt 79 percent to
Helms' 15 percent.
White voters in the latest poll gae
Helms a greater advantage than
he held in the May poll.
Censorship Discussed
Banned Books Forum Held
Metal Sculpture
Sometimes the o
Bicycles parked
rdinary things in life can seem oui-of-the-ordinary when you take a second look at them,
in front of Brewster can be beautiful, in addition to being efficient.
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
Seven panelists, participating in
a series of forums sponsored by
the North Carolina Humanities
Committee, met at the Regional
Development Institute auditorium
in Greenville on September 13 to
discuss the subject of banned
books.
The panelists were: David
Broyles, Associate Professor at
Wake Forest University, Nelda
Caddell, School Media Programs
Coordinator for Region IV,
Hamilton Horton, an attorney in
Winston-Salem, Gene Lanier,
Professor of Library Science at
ECU, Kathryn Lewis, Director of
the Rural Education Institute at
ECU, Daniel Pollitt, holder of the
Kenan Professorship, Law School
UNC-Chapel Hill and Barry
Hager, Executive Director of Peo-
ple for the American Way in
North Carolina.
The topic discussed was censor-
ship in Education. Censorship is
the deleting of material con-
sidered harmful to an organiza-
tion. A few of the books attacked
(for censor) in North Carolina are
The Merchant of Venice
(Shakespeare), Grapes of Wrath
(Steinbeck), Huckleberry Fin
(Twain), Sports Illustrated and
The Bible.
The panelists offered differing
veiws on censorship. Pollitt said
he felt censorship in any form was
wrong. Others felt younger
children needed guidance in the
books they read but college-age
people were old enough to decide
what to read.
Another issue was public
schools. Broyles said he felt public
schools were not doing their job in
teaching. He added that students
were being allowed to read inap-
propriate books. Lewis said she
was tired of public schools being
the "whipping boards
Beyond the elementary level,
censorship has occured at the
university level in North Carolina.
The most contemporary episode
has been the Speaker Ban Law, an
effort to limit free speech on a
University of North Carolina
campus.
Panelists talked of the Speaker
Ban Law and also of other rights
that may conflict with First
Amendment rights.
"Censorship � whatever it's
label � limits the diversity of
ideas, opinions, and points of
view to which young people
should be exposed. And which
public schools and libraries in a
free society have an obligation not
only to provide, but to
encourage
Red Cross Offers Disaster Aid To Hurricane Victims
(UP1) � Coastal residents of
North Carolina whose homes
were destroyed or damaged by
Hurricane Diana will be able to
get help at three assistance centers
run by the American Red Cross,
officials said.
The hurricane affected 3,545
families in varying degrees, said
Jo Anne Jones of the Red Cross
disaster headquarters in Wilm-
ington. State officials have not
reached a final estimate of
damages, but it is reported to ex-
ceed $67 million.
Final figures showed 27 homes,
21 mobile homes and 20 apart-
ments along the 30-mile stretch hit
by Diana were destroyed, "those
are total losses Jones said.
An additional 253 homes, 45
mobile homes and 22 apartments
were not livable, but could be
repaired, she said.
People displaced by the storm
had left temporary shelters by
Saturday afternoon and made liv-
ing arrangements with family,
friends and lodges, Jones said.
The centers are being opened to
help residents trying to repair or
rebuld their homes by offering
them groceries, clothing, basic
household items, medical supplies
and possibly repair assistance.
"The goal of the assistance
centers is to get the families back
to normal living sitution in their
one-family unit she said.
The centers will be opened in
Wilmington at the City's Com-
munity Arts Center, in Carolina
Beach at Town Hall and in
Southport.
Funding for the project will
come from Red Cross national
headquarters in Washington,
Jones said, but she stressed that
contributions of funds or supplies
are also needed.
Insurance commissioner John
Ingram also said he would spend
Tuesday traveling through sec-
tions of the coast hit by the storm
to help pinpoint those areas which
most need assistance from his of-
fice.
Damage to the storm-battered
communities lashed by Diana,
which packed winds of 115 mph,
was considered overall to be
minimal.
Dr. Orin Pilkey, a Duke
University Geology professor who
flew over the affected areas, said
the level of damage could have
been much worse.
"My biggest impression was
that I was suprised by the lack of
damage he said. "It appeared
to me from the air that damage
was purely (from the) winds

�M
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V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 11, 1984
t
Announcements

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
The EAST CAROLINA YOUNG DEMOCRATS
will meet Wednesday, September 19 at 4:45 p.m.
In Room 212 of Mendenhall Student Center Those
interested in getting involved with the campaign
to save America are urged to attend
PSICHI
Applications for Psi Chi are due Sept 21. Pick
yours up at the psychology office, Speight Bldg
First meeting Thurs Sept 21. at 5:00 p m in the
Psi Chi library All students welcome
Refreshments served
FORMAL SMOKER
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma would like to
announce their formal smoker, to be held Sept. 19,
at 9 00 p m in the Coffee house at Mendenhall All
interested young men are encouraged to attend.
CIRCLE K
College students are turning their free time into
service projects that are helping the campus and
community The East Carolina Circle K Is a ser
vice club which has been on campus since 1954.
They are iust one of the more than 450 Circle K
clubs in North America ECU Circle K is holdl
its first meeting and membership drive on Tue
Sept 18, at 7 00 p m in the Mendenhall Stude!
Center All interested students are asked to at
teno Students are becoming more involved in ser
viceable organizations each day; Circle K is one
way students are becoming involved
HATS
Show your school spirit by purchasing an "I
love ECU" hat for only 12 00! They will be on sale
on wed Sept 19 and Thurs , Sept 20 in front of
the Rawi Building (across from Student Store)
They will be sold by your American Marketing
Association who thanks you for your support!
ILO
Come join the fun! The ILO will hold its second
meeting o' the academic year 1984 85. on Tues
day. Sept 18, 1984 at 3 00 p.m in BC 305. You do
not have to be a F L major to attend Just show
an interest in the organization and its social ac
tivities! F L majors are urged to attend Come
find out about the upcoming events of ILO and the
Oktobertest!
CADP
CADP will meet on Sept 20, at 4 00 p.m. in 218
Erwin Anyone interested in volunteer peer
counseling is welcome to attend.
DECISION
SCIENCE
Computer Applications in Decision Science
meeting Tues , Sept 18, and Wed , Sept 19 at 3 15
in 103 Rawl Only one attendance necessary All
persons interested in computer applications in
business are welcome No computer experience
necessary
BUDDHIST MEDITATION
Our first meeting will be at the Coffee Hou
Mendenhall Student Center Monday. Sept.
7 00 A presentation will be made on the "R
tion Response followed by discussion
meditation instruction Please bring a cushiori for
meditation
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will have a general meeting
on Thurs , Sept 20 at 7 00 p m in Room 103 of the
Biology Building The executive board will meet
before the general meeting at 6 30 p.m.
BIKINI CONTEST
There will be an all campus bikini contest on
Sept 18. 1984 from 9 00 unV: 2 00. Admission is
$1 00 aria for 18 year olds, $2 00 All cans will be 80
cents First place will receive S100 00 cash plus
free semester membership to Nautilus. Second
prize will be $25 00 plus keg Third prize will be
S25 00 plus lots of free gifts and all three places
receive one year free pass to the Elbo All entries
can sign up at the school Book Store on Mon and
Tues from 9 00 until 300 p.m
INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement Service in
'he Bloxton House is offering these one hour ses-
sions to aid you in developing better interviewtfct
skills for use in your job search A film and discus-
sion of how to interview through this service witi
eef
be shared Each session will be held in the Care
Planning Room at 3 p.m. Come on any of the
following dates: Sept 13, 17, 26, or Sept 18 at 7
C m.
HAPPY HOUR
Come on out to the Elbo on Wed. night for 10
cent draft and lots of dancing music! Delta Zetas
are having a happy hour starting at 8:00.
SURF CLUB
The team trials were postponed last Sunday in
big choppy waves at Hatteras due to high winds
and strong currents. These conditions made iudg
ing impossible so another date will be set and held
at Emerald Isle. The most Important meeting of
the year is this Thursday, Sept 20 In Room 221
Mendenhall at 800 p m Topics to be covered in
elude rescheduling of trials, club dues, t shirt
and jacket sales, planning of road trips, fund
raising, and scheduling of contests Contact Dave
Colby at 758 2392 for more information.
NAACP
The next meeting of the NAACP will be held on
Monday, Sept 24, at 530 in the Coffee House on
the ground floor of Mendenhall We urge anyone
interested to attend "With your support we can
accomplish something for everyone "
ZBT
There will be a ZBT cookout on Thursday, Sept
20, at 5 00 p.m If you need more information
please call Cindy at 758 5180 or Renee at 752 6495.
Hope to see everyone there!
ZBT
ZBT Little Sister Rush will be on Tues Sept 18
from 7 11 in the Coffee House
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Anyone interested in Occupational Therapy is
invited to the O.T Club meeting on Tues , Sept. 18
at 545. We will meet in Room 203 at Allied Health
Building. Nominations for new officers will be
made Hope to see you there
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its regular meeting
on Wed Sept 19 at 4:00 p.m in Rawl 341 All old
members, and anyone wishing to join are en
couraged to attend
VOTER REGISTRATION
The National Student Campaign for voter
registration will hold a organizing meeting Wed ,
Sept 19 in Mendenhall Room 212 at 8 p m This
meeting is open to all ECU students and faculty
who are interested in helping register students
Oct 1 and 2 This is a non parfisian organization
NUCLEAR WAR
Nobody wants to think about the nuclear war
issue it's much easier to forget about bombs and
concentrate on our daily lives Yet the possibility
of war is very real So, however, is our ability to
prevent it If you would like to know more about
the Nuclear Issue, and what you can do. please
plan to attend a showing of the film, "The Last
Epidemic" Afterword, there will be a short talk
and discussion led by Dr John Moskop, Pro
-fessor. Humanities Division of the ECU Medical

chool Further discussion and refreshments will
Mow the program
NAACP
The next meeting of the NAACP will be held on
Monday, Sept 24, at 5 30 in the Coffee House on
the ground floor of Mendenhall We urge anyone
interested to attend "With your support we can
accomplish something for everyone
ZBT
There will be a ZBT cookout on Thursday, Sept
20, at 500 p.m. If you need more information
please call Cindy at 758 5180 or Renee at 752 6695
Hope to see everyone there!
ZBT
ZBT Little Sister Rush will be on Tues , Sept 18
from 7 11 in the Coffee House
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Anyone interested in Occupational Therapy is
invited to the O.T Club meeting on Tues , Sept 18
at 5 45 We will meet in Room 203 at Allied Health
Building Nominations for new officers will be
made Hope to see you there.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its regular meeting
on Wed , Sept 19 at 4:00 p m in Rawl 341 All old
members, and anyone wishing to join are en
couraged to attend.
PHI SIGMA PI
Brothers! The picnic was hot and buggy, but not
many alumni were bothered, wonder why! Dinner
meeting at 5:30 Wed at Western Steer Be there
NT'S
JT Look For Sub Station II �
r Coupons In Your Phone Book
Yellow Pages On Page 7!
BEAU'S
WEDNESDAY
Greenville's Newest Ladies
Lockout
All L&ies Free
9:30 to 11:00
Free Draft & Wine
At 11:00 For Men.50 Draft
$1.50 Highballs
With Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth
Playing The Best Party and Dance Music
In Town
Shag With Us! Prize winning Team
of Judy Bazemore & Charlie Wombel
Classes beginning Sept. 18, for 6 weeks
'��"� '� � !������� ���� ���� mm.t.r(� mmt ��int� ilv All AHt HnMU M��to�h� il,u. ,
Ciu�-st�. Ar�� Welcome.
CPR
Cardlopulmonary Resuscitation classes aie
now being ottered by the Department of Universl
ty UNIONS Sign up at the Central Ticket Office In
Mendenhall from 11 am to 6 p m Monday
through Friday The cost is ji 00 for the book
Must show your valid ID card at time of enroll
ment
AMBASSADORS
The ECU Ambassadors announce the t- all Pro
motions BLITZ The membership drive is 1 huis
day, Sept 20 through Tuesday, Sept 7S Stop by
our booth at the Student Store lor an application
and information
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Looking for fun, fellowship, and friends? Come
see what Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship is all
about! Join us this Wed night at 7 in the lenKins
Art Building auditorium as we ask the musical
question, "Are you ready for Urbana?
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holyommu
nion will be celebrated on Tues evening s.ept IB,
in the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal Church �"Vi
Fourth St. (one block from Garreli Dorm) The
service will be at 5.30 p.m with fne fci.s. opal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
VOTER REGISTRATION
The National Student Campaign loi ofei
registration will hold a organizing meeting wed .
Sept 19 m Mendenhall Room 212 at 8 p m This
meeting is open to all ECU students and fai ulty
who are interested in helping register students
Oct. 1 and 2 This is a non partisian organization
NUCLEAR WAR
Nobody wants to think about the nucleai wai
issue It's much easier to forget about bombs and
concentrate on our daily lives Yet the io'
of war is very real So however, is our at, I
prevent it if you would like to know more about
the Nuclear Issue, and what ou can do please
plan to attend a showing of the filrr
Epidemic Afterword there will ce a short tai�
and discussion led by Dr Jot �� .
fessor, Humanities Division of �i . t-
School Further discussion a � ��� �sl
follow the program
STUDENTS FOR HEI
All interested persons in working
Campaign are urged to atte I
Tues at 7 00. The meetings will be he
Mendenhall For any informal! , , 834
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should contact their
advisers prior to Oct 1, 1984 to schedule an ap
pointment for preregistration for the Spring
Semester
SLAP
The Department of Speech Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for all students
eligible for admission to the upper division of
ten' her education on Mon , Sept. 17, Tues ,
Sept 18, and Wed , Sept. 19. The department will
be testing from 5 00 7 30 p m on the above days
NO APPOINTMENT IS REQUIRED The SLAP
Department is located in Belk Annex on Charles
Street There WILL NOT be a make up session
Fall Semester
MAJOR DECISION
MAKING A MAJOR DECISION GROUP: This
program is designed to aid students in choosing
an academic major in a small group format Each
participant will also receive individual aid from
the group leader if desired Group participants
will increase self knowledge of their interests,
values and abilities, learn how these relate to ma
lOrs and career decision making process. The Ma
jor Derision Group will meet Wed , Sept 26,
Thurs Sept 27, Wed . Oct 3, Thurs , Oct. 4, from
3 4pm in Room 305 Wright Annex Although ad
vance registration is not required, we would ap
preriate advance notification of interest to insure
mat we have adequate materials on hand Please
contact the Counseling Center in 307 Wright An
nex ;57 6A6U tor further information or to let us
know you plan to attend
TABLE TENNIS
All full time ECU Day Students wishing to par
ticipate m a singles Table Tennis Tournament
most register in the Mendenhall Student Center
billiards Room on the bottom floor of Mendenhall
by Sunday, Sept 30, 1984 All students living in
Residence Hall should see their Directors for ad
ai information or call 757 6611, ext. 239.
CRAFTS
All ECU students, faculty, staff, and their
:ependents 18 yrs or older are eligible to join the
Mendenhall Crafts Center located on the bottom
� a � Mendenhal' Student Center Workshops
- g offei ed in Photography, Weaving,
� Man ng stitching, various
si � is atts Children's Ceramics and
lore1 Slop by the information desk or the Crafts
C.enlei and pick up a brochure For additional in
lation call '57 6611, ext 260 (after 5 p m call
ext 27).
NEWMAN CENTER
The ECU Newman Catholic Community will
have Its weekly meeting this Wed at 5 00 p m
Come loin us for worship service, followed by our
group meeting and dinner We'll be looking for
you!
IRATES
The (rates play ultimate Tues and Thurs at
5 00 at the bottom of College Hill Drive Come and
meet new folks and throw some disc Everyone is
Invited Be there or be oblong
DELTAZETA
Reminder of your meeting at the house wed at
7:00! Please be prompt and call if you can't at
tend. Happy Hour at Elbo afterwards!
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Service in
the Bloxton House is offering one hour sessions to
help you prepare your own resume Few
graduates get jobs without some preparation
Many employers request a resume showing your
education and experience Sessions to help will be
held in the Career Planning Room at 3 p m Come
on any of the following dates September 12, 18. 27
or September 19 at 7 p m
ASSERTIVENESS WORKSHOP
A three part workshop offered to students at NO
COST by the University Counseling Center Thurs
day, September 20, 27, and October 4 All three
sessions will be conducted from 3 4 p m m 306
Wright Annex (757 6661) The workshop will focus
on helping members distinguish between their
assertive, aggressive, and nonassertive
behaviors Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly and respond to in
terpersonal situations m a manner which neither
compromises individual beliefs nor offends
others PLEASE CALL COUNSELING CENTER
FOR REGISTRATION (757 6661)
NIH
A representative from the National institute of
Health, Bethesda, MD will be on campus October
1 and 2 to interview students who would like to be
health research assistants in their Normal
Volunteer Program beginning Spring. 1985
Students will participate in experiments ana
research regarding disease control and the
human body Will receive 112 50 per day stipend
plus free room and board, and transportation paid
to and from NIH Students in the health, natural
sciences, computer science, and business fields
who may be interested should contact the Co op
office, 313 Rawl. immediately to Sign up for an in
terview
COPING WITH STRESS
ARE VOU UNDER PRESSURE" COPk
WITH STRESS! I A frtt mini class offeree � ,
ECU Counseling Center tor students Tire p
grams Program i September 19 20 24 25 a. -it
p m . 305 Wright Annex Program II Octet
111, 12 pm 305 Wright Annex Program
November 7, (, 12, 13, 3 4 p m 305 wr,8r- t
No advance registration is required Can o' voc
by the Counseling Center for further mtorr- ,� v
(307 Wright Annex 757 6661)
BLOOD DRIVE
The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Cotm.
along with the Red Cross will be sponsor - ,
Blood Drive on September It & iv t
Mendenhall Student Center Room it ye
everyone to please come donate a pinl it �.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admissior r�g
(GMAT) will be offered at East Carolina Ur .�-
sity on Saturday. Oct 20. 19�4 Appiica'lot I -
ar� to be completed and maned to GMA T Educt
tional Testing Service. Box 966 R Princel
0540 Applications must be postmarxec
than Sept 17, 194 Applications may be otot� -�-
from the ECU Testing Center Room 105
Building Greenville. N C 27834
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test arill be crHerec �� EC
on Saturday. Oct 13, 194 Application blankj
to be mailed in time to be received by the D . B
os Educational Measurements. America
Association, 211 East Chicago Ave , Chicagc
60011, by Sept 17, 19�4 Appi cations ma, be -
famed from the ECU Testing Center Sp
Building, Room 105
GRE
The Graduate Record Examination
fered at East Carolina University on Satur
OC 13 194 Application oianks are to be -
pieted ana mailed to Educational Testing Ser . �
Box 966 R, Princeton. N j 08540 Appi c�" mj
must be postmarked no later 'tiar Sep' 13
Applications may be obtained from
Tesf.no Center Room tri5 Speight Bo��-
NTE CORE
The National Teacher E �am.nations .
ter, .i! De offerer: at East Caroina ' ,c .
Saturaay Oct 27 1984 Applicaor - - .
be completed ano mailed to tie E(h -
Testing Service. Box 911 R Pr.nceton s
to arnve by Sept 24 194 Appiica on�
obtained from the ECU Test.ng Center - -
Speight Building
KROGER
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Theft,
Campus crimes for the peri'
of Sept 9-16 were
Sept 9, 3:12 a.m. - A brea
ing and entering was reported
474 Jones Residence HaSi 12.
a.m. � An attempted suicide waj
reported in Jones dorm. 2
� Michael Lewis Holiom;
Barr Alan Deans. EJv Kntrel
Forrest, Jr and Gregoi
L'mstead were taken in
by Greenville Police
burglarizing the sorority house a
801 E. Fifth Strec
photograph of the soror
was alledgedK stolen. G
Police and soront sisters dk
that the matter would
sued, but the defend;
referred to the A
Judiciary for disciplii a
Incidents of vanda
heavy during the
first home football game. Da
to state and personal ;
such a fire exting
alarm systems, is a ci
be dealt with b arres
A .ehicle parked be
Self-Care i
Provided
The Student h
a new treat!
available to stude
gram is called the Se
Clinic. The pur:
twofold: 1) to
tion about the tre i
to the student ei
make inform
the type of trea
2) to provide i
hours a day, allov
to preoceed thr
receive treatment �
his chart pulled or
to see a nurse oi
The clinic
dent Health Sen
laborator and
Wall-hung p �
structions in 4 eas
the stuc.
checklist Th.
ten questions
have pa:n in j
you have a
pressure?"
"yes" to ax
should see a health ca
for evaluation aiu:
all questions are answerc.
student pr
two where he �
temperature. 1:
less than 101 dej
continue
the temperatu
degrees, me . .
be obtained. Step : �
the student I
throat and
with a nor: a i
ture. If the thi
student goes :
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1 4p.m 305 Wr.ght Annex
- � s required Call or stop
to! turther mtormation
AMI J
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K Aoo'nation blanks
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�e postmarked no later
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 18. 1984
Theft, Vandalism Among Campus Incidents
Campus crimes for the period
of Sept. 9-16 were-
Sept. 9, 3:12 a.m. - A break-
ing and entering was reported at
474 Jones Residence Hall 12:49
a.m. � An attempted suicide was
reported in Jones dorm. 2:30 AM
Michael Lewis Holloman,
Barry Alan Deans, Elw Kittrell
Forrest, Jr and Gregory Mark
Umstead were taken into custody
by Greenville Police after
burglarizing the sorority house at
801 E. Fifth Street. A composite
photograph of the sorority sisters
was alledgedly stolen. Greenville
Police and sorority sisters decided
that the matter would not be pur-
sued, but the defendants will be
referred to the Associate Dean of
Judiciary for disciplinary action.
Incidents of vandalism were
heavy during the weekend of the
first home football game. Damage
to state and personal property,
such as fire extinguishers and
alarm systems, is a crime and will
be dealt with by arrest.
A vehicle parked beside Jones
dorm was damaged when so-
meone threw fireworks out a
dorm window. It exploded on the
hood of the car, causing damage
to the paint. 3 p.m. � A purse
was reported stolen from 319 Belk
building.
Sept. 7 � 12:45p.m. � Obscene
phone calls were reported by the
registrar's office. 3:50p.m. � An
employee of Jones Cafeteria
reported her wallet stolen. 6:50
p.m. A resident of 305-C Scott
dorm reported money stolen from
his room.
Sept. 8, 3:03 a.m. � A fight
was reported in front of Clement
dorm involving Howard Lee
Gray, B-4 Wilson Acres. 1:15
p.m. � A vehicle was vandalized
while parked in the Fifth and
Reade Street lot.
Recent Arrests
Robert Allen Moss Jr 19,
305-C Scott, dorm, was arrested
for DWI Sept. 3. Joseph 11.
McHugh, 18, 2119 Dorsett St
Burlington, arrested for activating
Self-Care Medication
Provided To Students
The Student Health Service has
a new treatment program
available to students. The pro-
gram is called the Self-Care Cold
Clinic. The purpose of the clinic is
twofold: 1) to provide informa-
tion about the treatment o' colds
to the student enabling him hei to
make informed decisii ns I
the type of treatment to seek, and
2) to provide rapid cold care 24
hours a day, allowing the student
to preoceed through the clinic and
receive treatment without having
his chart pulled or having to wait
to see a nurse or physician.
The clinic is located in the Stu-
dent Health Service between the
laboratory and the pharmacy.
Wall-hung posters provide in-
structions in 4 easy steps. First,
the student picks up a "symptom
checklist The checklist includes
ten questions such as "Do you
have pain in your chest?" or "Do
you have a history of high blood
pressure?" If the student answers
"yes" to any question he she
should see a health care provider
for evaluation and treatment. If
all questions are answered no, the
student proceeds to step number
two where he she checks his
temperature. If the temperature is
less than 101 degrees he she may
continue to step number three. It
the temperature is higher than 101
degrees, medical treatment should
be obtained. Step three instructs
the student to check his her
throat and compare what is seen
with a normal and abnormal pic-
ture. If the throat is normal the
student goes to the last step of the
clinic where he learns about the
treatment of colds. Heshe must
fill out a student prescription
sheet to obtain over-the-counter
medicines such as Chlortrimeton,
asperin, and cough syrup.
The greatest benefit of the Self-
Care Cold Clinic is education.
I he student learns how to take
e of colds through prevention
and treatment. It is very impor-
tant to follow all of the steps of
the clinic and request only those
medications needed. By doing so,
the Student Health Service is able
to maintain a larger variety of
over-the-counter medicaitons to
aid a larger number of students.
a fire alarm in Belk dorm Sept. 3.
Kenneth Lamar Hord Jr 317
Mellwood Dr Charlotte, ar-
rested for larceny
Sept. 3. Ronald Thomas Ren-
frow, 25, 518 Ringold Towers,
was arrested for breaking and
entering a motor vehicle, larceny
and tampering with a motor vehi-
cle. Renfrow, a non-student, was
arrested by Corp. Rhonda Gurley
after a motorist saw the suspect
enter several unlocked cars in the
parking lot west of Mendenhall
Student Center. The witness call-
ed the police on the blue light
phone. Renfrow was found in
possession of several articles
which he had removed from the
cars he entered. A preliminary
hearing in District court in Green-
ville is pending. Renfrow is being
held on $2,500 bond in Pitt Coun-
ty Jail.
Robert Lester Rains, 22, 100-B
Meade Street, was arrested for
DWI Sept. 6.
Shawn Mark Stahl, 316 Aycock
dorm, and Edward O'Neal Yoder,
418 Aycock, were found in
possession of two chairs stolen
from the porch of Fleming Dorm
Sept. 6. Both were referred to the
Associate Dean of the Judiciary
for disciplinary action.
Maurice Lamar Kennedy, 18,
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and Avery Williams, 18, both ol
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possession of two potted plant,
which were stolen from th�
Building and Grounds Depart
ment greenhouse near Slay dorm
Both were referred to university
disciplinary channels Sept. 6.
James Martin Gilbert, 21, 604
S. Lombard St Clayton, N.C
arrested for DWI Sept. 8 north of
Tyler Dorm.
Tommy Broom Hammock, 19,
720 Pebblebrook Drive, Raleigh,
N.C was arrested for vandalism
to fire equipment in Belk dorm
Sept. 8.
Nicholas Radeka, 23, 1036
Rocksprings Rd Greenville, and
John W. Shumaker, 26, 58 Green-
way Apts Greenville, were bann-
ed from campus after being found
in the women's restroom at
Ficklen Stadium during the
ECUTempIe football game Sept.
o.
3:40 p.m. A roll of postage
stamps was reported stolen from
the secretary's desk in 104
Ragsdale. 1:30 p.m. � Peggy
Patrice Sasser, 19, of 101
Martha's Lane, Greenville, N.C
was arrested and charged with
The Spirit Of The
stealing money and a check from
a purse in the Allied Health
building.
3:20 p.m. �- Vandalism was
reported to the sun roof of a car
parked west of Aycock dorm. 8
p.m. � A battery was reported
stolen from a car parked in the
overflow let at the Brody
building.
1:30 p.m. � Vandalism wa
reported to the hood of a vehicle"
parked at the rear of Jones dorm.
3:26 p.m. � A rug was reported
stolen from the second floor
hallway of Fleming dorm.
Sept. 15 1:55 a.m. � Dwight Alex
Bullock, 21, of 504 McLean St
Fuquay Varina, was arrested for
DWI north of Joyner Library.
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2:20 a.m. � A milk machine in
Scott dorm was reported vandaliz-
ed. 2:30 a.m. � A soft-drink
machine in Jones dorm was
reported vandalized. 7:23 p.m. �
A phone receiver and cord was
reported stolen from the lobby of
Scott dorm. 8:40 p.m. � A fire
alarm box was reported vandaliz-
ed on the fourth floor of Aycock
dorm. 9:55 p.m. � Money was
reported stolen from a wallet in a
room on the second floor of Cot-
ton dorm.
Sept. 16 12:20 a.m. � A van-
dalism was reported to a window
in 204-A Belk dorm. 3:43 a.m. �
John Edward Cotton Jr 24, of
115 Forest Rd Raleigh, N.C. was
arrested for DWI on Fifth Street.
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. o��Monu��r
Greg Rideout, Managing w�or
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10$W
September 18, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Pee Dee
A Rational Argument For Removal
Recent controversy over the
school mascot, Pee Dee the Pirate,
apparently has many people in the
administration concerned about
why The East Carolinian has
chosen to attack the symbol on its
editorial page. We would now like
to take the time to rationally argue
our reasons for being against Pee
Dee and why we think a new sym-
bol, and especially a new name, is
needed.
First of all, as most people seem
to agree, the name is funny soun-
ding. It invokes no prideful feel-
ings in any student, only ridicule.
But aside from the phonetics of
Pee Dee, the way the name was
chosen was a disservice to and
ilight of the student.
The mascot of East Carolina
�University belongs first and
foremost to .the students. We are
:he university, no matter what the
athletic department may care to
rhink. To let a group of elementary
Ntudents choose its name can only
be termed a gross injustice to each
of the more than 13,000 of us who
attend this school. To think that
public relations and the selling of
'he Pirate team is more important
than the students who show sup-
port rain or shine is not only unjust
but somewhat mean. That is why
we choose to ridicule Pee Dee. We
know outside support of our
athletic program is fundamental,
but it is never more important than
the student.
We realize we have grabbed the
gauntlet a little later than we
should have. But certainly better
late than never applies here. The
average student may not know that
his school pride was trampled over
in the name of marketing, but we
will definitely try to tell him.
The East Carolinian has had
nothing but positive response to its
columns and editorials. Not only
students, but faculty, alumni and
Greenville residents have all called
or wrote in in support of our posi-
tion. It's funny how our consti-
tuency is supposedly the same as
the Athletic department's, but
somehow we are getting different
vibes.
Tons of money have been spent
on Pee Dee, but sometimes you
just have to realize what was done
is wrong. The administration
should understand this and fold its
cards before any more money is
spent. It's time to come up with a
new symbol � one the students
like and can have pride in. Or bet-
ter yet, bring back the old, fierce
Pirate.
Often a student's voice is a cry in
the wilderness, especially when
dealing with something as power-
ful as the athletic department. But
a college education helps one to
believe that justice does prevail in
this country. We are right in call-
ing for a reassessment of our
mascot. Maybe this time the plea
will make it through the forest to
the other side.
History Tidbit � Did you know
that James Knox Polk was the 11th
president of the United States. He
was born in Mecklenburg County,
N.C on Nov. 2, 1795. A graduate
of the University of North
Carolina, he moved west and was
admitted to the Tennessee bar.
Polk was elected over Henry
Clay in 1844 and proceeded steadi-
ly to achieve four goals: the acquis-
tion of California, the settlement
of the Oregon question, the reduc-
tion of the tariff and the establish-
ment of an independent treasury.
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By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
TV New Repnbik
Mario Cuomo, governor of New York
and a Catholic, recently engaged the
hierarchy of his church in a debate on
church and state. The dialogue went
something like this:
On June 24, the new archbishop of
New York, John O'Connor, said in a
television interview, "I don't see how a
Catholic in good conscience can vote for
a candidate who explicitly supports
abortion This turned out to be
something of a last straw for the gover-
nor.
"The church has never been this ag-
gressively involved (in politics) he told
The Sew York Times. "Look at what
happened in my last legislative session �
the Catholic church killed the ERA
And, charged Cuomo, "Now you have
the archbishop of New York saying that
no Catholic can vote for Ed Koch Pat
Moynihan or Mario Cuomo � anybody
who disagrees with him on abortion
O'Connor returned the serve. He was
"surprised" at the governor's state-
ment. He protested that "my sole
responsibility is to present as clearly as I
can the formal, official teaching of the
Catholic church. I leave to those in-
terested in such teachings whether or not
the public statements of officeholders
and candidates accord with this
teaching
The Reaganite reading of this par-
ticular inquiry into the boundary bet-
ween church and state has been
characteristically enlightened.
"Shame on you, Mario Cuomo
thundered Sen. Paul Laxalt, R-Nev
from the podium of the Republican Na-
tional Convention. "The Democratic
governor of New York goes out of his
way to attack the Catholic archbishop of
New York
There was a time in this country,
echoed President Reagan at a prayer
breakfast the next day, when "a politi-
cian who spoke to or of (religious
leaders) with a lack of respect would not
long survive in the political arena
There was also a time when a lapsed
Protestant pretending to be more
Catholic than the pope would have been
hooted out of the political arena. But no
matter. The president saw a political
opening and took it.
Running for re-election on a platform
of peace, prosperity and piety, the presi-
dent is pushing "social issues" very
hard. At the Dallas breakfast he said,
"Those who are fighting to make sure
voluntary prayer is not returned to
classrooms (are) intolerant of religion.
They refuse to tolerate its importance
in our lives
Now, this is a tendentious and
dangerous charge. (To say nothing of
the language: The use of the peculiar
locution "tolerate its importance" to
mean "mandate" is Orwellian.)
In a pluralist democracy, the charge
of religious intolerance should be reserv-
ed for the gravest offenses, of which op-
position to "voluntary" school prayer is
not one. That position rests on the view
that school prayer constitutes state-
imposed religion.
If Reagan's intent is to promote
religion-in-general as opposed to ir-
religion (a not unreasonable position)
then he should support silent prayer,
which is denominationally neutral.
But his intent is to curry favor with
the Christian right, whose expressed aim
is to use the cause of religion-in-general
as a wedge to promote, using state
power whenever possible, its particular
brand of Christian fundamentalism.
So much for the politics of the debate.
What of its merits? What is the proper
role of the church in the democratic
political arena? And what is the proper
role of the believer in that arena?
Normally, the ' 'privacy" claim is
powerful. In liberal democratic theory,
to find that something is private � as
the Supreme Court chose to define (ear-
ly) abortion � is to make the strongest
possible case that it should be outside
government control.
But there is still a large area, from
pornography to polygamy ("private
morality"), that is often regulated,
restricted, sometimes banned by govern-
ment. Conservatives and liberals also
argue over whether this category should
indeed be regulated.
So, if not democratic theory or
privacy, then what? Perhaps John
Courtney Murray's notion of "civil
peace
In the 1950s Murray presented a con-
servative Catholic view of religious
pluralism in America. He was writing to
defend Catholicism from the charge that
its universalism and authoritarianism
placed it in conflict with American
religious pluralism as embodied in the
First Amendment.
Murray was no great lover of
pluralism: "Religous pluralism is
against the will of God; but it is the
human condition
Yet he argued that for the American
Catholic, it is not only a civic obligation,
but a religious duty to separate church
and state and respect religious pluralism.
He credited Roger Williams with hav-
ing (despite himself) enunciated the rele-
vant Catholic principle. "It is one thing
to command, to conceal, to approve
evil wrote Williams, "and another
thing to permit and suffer evil this suf-
ferance of permission of evil is not for
its own sake, but for the sake of the
good
Murray explained: "The 'good' here
is the public peace A civil law which
fosters it enjoys not just pragmatic but
moral validity and, ultimately, religious
sanction. The First Amendment, is not
an "an article of faith but "an article
of peace
Murray was speaking of religious
belief and practice; he was explaining
why a conscientious Catholic is not re-
quired to try to use the instruments of
state to spread them to others. He would
certainly not approve extending that
principle to abortion. Nevertheless, if
civil peace is indeed a religious value,
then Murray's argument lends religious
sanction to policies that work to
preserve that peace. Non-coercion on
abortion is surely such a policy.
One can believe that abortion is
murder and at the same time not de-
mand laws outlawing it for everyone.
The reason is that whereas normal
murder is universally accepted as evil,
abortion is not. So many Americans
don't believe it to be evil, in fact, many
believe it � however wrongly � to be a
right, that even if one could muster a
majority to ban abortion, that would
constitute a grave violation of the civil
peace, which both supports and is itself
supported by religious pluralism.
The appeal to civil peace has neithc
the populist bite of an innovation of ma-
joritarianism, nor the ring of
righteousness of an appeal to privacy.
Instead, it is a modest, conservative
reading of the duty of religious tolera-
tion. It resists the anti-abortionist
crusade not because that crusade begins
in religious belief (a rationale truly
deserving of the word "intolerant"), but
because it threatens to end in an "appeal
to heaven" � Locke's term for revolu-
tionary upheaval.
Moreover, the appeal to civil peace
does not resolve, it pacifies the conflict
between religious conscience and
political necessity. For zealots on either
side, it will have no appeal at all.
(Charles Krauthammer is a senior
editor of The Sew Republic.)
let. It4. Tailed Fratarc S�aMcal. lac
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
Being that it's been more than a week since I've thought of anything, and
being that I had to go hurricane hunting, we were unable to look at life's
jocular side last week. But, alas, I got in some new gray matter from cen-
tral supply and I'm readv to once again bring you "Things I Thought
Of
Have you ever heard anyone say, "Gee, could you hand me that nuclear
bomb there so I can stuff it down my shorts. I've got an itch that's just
killing me I haven't. Seems to me it would be something you would hear
more often in this day and age. Hmm.
Did you know that the Tanzanian government is making an artificial bar-
rier reef from discarded toenail clippings? Truth. They don't have tires and
old Dodges like we do, so they have to use what they have most of �
toenails. Tanzanians can get three drigdrogs for every basket full of toenails
they turn in.
I'm not understanding the meaning of wearing a fishnet shin over a
regular shirt. Seems to be the craze, or are there just a lot of impoverished
fishermen attending school. Heck, I guess it's great for trips to the beach,
but as fashion it seems pretty fishy to me.
Whatever happened to the Batmobile? Gee, I miss it. The B-man and
Robin the boy wonder (hard to swallow that name these days) would zoom
around just having a fun time. Maybe it's in Ficklen Stadium waiting in
vain for a full stadium so it can be given away. Zap!
Did you know that during Walter Mondale's childhood his friends called
him Wally. Some even do to this very day. So if he's Wally, then I wonder
who The Beav is?
I'm not sure I understand the concept behind these plastic shoes. 1 guess
they don't get soggy in the rain, but can you wear them to a firewalking
contest? Just exactly what does burnt flesh and plastic smell like? Oh well.
Did you notice how none of the cops on TV resemble those we have here
at ECU. Gee, you'd think Aaron Spelling or someone would dream up a
plot about round chubby guys riding around in a funny looking car giving
out parking tickets. I guess it's just too much violence and sex for the net-
works to handle.
I heard a rumor that Johnny Howell would start at QB for the flounder-
ing Pirates, with Dicky Blake and Angie Volpe in the backfield and Elmy
Meyer at center. I can't confirm it, but with how desperate oP Ed is right
now, it could be true.
Speaking of football. I'm not able to fathom how anything called a Chip-
pewa could beat a fierce Pirate. But then again, we don't have a fierce
Pirate � we have this wimp named Pee Dee hanging around our sidelines.
With a mascot named Pee Dee, we probably couldn't even beat Pitt Com-
munity College. What a bummer.
Did you know that Ronald Reagan is really God?
Do you know that the best way to get a job quickly after school is to
study 14th century renaissance chemical engineering. They offer it here in
the P.E. department � all the football players major in it. It's the truth.
ECU Goal $35,000
United W
By ELAINE PERRY
uff � nu,
The 1984-85 United Wa Cam
paign began last week with a
Campaign Kick-Off Breakfasi
sponsored by Chancellor Howell
The breakfast was held Sept
Mendenhall Student Center
proximately 80 people attendee
the breakfast including pro
fessors, deans and other ECU per
sonnel.
Andy Warren, the general
paign chairman, thankee
everyone for their support. Ht
saidSupport is important to th(
overall contributions. As a team
we'll come through November '
with our goal Warren :hankec
New Progri
By MARUAKE FREEMAN
Stall Vknirr
The ECU Counseim
located in the Wrij
building, will offer
grams during Septembei
programs will be led bj
sionai staff member and i
of charge to all stud-
Preregistration is not rec i
any of these programs.
A program entitled "H
Succeed in College" is aim
improving stud ski!
course is offered a: Three i
times in order to accom i
dividual students. The
are:
Mondav through
September 3-18, 3-4 p
Tuesdays and T h u
September 4-October -
Students Disc
Continued From Page 1
ECU's Chancellor, J
Howell, said his beach house
Wilmington received r
damage. "A couple of win
were broken and a lot of
blew inside Howell als
roof of a nearbv motel w a
1 maxell
F
KA
T
Siste
Tuesday t
Sepi
-
PI
DAUSCH&IOMD
coMPtere
Fonust $s? vex. I � "�����
Bausch&LomD
need to put your gtass
corekit instructions ana'c
two weeks tnai
BauschMomb Softens Coot
yourself today'
Drs.
Tipton Annel
. A-
4
i





"
mm
:m. sat
religious
raining
- not re-
ents of
He uould
ding that
eless, if
is value,
� -eligious
� rk to
.on on
it abortion is
le not de-
e very one.
normal
ed as evil,
Americans
act, many
- to be a
. d muster a
nat would
� the civil
self
- w
. neither
ma-
ring of
privacy,
servative
gious tolera-
abortionist
�ade begins
nale truly
ant"), but
an "appeal
?rm for revolu-
i peace
he conflict
. e and
n either
all.
?r is a senior
Rer t
� t l�c
f
u rthing, and
:o iook at life's
"om cen-
5s I Thought
I e that nuclear
hat's just
k iu would hear
artificial bar-
n't have tires and
k most of �
iket full of toenails
fct shirt over a
It of impoverished
ips to the beach,
The B-man and
days) would zoom
hum waiting in
his friends called
lly, then 1 wonder
�tic shoes. I guess
to a firewalking
lell like? Oh well.
those we have here
)uld dream up a
looking car giving
id sex for the net-
for the flounder-
ckfield and Elmy
ite ol' Ed is right
thing called a Chip-
It have a fierce
und our sidelines.
:n beat Pitt Com-
fter school is to
sy offer it here in
lit. It's the truth.
t
ft
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1984
ECU Goal $35,000
United Way Campaign Begins
Walkin' The Plank
By ELAINE PERRY
Sun Writer
The 1984-85 United Way Cam-
paign began last week with a
Campaign Kick-Off Breakfast
sponsored by Chancellor Howell.
The breakfast was held Sept. 13 in
Mendenhall Student Center. Ap-
proximately 80 people attended
the breakfast including pro-
fessors, deans and other ECU per-
sonnel.
Andy Warren, the general cam-
paign chairman, thanked
everyone for their support. He
saidSupport is important to the
overall contributions. As a team,
we'll come through November 7
with our goal Warren thanked
the agencies who contributed to
the campaign.
The Pitt County Goal is
$681,325. The total ECU goal is
$35,000. The goal is divided into
two parts. The main campus goal
is $23,000 while the goal for the
School of Medicine is $12,000.
Each division chairman has a pro-
jected goal. The goal is based on
previous goals with an increase
for this year.
Mimi Quick will be the 1984-85
main campus chairman. Sam Pen-
nington will be the Medical
School's chairman. The co-
chairmen are Nicholas Raden,
Jim Hickes, Nellie Taylor, Jim
Westmoreland, John Paines, Bill
Shires, Pam Holt and Becky
Singletary. They will work with
unit representatives within their
respective divisions, discussing
ways to meet the goals.
Lou Folger of the United Way
office spoke briefly at the
meeting. Two movies were also
shown. Folger will be helping with
publicity for the campaign.
The campaign on the main cam-
pus will end on Nov. 1. The Pitt
County deadline is Nov. 7.
Chancellor Howell said, "the
United Way is a source of essen-
tial help for the less fortunate in
our community. It provides digni-
ty and affords basic human needs
for those who cannot help
themselves. Your contribution to
the United Way can be donated.
i



1CIH� f
S6TW&TM T�i� Ht(�s
ftx? T� vjmt 7ee,
f-TAT 5C-f , xc yo-
J
)
New Programs Available At Center
I- "LjoMt rHifJK -HM
rA(i� To -5 (
u
Am i orprt�Mr
cr �
I
!uJkkjnui fcwcwo
Ujnt
By MARIJAKE FREEMAN
staff Writer
The ECU Counseling Center,
located in the Wright Annex
building, will offer several pro-
grams during September. These
programs will be led by profes-
sional staff members and are free
of charge to all students.
Preregistration is not required for
any of these programs.
A program entitled "How to
Succeed in College" is aimed at
improving study skills. This
course is offered at three different
times in order to accomodate in-
dividual students. The sessions
are:
Monday through Thursday,
September 3-18, 3-4 p.m.
Tuesdays and Thursday,
September 4-October 4, 1-2 p.m.
Monday through Thursday,
October 22-November 6, 3-4 p.m.
All sessions will be held in room
305 of the Wright Annex.
On Monday, September 24
from 4-5 p.m. in room 305 of the
counseling center, there will be a
workshop on "How to do Well on
Standardized Tests including
the LSAT and GMAT. The same
type of workshop to help prepare
for the GRE, the Graduate
Record Examination, will be on
Tuesday, September 25 from 4-5
p.m.
A "major decision group" to
aid in identifying academic ma-
jors and career areas of interest to
the student will be help on
Wednesdays and Thursdays
September 26-October 4 from 3-4
p.m. in room 305.
An assertiveness training pro-
gram will be offered in two
seperate groups. Group I will be
on Thursdays, September
20-October 4 from 3-4 p.m. and
group II on Thursdays, October
18-November 1 from 3-4 p.m.
Both groups will be in room 306
of Wright Annex.
Most college students ex-
perience stress in many ways from
taking exams to simply feeling
homesick. A program entitled
"Coping with Stress" will be held
at three different times. The times
are;
September 19, 20, 24, and 25
from 3-4 p.m.
Monday-Thursday October
8-11 from 1-2 p.m.
November 7, 8, 12, and 13 from
3-4 p.m.
These sessions are intended to
help the student cope with stress.
Yoo T0 AQ.� T�liNG thc
1 s� �I
7 u �b
Students Discuss Damage
Continued From Page 1
ECU's Chancellor, John
Howell, said his beach house near
Wilmington received minor
damage. "A couple of windows
were broken and a lot of sand
blew inside Howell also said the
roof of a nearby motel was sitting
in front of his cottage. "I feel very
lucky. It could have been a lot
worse because Diana was such a
dangerous storm. I am very glad
ECU students and my house are
still standing.M
Checkout
The
Library
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
� not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box
Clifton, NJ 07015.
If you re
7713,
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
tC�.VX VV.VWV�, lUll(�Ul��t(llll -t�
maxell
MAXELL OR PD MAGNETICS
C 90 Cnrom Tapes
3 Tapes for $9.99
Free T-Shirt or
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E�ptfesS�pi V) 1984
I

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Tuesday and H ednesday
Sept. 18& 19
9:00-until
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Bausch & Lomb Softens Contacts for $99 complete? Come see for
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For SmdwU WMi ECU 10.
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�Y�GAR�C�HI�R
Drs. Hollis & Scibal
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Buffet Lovers, take your
Pick of The Pizzas at Mr. Gatti's
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U-22W1M

Once you ve tasted
Killian s Irish Red,
you may lose your
yen for Japanese beer.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Japanese
make some pretty
fine beers.
But none of them
slow-roast their malt
like we do.
So no Japanese beer
has the color, the
character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
ofKillian'sRedAle.
So the next time
you're about to order
your favorite Japanese
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
You just may lose
your yen for anything
less.
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�HI I AS!AROl INIAN st PT1 MB! K IS 14
Last Chance
Photo Contest
The East Carolinian Name The Landmark' Contest
1 2H�2T �" tfrr -o flcH �" ' CC campus. Oi lucky freshman can
"Tf�'�� lk m1bnvorctfy identifying these two landmarks plus six
9ikmn that will t run in the next three issues Entries that correctly identify all eight will be
tFwmj,&Mt aHd � d� �U1 deUrmine.the winner. Be precise. When you think you've
Cfjf M!Lm? fom by The Easl arotihi office in the old South Building across
frxm the Ubtmy. All entries art subject to verification by the managing editor Good luck!
A0VERTIS60
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Page
Shakespeare Classic
To Be Performed
The ECU Department of
University Unions Theatre Arts
Committee will present the North
Carolina Shakespeare Festival in
its OUTREACH '84 touring pro-
duction of The Merry Wives of
Windsor, the Bard's rollicking
comedy of love and romance. The
Festival has selected this produc-
tion for touring in celebration of
the 400th Anniversary of the
Roanoke Voyages currently being
held state-wide.
The action of the play revolves
around Sir John Falstaff and his
attempt to "woo" Mistress Page
and Mistress Ford. When these
"merry wives" decide to teach
him a lesson, the resulting com-
plications lead to a boisterous
conclusion in the only comedy
Shakespeare set in his native
England. The production is
directed by Festival artistic direc-
tor Malcolm Morrison.
The tour will feature several ac-
tors in leading roles. Michael
John McGann will play Sir John
Falstaff. McGann, who hails
from New York, NY, has ap-
peared off-Broadway (most
recently in New York City's
Lambs' Theatre) and extensively
in many of the USA's regional
theatres. He has directed The
Matchmaker and Philadelphia,
Here I Come at Winston-Salem's
School of the Arts in two previous
visits to North Carolina and is
returning from Cape Cod where
he has just directed Pygmalion.
The "merry wives" are Joan
Grant and Johanna Morrison.
Grant, who played Blanch in A
Streetcar Named Desire during
the '84 season, is cast as Mistress
Page. Morrison, a veteran com-
pany member, will play Mistress
Ford. Pedro Silva, managing
Director of NCSF, returns to the
stage in the role of Page. Ford will
be performed by John Sefton, a
member of the '84 company and
head of the acting company at the
University of California at Santa
Barbara. Lesley Hunt, Assistant
Dean of Drama at the N.C.
School of the Arts and NCSF
company member for several
seasons, will play Mistress Quick-
ly.
Supporting roles will be played
by Festival veterans Lucius
Houghton as Nym, John Wood-
son as Parson Evans, Henson
Keys as Dr. Caius, Randell
Haynes as Justice Shallow,
Michael LeGue as Master Fenton.
The Festival's fall tour will
travel throughout North Carolina
and Virginia through the first
week of October. This Wooden
"0 the spring tour sponsored
by high schools and arts councils,
performed in 57 five states
throughout the southeast.
The North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival is the "state
Shakespeare Festival" and has at-
tracted audiences from all over
the country in its 80-year history.
The touring program offers many
communities a rare opportunity to
see outstanding, classical theatre.
"The Merry Wives of
Windsor" will be presented on
Thursday, September 20 at 8:15
p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
The ever-popular Shakespearean drama. "The Merr Wi.es of Windsor will be performed Thursday night at 8:15 in McGinnis Theatre.
History Buff Anticipates Anniversary Of Famous Battle
By JOHN M. CARTER
Get your chain mail polished,
your charger in shape, and your
trusty blade sharpened. Sunday,
October 14, 1984 is the 918th an-
niversary of the famous Battle of
Hastings which made William, the
Duke of Normandy, the king of
England (actually, his coronation
was not until 25 December 1066,
but who's counting?). This an-
niversary will not raise as many
eyebrows or cause as much ink to
flow as the 900th anniversary did
(an impressive number of volumes
appeared on the subject in 1966),
but at least one aspect of that
great battle, the famed, feigned
flight episode, continues to be
debated by scholars and battle
buffs.
Every American school child
knows that William the Con-
queror and his Norman cavalry
turned the tide at Hastings by
pretending to retreat, really luring
the unsuspecting Anglo-Saxons to
their doom in the valley below the
Saxon position (the Anglo-Saxons
established a defensive position
atop what is known as Senlac Hill
� about half a mile from the
present-day English town of Bat-
tle and approximately eight miles
from the village of Hastings
itself)- But, there are many
modern historians who have
argued that Americans (and
British, for that matter) are not
learning the facts regarding the
legendary feigned retreat by the
Norman cavalry.
Who started this 'legendary
story? William of Normandy had
a flimsy claim to the throne of
England. It was so shaky, in fact,
that he had to fight to make good
his claim. He needed as much
legitimizing as the Norman
historians could give him. William
of Poitiers, Duke William's
chaplain and one of our chief
medieval sources for the Battle of
Hastings, was a confidant at the
Duke's court. It was Poitier's
chronicle which first contained
the myth that has lived on � for
918 years � in the annals of
Anglo-American historiographer
Antonia Gransden, insisted that
the shrewd Norman duke, upon
seeing that his earlier charges up
Senlac Hill had proved futile,
thought of the feigned flight, a
tactical slight-of-hand, im-
mediately, right in the thick of
battle.
William the Conqueror rightly
deserves most of the accolades
bestowed upon him by historians,
medieval and modern alike.
However, it does not blemish his
reputation to demonstrate that a
manoeurve, such as the alleged
feigned flight, could not have
taken place in the manner sug-
gested by William of Poitiers and
the host of other historians who
simply took William of Poitiers at
his w oi I d( the
possibility , share graj icall)
portrayed in one-third of me 59
plates of the equally famous
Bayeux Tapestry, which is housed
in Bayeux at the Museum de la
Tapisserie de la Rein Mathilde):
Norman knights are fighting
hand-to-hand against Anglo-
Saxon infantrymen who are
wielding two-handed Danish I
tleaxes. The noise oi the struggle
must have been deafening (horses
moaning and wilting under the
weight of charge after charge;
men yelling with enthusiam and
fear; chain mail and nr)
clanging). Ho � could ' i m
"lieutenants" ge; word to 15 linn
dred or so inounted warriors in
the midst oi this tumult0
The rm th of the flight u as pass
ed on for nine centuries before
anyone thought to, or dared to,
question the validity of one of the
gospels of English medieval
history. Surely, English historians
of the 19th century thought, those
hated 'French' (well, they lived in
France, didn't they? So what if
they were Scandinavian?) must
have used dirty tricks to defeat
Harold Godwinson and the flower
of English manhood
Looking at the 'feigned flight'
from another perspective, other
historians, English, French, and
American, understanding correct-
ly that the onqueror was a gifted
warrior, leader of men, ad-
ministrator, and husband, con-
cluded that the use of a tactical
vacuum was simply another
outstanding attribute oi a great
man. Indeed. John Beeler, pro-
fessor emeritus of medieval
history at UNC-Greensboro and
author of inter alia) in England,
1066-1189, uds jne of the first
scholars writing in English to re-
ject the traditional view.
The myth of the feigned flight
at Hastings started for reasons
similar to those behind Parson
Weems' story of George
Washington and the cherry tree.
The Norman leader who had
recently succeeded in conquering
a kingdom needed a flawless,
heroic image. Norman historians,
such as William of Poitiers (and,
of course, the Bayeux Tapestry,
which was the plan of the Con-
queror's halt-brother, Bishop
Odo of Bayeux), concocted such
stories as the flight episode of the
Battle of Hastings to inflate
William the Conqueror's image
and to conceal the fact that the
Normans were very nearly beaten
by the Anglo-Saxons'
(Dr. Carter teaches medieval
history at ECC and has published
articles on the Sorman Conquest,
the Bayeux Tapestry, and crime
and sport in the Middle Ages.)
Thomas Gives Concert Benefit For Christian Coffeehouse
�Reviewer's Rap� ���nffiHI �A Personal Profile
Bv BRIAN RANGELEY
Suff Writer
Last Friday night, the Greenleaf Entertainment Center was the site
of an exciting performance by B.J. Thomas. B.J. sang for an hour
and a half, singing many of his hits from all the way back to the late
'60s as well as his more recent favorites.
The concert was a benefit for Thif Way Up, a nondenominational
Christian coffeehouse on 5th Street in downtown Greenville.
Pressing a thousand in number, the crowd lined the balconies and
crowded the stagefront for the 8 p.m. opening. Logos, a middle-of-
the-road contemporary Christian band from Raleigh, performed the
warm-up show.
Logos' performance left me cold. Don't get me wrong; as represen-
tatives of the Christian faith, their lyrics were on target. But musically
speaking, groups like Greenville's own Cross have a much tighter, up-
front sound.
The band's seeming lack of musicianship (and practice) makes me
think that the members are actually construction workers or part-time
landscapes who gather sometimes to play at mom's church on Sun-
day nights. The drummer was chewing gum and looking around the
room; how much could he have been concentrating on the music?
The band wasn't a total loss. I didn't recognize many of the tunes,
which says that some of their music is probably original. At least one
of the band members has some talent. Logos just needs to go back
home to the garage and practice. The group played for about an hour.
The crowd politely clapped.
The sound system whined out the nasal tones of Willie Nelson dur-
ing the 30-minute break, while B.J. Thomas' band set up. Some peo-
ple swayed and sang along with Willie while others moved forward in
anticipation, looking for a better vantage point.
The crowd was getting restless. Members of the band were moving
into place, but still no B.J. People began clapping a steady beat and
shouting, "B-J! B-J! B-J
Finally, the house lights dimmed. The crowd began cheering. The
�band began to play segments of B.J. Thomas hits, and then one of the
band members introduced the star of the B.J. Thomas show.
B.J. came onto the stage in, I guess what you could call, semi-
formal dress: a black bow tie, a tux, a black coat, and jeans that were
See Oldies, Page 8.
MARK BARBER � ECU Photo Lab
B.J. Thomas gave a meaningful performance last Friday night at the
Bv JENNY MEADOR
Miff Writer
"Nobody you know" is displayed across the the lighted slot of his
bus, but it wasn't hard to tell who "nobody" was last Friday night at
the Greenleaf. Preceeded by a band from Raleigh called Logos, the
trim and good looking B.J. Thomas strolled on stage at 9:30 p.m. and
opened with the song "A Little Bit of Love not to mention just a bit
of humor when he said, "Welcome to the show, and it's good to be
back in, uh, where are we?" The crowd immediatelv responded with
"Greenville
Thomas also commented, "It's been a long time since I've worked
with a flashlht, ' refering to spotlight. "But I guess we've just about
covered all the bases. We've played at the steakhouses, the Pizza Inns,
the parking lot, the infield, the little league park, and just about
everywhere else so I guess we're doing good
The 1984 World Tour includes the big places as well as the small
ones. Just two months ago the band and Thomas got back from tour-
ing Europe for two weeks where some of the highlights included
Switzerland, England, and Holland. Their next stop is Hazard, Ken-
tucky and the rest of the U.S.
Bass player, John Sterling Francis said, "I like working with B.J.
He's nice � he's always joking with us, even when we're not practic-
ing or playing. He's great Besides teasing the band members about
their hair cuts or hair length, Francis was worried about being
humiliated about his age. "I am the youngest member of the band.
I've been playing for him for about eight years now; I started when I
was 20 he said.
Thomas doesn't like to fly so the he and the band travel by a huge
bus that has all the comforts of home. Thomas' bedroom, in the back
of the bus, is almost larger than a dorm room. Here he keeps a small
portion of his collection of golf clubs and cowboy boots. Included in
this mini-house on wheels is a microwave, VCR unit, bathroom, and
six compartments for the band members. "The band always travels
together because they are so much like family, brothers said Marv
Francis, sister of bass player, John Francis.
But for the band members and Thomas, there's nothing like actual-
ly being home. Three of the band members are from Fayetteville
Thomas now resides in Rosenberg, Texas with his wife and three
See Thomas, Page 9.





J
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Oldies Are Still Goodies
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Williams, "I'm So Lonesome 1 Could Cn "B I anj th
as much feeling as Williams could 1
i'iut midwa) through thei houi and
ul his spiritual "transformation" and what beii
to him He mentioned how his experience with God had
how to love himseli again, and then h
"If that's not being a Christian said Hi
it is
I he statement is a powerful one, ominjj
riage and family lifi once soured, a
bod with drugs. B I mentioned i
ba k on drugs 1 homas w ai
that, cen now, he must deal with druj
H I sang most of his gospel
a platinum status
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with the audi nee, displa
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1 as! Fridaj night's concert show
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oposal ndrea Bl

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SnpfYYYprrTTTTt'
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it
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presents
GIXG, DANCING, C OMEDY
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W Kl II ALL: 757-6390 COME BY:
General Manager Messick Theatre Arts Center
rast Carolina Playhouse 5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27834 Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm
ITITII�"TTT� Mrrrr
Free wine & draft for the U
Free admission for Lady members
(guests-$1.00)
Doors open to men at 10:00
Papa Katz D.J. spins all your favorite tunes
Memphis Rockabilly rocks you
right out of your blue suede shoes
Plenty of parking & no long lines!
The Best Just Got Better
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
Every Wednesday!
For more information call 75S-557Q
The Carolina Opry House to a -
fofwrtwl
Thomas Rel
Continued rrom
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BusinessManager, Come
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GKorvi
758-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1984
5
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Thomas Relates Past Experiences To His Present Christian Attitude
i ontinued From Paa 7.
Continued From Page 7
jaughters.
in nnc nf Thn ' amiciiicni; oonicinuig nappcncu in my me seven or
�L� Mr - country h,ts he san� about hav- eight years ago and I gucsss down through the years
!n5 AZ 'J rt8frageVa tw�storv house a couple of I've lost some weight and people have been worried
klt' i IT I rlet' WeU- tloB� witn nis about me, and asking about me, but I'm not back on
golt cmes and cowboy boots, Thomas has a brown the stuff (People cheered and clapped). I'd just like
and beige two-toned Chevrolet. to say t0 thc young p here tonight, that the
rrancis. wno was wearing a pair of gold, snakeskm drugs are just something I have to deal with, I think
boots Thomas had given him said, "I think a lot of uu� J � �J-� :L -�- �
people might have been disappointed because this
was advertised as a Christian concert, but we do this
same exact show everywhere we go
Near the end of the concert Thomas shared his
views on Christianity and his testimony with
eeryone, and the crowd cheered when he first men-
tioned the word conversion.
In reference to his conversion Thomas made this gotten into them. I encourage you to just stay away
statement: "Something happened in my life seven or from them.
I think I've found that over the years I've been try-
ing to be a Christian, I'm not very religious, I'm not
a fundamental Christian. But I do believe in Jesus
and I believe in the life he lived. And I believe what
he tried to show us is that heaven, wherever that
jo might be, is not restricted. He lived a life to show that
about them tomorrow and I have to deal with them if you can love yourself, you can love other people.
tomorrow.
It's kind of related to my dad. I never really knew
if my dad loved me or not, so I ran from my feelings.
My dad is kind of like me because it's hard for him to
show his deep feelings, and shoot, I didn't know how
he felt about me. Anyway, it led into drugs. There's
And that's about as Christian as I think you can
get
Overall, the crowd couldn't have been more pleas-
ed. Kay Henderson said, "I loved it which was the
general concensus. Roy Brewer said, "I enjoyed it �
Amazing Grace was my favorite Liz Werrell was
just a little bit excited when she said, "I got to shake
his hand
And believe me, BJ's not a bad guy, afterail, he
gave me a "World Tour '84" t-shirt
Auditions Being Held For Youth Production
Classifieds
Auditions for the East Carolina ECU students, faculty and staff "
no way you can get away from drugs once you've Youth Playhouse production of Anyone wishing to audition may
MISC
LOANS ON & BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras, typewriters, gold & silver,
ng else of value. Southern Pawn
p 752 2464
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
AND NIGHTS on video cassette VHS
r BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell Hi-Fi Audio Join our video club
enjoy the Jacksons, Michael, Jer-
3 ne Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
H a e n Cyndi Lauper, The
pretenders, Cheech & Chong, The
" me The Alan Parson Project,
; an Duran, and much, much
e We make video's � John
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'58 6344.
NEED EXTRA MONEY? Free lance
; 1 si needed for local silk screening
� rm. WHi pay cash for designs. Call
756 058
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
viCEwWORD PROCESSING. Spell
g electronically checked. Term
racers and Dissertations $1 75 a page
acer included. Call Mark After 5 at
440.
iTERATIONS � CHEAP! Call SB.
I ley 7521964 after 1 p.m. MTWF
at.
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM? Ab
e!y "no charge" for repair
?es at the Tech Shop. Call
Nineteen eighty We thought
c like to know
THE WIZ CLUB and Mills Brothers
'On in cooperation with John
3eaver Video Recording Service pre
ECU College Video Night at the
: Come out and jam your body at
Vi2 beginning Thursday nite Sept.
: 964 on Video One thin skin will
� ou all in Free beer tor all ECU
students. Come check it out and jam
on video, one dollar for tree admission
and brew Time 1000 p.m. until
. ut out this ad ana carry it to the bar.
WANTED
SALE
NEEDED: PART-TIME SOCCER
COACHES for various Pitt County
Schools. Contact Alice or Barry at
752-6106 if interested.
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for
local law firm: IBM PC AT Salary
commensurate with experience. Call
758 6200.
FEMALE ROOMMATE nonsmoker
needed to share 2 bedroom apt. 5
blocks from campus. Carpeted, cen-
tral air and heat, quiet neighborhood,
bedroom furniture needed. Rent
$112 50 per month. Call 752 9110.
GWM SEEKS contact with similar -
on or off campus. Only the serious
need respond. T.C POB 4273, Green
ville.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed: Non
smoker washer and dryer provided;
New mobile home, rent $165.00, one-
half utilities; private room and
private bath; call 756-6151.
FOR SALE Emerson Stereo in good
condition, AM-FM receiver, turn-
table, and cassette player, must sell,
call Wail at 758-9856.
GOLDEN RETRIEVER and black
Lab puppies 4 females, 2 males,
wormed $10.00 pick up one week,
choose now after 5 355-6434.
SOFA FOR SALE call 752-0972. It is in
good condition and I'm willing to sell
for $25.00 or best offer.
COLOR TV 13' color T.V. - solid state
chassis, excellent condition. $90.00.
call 752-1866.
Read the
Classifieds
another children's favorite, Ozma
of Oz: A Tale of Time, are
scheduled for Wednesday and
Thursday, Sept. 26 and 27 in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center. The
auditions will begin at 7:30 p.m.
each evening in Room 206.
Ozma of Oz, a modern fantasy
loosely based upon characters
from L. Frank Baum's book of
the same title, explores the rela-
tionship between a now teenaged
Dorothy (age 14 or 15) and her
elderly Uncle Henry. In this
adventure, they meet Bill, a giant,
wisecracking chicken; the wacky
Wheelers; the vain and vicious
Langwidere; and finally the
superstrong, wonderfully wise Oz-
ma.
"There are at least 15 roles
open for casting commented
Director Douglas Ray. "Given the
age range of the cast, we want to
encourage all local residents 13 or
older to audition, as well as all
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST Ladies Gold Pulsor watch, lost
over weekend, of great sentimental
value If found, please call 758-8053.
Reward offered.
PERSONAL
TARBORO: JOHN WYATTS is
wrong- "I am missing U since you've
been gone But hey - what's love got
to do, got to do with it? I wonder! OX-
OXO Your "friend" from Greenville.
"Come Play The Indian
This Fair
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
WZMB FM, the Campus Radio Station, is now
accepting applications from talented in-
div ials interested in being DJ's. Non-talented
persons are encouraged to apply for WZMB
Business Manager. Come by WZMB and ask for
Susan Duncan or Spike, Mon-Fri between 12-2.
Canon
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T.V sv stereo's, cameras, video, microwave ovens,
bicycles, watches, binoculars, walkmans portable
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crystal, typewriters, etc.
rOtN& RlNCju
400 EVANS, "on the corner"
Downtown Greenville
752-3866
find scripts in the Reserve Room
of ECU's Joyner Library under
the heading of Theatre Arts.
Ozma of Oz will be the only
production of the East Carolina
Youth Playhouse this season and
will be performed in McGinnis
Theatre. There will be three
matinees: 9:15 a.m. on Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday,
November 12, 14 and 15, and one
evening performance at 7.15 p.m.
on Tuesday, November 13.
Tickets go on sale Monday,
November 5. For more informa-
tion call 757-6390 in Greenville.
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4

I HI J-ASI i A KOI INI N
Sports
Pirate
Optimistic Turner Ready
B I'OM HHllUN
M�ff Wrlirr
EC I volleyball swings into ,t,
tor the '84 season as the
a trs p 1 av host to I INC
nington and N C Wesleyan
0 p m, tomorrovs in Minges
;seum.
The Pirates face I Nc W in the
ning match, then the
Seahawks play Wesleyan at 8
. followed bv the final match
1 v I s Wesleyan
e season openers should pro-
vide a good test o the condition-
. im oach Imogene
has put the team through.
K - do have the home court
.mage and a break between
.he whi ild give a slight
edge to EC! as the night pro
gres
Plaveis tentatively listed as
staiteis toi E I wu hide Ann
viinda and Tanunv Riggan set
ters; Martha McQuillan middle
hitter; ami ITraci Smith, Sheri
Brinson and Dawn 1 angle)
outside hitters.
Mar) Barnum will be the
primary defensive substitute while
Kim Adams should see a lot of ac-
tion a! mid,He hittei Injuries to
two siaiteis caused a last minute
change in the lineup and strategy
according to (.oach Turner
"Barbara Chadwell broke an
ankle and Sharon Shank got a
badlv sprained knee she said
"We'i e had to t i actice at the Elm
Street Gym jn the tile-on-
concrete floor probably con
tributed to these injuries.
"We had no where else to
work-out because Minges was be
ing renovated and Memorial was
unavailable Turner com-
mented "Then last week when
we staited to practice in Minges,
the roof started leaking again and
we had to go back to Elm Street
Efforts to interview James
1 owry, Director of ECU's
Physical Plant, on why the leak
incurred, failed when he declined
to give any details on the project.
Sources at Minges speculated
the leak was due to the flashing
not being replaced around the
edge ot the newly-repaired roof,
but this could not be confirmed
without information from Mr.
1 owry.
Even the adverse practice con-
ditions have failed to damper the
team's progress, according to
(oach Turner. "The entire team
has improved tremendously she
said. " The learning attitude is the
most important aspect of the
team.
"Charlie Vincent and Nancy
Evans of the Greenville Parks and
Recreation Department made this
progress possible with their help.
They worked hard to have the
gym ready tor us
With all the hard work they've
put in. these dedicated players are
looking forward to an enthusiastic
group of supporters to help urge
them on to a good start for 1984.
H BII 1 MID HH -� -Ur-
Ftondu state

� ' �
.
.
.
I empk
The 1984 E( I Volleyball
Mingesoliseum, and the
season begins at
Pirates are readv
6:30 tomorrow nihi
to g
ACC Downs Booters Georgia
R CPftTT DmiCDC ji . , .
�MMMK
ECU soccer team couldn't overcome an early defi.it, and fell 2-0 to Atlantic Christianollege.oach
� Brodv. however, said his team showed sij.ns of improvement
By SCOTT POWERS
The ECU soccer team couldn't
overcome an early deficit against
Atlantic Christian College as thev
fell to AC C 2-0 in Wil
Thursday.
"Thev (ACC) scored two fluke
goals m the first ten minutes and
then we dominated play the re
the match was the way head
coach Steve Brody summarized
the loss.
"We :n i
our peri
Mason . . Brody added.
"I'm pleased with the way
team didn't gut .
II ios- more than just
game against A as fulll
I arry Bennett, who has
well thus tar in the seas
fered what was probably a
ending shoulder injury.
The game wa
and the Pira
to get on the b :
Pirates Fall At OMJ
B ROBERT PERRY
Stiff S"1rr
:ipated d Dominion
Invitational over the weekend, but
io a bad draw, thev onlv
rd.
angular
Dl ,
ge V . ind Pen
but Penn didn't show up
tel 'at Sh(
iqi i d uai
were played.
one and two seeded
red in tourna-
ur seeds
layers five
irnament C
eds had to
heir tourna-
acinj
I . and it
Sherman said. "Our
nen, Kevin Plum and Scott
ut the team
get a chance to practice that
ne
ch
.
She I EC!
most depth of thi
ticipating, but felt ODU had the
. 5t upper seeds
1 he Pirates next
Sept. 21-22 a

day agi UN Gre(
the E
Results:
1. Greg Willis (A) semi-
finalist; 2. Dciil I ak- ' t
c ons lation s innt r; 3 Tre-
ble f Hi cons, lati i unnei
4 Da id ch (B) consola-
tion winner; 5. Greg i oyd (. I
semi-finalist; 6 David Turner (C)
semi-finalist; 7. ke in Plum
IB) ci msola ioi lalist; 8
S ott A1 ei v (A) ation
runner-up.
Willis-Turnei . ners-
up; rrel I (A)
tion champions; Avery-Plum (A)
consolation champii
1 aMont-I oA (A) consolation
runners up.
Hall Named Florida (oach
: (UPI)
. ti (ialen
temporary
dismissed
ie wants to
a permanent
:d to he h(
the ! n ersity of
la aid I 14, who join-
stafl as ol
in February
I ears as an assistant at
iia "N opefully, it
� he next season
rida athletic director Bill
aid the search is on for a
r, and he expects to name
rmanent coach af the end ot
�son.
i - Ha ai the biggest
tnge will be motivating his
.
r goinj do everything
an � maki 'his the best
possible ' n our players
( the circumstances said
"What we are concerned
it right now is doing what is
best for our players They are the
i priority in every thought
Hall takes over for Pell, who
was tired Sunday, less that a week
after the NCAA charged the
Florida football program with 107
rules infractions.
The remainder oi the Gator
� lung staff was retained and
Can said it would finish the
season intact.
Hall is the newest member of
the Floi ida staff ai inked
to any ol the alleged viola
vered during the 21-month
N( A A in estigation.
Hall, a baldinj ofi spoken
man, said he was shocked by
Pell's dismissal but pleased
selected as intei in
"I think the players ha1 deep
loyalty to oach Pell said Hall.
"But I think thev wil foi
whoevei is head oa h, foi the
university and foi themselves "
said Hail.
A native ol � Iti na Pa Hall
graduated trom Penn State in
1962 where he played quarterback
las last two reasons and led the
Nittany I ions to victories in the
I ibertv and (iati u Bow Is.
He played briefly with the
Ml Washington Redskins and
All New Youk Jets before star
ting his coaching career as an
assistant at West Virginia. In
1966, he moved to Oklahoma.
As a top assistant tohuck
Fairbanks and Barry Switer at
Oklahoma, Hall was credited with
helping build one of college foot-
ball's best records during the
18-year period he worked in Nor-
man.
Some Florida observers feared
Hall would force the Gators to
adopt a run oriented offense
similar to the one at Oklahoma,
but Hall said he had no intention
of scrapping the Florida offensive
scheme, which features an equal
mix of the two facets of the offen-
sive game.
ECU tennis coach Pat Sherman said her team was given a bad draw in
thier weekend tournament at Old Dominion.
ECU Football Off
To Terrible Start
Ml PI EASANT, Mich. �
The ECU toot ball team fell vic-
tims to Central Michigan 17-12
this weekend, and they now stand
at 0-3 on the season the worst
start foi a Pirate football team
since 1971.
"1 don't think we're a very
good football team right now a
dejected Id Emory said after the
contest. "An Fast Carolina pro-
gram should not lose to a Central
Michigan program
Chippewa reserve quarterback
Bob DeMarco played the entire
second half for injured starter
Ron Fillmore, and guided his
team 70 yards midway through
the fourth quarter for the winning
drive.
On the previous series, ECU's
Jeff Heath had tied the score at 10
with a 40-yard field goal, but
Demarco connected with John
DeBoer on passes of 29 and 49
yards to put the ball on the Pirate
one-yard line. CMC lost three
yards on thier next two plays, but
on third and goal, Demarco found
Ted Hollern wide open in the end-
zone for the touchdown.
ECU had one last chance as
Darrell Speed replaced an injured
Robbie Bartlett on the Pirates'
next drive and moved the ball to
the Chippewa 14-vard line, but a
fourth down attempt failed to
preserve CMU's second win
without a loss this season.
Bartlett's injury was diagnosed
as torn knee ligaments, and it's
possible he might miss the re-
mainder of the season.
The only bright spot for E( I
was their ability to move the ball.
The Pirates had 325 yards worth
of offense compared to only 290
for Central Michigan, and also led
in the first down category.
ed early, we outshot them and
outplayed them all over tl
but we couldn't ever .
in the net Brody said
Brody was pleased with the
�nan
Daughtery I I 1
there
"The wh
played well aid
rh
Greg Bran ; ,

'
� �
Kareem Still Going
By DOt (, I Pf
V
Being a I i
Ai
reme: king f
grade I libra' The Big
A: The Srr of Lew 4lcindoi
i
. -
about

tl
erin.
Cat
bee
star. 1 � er Me:
S
IT I to the Milwauklee Bu �

the perfect I
mention
I can also rememl
was most envious
class an ext emely large -
sock. My t'riend w .
known ind Washing
Her and
no one in my class believed him �
except me Even though the
was and white, 1
convinced that no one bu; I ew
Alcindor could wear a sock
bit:
s 1 grew up, th it
to see a my idol wasi
paperback books made hii
be. Much to the displeasure of his
parents, he abandoned the
Catholic religion. I ater, he
changed his name to Kareem
Abdui Jabbar. Then people were
killed in a house he owned. Then
he divorced his wife. None of that
really mattered to me, though,
because 1 didn't understand most
of it. As long as he still played for
my favorite team. Milwaukee, he
could do anything else he wanted
But then he demanded to be
tr ided.
Milwaukee didn't otter hint
enough culture, the stones
Milwaukee wasn't good enough
for him. And for that matter,
neither was the Midwest. He
wanted to go to either New York
or Los Angles. And fast.
He was traded to the Fakers
and, in what was a major decision
for an eighth-grader, 1 decided to
go with him. Down came the
Milwaukee Bucks' pennant and
up went the I akers
Whenever he came back to
Milwaukee, he was booed. I ike
always, he was booed in Chicago
Then, for some (justifiable
reason, he punched cut Benson
In the process, he broke his hand.
That really didn't matter, though,
because he was suspended and fin-
ed anyway.
For a number o vears after

I
.
ser i
he
-
. :
b :�
-
career reo
Durabi
anything else. If .
you've done more
asienss
which differ be
number of game-
changed.
And do-
?out Moses Malone K e
he's in his prune K
Granted, Kareem has
rebounding I
husi.e; He's just been consist
ly brilliant sse playei
physical position.
Over spnng break, I
another book ab �
dor. This one was
autobiography Giant Steps
and in it Kareem writes ab.
masturbation, drugs and !
He talks about the "invention'
the most beautiful sight in sp
the skv hook, and his Islamic
name, which means nobU
generous, powerful serva
Mainly, though, he just wi
about being Kareem bd
Jabbar
Which, at least until now
hasn't been particulars eas
either.
Your
DateN
Place
mmmmm
f
!





1
SEPTEMBER 18, 184
M) tomorrow night in
ooters
veek.
iv another game
i October 1,
ost merican
team's opponents
will be .C.
� the Pirates
(ld Dominion '
S will
the top
ur-
P 10. and
gram '
t � winners. ,
hat the Pirates i
( om- e
and
September
irrently
as seen
ill feels
N be a good
II Going
i
�aed.
ol

the most un-
in the country.
esi �
:he court, his
ies during
ever have '
Mympics. Not
� ku ggles.
ni came ou
became more per-
. more eager
'�� Once the
him, they
le better. The
i the road now
'hat
Vegas. All
attendance
B g Fella" set
� ring record.
- red and got
the intensity
i And when
he 12-foot sky
h period.
ut jump from
' Kdreem
ore the
were saying
Vou can
" ugh. A
i eer record.
a factor as
� � ionger,
Sav,
�� � rds,
e of �
i
kilha;
icaJ i
star- telimg me
Right now,
me Kareem isn't.
ever been a
� a great
nsistent-
' - player in a
"ng break, I read
ok about Le Alcin-
�his one was his
ography - (�ant Steps
Kareem writes about
rbation, drugs and Islam
about the "invention" of
fiost beautiful sight in sports
I : hook, and h,s Islamic
which means noble and
Kous powerful servant
I Iv. though, he just writes
being Kareem Abdul-
M at least until now,
been particularly easy,

THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 18. ljjU
Pirate Opponents Have Lackluster Weekend
By BILL MITCHELL
Staff Writer
Florida State � Greg Allen led
17th ranked Florida State to a vic-
tory over Kansas, 42-16. He had
two touchdowns and 133 yards
rushing to become the Seminole's
all-time leading rusher and scorer.
Allen topped the 100-yard mark
for the 12th time in his career and
hit the top spot in career rushing
with 3,044 yards. Allen's runn-
mgmate Cletis Jones also topped
the 100-yard mark in the win.
Temple � Rutgers quarterback
Rusty Hochberg hit nine out of 11
passes in the second quarter to key
two scoring drives and lead the
Scarlet Knights to a 10-9 triumph
over the Temple Owls. Hochberg
found flanker Andrew Baker in
the end zone with a 14-yard scor-
ing pass to erase an early 3-0 Tem-
ple lead. The junior quarterback
also hit Baker on passes of 37 and
20 yards to set up placekicker
Tom Angstadt for a 38-yard field
goal for what proved to be the
winning points.
Sophomore placekicker Jim
Cooper hit field goals of 41, 39
and 43 yards to account for all of
the Temple scoring, but missed a
23-yarder in the third quarter that
could have put the Owls on top.
Temple quarterback Lee Saltz was
intercepted twice, the second stop-
ping Temple's final drive at the
Rutgers 32.
Southern � Georgia Southern
whipped Central Florida by a
score of 42-21 to run their record
to 3-0. The Eagles scored at will
against CFL, and many young
players got valuable playing time.
Georgia Southern comes into
Greenville this Saturday to face
the Pirates.
N.C. State � Furman scored on
four of it's first five possessions in
the second half, including the win-
ning touchdown with 2:50 remain-
ing in the game, to upset the
Wolfpack 34-30 in Raleigh. The
Paladins, now 3-0, took the lead
on a six yard run by tailback Rob-
bie Gardner, ending a seesaw se-
cond half battle.
The Pack led 20-10 at the half,
but Furman went 59 yards in four
plays, the last being a 35-yard
touchdown strike from quarter-
back Bobby Lamb to Kirk
Burnett, on their first series of the
second half to cut the lead to
20-17.
State tailback Vince Evans
scored on a 33-yard run and Mike
Cofer kicked a 39-yard field goal
as the Wolfpack tried to hold on
to their lead, but Chris Fox scored
for Furman on a reverse from 22
yards out and Kevin Egval kicked
a 21-yard field goal before the
Paladins final score.
Pittsburgh � The University of
Pitsburgh fell to 0-2 after being
blown out by the Sooners of
Oklahoma, 42-10, after literally
falling apart in the second half.
The Panthers could only muster
32 yards on the ground as
Oklahoma rolled to 238, as a 3-0
Panther lead at the end of the first
quarter was a 23-3 deficit by
half time. Turnovers and poor
passing by quarterback Gary Con-
gemi plauged Pittsburgh as they
never could get their offense
cranked up.
Tulsa � The University of Tulsa
fell to Brigham Young by the
score of 38-10 in a game that was
a lot closer played than the score
indicates.
BYU, primarily a passing team,
rushed for 389 yards against the
Golden Hurricane, while Tulsa
amassed 355 yards on the ground
while controlling the ball well with
ten minutes more possession time
than BYU.
Tulsa tailback Gordon Brown
had 16 carries for 116 yards as
they penetrated the BYU ten-
yardline seven times without a
score, as the Cougars used the
long ball and superb special teams
play for a lot of their scoring
East Tennessee State � ETSU
beat rival Eastern Kentucky in a
defensive battle, 10-7, on their
home turf in Johnson City. The
Buccaneers pushed their record to
3-0 with the victory and will travel
to Greenville to face the Pirates
on October 20.
South Carlina � The Gamecocks,
who stand at 1-0 on the season,
were idle. The face Duke Univer-
sity in Columbia on Saturday.
Southwestern Louisiana � The
Rajin Cajuns fell to upstate rival
Northeast Louisiana by the score
of 7-6. Northeast Louisiana's only
score came on a 36-yard
touchdown pass in the third
quarter, while the Cajuns were
only able to muster two Patrick
Russard field goals of 27 and 31
yards. USL had many oppor
tunities to win as Russard missed
three attempts as they fell to 1-2
Southern Mississippi � Southern
Mississippi dominated Louisiana
Tech, coming away with a 34-0
win as they amassed 455 yards i i
total offense.
The Eagles put the game out ol
reach early, scoring two
touchdowns in the first fo u
minutes of the game with tailba. k
Sam DeJarnette going in from the
four then returning a Tech punt
back 59 yards for another score
Quarterback Rober'
Ducksworth had a 59-yard scoring
run as the Eagles thorough,
dominated the game.
Georgia Tech Turns Tide On Alabama
(UPI) � Georgia Tech Coach
Bill Curry saw a goal set 11 mon-
ths ago become reality when his
Yellow Jackets stung Alabama,
but he cautioned against con-
fidence.
"What we don't need right now
- for people to start saying we are
a great team because of this
game Curry said after the 16-6
victory Saturday. "It's a step
That's all
It was not the only upset in the
Atlantic Coast Conference. Navy
doused North Carolina's hopes of
a victory in its season opener with
a 33-30 win and underdog Furman
slipped by North Carolina State
54-30 � twin upsets in the Tar
Heel State that left both coaches
scratching their heads.
In other ACC action, Vander-
bilt downed Maryland, 23-14;
Wake Forest downed Ap-
palachain State, 17-13; and
Virginia easily downed Virginia
Military Institute, 35-7.
In the Alabama upset, key plays
came from Tech standout Robert
Lavette. who ran for 128 yards
and a touchdown, and from
David Bell, who kicked three field
goals.
The Tech defense allowed 20th-
ranked Alabama only one scoring
drive.
Alabama went into the game as
a 7-point favorite and left with an
0-2 record.
Tar Heel Coach Dick Crum had
mixed feelings about his team's
lot.
"Our quarterbacks did some
things well and some things not so
good said Crum, whose team
allowed the Middies to complete
four touchdown passes and in-
tercept Carolina four times in the
second half before a crowd of
49,500. "They're just young
Wolfpack Coach Tom Reed
summed his teams foibles up
generally. Said he: "We made
mistakes on offense, defense and
in the kicking game
The Middes made their killer
play against the Tar Heels, 0-1,
with a 60-yard touchdown bomb
from quarterback Bill Byrne to
tailback Rich Clouse with 2:24 re-
maining. It overcame an 83-yard
scoring drive by the Tar Heels that
pushed them in front 30-25 with
4:02 left.
Clouse made the winning catch
uncovered. The defense was blitz-
ing, forcing man-to-man
coverage. Clouse lined up as a
wingback to the right and raced
straight downfield, taking a
perfect pass from Byrne and con-
tinuing untouched into the end-
zone.
Furman, 3-0, tackled the
Wolfpack with a game-winning
6-yard scamper by tailback Rob-
bie Gardner, capping a 72-yard
drive and ending a seesaw second-
half battle.
It marked the second time in
three meetings that the Division
I-AA Paladins had upset State,
now 1-1. Furman beat the Pack
17-12 in 1976 and lost 26-0 in
1982.
In Winston-Salem, Michael
Ramseur rushed 30 times for 171
yards and a third-quarter
touchdown to lift Wake Forest to
a 17-13 victory over Appalachian
State, 1-2. The Deacons boosted
their record to 1-1.
Virginia's Kevin Ferguson was
the hero for the Cavaliers, throw-
ing three touchdown passes, in-
cluding an 89-yard second-quarter
bomb to John Ford, to give
Virginia its 35-7 victory over
UMI, 0-2.
In College Park, Kurt Page
tossed two touchdown passes to
Chuck Scott to lead Vanderbilt to
a 23-14 victory over Maryland,
now 0-2. Ricky Anderson booted
three field goals for the Vander-
bilt effort.
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12
I IKOllMAN
SHHIHMBhR 18. 1W4
Gant Cruises To NASCAR Victory In Dover
DOVER, Del (UP!)
Popular Harry Cant took the lead
it the two-thirds maik and pulled
steadily ahead the rest of the way
' capture Sunday's Delaware 500
( vei the Dovei Downs "Monster
Mile" in an average speed of
ill .856 mph.
Ciant, nou a three tune winner
on the NASCAR Grand National
circuit this season, came out of
the pits ahead of Ron Bouchard to
take the lead for good.
Texan Terry Labonte, who
came into the race leading the
Winston Cup point chase, wound
up second when Bouchard ex-
perienced late tire trouble and fell
back in the pack.
Ciant and Labonte finished two
laps ahead of one-time winner
Ricky Rudd.
Veteran Dave Marcis and Dale
Earnhardt were next, three laps
off the pact.
The victory moved Gant ahead
of Dale harnhardt into second
place (3,532 to 3,507) in the
Winston Cup point competition
and 81 points behind Labonte
who leads the competition.
There are six events remaining
on the 30-race Winston Cup
series.
Gant led 281 of the 500 laps,
IRS Cracks Down On Tax Free Gifts
iREENSBORO, N. U PI)
The Internal Revenue Service
s it uill no longer allow tax
actions foi contributions to
. time college sports programs
the donations bring preferential
ket treatment.
thletic directors at North
rolina's majoi colleges said
ursda) their fund-raising cam-
paigns could be undermined if the
IRS strictly enforces the new rul-
ing.
"Not many people will con-
tribute unless they receive
something in return. It's the
American way said Ernie
Williamson, executive vice presi-
dent of North Carolina's Educa-
tional Foundation.
pedal Announcements
hit Of Intramurals
B .If- ANSI- I IE ROI'H
si�ff t mri
incements concer-
g the Inti il Recreational
v es department.
il Club: 1 he fii st Sport Club
ttncil meei c I or Sept. 19
� 00 B-103.
t)i Football: During ill 1
otball compel it ion. no rain-
ts will be replaved except for
. mens' Residence Hall Divi-
ing Deadlim

'
gles -tment
' and
�t Sept Plabegins on the
Memorial
ig Event:
ehave been
e for is ju.
our
pr
lon't
care. Just come on out and have a
good time. Bring your three guys
and three gals and sign up on
Sept. 24-27.
Sports Medicine Services:
While you're out and about
remember that the IRS Sports
Medicine Center is there for you.
So. the next time you trip up
Speight's stairway, or fall in the
road after happy hour, get your
injury evaluated, treated, taped
and rehabilitated through the
Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services. Training
o m hours are Monday -
tursday from 10 a.m. to 12
noon and 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. These
services are available for all facul-
ty . staff and students.
Plaer of the Month:
If you know of an IRS partici-
pant who puts out that little extra
effort come by Room 204
Memorial Gym and put their
name in the box marked Player Of
The Month. This person will be
ec �j nized in the IRS publication
TIDBITS and by CO.
Tankard Company. We need your
input Remember the IRS motto:
Participate rather than spectate
Organizations like the Educa-
tional Foundation, North
Carolina State's Wolfpack Club,
Duke's Iron Dukes and Wake
Forest's Deacon Club routinely
solicit money by promising that
donors will go to the head of the
list for season tickets and their
contributions will be tax exempt.a
But the IRS ruled Tuesday, "A
contribution to an athletic
scholarship program that is re-
quired to be made in order to ob-
tain the right to purchase a prefer-
red season ticket to a university's
home football games is not deduc-
tible as a charitable
contribution
In the 1982-83 fiscal year.
North Carolina raised $3.5
million, North Carolina State $2
million, Wake Forest $1.4 million
and Duke about $1 million.
"I haven't had a chance to see
the IRS interpretation in writing,
but it certainly could have an
ultimate impact on many college
athletic programs said North
Carolina Athletic Director John
Swofford.
The IRS ruling could have a big
impact on basketball in the state,
where tickets to the Atlantic Coast
Conference Tournament are the
prime plum available to large
donors.
"If it were strictly enforced, it
would do away with every foun-
dation and charitable organiza-
tion in America. I'd need to apply
for early retirement Williamson
said.
holding the lead four times. The
lead changed times 22 times
among 10 drivers, with only Gant,
Labonte, Earnhardt and
Bouchard leading more than one
lap.
There were 21 of the 40 cars
which started when the checkered
nag fell.
The race was slowed by 10 cau-
tion flags covering 75 laps. Five of
those periods occurred in the first
100 laps.
A 139-lap caution-free period
ended suddenly when the
Chevrolet driven by Tommy Ellis
of Richmond, Va went out of
control, triggering a chain-
reaction accident in the Nos. 3
and 4 turns on the 277th lap.
Six cars, including those of
Ellis, Ronnie Thomas, Rusty
Wallace, Tim Richmond, Bill
Elliott, and Jody Ridley, suffered
varying degrees of damage with
all six unable to continue.
"Something just broke loose
and spread a lot of oil on the
track said Ellis, a veteran of
short-track competition. "I guess
in the transmission.
"It happened so fast, I couldn't
do anything but ride it out. I'm all
bruised up
Richmond was taken to a local
hospital with a bruised ankle "as
a precautionary measure" follow
ing the accident.
Earlier, defending Winston
Cup champion Bobby Allison
went into the outside wall in the
No. 4 turn. He was taken to the
hospital with a fractured right
shoulder.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 18, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 18, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.360
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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