The East Carolinian, July 18, 1984






�he
(EnraiMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.Sg NoC7
Wednesday July 18,1984
Greenville, N.C.
Rep. James Martin Visits ECU;
Discusses Democratic Feuding,
Gubernatorial Campaign Plans
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Not EdHor
If Congressman James Martin,
R-N.C, is elected governor of
North Carolina in November, he
plans to have the ECU Marching
Pirates play at his in'agauration.
Martin announced this during an
appearance at the Student Supply
Store yesterday.
Martin stopped at ECU during
a campaign swing through Martin
and Pitt counties. This was his
eventh appearance in Pitt Coun-
ty, saying he recently completed
an early objective of visiting all
100 counties in North Carolina.
Martin said with the unification
the state's Republican party, he
was ready to reach out to Tar Heel
Democrats, whom he terms essen-
tial for victory in November. "If
you look at the statistics, North
Carolina is a little over three to
one in favor of Democrats. A
Republican candidate has to try
not only to get all the Republicans
but also a larger number of
Democrats or he will lose Mar-
tin said.
Recent endorsements of key
Democrats such as Monroe
Waters, former chairman of the
Eddie Knox gubernatorial cam-
paign, were cited by Martin as giv-
ing him a "big boost In-
dividuals, he said, can "do more
for the Democratic party by show-
ing independence and helping to
clean up some of the stuff that
happened during the primaries
Martin said he does not believe
the behavior exhibited by Eddie
Knox and his family members,
some of whom have declared their
support for Jesse Helms, is due to
sour grapes. Instead, he said it is a
result of the candidates' actions
during the Democratic primaries.
"If it just was a matter of winn-
ing or losing, I think they (the
Knoxes) could have accepted the
outcome of the primary he said.
"What they could not accept was
the way in which the campaign
was reduced to an undercurrent of
gossip and rumors against the
family.
"You can take losing to
somebody, but you can't take it
when they drag your family
through the muck of the cam-
paign, and that was done to
Knox's family, I think
There has been a great deal of
bitterness generated by the
Democratic primaries that Martin
said was unanticipated. "That
means there is a lot of support
coming to me through no fault of
my own, but because of bit-
terness he said.
The end result, Martin said, is
that "it has emphasized to
Democrats that they don't have to
be hidebound to vote for a can-
didate that was not their first, se-
cond or third choice
Martin stated that there will be
none of the "mudslinging"
prevalent in the gubernatorial
primaries and in the Hunt-Helms
Senate race. "I don't want to have
a campaign based on the personal
qualities and personal
characteristics and so forth. I
want us to campaign on our
public record
"I'll be raising questions about
things my opponent has not done
as attorney general Martin said.
Because of the voting power of
Democrats in the state and the
fallout from the gubernatorial
primary, Martin said he feels he
has strengths he can emphasize to
Democrats.
See MARTIN, page 3
MYAN HUMBERT � KCU PtWto Lb
N.C. gubernatorial candidate James Martin m.n.
Stata. Supp Sre � c.mpSXtpirCo��lS;0;jIrS.CyU'
Med School
Performs 1st
Triple Bypass
ECU News Buretiu
A 47-year-old Rocky Mount
man underwent open heart
surgery at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital early last Tuesday morn-
ing.
THe triple cororary bypass
surgery, which lasted approx-
imately four hours, was the first
open heart procedure performed
at the hospital.
Dr. W. Randolph Chit wood,
Jr chief cardiac surgeon at the
ECU School of Medicine, said the
patient was resting comfortably in
good condition Wednesday morn-
ing in the hospital's cardiac inten-
sive care unit.
"The surgery went verv
smoothly Chitwood said
uThat was what we expected, con-
sidering the experience d team we
have brought together here at the
medical center
The cardiac surgery team,
developed in a joint erfort by the
medical school and the hospital,
will perform approximately 125
operations in the next 12 months,
Chitwood said.
Chitwood, who just completed
a ten-year residency at Duke was
hired last week. Several members
or the cardiology team had work-
ed with him during his residency.
w j rWTk MY rWl F�K�.ng m tin County yesterday ecl Wltn him during his resi
.�J� Sontime Classical Programming Each Week
m tRNST�?BERTS dicated the board would need to Thursday from 10 D.m. to 12 am the inn cH�m : .
By ERNEST ROBERTS
Staff Wilier
Proposed formal changes made
by WZMB, the campus radio sta-
tion, were discussed when the
ECU Media Board met in Special
Summer Session on last week. The
board voted Wednesday to have
six hours of classical music per
week and a new wave segment
from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Wednesdays.
Jim Ensor, general manager for
WZMB, described the proposed
new format but Dr. John Ebbs,
faculty advisor to the Board, in-
dicated the board would need to
have a written format in order to
better evaluate the proposed
changes. Dr. Ebbs moved that the
proposals be discussed Wednes-
day and voted on Monday at the
next meeting when written
material could be available to the
Board. Ensor objected to the
delay due to the need for more
time to prepare for the Fall pro-
gramming but the delay was ap-
proved.
The proposed programming
changes included changing the
new wave show from Tuesday and
Thursday from 10 p.m. to 12 a.m.
to Wednesday from 11 p.m. to 2
a.m. The new wave change was re-
quested on an experimental basis
for the remainder of the summer.
Ensor indicated the success of the
change would be determined by
feedback from listeners and by
number of phone requests receiv-
ed.
Ensor proposed the classical
programming be deleted
altogether due to what he terms as
insufficient student support, in-
terest and need and also insuffi-
cient community need. Ebbs said
Browning, Bearden, Uhr
the station should consider cutting
back the amount of time devoted
to classical music rather than
deleting it altogether.
Rudolph Alexander, director of
University Unions and associate
dean of Student Activities, said
Monday he did not want classical
music cut from the format. Alex-
ander said he liked the Classical
format on Saturday and Sunday
and he didn't want it to be deleted
or changed.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life, said
Chancellor Howell and many
other individuals are interested in
building a quality university.
Meyer said classical music is an
important part to the total quality
of a university environment.
The board decided to incor-
porate six hours of classical music
per week and new wave from 11
p.m. to 2 a.m. Wednesday.
WZMB's summer format in-
cludes Contemporary Gospel
from 6-10 a.m. on Sundays, Inner
Rhythms (Soul) from 6-10 p.m.
on Saturdays and Sundays,
Sounds of Jazz on 6-8 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday, New Wave
from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on
Wednesday, classical and pro-
gressive rock.
WZMB, a UPI affiliate, was
founded February 2, 1982.
WZMB is a 282 watt educational
radio station designed t;) serve the
Greenville community and the
13,000 plus ECU campus popula-
tion. WZMB provides news and
special programming geared
towards the campus and com-
munity audience indludmg:
Tennis Shoe Talk Show �
WZMB covers the sport events of
the ECU Intramural program.
Deans Recall Development Of School
From its humble beginning as a throughout the '70s to brine the numh,r,H � tho, - .
From its humble beginning as a throughout the '70s to bring the
small department in 1936 to its school to its present sfrong
TZTnu f thl l5S? profes" academic standing. The future
sional school on the ECU campus, belongs to current dean Dr.
the EC! School of Business has Ernest Uhr, who took over the
prospered under the guidance of
just three men. Those three men
have held the title of Dean of the
School of Business for a total of
48 years; a unique accomplish-
ment in the academic world where
a typical dean stays in place for
about five years.
Taken individaully, their terms
of leadership define the past, pre-
sent and future of a school thrust
into prominence by a national
passion for careers in business
management. The first director,
Dr. Elmer Browning, shaped the
school's past as he led its develop-
ment from 1936 through 1968.
Following his lead, Dr. James
Bearden, now a special assistant
to the ECU chancellor, worked
reins from Bearden in 1983.
At a recent meeting on the ECU
numbered men that at socials, the
ladies had to reserve a chance to
dance by pinning tags on the
gentlemen's coats Browning
recalled.
way to provide a first rate pro-
gram for all students was to move
toward formation of an ac-
credited School of Business
For many years in the '50s and
campus, the three deans reflected began to occur when large
Changes in the student mix and early '60s, Browning labored to
in the nature of business courses
on the trends and changes that
have challenged the shcool during
their tenures.
When Browning first arrived in
Greenville in 1936, he took over
the tiny department of comm-
merce in a school of 1,600
students devoted almost exclusive-
ly to teacher education. Business
textbooks at that time dealt with
office practices, bookkeeping,
and secretarial sciences, with
perhaps a chapter in the back that
touched on business administra-
tion.
Almost all his students were
women. "Women so out-
numbers of World War
veterans enrolled at ECU in the
late forties. "The influx of am-
bitious G.Is made it necessary
for us to change our department's
lay the foundations for a solid
undergraduate program in
business administration. The ef-
fort required strong leadership.
Browning constantly pushed for
resources that were often promis-
ed but seldom delivered in full. He
focus, Browning said. "They competed for top quality instruc-
demanded courses in accounting,
marketing, and finance. They
were eager to use their education
to secure a place in the business
world
"It soon became apparent that
the courses required by these
students didn't blend well with a
program of study designed to pro-
duce teachers and secretarial per-
sonnel. I felt then that the best
tors with universities across the
country. At the same time, he per-
formed a balancing act to keep
everyone happy within his own
growing department.
When Bearden took over as
dean in 1968, a full fledged School
of Business awarding both
undergraduate and masters
See TRIO, page 3
Anti-Nuclear Group Receives Sentenc
America's 400th
America's 400th anniversary was celebrated at Manteo last weekend
Hunt, N.C. Got. James Hunt and Princess Anne. -rv,yB
On The Inside
Announcements.
Editorials
Features
Sports
Classifieds
.2
.4
.5
.7
.8
�ECU
basketball
7.
coach.
women's
See Sports,
�The ECU Summer Theatre
production of Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolor Dream-
coat and the movie The Karate
Kid are both reviewed in
Features, page 5.
ORLANDO, Fla (UPI)
Greenville resident and former
East Carolinian writer Patrick
O'Neill was one of eight members
of an anti-nuclear group known as
the Pershing Plowshares found
guilty Saturday of breaking into a
Martin Marietta defense plant and
damaging Pershing II missile
components.
A federal jury deliberated one
hour and 40 minutes before
reaching the verdict against two
women and six men, each of
whom was charged with two
counts of conspiracy and damag-
ing government property. U.S
District Judge George Young set
the sentencing for July 25.
Each defendant faces a max-
imum of 15 years in prison and a
$20,000 fine.
Members of the group broke in-
to the Orlando defense plant early
Easter Sunday and vandalized the
facility by damaging missile com-
ponents with hammers and smear-
ing blood over a patriot missile
launcher.
"I believe that under the
evidence, it's the only true verdict
they could have rendered and
been faithful to their oath said
prosecuter Tom Turner. "The
evidence is quite clear. These peo-
ple damaged government proper-
ty, and they did so intentionally
"This is the first step in a pro-
cess said defendant Patrick
O'Neill, 28, of Greenville N.C,
after the verdict. "To change the
process of slavery took a long
time. And to change the laws that
permit us to prepare for our own
mass suicide will take a while
too
The other defendants are Per
Herngren, 22, of Sweden; James
Perkins, 45, of Baltimore; Sister
Anne Montgomery, 57, a Roman
Catholic nun from New York Ci-
ty; Cristin Schmidt, 24, of
Baltimore; Tim Lietzke, 32, of
Richmond; and Paul Magno Jr
27 and Todd Kaplan, 26, both of
Washington, D.C.
After the verdict, juror
Margaret Lee asked the nun how
she could follow God's law and
break the government's law at the
same time.
"How dare you sisterstand in
front of the court and say you're a
Roman Catholic nun. I'm sorry,
sister, people judge you for your
words and actions said Ms. Lee,
who is also a Roman Caiholic.
"From our hearts we followed
our conscience Sister Mon-
tgomery said.
The group, which has claimed it
never intended to break the law
but rather make a point, has used
a its defense the argument that
nuclear weapons are immoral and
illegal.
The defendants admitted
throughout the trial thai they
broke into the plant by cutting
through a chain-link fence. They
then broke down a d;or and
entered a building where Pershing
II missile components are
manufactured.
The judge repeatedly warned
the defendants not to use the
courtroom as a "political forum"





JHE EAST CAROLINIAN JULY 18. 1984
Announcements
MALE FASHIONS
C�r.i'i unllmlfM prMnrs to ttw city of Grn
vlll. tho mm .11 m.i. paaMw Show Frlday Ju(y
JOIh 1:00 .t tWMM Stwr.ton for the faihion
cemctontieut Man �. woman. Tlckot. con bo pur
chaMd � , �� llm ,���� - �
H.lr�tylirg. Cannon Mm Shop. Crm. King; no
J�rvl� Hall; or by phoning 75WSS - 7X-OW7.
MISS PRINT
On Wadnaway, July 11, MM It mm Incorractly
statad that tha E.CU. Gospel choir was sponsor
ing Caral'� Unllmltad fashion Show.
ADMINISTRATIVE PLANNING
Examine and analyze planning and zoning or
dinanca in seaside community. Full tlma. nous
'ng available at nominal coat. Contact Co-op of.
flee.
VOLUNTEERSNEEOEO
A study it being conducted at tha ECU Speech
�nd Hearing Clinic to determine the difficulty
hearing Impaired ttudentt may have in
discriminating word In foreign language. Hear
log Impaired volunteer it to 2a year of age are
�edw for a simple hearing test and word
discrimination task. No foreign language
background Is necessary, pi confBct Mr,
Met. Downes. Department of Speech Language
and Auditory pathology, 75791, ext. 270.
FREE MUSICALS
Want to see Broadway musical, for free? usher
or the East Carolina Summar Theatre. Sign up In
the Mmick Art CM room ,0i. This � your op-
portunity to have some fun and sava money at the
sern� fme.
ACROSS
MARKETING OPENINGS
Opportunity for good pay and experience with
direct marketing department of malor leisure
time corporation located In Raleigh. Salary plus
mileage and travel benefit Apply Co-op office,
313 Raw! Bldg.
PLANTERGROWER
Positions avallableln Emerald isle to assist in
growing and planting flowers and shrubs for land
scaping. Full time, housing available at nominal
cot. Contact Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bldg.
TEST PERFORMANCE
A 1 12 hour workshop on Improving your te�t
Performance will be conducted by the Counseling
Center, Wednesday, July 18, 2:00 3:30 PvV Con
tact the center at 757 4661 for details. No reglstra
tion or fees required.
1 Cavil
5 Spanish
plural
article
8 Wild buffalo
of India
12 Name for
Athena
13 Macaw
14 Metal
fastener
15 Scorched
17 Dog
19 Essence
20 Tricks
21 Man s name
23 Heap
24 Insane
26 Turf
28 Parent:
colloq.
31 Symbol for
silver
32 Southern
cuckoo
33 Behold!
34 Edible seed
36 Impudent
colloq.
38 Excavate
39 Stalk
41 Possessive
pronoun
43 Old Turkish
title
45 Carouse
48 Rub over
with oil
50 Testify
51 Ripped
52 Exist
54 Units of
Siamese
currency
55 Surfeit
56 Nod
57 Dregs
DOWN
1 House in
Madrid
2 Landed
3 Leased
4 Heathen
5 Young boy
6 Conjunction
7 Algonquian
Indian
8 Cancel
9 Lifted
10 Bagman
team
11 Beverages
16 God of love
18 Dry
22 Throng
23 Thing that
refracts
light
24 Chart
25 Mature
27 Collection
of facts
29 Moham-
medan name
30 Canine
a�S$?NAL CARE ATTENDANTS
Abdications .re raffed from moae par
�ar?t���5 ln ����� PERSONAL
fCh eI OANT$ ���"�� for
ter��Tr' m- W particularly In-
- J " re who hw a background of
living lnd,vl�uel with their activities of dally
J!i0r�Z?r d�� con�ect: Office of Handicap
EL.trT ���� �" Whlchard Building,
feast Carolina University, Phone 757 dm.
AUDITOR INTERN
Audit under supervision of senior accountant;
auditing course required. Position available In
accounting firm located In Morehead City. Con
tact Co-op Office 313 Rawl Bldg.
BEACH JOBS
Retail, grocery and fast food positions available
at Nags Head, Kill Devil Hills antf-Myrtle Beach.
Some with eccomodatlon assistance. Contact Co-
op office, 313 Rawl Bldg.
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
SUMMER JOBS
What will you be doing in the summer of i5?
Now is not too soon to begin planning tor cereer
experience with malor corporations and govern
ment agencies Opportunities for variety of me
lor In locations nationwide Contact Co op office,
313 Rawl
BSU
The Baptist Student Union has dutch dinners
�very Tuesday Evening at 5:30 Join us at the
BSU Center on 511 East Tenth Street every week
Programs follow
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
Malor national and North Carolina corporation
has recently begin an internship program for
lunior level student malorlng in computer
science For further informetlon contact Co op of
flee, 313 Raw! Bldg
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Positions available with m.iior detens 'ootr,
tor located in Washington, DC tor Spr.no ifM
Summer. MM Opportunity f state of �r� .
perlence Deadline to applr October if4 .
tect Cooperat.ve Education Office. 3)3 Raw Bioo
WOODWORKING DESIGNER
Opportunity to design and construe
snop for construction firm located n Err
isle Housing available at nominal cos' cJ?'C
Co op office. 313 Rawl Bldg -on'ec
Classifieds
work for you
35 Classify
36 Legume
37 Lease
38 Dedicate
40 Poetic
pronoun
42 Katmandu is
its capital
43 Strokes
44 Ox of
Celebes
46 Heraldry:
grafted
47 Smaller
amount
49 Flap
50 Condensed
moisture
53 Artificial
language
Stye East (ftarnlimatt
SUBCRIPTION FORM
1 122I5 I6 I7891011
13114
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j 20
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For just 75 cents a line,
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m
c L r c MortV. M,ke & James
Fashion Cuts For Both Men & Women (9! 9) 752 Ig:
By Appointment
OR�DK�N�

SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
Students wanting to have their parents receive
The East Carolinian can fill out the form
above and drop it by The East Carolinian of-
fices on the second floor of the Publications
building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $30 for one year and $20 for
six months.
30! EvorwSt
2nd FIock Mrnges Bldg
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Kim Shirley
(919)752-7637 Fosh,on Cli�&�Ws For Both Men & WQ
By Appointment
tfeetiji
1983 United Feature Syndicate
. Inc
FREE ROOM and
PART TIME WORK
For Clean Cut Male
Openings For Fall Semester
See If You Can Qualify
Contact:
Don Wilkerson
Wilkerson Funeral Home
752-2101
:Micfoatcfs Beacfo
Washington, N.C.
�Swimming Snack Bar New Larger Game Roam
�We Book Parties �Campground �Water Slide
lA Mile of Bathing Beach
Full Service Marina
DANCE CLUB CALENDAR
JULY
20th 9:00-1:00 Country Ways
21st 9:00-12:30 Counter Caravan
22nd 2:00-6:00 Carolina Breezewood
(No cover charge)

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
i
FISHERMAN'
BUFFET
t
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
ONLY
OmmUtUumi
r-
Phone 946-4275
Washington, N.C.
INCLUDES:
A variety of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Sryle Fish Fillets, Hush
Puppies, French Fries,
a choice of Hot Vegetables
and our own Famous Seafood Chowder
5H0NEYS
9
�r �V���
lB,1M,lfllssll'llllllllllKllM(lHaBm'
ATTiC
Thurs. & Fri.
STORMS
Lad. Free til 11.00
on Thurs.
Saturday
THE NIGHT
Featuring
John Kurzwig
Happy Hour
while it lasts
Sti ro food
A warmed over burger type
food usually cooked before breakfast
and served after lunch.
LET SUBWAY CURE
SJYROBLUES WITH A
FRESH ALTERNATIVE
iiSSfc
IS YOUR CAR READ YFOR THE TRIP I
1
USEiTl HOME?
I Tires
Up
:A.
SERVlCj
Complete 5 Point
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CA� SHAKES?
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$14.88
For
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�P1 AM VIC! NATIO AOOOuS "
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SUNDAY
IN CONCERT
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' 'Consider us your cars'
Home Away From Home '�' .
COME AND SEE US'
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
3 20 West Greenville Btvd
Two 1
By ERNEST ROBFRTS
Crimes reported to h E
Public Safety Department for
ly 11-14 includec a variety cfi
cidents. There were two report-
unauthorized dorm living
reported assaults, six theft's
three reported incidents of
dalism.
Two cassette players, two
Trio Of D
School Fo
Continued From Page 1
degrees in business admir
had been established, i
significantly, in 19-
undergraduate program had c
come rigorous academic
quirements to receive ace red
tion from the American Asem
of Collegiate Schools of Busing
the national accrediting ager
for higher education in busm
AACSB approval placed EC
School of Business in an e
group; even todav, onlv215 of
available 1,200 undergradu
business programs in :he L'ni
States have received accreditati
Working from this strc
academic base, Bearden sou
and won .AACSB accrditatior.
the school's MBA program. lj
effort required an extens
overhaul of the entire curricul
recruitment of additional fac
in competition with other sc.no.
and the development of advan
programs for business researc
A true product of E
Bearden was a student in 1
who stayed as an instructor
professor before becoming dt
During this time and during h:
years as dean, Bearden saw an
plosion in he demand
I �����
I
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ThisWJ
Whj
No.6 Roas
No.l4RoasiBe
FOR
NOW FEATURING
FROM
75:
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512
Green vl I le
Tea A Free Meals
Monthly & Summer
$50
$250
$65 Si
Doily
$2,251
includes 1 meat
lbl
For take-outs





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JULV MTlgg 3
� MPUTER SCIENCE
Mann contrac
Hi Spring arMj
�taM o the art ex
totoajf i��4 Co
" . e 313 Rawl Blag
G DESIGNER
� ' instruct a wooo
xated at Emeraia
s cost Contact
dssjfieds
prk for you
s a line,
Classifieds
town to
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e & James
'52 1836
Tent
II 11
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INLY

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By ERNEST ROBERTS
Staff Wrliar
Crimes reported to the ECU
Public Safety Department for Ju-
ly 11-14 included a variety of in-
cidents. There were two reports of
unauthorized dorm living two
reported assaults, six thefts and
three reported incidents of van-
dalism.
Two cassette players, two hub-
Assaults and Six Thefts Among
caps, a license plate and a lock
were on the theft list. The van-
dalism reports included a window
screen and door, a janitor's door
and a vehicle.
Incidents reported for July
11-14 included:
July 11, 7 a.m. � Virginia M.
Weiland of Raleigh was issued a
citation for riding a motorcycle
without a helmet. 9:15 a.m. �
Trio Of Deans Leads
School For 48 Years
Continued From Page 1
degrees in business administration
had been established. More
significantly, in 1967, the
undergraduate program had over-
come rigorous academic re-
quirements to receive accredita-
tion from the American Assembly
of Collegiate Schools of Business,
the national accrediting agency
for higher education in business.
AACSB approval placed ECU's
School of Business in an elite
group; even today, only 215 of the
available 1,200 undergraduate
business programs in the United
States have received accreditation.
Working from this strong
academic base, Bearden sought
and won AACSB accrditation for
the school's MBA program. This
effort required an extensive
overhaul of the entire curriculum,
recruitment of additional faculty
in competition with other schools,
and the development of advanced
programs for business research.
A true product of ECU,
Bearden was a student in 1958
who stayed as an instructor and
professor before becoming dean.
During this time and during his 15
years as dean, Bearden saw an ex-
plosion in the demand for
business studies and a dramatic
rise in the number of women who
chose to prepare for business
careers.
"The rising involvement of
women in business has been in-
credible Bearden observed.
"When I was a student, you might
have seen one or two women in an
upper level business administra-
tion course. Now, more than a
third of our business administra-
tion students are women
By the eJ of the '70s, the
School of Business had grown to
be the largest professional school
at ECU with 55 faculty and 2,088
students. Today, changes in the
organizational structure of the
program have reduced the actual
enrollment to 781 students but
there are more than 1,400
freshmen and sophomores who
indicate business administration
as their intended major. The
faculty today numbers 63 in five
separate departments.
In the coming years, these five
departments will have to deal with
two key issues � the rising use of
computers in business and the
need for tighter links between the
school and the business communi-
ty
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Jarvis Residence Hall in reference Charles Kuwalik oT'inc m thC WZMB produc- Hal1 rcP�rted damae to hcr ��
to not having authorization to was �J5Tfor JSLL V,��Zn dow screen and doo?of her nxm.
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was critical of the value of Ed-
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�te Eaat Orarnliniati
Serving the East Carotin campus community since 1923
C Hunter Fisher. - -� .
Jennifer Jendrasiak. , or JT p
Randy Mews. &,� ' ' riETRZAK. �� �m��
Tina Maroschak. ?�� Mar�� -
BILL AUSTIN. �.mMmm. I 1 v �
Linda Vizena. � rcA
July 18, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Keynote Speech
Mario Blows Them Away
The Democrats look like they
might get that illusive Unity after
all. We thought they had it last
week after Walter Mondale blew
the country away by selecting Rep
Geraldine Ferraro, D-N.Y as his
running mate. But, the weekend
snatched the Unity back and
dumped the old slogans of "in-
decisive" and "not a leader" back
on the former vice president.
Unity, Unity, who's got the
Unity the Democrats cried as
they lumbered into San Francisco.
Clearly, something had went
afoul. Why, it seemed like Mur-
phy's Law was about to traumatize
the delegates as Monday rolled
around and the convention open-
ed. Mondale had made the
LanceManatt boo-boo. There
was even talk of abandoning Mon-
dale on the first ballot for his faux
pas. But then came Mario.
Yes, Gov. Mario Cuomo of New
fork. His oratory, although a
decided defense of liberalism, was
nonetheless a strong call for the
party to put its differences behind
rhern and defeat the Reagan ad-
ministration. The speech harnessed
he illusive Unity for the
Democrats, and, in our opinion
set the Party in a good position for
upsetting the Republicans in the
tall.
Cuomo's 40-minute speech was
the medicine the doctor ordered
for the battle wounds inflicted over
the primary season. With one
hard-hitting, to-the-point lam-
basting of the president's policies
and actions over the last four
Democratic Unity for good. His
keynote speech is being hailed as
one of the best of the century. Uni-
ty is ours, the speech said.
Mondale owes Mario one. Don't
be surprised to see Secretary of
Whatever Cuomo. The speech was
brilliant in the way it took
Reagan's own words and turned
them on him. The Great Com-
municator was out-communicated.
'The Republicans believe the
wagon train will not make it to the
frontier unless some of our old,
some of our young, and some of
our weak are left behind by the
� �l the ail Cuomo said.
We Democrats believe that we
can make it all the way with the
family intact. We have. More than
once
Delegates cheered continuously
throughout the speech, for finally
someone was giving them a strong
sense of purpose to begin the fall
campaign with. Cuomo gave each
delegate a reason not to be disrup-
tive, a reason to act for the good of
the whole. The Cuomo speech ap-
pealed for the old core of the
Democratic party, the middle
class, to come back into the fold
With a speech like that, they will.
And in the end, when the speech
was over, many delegates wept.
They new Unity was theirs. Only
another major screw up will take it
away � hear that Jesse and Gary
By GREG RIDEOUT
The clamor won't die down for a
while. Guessing about whether it will
help or hurt will go on until November
And pollsters haven't been this happy
since the computer came along Bzzz �
everyone's talking about it. A bold
stroke. A surprise move. A mark of
leadership. And, of course, HISTORY
But, what does the selection of Rep
Geraldine A. Ferraro, D-N.Y as the
Democrauc candidate for vice president
H�r theItlkcket- PoUs can't tell us, says
Haynes Johnson, a veteran political
reporter; this time intuition must guide
us, and even then, one guess is as good
as the next. Will people vote for the
Democrats just because of Ferraro? Or
will she turn some voters away.
Both statements will be proved true �
only this reasoning won't be as prevalent
as people think. Americans will be pick-
ing a president first - either Mondale or
Reagan. The vice president will be
secondary. If the vice presidential can-
didate does count, it will be in the home
states of the two second-stringers -
New York and Texas. In fact, of all the
reasons for picking a running mate
geography is the best, like Kennedy with
Johnson in 1960. Gender usually doesn't
matter, but this year it did � for dif-
ferent reasons.
Mondale's move was brilliant not in
looking forward to his contest with
Reagan in the fall but for serving the
SS birWu t0 Hart and Jacks�n this
w : , n one unconventional move
Mondale has garnered labels such as
leader "bold "strong" and
decisive. ' He has guaranteed himself
years, Cuomo captured
Listening to Jim Martin today r
S�SSSS5Sa: InnocenceIn Washington
little scared.
front-page stories until November
Mondale picked a vice president to
defeat his Democratic rivals, not
Reagan. It worked. Hart and Jackson
are now in the background, forced to
praise Mondale's pick.
?u Yck other than to set history and put
the Democrats off on a good foot
towards November, Ms. Ferraro will
probably have little impact on the out-
come of the race. But she will make it
more interesting to watch. How will
Reagan handle her? Already he has
shown signs of being unsure of what to
do and say about her. How will Ferraro
stand up u-der the scrutiny of the na-
tional campaign and news media? She
recently blundered when she said she'd
let her name be put in nominatian if she
wasn t chosen by Mondale. But the
main reason for watching, of course
will be to see if she'll actually be vice
president of the United States in 1985
History Few people get to make it
and even less get to make important'
significant history. Reagan made it with
Sandra Day O'Connor. If anyone has
only one good thing to say abo.it what
Mondale did, most surely he or she will
ate the setting of a precedent. 'Wow a
woman will be a serious contender
everytime - and not because ;hes a
woman.
First-timers in history, like FerraroL
get hit with cries of tokenism and un-
qualified. Whether they are true depends
on who is listening. But choosing a runn-
ing mate has nothing to dc with
presidential mettle and isn't the ton
criteria for the job - no matter what the
candidate says. Usually, it's a person's
ability to ticket balance, mostly done on
a geographic basis becasue of the elec-
toral college. This yew is differed
So, balance aside, whatever happens
in November, Gerry Ferraro has marked
history. The question is whether as a
candidate or a vice president, like I
said who knows what will happen, but
it 11 be fun watching.
Can't Get Access Without The $
Nathan the Innocent was a good
citizen who knew nothing about the
American Political System. All he
wanted to do was get someone to stop a
chemical plant from dumping toxic
wastes in his cow pasture. He wrote to
the EPA, his congressman, his senator
and the president of the United States
EPA replied they would look into the
matter some day.
His congressman wrote that if he was
re-elected he would stop the dumping.
His senator said he would forward his
letter to the EPA.
And the president thanked Nathan for
supporting his policy in Central
America
Art Buchwald
giiggg�
ACTUAUy�,THE LASOOW Wfofr TURN BlM MIL
reagan NrWm wmmow
Why don t you go to Washington
yourself, Nathan?" his wife pleaded
Then they will listen to you
Nathan the Innocent bought a ticket
on -People Express" and flew to
Washington. He put on a suit and tie
and went to the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency. The receptionist told him
everyone was in an important meeting
and suggested he come back in three
months.
Nathan then went to see his con-
gressman and was turned over to a sum-
mer intern who didn't know what toxic
3&M2The w� �� 2
He then went to see his senator. The
receptionist said the senator was out of
town but gave him ten campaign bumper
stickers which she suggested hi
distribute to his friends. UggCStCd he
Finally, Nathan went to the White
Houk. He asked to see the president
He was placed in a locked hospital
room with a Washington lobbyistwho
ZZLSffe�JTOm deep depression. It
seemed a bill he worked on to make the
MXtounching pad into tax shelters had
failed to pass.
Nathan told his story to the lobbyist
who said, "You are really innocent. You
cant come to Washington and just
speak to anyone here. What you need is
Access
"What is Access?"
wanfedknor Nathan
thYOU .mak! Poutical contributions to
the people who can help you. You can
donate directly to youV congressman
your senator or the president anT1�
directly by joining clubs that have bin
WeUPt�a5?lld h�W much y�u c�n
give the candidates. The more you
donate the more Access you will have
NathDaneinkid.that g" �-e?"
chea" government d�e't come
A few days later the psychiatrists
d�lded- though Nathan walneS
about toxic wastes, he wasn't a danger
to the community.
He went back to his motel and wrote
SfSS t0 his conressman, senator,
the president and clubs such as "Citizens
for a Better America "The Fund for
Honest Elections "Americans for the
Little Guy" and the "President's
Golden Circle
In two days he found all doors were
open to him and everyone listened �ym-
pathetically to his problems and said
they would get on it right away. He was
even invited to the White House to
watch the president issue a new FP4
Postage stamp, with Anne Burford (kr
such s picture on it.
Nathan the Innocent came hom: in
triumph and told his wife, "The
chemical company will never be allowed
to dump toxic wastes in the cow pasture
again K
Good said his wife.
"The bad news is I had to sell the
tarm to stop them
"Why?" she asked.
"It was the only way I could raise dj
money to get any Access
(e) 1984, LosAitfks Kmo Symdkwu
Some Things I Thought Of 1
By GREG HIDEOUT
Yes, once again ladies and gentlemen it tim fA- ��t-v
Of that illustrious syndicated coE printS da?lv inT ' Th�Ught
the world. P"mea aaily m newspapers across
Why can't Bob Uecker learn the truth' Heck nm,�.
no one likes him. Why can't he say, "Ah Those" XTS ?� to tcU
going home. I ain't sitting in the uppeiSft5j �� mc- I'm
Who needs 'em any way. I'll go buy my o Ser �nH ??� me'
back yard y wn Decr 8�t drunk in my
Why do people from New Jersey drink Ex-I � ck,l - ,
Why else do you think it stinks up t�re Renfrl - il'S truc"
eyes. � ve n it with my own
Why are all the women activists, hke the on k ki�
it. Take a look at those honies; geez, it's no wonder ,?W' " Ully7 l mcan
pants - they don't have the legs toWear TJZZTZ2 want to wcr the
Where'd Dan Rather get thaffumiylittle Zm�WOw!
the Nightly News? It makes him falikea S�?Cf" fc! at � � of
Walter would never convolute his lips hke thaf " " V�-
Stan Landers wrote me the other dav He cain k- , ,
of close to it. He was forced to marry a fat lady froJW but �
drunken mistake. The Landers nXU L Mckolo11 �
bowls on Tuesdays with the guys �citory Slick, N.C. Stan
ttJ� W e then,
Jlonnie had no comment JUSt not ReP�blk�i thing to do.
bosomed Wls,oconwon j � St K
THF fcAJJ
i
i
'Joseph and th
Unique
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Lights and music play a crucial
role m this week's East Carolina
Summer Theatre performance
Joseph end the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat Based on
the Biblical story in Genesis, Jav
Fox directs and choreographs a
unique drama that lends itself to
both comedy and sincerity
Stars of the show include Bruce
Ewmg and Barbara Guian Ewinc
plays the role of Joseph, Jacob's
favorite son forsaken by his 11
brothers. Gulan acts as the
� mucal narrator, charming the
t audience with her vivacious voice
; and radient smile. Neither are in-
experienced in the drama circle as
jboth have numerous credits' o
their name.
The play begins in the land of
Cannaan. "Now isreal loved
Joseph more than all his sons
because he was the son of his old
age; and he made him a
varicolored tunic. And his
brothers saw that their father lov-
ed him more than all his brother
and so they hated him and could
not speak to him on fnendlv
terms (Gen. 37: 3-4) According
to the scripture, the brothers hate
Joseph even more when he relates
a dream he has that he is to reign
over them; so they instantly plot
to rid of him. Rather than killing
him, they sell him to the
Ishmaelites, tear his multicolorec
tunic, and dip it in blood. The
brothers take the tunic to their
father so he will think that Joseph
has been devoured by a wild
beast.
NewCl
By BRJANJRAN GEL E Y
On my way home from the
Park Cinema two Saturdays ago
1 noticed something new on The
corner of Fifth and Cotanche
You may have noticed it It's
the unoccupied building with the
SEEn niCaJ arrOWS' and "This
way Up painted on the window.
When I first noticed the
storefront, I thought "This Way
Up was going to be a new
women s designer clothing store I
learned that you can't judge "a
store by its front.
This Way Up" is Greenville's
newest downtown night spot. The
nrst characteristic that sets this
Place apart from the others is that
no alcohol is served.
So you're suprised? So was I It
turned out that I had stumbied
upon the Grand Opening of a
Christian coffeehouse. I had
�2 �y the sign in the window
mat a band was going to plav, so I
dfecided to stick around -
Besides, it was raining.
�V2. l was checing the place
om,JJpund Chap Tucker hunch-
i3
n0,






AREVOCM
XCREIAftf
froke
put m nomination if she
bj Mondale. But, the
n watching, of course,
see if she'll actually be vice
of he United States in 1985.
Fe people get to make it,
less get to make important'
rv Reagan made it with
a O'Connor. If anyone has
good thing to say about what
did, most surely he or she will
ing of a precedent. Now, a
be a serious contender
� and not because she's a
timers in history, like Ferraro,
) cries of tokenism and ury
Whether they are true depends
listening. But choosing a runn-
has nothing to do with
ial mettle and isn't the top
� no matter what the
s Usually, it's a person's
ticket balance, mostly done on
Jphic basis becasue of the elec-
ieae This year is different,
iance aside, whatever happens
or, Gerry Ferraro has marked
He question is whether as a
a vice president. Like J
- s what will happen, but
matching.
t The $
tier America "The Fund for
�lections "Americans for the"
my" and the "President's,
lrcle
days he found all doors were
lim and everyone listened syra-
lly to his problems and said
Jd get on it right away. He was
Hted to the White House to.
le president issue a new EPA.
stamp, with .Anne Burford Gor
fcture on it.
the Innocent came home in
and told his wife, "The
company will never be allowed
toxic wastes in the cow pasture.
said his wife.
3ad news is I had to sell tfcj
stop them
' she asked.
is the only way I could raise thj!
o get any Access
994, Las a fe, rima Syndtnte
ught Of
for "Things I Thought
daily in newspapers across
someone ought to tell him
fans, they hate me. I'm
id get bird caca on me.
tr and get drunk in my
shakes? I swear it's true.
, I've seen it with my own
in NOW, all ugly? I mean
fnder they want to wear the
?s. Bow wow!
rch he lets lose at the end of
citor from San Francisco.
he wasn't dead, but sort
from Bethel after a costly
fckory Slick, N.C. Stan
ys she doesn't like them
� Republican thing to do.
��1 Especially on "The
r only ask the big-
watch, though.
Features
'Joseph a�d the 4mazinlf T�h�tl.ohr Dreamcoat,
Unique Musical
By "NAMAROSCHAK
Lights and music play a crucial
: role in this week's East Carolina
Summer Theatre performance
; Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat. Based on
; the Biblical story in Genesis, Jay
Fox directs and choreographs a
; unique drama that lends itself to
both comedy and sincerity.
Stars of the show include Bruce
Ewing and Barbara Gulan. Ewing
plays the role of Joseph, Jacob's
favorite son forsaken by his 11
: brothers. Gulan acts as the
: musical narrator, charming the
: audience with her vivacious voice
; and radient smile. Neither are in-
. experienced in the drama circle, as
; both have numerous credits to
v their name.
The play begins m the land of
Cannaan. "Now Isreal loved
Joseph more than all his sons,
because he was the son of his old
age; and he made him a
varicolored tunic. And his
brothers saw that their father lov-
ed him more than all his brothers;
and so they hated him and could
not speak to him on friendly
terms (Gen. 37: 3-4) According
to the scripture, the brothers hate
Joseph even more when he relates
a dream he has that he is to reign
over them; so they instantly plot
to rid of him. Rather than killing
him, they sell him to the
Ishmaelites, tear his multicolored
tunic, and dip it in blood. The
brothers take the tunic to their
father so he will think that Joseph
has been devoured by a wild
beast.
New
" rur � tms P01"1' thc brothers
(Kevin Bailey, Leonard Goffredo
Michael Scott Krohn, Gary
Lamb, Jeff Loeffelholz, Gerry
Mclntyre, John Peterson, Mit-
chell Riggs, Eric Sox, John
Vaughan, and Loren Watkins)
show off their talent with a
satirical rendition of the number
One More Angel in Heaven
Joseph is then taken to Egypt
by Potiphar (Doug Mitchell),
Pharoah's officer and captain of
the bodyguard. Potiphar takes a
liking to Joseph and makes him
his personal servant and overseer
of his house and field. Joseph has
access to all that is Potiphar's
with the exception of one thing �
his wife. As the story goes, Mrs.
Potiphar (Jennifer Paulson) tries
numerously to seduce Joseph, but
to no avail; Joseph refuses her
each time and finally ends up flee-
ing from her (and leaving his
cloak behind). Mrs. Potiphar, the
sneaky seductress that she is, tells
herhusband that Joseph tried to
"make sport" of her, so Potiphar
has Joseph imprisoned.
While in prison, Joseph correct-
ly interprets a dream for two of
Pharoah's imprisoned officials �
the chief cupbearer and the chief
baker. Pharoah (David Heckert),
disturbed by a dream he cannot
understand, hears of Joseph's
remarkable talent and summons
him to his side. Joseph tells him
that Egypt is in for seven years of
great abundance and seven years
of famine. Pharoah, according to
the scripture, says to Joseph,
"You shall be over my house, and
according to vour command all
my people shall do homage- only
m the throne I will be greater than
you. (Gen. 41:40)
In Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat, Pharoah
is not your usual run-of-the-mill
ruler. Clothed in his gold, glitter-
ing jacket, pulled-up collar, tight
pants, and sparkling pumps,
Pharoah wins the audience's ad-
miration with his Elvis-like dress,
personality and manner!
Heckert's role is undoubtedly the
funniest and cleverest in the play.
When famine strikes, Jacob
sends his sons to Egypt to buy
grain. Little do they know that
they are begging from their
brother Joseph. At first Joseph
(whom they do not recognize as
such) teases and taunts them
Later, however, he reveals
himself, and the play ends with a
happy reunion between Joseph
and his family.
Although scrutinized by some
Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat teaches a
Biblical story while entertaining
and enducing laughter at the same
time. In 1968 the story, written by
Tim Rice (words) and Andrew
Lloyd Webber (music), began as a
15-minute work for a children's
chorus. It eventually grew into a
70-minute production. Rice and
Webber are also credited with
Evita, Jesus Christ Superstar, and
Cats.
As mentioned earlier, lighting
enhances the play tremendously.
In one scene where the brothers
are mocking Joseph, a green light
illuminates them, illustrating their
envy. It was quite an unexpected,
A Delightful Comedy
Joseph (Br�, Ewtag) �d Phtmt (DtvW Htektn) �
yet delightful surprise.
The choir also contributes to
the humor, acting out everything
from "teeny boppers" to Egyp-
tians. Members of the choir are
Tracy Donohue, Paula Johnson,
Jennifer Paulson, Tremaine Wad-
dell, Jami Wilkerson, and Connie
Yoder.
As always, Producer Edgar R
Loessin and the production
staff did an excellent job.
Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat will be
playing through Saturday, July
21. Tickets are still available for
all performances and may be pur-
chased at McGinni Theatre 10
a.m. to 8:30 p.m or reserved by
calling 757-6390.
By BRLVNRANGELEY
On my way home from the
J'ark Cinema two Saturdays ago
I noticed something new on the
corner of Fifth and Cotanche.
You may have noticed it It's
the unoccupied building with the
stripes, vertical arrows, and "This
Way Up" painted on the window.
When I first noticed the
storefront, I thought "This Way
Up was going to be a new
women's designer clothing store I
learned that you can't judge a
store by its front.
"This Way Up" is Greenville's
newest downtown night spot. The
first characteristic that sets this
Place apart from the others is that
ho alcohol is served.
So you're suprised? So was I It
turned out that I had stumbled
upon the Grand Opening of a
Christian coffeehouse. I had
noticed by the sign in the window
that a band was going to play, so I
decided to stick around �
besides, it was raining.
; While I was checking the place
out, I found Chap Tucker hunch-
ed over a Phoenix video game
with desperation in his face. He
was losing. A few minutes earlier,
I had seen him walking around
looking important. He looked like
he controlled the flow of events,
except for the video games, of
course.
After Tucker recovered from
his defeat, I asked him to tell me
about "The Way Up
"About a year ago, we started a
Bible study with 6-8 people. Our
main concern in that Bible study
was to make sure that the people
were learning what the Word says.
Our interest was not to grow into
a large group
But grow they did. After several
months, the meetings grew too
large for living rooms. I estimated
Saturday's crowd to be at least a
hundred strong.
Sue Holec attends the Monday
gatherings. She says some 50-60
people usually show.
"We're all bascially learning
about our Christian walk with
God says Holec, "and how it's
a road less travelled. We're a sup-
port group for one another
Tucker continued. "I think that
God has need of a place like this
downtown. And He's gonna pro-
vide the means for it to work. But
like everything else, He's not gon-
na let this drop right down out of
heaven
Currently, donations are the
means to stay open. The Green-
ville merchants have been good
about contributions. Tucker said
that the coffeehouse will need
support for about six months. The
club should be self-supportive by
then.
"We're not naive enough to
think that we're gonna keep our
doors open strictly by
donationssaid Tucker. We're
trying to think of creative ways to
keep the money flowing
Volunteer staffing helps to keep
the overhead low. Tucker says the
people are committed to keepine
"The Way Up" open.
One method of fund raising is
sponsoring concerts. I was sur-
prised to hear that "This Way
Up" planned to bring B.J.
Thomas to Greenville in
September, as well as other
popular Christian groups such as
Petra and the Gaithers. Proceeds
from the concerts will keep "This
Way Up" open.
If you're beginning to feel that
the new nightspot is a fly-by-night
operation, rest easy. Chap Tucker
is one member of a board of direc-
tors for "This Way Up The
board consists of representatives
from several Greenville churches.
An adult or college-age supervisor
will always be present, and a
qualified counselor will console
troubled souls upon request.
On Monday nights, Tucker
leads a Bible study. A crowd of
about 60 people listen attentively
to the instruction. I asked several
of the regular Monday nighters
what kinds of things they have
learned, and all but one or two of
the people I questioned could tell
me in detail, so most of these peo-
ple are interested.
Some time in the future, says
Tucker, Tuesday evenings will be
set aside for junior high-aged peo-
ple. On Thursday nights, "This
Way Up" will open again, mainly
for high school and college peo-
ple, with no particular programs
planned � just.an evening of
social interaction.
Friday and Saturday nights will
feature films, Christian drama, or
bands. The band I saw last Satur-
Way Up
day was called Cross.
Not knowing of the band, I half
expected to hear the semi-soft,
sweet-sounding middle-of-the-
road music I usually hear labeled
as "contemporary Christian
Once again, I was surprised. In-
stead of a gentle band, what I got
was prerecorded music. Technical
difficulty delayed the band by 45
minutes.
Finally, the lights dimmed.
Lights from the passing traffic on
Fifth and Cotanche streamed
through the windows and swirled
around the walls. The rain con-
tinued; the four-man band step-
ped onto the stage. Being a fan of
rock & roll, I was much pleased
when the music thundered
through the whole room.
Cross is as uncompromising in
their sound as they are in their
Christian message. Paul Tucker
played keyboards and helped sing
lead; Ken Cartwright was well
received on lead guitar; and,
drummer Greg Pitts pounded a
sharp beat for the band to follow
� Says �ass player Joe Sasser,
We ve been working on our
sound, trying to get it as tight as
we could The music was a little
rough-cut � understandable for
an emerging group. But overall,
the all-original music was solid
and fully produced.
"We want to sound good. We
want to be respected for what we
do, both vocally and musically.
But we always keep our purpose,
to minister the Gospel
The crowd loved Cross
However, they played only one
fifty-minute set and ended with no
encore. Everyone wanted more.
After the crowd broke up, one
guy commented, "I was impress-
ed with the professionalism of the
group. Like the lead guitar player
� he was excellent
The people seemed lo be having
fun. No one tried to convert me,
nobody beat me over the head
with a Bible, nobody even called
me a sinner. I still saw what they
weren't saying; they just sat back,
let me see, and never made me un-
comfortable.
I've been inside just about every
bar in downtown Greenville. Each
place has its on atmosphere and
its own crowd of regulars. So does
"This Way Up In the words of
Miss Holec, "It's a good group of
people. We grow together
Hurrah For The Underdog
'Karate Kid' Deserves Praise
By GREG RIDEOUT
tone test oa
Karate Kid makes you feel hap-
py. It is a triumph picture a la
Rocky and a magical, heartwarm-
ing film like Star Wars. When you
leave the theatre, you'll be doing
karate kicks with a smile on your
face.
The story of a wrong-side-of-
the-tracks New Jersey teenager
figuring out life while coping with
a new town and a gang of subur-
ban thugs may seem a bit
melodramatic and old hat, but
weave in karate and fine perfor-
mances by Ralph Macchio as
Daniel and Noriyuki "ft -
Morita as his Yoda-Uke mentor
and instuctor and you're left
cheering and wishing for more.
Karate Kid is an adolescent
movie that captures everyone's
teenage years in its magic web.
The sugary theme of good guy
triumphing over bad guy is
somewhat trite but is put on a
special plane by the chemistry of
the cast. Daniel is at once the boy
getting sand kicked in his face, the
kid stealing his first kiss, the guy
Mr. Miyagi (Noriyukf "Pat" Mmm,i meeting the girl's parents and the
j-v u�nyaai rat Morita). person longing to fit in. He's the
tough who's not really so tough if
someone would care. Everyone in
the theatre understands why
Daniel has to learn karate and
defeat Johnny, the motorcycle
thug played to a "T" by William
Zabka.
The magic of the movie comes
from the relationship between Mr.
Miyagi, the karate teacher, and
Darnel. Rarely can the screen
develop a believable relationship,
one that lets you care and believe
in what's happening in the film.
Morita will shock many who
know him only as Arnold on
"Happy Days His reserved por-
tmfii ofc Mtytfi brings alive a
&; in fact he
mates ft look easy. Morita, in his
first serious leading role, gives the
screen's finest performance of the
summer.
. Th sccne where Miyagi
belatedly decides to teach karate
to Darnel is one of the most poig-
nant, for here the commitment to
each other begins and the friend-
ship blossoms � and the audience
is won over. "I promise learn
karate Daniel says. "I promise
teach karate Miyagi responds.
Ralph Macchio is better than
good as the hero-again st-all-odds
Daniel. Macchio's acting skills
make you care for Daniel, to cry
when he's losing and cheer when
he's winning. He tears vour heart
out and makes you feel good
about it. Macchio is us�kI to play-
ing the underdog, evidenced by
his role as Johnny Cade in The
Outsiders. Now, as then, he does
it brilliantly.
Robert Mark Kamen's
screenplay was helped but not
brightened by his 18 years of
karate training. The r.saiism on
the mat is suspect, but it doesn't
detract from the film. Kamen's
story Is brought �Jive by the direc-
tion of John Avildsen, the
academy award winning director
of Rocky. Avildsen's .ihceceof
scenes and his camera use aive th
Picture a "fighting up from Z
bottom" ambiance that tones the
movie. "
S(a definitely Four-
Star. Go see the movie of the sum-
SfLi' Pkym at the Phtt
Theatre, Carolina East Conve-
BmSST "to " CaroUna





�IME EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 18, 1984
Jacksons Sing To Victory'
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Staff Writer
So, you're all waiting with
bated breath for the verdict on the
new Jacksons album? Well, break
out your one glove and get ready
to backslide, because Michael and
the boys are pulling no punches
on this one.
In a sense, Victory is just that
� proof that there is life after
Thriller for the Jacksons as a unit,
and reinforcement of Michael's
musical roots with his brothers.
Who can forget those great four-
part harmonies on such classics as
"ABC" and "I Want You
Back?" Well, Victory finds that
same chemistry at work again,
with Jermaine and Michael
trading vocals on "Torture
"Baby you're cutting me like a
knife without your love in my
life I'm out, I walk in the night
And I just can't stop this feeling
It's torture Besides being the
most prolific song Jackie has ever
written, the group's tight perfor-
mance is convincing and the pro-
duction is clear as a bell � cer-
tainly my candidate for the next
single.
"One More Chance" is not a
remake of the boys' old standard,
but a new tune penned by
youngest brother Randy. The
song is a heartfelt love recital with
a pop feel to it, providing the
perfect tempo change from the
frantic opening of "Torture" and
"Wait
This brings us to the moment
you've been waiting for � and
what a moment it is. "Be Not
Always" is Michael Jackson's
solo contribution to Victory, ac-
companied only by acoustic
guitar, piano, and lush orchestra-
tions in all the right places. Song
structure aside, "Be Not Always"
is a beautiful melancholic reflec-
tion on unfulfilled dreams and
desperate revelations. I'll let the
lyrics speak for themselves:
"Time has made promises Just
promises Mothers cry Babies
die helplessly in arms Where
rockets fly And research lies In
progress to become But what are
men, but flesh and blood we turn
our backs on life How can we
claim to stand for peace When
the races are in strife Destroying
life This is a coherent political
statement that displays Michael's
apparent social conscience.
Side two opens with another
Jagger � Richards original � did
I say thatNo, actually "State of
Shock" was written composed,
arranged, and produced by
Michael Jackson, and features his
much-publicized duet with Mick
Jagger. It's just that Jagger's
raspy voice can make anything
sound like the latest Stones opus.
This rocker, the album's current
hit single, leads into Tito's well-
intentioned, if unnecessary,
overstatement, "We Can Change
the World
The album is rounded off with
two dance-oriented numbers,
Randy's "The Hurt" and
Marlon's "Body which includes
a hot guitar solo by Greg Wright.
As expected, Michael's tunes
Manteo Receives Two Treats
By TONY BROWN
Staff Writer
Super! That's the word for the
concert by the Super Grit Cowboy
Band and the North Carolina
.Symphony at the Waterside
Theatre in Manteo last Sunday.
The concert capped a weekend
of celebrations in Manteo for
North Carolina's 400th anniver-
sary, which also included a visit
by Princess Anne of England,
Gov. Jim Hunt, veteran actor
George Grizzard, and Walter
Cronkite.
The symphony opened the show
with stirring renditions of "God
Save the Queen" and the National
Anthem, followed by "Buckaroo
Holiday" and "Hoedown" by
Aaron Copland (the latter tune
may be familiar to rock fans
through its performance by Emer-
son, Lake � Palmer).
Another excellent piece follow-
ed as the symphony aroused many
memories and hopes with Elgar's
"Pomp and Circumstance
familiar to most as the graduation
march.
The symphony ended up its solo
spot with "Greensleeves" by
Ralph Vaughn Williams and then
"Coronation March" by Walton
and received a well-deserved
round of applause from the entire
audience.
The Super Grit Cowboy Band
then really knocked the audience
. back a couple of notches as they
exploded into their solo portion.
It didn't take long for them to get
the viewer's attention, as even the
older generation present for the
symphony started clapping along
Since Super Grit was video-
taping the performance and also
planning a live album from the
show, more excitement than usual
was in the air. The show was slow-
ed in some spots because of the
special demands of TV, but it
didn't affect the concert at all.
Each member of Super Grit
performed well, with the current
rline-up of: Clyde Mattocks, steel
guitar, banjo ; Danny Vinson,
drums; Mike Kinzie, fiddle,
horns, harmonica; Alan Hicks,
bass; and, Mark Golladay, lead
guitar. All sing lead vocals and
play various other instruments.
The band opened with a very
appropriate "Carolina by the
Sea then "I Bought the Shoes
That Walked Right Out On Me
two good country-type songs.
"The South's Hottest Honkey-
tonkers" continued with "White
Lines" and "Why Baby Why
then launched into their most
popular tune and first release "If
You Don't Know Me By Now" �
one that should stand the test of
time to became a country classic.
The two groups joined forces
for a fantastic set of music star-
ting with an almost unbelievably
good version of "Mr. Bojangles
which was a hit for The Nitty
Gritty Dirt Band and Neil Dia-
mond. It seemed to be the best fu-
sion of the two forces and could
be a hit again.
During the last part of the
show, all the members of Super
Grit were getting laughs from the
audience with their "highly
choreographed" dancing in
unison and various antics. Clyde
dueled on guitar with Mike on a
French horn ala "Duelin'
Banjos Then Clyde battled with
the lead guitarist who sounded
most like a train until Clyde went
to his steel guitar and donned a
trainman's hat and claimed vic-
tory.
The symphony then took over
and did their own "duelin with
each section playing a part that
turned in a well-balanced effort.
"The Legend of the Lost Col-
ony a song Super Grit wrote
(which won the competition for
the official 400th tune) went off
very good, with Mike doing a fine
job on vocals.
The crowd's response was so
enthusiastic that the groups had to
return for a stimulating finale
"Battle of New Orleans Super
Grit really kicked up their heels as
they worked the audience up and
bobbed up and down.
As the song was winding up, a
fantastic display of fireworks
spread across the sky, capping a
great evening of entertainment for
all present.
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ALICE IN
WONDERLAND
The Jacksons
JJJ no! the on,y '�� who can still land � hit. Victory may
are the best of the lot I still can't �� u �.
say enough good thing abou th,h J I' "T8 " real ear'
"Be Not Always �' Thlf Jt � thshakers, but then again, they
woSftheCte SEfi meam t0 bC- The new
to hear Michael's passionate voke ��� TTOUS � achiring
deliver the deepest lines of his Zf u . Jacksons. have alwaVs
career. Besides "Torture "none S 5f Z entertammcnt for e
��riure, none sake of entertainment. And, as sil-
prove to be the brothers' biggest
ly love songs go, what's wrong
with that?
Victory, as well as the Jackson
Five's back catalogue, is on sale
this week at the Record Bar in
Carolina East Mall and the Plaza.
'1940'm Radio Hour' Will Close Season
An unforgettable era of crooner
and cooers comes magically alive
in the East Carolina Summer
Theatre production of the Broad-
way musical hit The 1940's Radio
Hour, Monday through Saturday
July 23-28, at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU
campus.
Complete with an eleven-piece
"studio" orchestra playing those
great old songs made famous by
Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington and
Artie Shaw, flashing applause
sign, sound effects booth and
authentic commercials about Pep-
si Cola for a nickel and the
15-cent pack of cigarettes, The
1940's Radio Hour conjures up a
December 1942 radio broadcast
"live from the Algonquin Room
of the beautiful Hotel Astor in
New York City
Highlighting the show is a
panorama of memorable sw-
ingtime tunes including "Chat-
tanooga Choo Choo "Boogie
Woogie Bugle Boy "Tuxedo
Junction "Ain't She Sweet
"I've Got It Bad and That Ain't
Good as well as singing com-
mercials, contests, comedy
routines and smooth-talking
banter.
Says Director Edgar Loessin,
"We hope to deliver an ex-
hilarating show of singing, danc-
ing and funny commercials about
Sal Hepatica, Nash cars and other
indispensable products of the
'40s. It's all full of fun, innocence
and for the entire family
The 1940's Radio Hour is the
final offering of the season by the
popular summer theatre.
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j

PAPA
KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
WEDNESDAY NITE
Greenville's First&Still No. 1
Lodies Lock-out
8:30-10:00
Free Draft&Wine
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5:00-8:00pm
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I
DANCE SPECTACULAR!
STARRING
LENNY PANARO &
PURE HONEY

Ladies
�j
PURE HONEY is a nationally recoqnued male tr�mm (�� �
inDance Soectacular BXS2 hoTTS
Thursday Night, July 19th
One Show Only At
Tickets On St� Now' S4 ac n �
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THt
Pirate He
Emily Manwaring, head basket
ball coach at San Francisco State
he past si years, has been named
o the same position at ECU
thletic Director Dr. Ken Kar
uoimced Tuesday.
Manwaring, 35, succeeds Cfttfej
ndruzzi, who resigned as
ady Pirate coach after su )
o pursue business interests.
"I'm really looking forwarc
:oaching the elite athletes that
ast Carolina attracts Manwar-
ing said. "I'm sure my coaching
philosophy will differ so-new ia:
rfrom my predecessors bur this is
an established program and I
think it's at a good stage right
now
f Manwaring led Division II San
Francisco State to a 19-12 record
I and the Northern California
; Athletic Conference Champion
; ship and a benh in the NCAA
West Region playoffs during the
: 1983-84 season.
h A native of Tecumseh. VI
s
Marke
ByTONYBRO
a
Flip over the Pirate attack!
: Assistant Athletic Director of M;
: has been generating since last ye
: The slogan came naturally v.
-Henry Williams began ;elebratn
with a flip in the endzone.
i "Every billboard, every T
our promotional material is idem
over the Pirate attack slogan
working hard to condition area
Pirate fans rather than giving thei
area schools.
"In order to build such a follow
trating on the young kids tha: will
the years to come. If we can rela
level, we can get them into the stai
it exciting they'll stay there.
"That's the purpose behind P
Hart continued, "in the short t;i
promoting our new mascot th
responded to him and requests f
tremendous.
"If you ever see how :he kid:
pond to Pee Dee, you'll underst
Radio N;
By RANDY MEWS
The decision to make the Pirati
Sports Network a totallv ��
house" operation has "thruJ(
Assistant Athletic Director foj
Public Relations Ken Smith intc
his new role as executive produce!
of the network for the upcominj
football season.
The hiring of Bob Genareili .
April freed Smith from his formei
duties as sports information direc-
tor, and has enabled him devoteL
�11 his time to publicizing the ECU
athletic program through radic
and television. "What we're try-
tag to do is get a continuity so that
Ken Smith can be the voice of
ECU, and the people will relate
that voice to ECU athletics
Smith said.
Although he has kept busy this,
sumn.er by producing highlight
films, radio spots and televisonl
commercials, the primary reason!
Gennarelli was hired was to allowf
Smith to become the play-by-pla
(radio) announcer for the net-
work.
Tracksterl
By GEORGE THREEWTTTS
I
ECt
' In his appearance, Steve Rash
I physical education major
CU, resembles most othei
hletes. He's tall, muscular an
Sicily adheres to the athletic styl
wearing gym shorts, T shirt!
id running shoes.
But the 21-year-old tracJ
ister from Durham completes
wardrobe with some ac-
mes that will never be sold ii
Uetic and sporting goods stores,
' into each of his ears is
flesh-colored devie thai
ibles him to hear. Rash is legal-
deaf.
Some people would call a hear
impairment a handicap, buj
i Rash. His hearing has don
to slow him down. He
of the fastest deaf athletes
world and is competitive witl
iy track runners with norms






he
the brothers' biggest
songs go, what's wrong
ry, as well as the Jackson
catalogue, is on sale
eek ar the Record Bar in
a East Mail arid the Piaza.
e Season
well as singing com-
ontests, comedy
mooth-talking
and
Edgar Loessin,
deliver an ex-
- show of singing, danc-
-ommercials about
a. Nash cars and other
isable products of the
s aJ! full of fun, innocence
the entire family
'Ws Radio Hour is tne
tig of the season by the
-Timer theatre.
STORE
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im
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY ia, 14 Pao 7
Manwaring Named
Pirate Head Coach
Emily Manwaring, head basket-
ball coach at San Francisco State
the past six years, has been named
to the same position at ECU
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr
announced Tuesday.
Manwaring, 35, succeeds Cathy
Andruzzi, who resigned as the
Lady Pirate coach after six years
to pursue business interests.
"I'm really looking forward to
coaching the elite athletes that
East Carolina attracts Manwar-
ing said. "I'm sure my coaching
philosophy will differ somewhat
from my predecessors but this is
an established program and I
think it's at a good stage right
now
Manwaring led Division II San
Francisco State to a 19-12 record
and the Northern California
Athletic Conference Champion-
ship and a berth in the NCAA
West Region playoffs during the
1983-84 season.
A native of Tecumseh, MI,
Manwaring received her
bachelor's and master's degree in
sports administration from
Michigan State University where
she was also a graduate assistant
coach.
She coached three All-Americas
at San Francisco State and com-
piled an impressive 97-56 record.
During her six years,
Manwaring's teams never suf-
fered a losing season.
"We are very happy with the
situation and feel Emily will do an
outstanding job Karr said. "I
have confidence she will continue
the fine tradition that East
Carolina has built over the
years
Manwaring becomes only the
third coach of the Lady Pirates
since the program's inception in
1969. Joining Manwaring as assis-
tant coach is Jo Anne Bly, who
served in the same capacity under
Manwaring at San Francisco State
the past three years.
Emily Manwaring was appointed the new ECU women's head basket-
ball coach yesterday. She comes from San Francisco siteWh� she
Marketing Promotions
" SSSS1C � ��' -
berth hi
By TONY BROWN
Staff Witter
philosophy behind him. The kids love him and when
he appears at promotional events it adds immensely
to the appeal of Pirate sports.
Flip over the Pirate attack' That's the m� �0"This lies in w1 our Push to make Pirate football
Assistant Athletic Dfrec.o" o' Marketina DavSt ST� T? '� T T? like is at � ���
has been generating since las. yeaf SEM?T!��E " in,rodu�io� "
The slogan can naturally .hen kick returner SofdeneuVappaT �" Which
" thra m 'Se ZnT" tmKM�� JfiSsSS �" ' � �d'
"Every billboard, every TV advertisement all of Z-Jl �. P T5 sP.?nsors " Fast Fare, we'll be
our promotional materia?is identified wl the Fl SSH K�� ' " �" r"St��
-So. o?;� Te'h" �'�- -en, is planned for the
Pirate fans rather than givingTeir atten, ono o�heT WjKEftVSSi 'm ft Stadium
area schools. , oul on bept- 8� a ticket-holder at the stadium
"In order to build such a following we're concen. studente dStfeST" C0UPe� ECU
SS2T "J?� thaJ !��� fans in Later ativtf Includgiving away a four day
Aft
planned, further details will be announced later
. "He's really done a job that's been neea a iong malice Y mUCh "� by the X' -
time at ECU football coach Ed Emorv said of tk' r -
Hart. "His ideas have helped promote X4t oro uJfV- �f thc e Club �" :cn �" W
duct we have in football When you'vegoTfJSod SSSS T V Sj dcmand fcr Uck�� �
thing going, you've got to let people knoJaboutT tem h? fiL thc " ���" �
Promotion was second-natur"to Hw wWte he �JS�?�SHf f - in �etttat ECU
served a stint as a high school coach in LoTsville ?4� 25? SPSS Aciation.
KY. "In high school we had to doLownnrol KJhc S2T2 � thls Vrn'����� �' has not yet
tional work as well as coaching. Wh� ITw the ef" LTS ft PUbUc'M Hart add' Mwith "
fectiveness of our public relates caSpai I ZZ'J�10" i" W contr. "�
became increasingly interested in that STSich 52 Eg BkTo 2rFAthat "?�
led me to a position at ECU " " �"u k � 8L � or CFA arc �0,I1� t0 ve
According to Hart, college level promotional work rTave at EcS PT�Vim $UCh M We
- - o�-��� i- H��.miai lans 111
he years to come. If we can relate to them on their
level, we can get them into the stands, and if we make
it exciting they'll stay there
, �6 array a lUUr Uay,
hree night all-expense paid trip to the Bahamas or
the Caribbean for the best tailgate party "The winn-
ing group of four will be picked by judges on the
"That's the purpose behind Pee Dee the Pirate " wLfSt �i four P-ed by judges on the
Hart continued, "Fn the short time smce I Z purpland n' " ���� -
promoting our new mascot the kids have reallv FnTSnT g d atire-
responded to him and requests for Pee Dee decays is iJS H?1rJecomin8 on Oct. 20, a purple and gold
tremendous. Utc deCais ,s jacket wlU �e given to each of the first 1,000 children
"If you ever see how the kids in a classroom res n Si l co"rtesy of the Coca-Cola Co.
pond to Pee Dee, you'll understand the mXt ng ShHne Dav i rX" �Ut"? P- f0rCe f�r
oaRcuag annne uay. A parade and ceremonial events are
is much more involved. "Our marketing methods
have to be creative but credible Hart said "For ex-
ample, we don't claim to be number one, only that
'we're going after the best
"If you oversell or lose believability, the fans will
see nght through it. A somewhat similar situation oc-
curred last year when the media reported sell-out
conditions at Ficklen without checking official
sources and attendance was affected

� J2Li!ave t0 TCahz our situation here Hart
said. When we draw 30,000 people to home games.
they re almost entirely Pirate fans. Most visiting
teams are so far away few of their fans attend "
Hart divides fans into three basic categories-
hometown followers, away-game fans, ;iind ones out
to see a good mtra-conference game. "1he only way
we can progress is to fill the stadium now - which
would justify enlarging the stadium and! bring more
� ��-�� �"v ivvuiu JCdoOIl a
Radio Network Moves 'In-House'
Smith Takes Over As Play-By-Play Announcer
begJfucceed. SeSL taS 'SSS2
past year he said, "aid TheTenhalcemen?o? he JE?EL " h0t m thc ECU �
winning spirit at ECU trough promSSkftJ SSSSSTTf 22 Hart ' $Uf' m
record season attendance average SstySr wWch ball �f SUCCM foot.
By RANDY MEWS
Sporti Editor
The decision to make the Pirate
Sports Network a totally "in-
house" operation has thrust
Assistant Athletic Director for
Public Relations Ken Smith into
his new role as executive producer
of tne network for the upcoming
football season.
The hiring of Bob Genardli in
April freed Smith from his former
duties as sports information direc-
tor, and has enabled him devote
all his time to publicizing the ECU
athletic program through radio
and television. "What we're try-
ing to do is get a continuity so that
Ken Smith can be the voice of
ECU, and the people will relate
that voice to ECU athletics
Smith said.
Although he has kept busy this
summer by producing highlight
films, radio spots and televison
commercials, the primary reason
Gennarelli was hired was to allow
Smith to become the play-by-play
(radio) announcer for the net-
work.
When Ken Karr (ECU's athletic director) came
here four years ago, he said he would ultimately like
to see both the play-by-play and color voices be in-
house' (members of ECU's sports information
department) Smith explained, "and it was not until
this year that we got ourselves into a position where
Assistant Athletic Director Ken Smith
we could do this
Local personalities Lee Moore and Jim Woods had
more than 20 years of experience between them as the
broadcasters for the network, but during last year's
basketball season Smith and Director of Marketing
Dave Hart (color voice) experimented as the new an-
chors The decision was then made to bring the net-
work "m-house which means Smith and Hart will
now cover any ECU athletic event that is aired on the
network.
, J?�HJ;raCtS for the network were signed with three
100,000 watt radio stations earlier this year, thus
assuring coverage from Myrtle Beach, S.C up the
coast to Virginia Beach and west to Raleigh It is ex-
pected a total of 15-20 stations will carry Pirate foot-
ball this fall.
Smith said a large part of the network's expansion
is due to the success of the football team, and feels
with each year it will continue to grow. He noted the
strides the football team had made just since 1981:
"Three years ago I could have gone to all 23 stations
in the GreensboroHigh PointWinston Salem area
and would have been lucky if one of them had let me
in to make a presentation � this year I've been in
every station but one
Smith is predicting such things as football sellouts
and the expansion of Ficklen Stadium in the years to
come, but before that happens, behind the deter-
mination of one Ken Smith, the Pirate Sports Net-
work should be forging west to Greensoboro
Charlotte and even Asheville
Basketball Schedules
Released For '84- '85
By RANDY MEWS
v,iiariuiic ana even Asnevuie.
Trackster Qualifies For Deaf Olympics
By GEORGE THREEWTTTS hearing. uM� . u u �
By GEORGE THREEWITTS
EG Nmlwin
In his appearance, Steve Rash,
a physical education major at
ECU, resembles most other
athletes. He's tall, muscular and
rigidly adheres to the athletic style
of wearing gym shorts, T shirts
and running shoes.
But the 21-year-old track
speedster from Durham completes
his wardrobe with some ac-
cessories that will never be sold in
athletic and sporting goods stores.
Folded into each of his ears is a
small, flesh-colored devie that
enables him to hear. Rash is legal-
ly deaf.
Some people would call a hear
ing impairment a handicap, but
not Rash. His hearing has done
nothing to slow him down. He's
one of the fastest deaf athletes in
the world and is competitive with
many track runners with normal
hearing
In qualifying trials for the Deaf
Olympics conducted recently at
the University of Texas in Austin,
he captured first place in the 110
meter high hurdles and finished
second in the 400 meter in-
termediate hurdles. His perfor-
mances qualify him for represen-
tation on the U.S. Track Team at
the Deaf Olympics that will be
held next summer in Los Angeles.
"I wanted to represent East
Carolina in what I can do � and I
did he said.
He also competes with the ECU
track team and is looking forward
to next year's season with the
Pirates. He was redshirted this
spring.
To qualify for the Deaf Olym-
pics, an athlete must have at least
a 55 percent hearing loss. Rash
says his loss has been measured at
about 70 percent.
When he runs he removes his
hearing aid which doesn't present
any real problems, he said. Unlike
some deaf runners who must
crane their necks to see the smoke
from the starting pistol, Rash says
he can usually hear the noise of
the gun and even feel its vibration.
In deaf competition the starting
gun is supplemented by a flag
dropped at the start of the race
and sometimes by lights and an
electronic pressure device in the
starting blocks.
Track is a sport that is fairly
new to Rash. While growing up in
Durham, he said the sport didn't
appeal to him. "I was interested
in baseball. I even used to sleep
with a bat he said.
"I played football and basket-
ball and the coach there convinced
me to give track a try too. I did
and I liked it he said.
In his sophomore year at the
N.C. School for the Deaf he won
the conference championship in
the high and low hurdles. In his
senior year he won again and
competed in the sectional and
regional prep track meets and also
in the World Games for the Deaf
at Cologne, West Germany.
While his performance at the
World Games was hampered by
an injury he won a silver medal
and his second place finish in the
high hurdles broke the national
record for the deaf in that event.
The greatest challenge in track,
according to Rash, is the 400
meters intermediate hurdles
because it requires a runner to go
at full speed during the entire
race. "You have to be both men-
tally and physically prepared to
do well in this event he said,
"I am going to change my event
this year and run the in-
termediates. It's challenging he
said. "Very challenging
A challenge is something this
speedster thrives upon.
The ECU men's and women's
basketball schedules were an-
nounced last week, and both
teams will be facing opponets
that were nationally ranked last
year.
Foremost on the men's
schedule include Boston Univer-
sity and Virginia Commonwealth
at home, and Wake Forest, Tulsa
and Duke on the road. MWe have
a very competitive non-
conference schedule men's
coach Charlie Harrison said "I
feel I owe it to my players to go
up against the best teams we
possibly can
Harrison also expects most of
the league games to be very dif-
ficult becuase "almost all the
teams in the conference have
their best players coming back
The league grew to eight
members this year with the ad-
mission of American University
and UNC-W, and ECU will play
each of the seven teams on a
home-and-away basis.
The Pirates will open then-
season November 27 against Cen-
tral Connecticut State, and will
wrap it up March 7-9 at the
ECAC-South Tournament on the
William & Mary campus.
The Lady Bucs play a total of
14 home games, including con-
tests with heavyweights Old
Dominion and South Carolina,
and six conference games (James
Madison, William St Mary,
George Mason, Richmond,
American and UNC-W). Navy
does not field a women's team.
ECU will open their season in
Fayetteville at the Dogwood
Classic against North Carolina or
N.C. State in the double-
elimination tournament, and will
finish up March 1-3 in the
ECAC-South Tournament at a
site yet to be determined.
1st VIRGINIA COM-
MONWEALTH; 4th at DrexeJ;
8th CHRISTOPHER
NEWPORT; 13th at Campbell;
19th at Wake Forest; 28-29th at
First Tulsa Classic.
January
3rd BOSTON; 7th GEORGE
MASON; 9th at Duke; 12th
WILLIAM A MARY; 19th at
Richmond; 21st at Howard; 26th
NAVY; 28th JAMES MADISON J
February
2nd at George Mason; 6th at
UNC-Wilmington; 9th at
William A Mary; Hth
AMERICAN; 13th WIN-
THROP; 16th RICHMOND;
18th at Navy; 20th at American;
23rd UNC-WILMINGTON; 27th
CAMPBELL.
March
2nd at James Madison; 7-9th at
ECAC-South Tournament.
Women's Schedule
November
23-24th at Dogwood Classic-
28th FAYETTEVILLE STATE
December
1st at UNC Charlotte; 4th
HOWARD; 7th OLD DOMI-
NION; 15th at South Carolina-
18th at Moorehead State; 19th at
Marshall. w
January
2nd SOUTH CAROLINA- Sth
IONA; 9th CAMPBELI UUi 2
mond; 19th GEORGE MASON
ford; 28th at James MidSon-
31st UNC-WnjurnGTON'
Men's Schedule
November
27th CENTRAL CONNEC-
TICUT STATE.
December
February
2nd SOUTH FLORIDA: �k
HAMPTON INSTrrUTBrWi
American; llth at Geor
Mason; 16th WILLIAM fi
MARY; 18th FAMP�
MADISON; 21it it ntr
Wilmington; 24th RICHMOND
March
JU3rd at ECAC-South Touro





THE EAS r CAROLINIAN
JULY 18, 1984
Will
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI) �
Next week the Atlantic Coast
Conference Sports Writers
Association will in all probability
name North Carolina's Michael
Jordan as the ACC's athlete of
the year.
And if Jordan wins, it goes
down as one of the more com-
petitive races the 1984 national
player of the year and two-time
All-America has ever won. The
ACC this year was loaded with
Olympic and NCAA champions
in everything from wrestling to
golf.
In fact, there wasn't room
enough on the list of nominees for
some of the league's athletes who
distinguished themselves highly
on a national level.
The award is called the An-
thony J. McKevlin Award and it
will be presented next Saturday
night at Pinehurst when the media
and the league's football coaches
gather for a weekend of golf and a
preview of the coming season.
It's and award that has been
dominated by basketball players
in a league where basketball is the
dominant sport.
Last year it was won by
Virginia's Ralph Sampson,
himself a national player of the
year. Prior to that, the winner was
North Carolina All-America
James Worthy, the Nation's No. 1
NBA draft pick in 1982. Other
winners include former North
Carolina All-America Phil Ford,
a two-time winner, and North
Carolina State's David Thomp-
son, who like Sampson was a na-
tional player of the year.
In the past 10 years only two
non-basketball types have claimed
the McKevlin award. North
Carolina distance runner Julie
Shea won it twice, while Maryland
hurdler Renaldo Nehemiah won it
in 1979.
"It's hard to overlook those na-
tional players ot the year " ex-
plains ACC Assistant Commis-
sioner Marvin "Skeeter" Francis
Each school submits its
nominations for the conference's
Of
nominees left out were two-time
All-America basketball player
Sam Perkins, and baseball players
B.J. Surhoff and Scott Bankhead,
both members of the U.S. Olym-
pic team. Bankhead, a pitcher,
has an 11-0 record this season, the
country's fifth best ERA and was
ranked eighth in strikeouts.
Duke nominated quarterback
Ben Bennett, who holds six
ton awarH 9n(j .u. � " "t,J D��cu, who noias SIX
oTenZlni � � CAA passing records including
, i J"J winy iwj
IRS Tennis & Softball Action
By JEANETTE ROTH
TENNIS ACTION:
You think Wimbledon was ex-
citing? Well, the Intramural Ten-
Singles tournament is well
under way with semi-final rounds
ending this week. Among the net-
ters are top-seed Brian Kilcoyne,
who goes into the tournament
with an impressive 4-0 record.
Other players include: Edgar Lox,
Ray McKeithan, Randy Meetre,
Joel Schultz, Jay Bowling and
female hopeful Shervl Redman. A
big GOOD LUCK is extended to
the tennis singles participants.
SOFTBALL ACTION:
With just two teams entered,
the softball tournament will be a
competitive battle between last
session's champs "The Bombed
Skaggs" and the "Contenders
Both teams are seasoned
powerhouses, so the champion-
ship is up for grabs Get out and
wateh the action this week, July
18, 19 and Monday July 23 on the
IM fields.
NEXT SEMESTER ACTION:
Just a word about Fall Semester
Intramural Action. September ac-
tivities include: a bicycle race, in-
tramural extravaganza, flag foot-
ball, team putt-putt, three-on-
three basketball, tennis singles
and co-rec softball. September is
loaded with fun and excitement.
Participate through Intramural
Recreational Services.
Look for Intramural Activities
dates on various Campus Source
Bulletin Boards throughout cam-
pus
Classifieds UNC Vs. UCLA In '85
SALE
-OR SALE: 1974 Yamaha 750 Looks good - lots of
Mwtr �5 75837S3 twfore 8 30 am please.
fOR RENT: P' vate bedroom of large house One
:ocK from campus. Washer, dryer, microwave;
Teed BR furniture jl2i month Off street parking!
mcatDaT Graduate Preparaioo Services Kit
GAPS; for sale 1 yr old, 4 notebooks, 34 casset
'es interview Technique Chem Biology, etc J350
Value � only J10C TS8 3�73
MISC
QUALITY TYPING - IBM Typewriter. 15 years
?perience Fwll time typing tor faculty �
'�aen 754 340
PERSONAL
(UPI) � North Carolina will
open its 1985 basketball season by
meeting UCLA in the first game
ro be played in the University of
North Carolina's new Student Ac-
tivities Center.
Athletic Director John Swof-
ford said the game against UCLA,
which is scheduled for Nov. 30,
1985, will mark the beginning of a
four-year series between the two
schools. The schools will trade
home dates during the series.
"We feel that this is a very ap-
propriate opening game between
the two institutions that have pro-
bably the greatest names in college
basketball Swofford said. "We
also are planning a dedication
game between our former players
sometime in the early fall of
1985
The 22,000 seat Student Ac-
tivities Center was scheduled to
open in February 1985 but minor
design changes have pushed the
construction schedule back. The
first official function in the center
is scheduled to be graduation
ceremonies in May 1985.
The multi-million dollar
building is being funded entirely
by private contributions. The
center origianlly was expected to
cost $30 million. The building
changes will drive the cost up to
$33.8 million.
CHAFE So you finally made 21 but can you go a
eK without e beer We will wneel you home in a
Aheeibarrow on Thgrs nicjht P S Go Jessie
-leims that is SKU.
LOST AND
FOUND
At The
StCarp.
i-OST: on campus, female haJf-Sibenan Husky One
Hue eye and one brown eye Us! seen on Tuesday at Stu-
dent Store. If found or know anv information call
"58-4316.
iiiitgRiiTiAAyd
WANTED
ROOMMATE wanted for summer andor fall la
rent and utilities. Easrbroofc apts Can 752 WM
MIATB WANTED FOR FALLluirSe
-eat and responsible Private furnished roonV
share rest of house Located behind BeTk �m
ms.month 758 7470 after 2 p m
ROOMMATES NEEDED Furnished duplex In
�ties No deposit required. Call 75a 5MM
ROOMMATE(S) WANTED to share Tie
Townhouse biks from campus S155 mo plus half
utlMess if Z share BR 752 7M7 afterjTn m
F.EMALE ROOMATE near campus 13 rent and
utilities Contact Paula at 919 fuiHt
FEMALE ROOMATE wanted 100 Rnt 13 utll "l
block from campus 758 ?020
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share dupTSTnear
ECU after July Private Bedroom $93 a m�m
dius 13 utilities and phone AC and oil heat Must
-e neat, responsible, non smoker required No
pets Call 752 1001. �
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to share
bedroom Eastbrook apt , pay 13 rent and
unties Call Karen at 758 7408
PERSON WANTED to work on campTSloIaTTy"
or information and application send sase to'
Allen Lowrance, 251 Glenwood Drive
Mooresville, NC 28115 "rive.
�i
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frt
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Musical For The Entire
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July 16-21 � 8:15 p.m.
McGINNIS THEATRE
(corner of 5th and Eastern)
For reservations call 757-6390
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W.W List - Safe $5.99
Newest releases by:
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Lunch Buffet -1 laro-2pm Daily
(All You Can Eat) $2.99
Dinner Buffet - 5-8pm
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Spaghetti - 5-Spm Than.
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Video Games Big Screen TV
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open one not limited to seniors or
to a specific number of nominess
from each school. Some 300
members of the association
receive ballots.
North Carolina nominated
three athletes this year, and ac-
tually had six legitimate can-
didates.
In addition to Jordan, the
Tarheel's sports information of-
fice nominated swimmer Sue
Walsh, who set a U.S. record in
the 100 and 200 meter backstroke,
and John Inman, the current
the most completions and the
most yardage. Not nominated
were Mike Jeffries, winner of the
Herman award which is the
Clemson submitted the name of
Mike Eppley, one of a small
number of athletes to ever start in
both football and basketball at a
major college. That left out defen-
sive tackle William Perry, and
tennis player Lawson Duncan, the
NCAA runnerup in singles who
holds the record for the most
singles victories ever in a season.
At North Carolina State,
Wolfpack officials gave the league
a change of pace with the nomina-
tion of Tab Thacker, the NCAA's
heavyweight wrestling champion.
They chose Thacker over Tracey
Woodson, the league's baseball
Heisman Trophy of soccer, and player of the year who led the na-
teammate Tom Kain, who made tion in home runs,
the U.S. Olympic soccer team. Wake Forest nominated soccer
Another potential candidate was player Mark Erwin, who in 1983
golfer Mary Anne Widman, who led the nation in scoring Georgia
women's golf Tech nominated Aiitonio McKay
NCAA golf champion. Potential leading passer.
championship this year.
Maryland added another foot-
ball player to the list by
nominating quarterback Boomer
Esiason, the Terps' all-time
a world record holder in the
400 meters who won the U.S.
Olympic qualifying competition.
Virginia submitted the name of
Ray Brown, the ACC's 800 meters
champion.
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STUDENTS OUR NAME BRAND SCRFFN
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Hours: WedFri.
9:30-5:00
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4 Dacron poly fill pillows
4 twin mattress pads
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 18, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 18, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.351
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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