The East Carolinian, February 28, 1984






She
Vol.58 NoWU
SOULS Moving
In New Direction
Becoming Active
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newi tdliof
The Society of United Liberal Students will be
heading in a new direction this vear, according to
SOULS President Jimmie Hackett.
"In the past SOULS ha been social but not
active Hackett said, "but now we plan to enter fur-
ther into the scope of reality and deal with real pro-
blems which are dealt with by minoritv students and
by most people in today's society
"The major problem with the organization is that
it excluded the major political problems of the cam-
pus said Vice President Monteith Womble, "In-
stead of being active, they were reactive
In order to increase involvement in the organiza-
tion, SOULS has planned many activities for next
year. A study habits workshop will be held Sept. 11
and a minority banquet will be held Sept. 18. The
group would also like to
sponsor films on Monday
nights. In November, they
will sponsor the Shaw
Players, a theatrical group.
In February, a special ac-
tivity is planned for every
week.
SOULS elections will be
held Thursday. Jimmie
Hackett is running again
for president, Monteith
Womble for vice president,
Martha Kornegay for
secretary and Ella
Hedgepeth for treasurer.
Harlot A11 are runnin8 for re-
����-� �� -lection unopposed.
Membership in SOULS is open to all students. It is
oriented toward minorities and dedicated to the im-
provemen of race relations.
"All these goals and ideals can't ever be reached
without the input of the student body. Students' sup-
port and service is very much desired and ap-
preciated Hackett said.
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, February 28,1984
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
?V7
mqm.
Minority Council,
Reception Approved
, 't
Rain, Rain, Go A way
This is a typical February day in Greenville. Only three months until June!
MA�K lARtEft ECU Photo Lab
Pirate Walk 'Surviving'
Despite Usage Decline
By MOLLY BLSH
surr w hicr
In 1983, Pirate Walk was
established to provide walking
companions for the women of
ECU. Today, with approximately
sixty students volunteering their
time, Pirate Walk is still surviving
despite the decreasing number of
callers requesting the service.
"The reason we are falling
behind is lack of advertisement
Ronnie Langley, director of
Pirate Walk said. "If girls were
only aware of how many attacks
there are around campus, I feel
they would use the Pirate Walk
There have been two reported
rapes this semester. One occured
last semester, but was reported
this semester. "The other
reported incident did not actually
occur said Francis Eddings,
Assistant Director of Public Safe-
ty. "Just because things are going
well is no reason to think these
rapesassaults will not occur he
said. "It is human nature to think
'it's not going to happen to me
Lack of fear is sometimes worse
than too much fear
According to Langley, the pro-
blem areas are around campus
and in the downtown region. Ed-
dings agreed, saying anywhere so-
meone can be concealed is a
potentially hazardous area. Some
places cited are between the main
campus and the College Hill, the
Joyner library and Slav Hall,
Umstead Hall and the downtown
area near Fletcher Hall.
Both Langley and Eddings
agreed safety is in groups. "It is
always good to have someone
with you after dark said Ed-
dings.
By DARRYL BROWN
Maaaglaa. EtfHor
The SGA Legislature Monday
passed resolutions approving a
charter for the minority Greek
council, an endorsement for a fall
semester graduation reception and
a rule prohibiting campaigning by
SGA candidates after 10 p.m. in
residence halls.
The charter for the minority
Greek and social council was ap-
proved by the legislature. The
organization is to be a governing
body that fills in when the
Panhellenic Council and the Inter-
fraternity Council cannot incor-
porate minority organizations, ac-
cording to Vice Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer Meyer. The
Panhellenic Council will accept
any chartered sorority, but the
IFC will admit groups only if they
have at least 20 members. Neither
organization has discriminatory
bylaws,however, Meyer said.
The Student Welfare Commit-
tee brought forth a resolution en-
dorsing a winter reception for
graduating seniors and guests.
The event would honor students
graduating in December but
would not be a full graduation
ceremony, said Glenn Maughan,
the committee member who
presented the bill.
Student Welfare Committee
Chairman David Brown presided
over the meeting, since Speaker of
the Legislature Kirk Shelley was
absent.
The Student Welfare Commit-
tee "looked at this resolution and
we whole-heartedly endorse it
Maughan said. He said the event
would cost only about $1,500,
while a full commencement
ceremony would cost much more.
Brown
"Its something that's needed
and it's something that's wanted
among the seniors said Senior
Class President Lisa Roberts.
The SGA Legislature supported
a recent Student Residence
Association rule making it ill
for SGA candidates to camp
in door-to-door in residence ha
after 10 p.m een though regular
visitation hours extend after tha
time.
The legislature spent nearly 1
its Monday meeting debating
changes in rules for the SGA ex-
ecutive elections next month. The
legislators debated for more than
half an hour before passing a rule
limiting the use of "sound
mechanisms" by candidates.
Other rules included a require-
ment that candidates report all ex-
penses and campaign workers for
their campaigns.
SRA President Mark Nieu
reported preliminary results from
an SRA survey on the "quie
dormitory. Niewald said more
than 200 students of 600 who
returned surveys were interested
in living in a residence hall witr
stricter noise restrictions.
Archaeology Excavation Continues;
N.C. Algonkian Artifacts Studied
Langley
"A self defense or karate
course offered on campus through
intramurals will help said
Langley. "The key is to be aware
of what is going on around you
and to use the Pirate Walk. Its
purpose is to provide protection
All escorts and operators of the
Pirate Walk are ECU students.
Pirate Walk operates Sunday
through Thursday nights 6 p.m.
to midnight. The telephone
number is 757-6616.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
C�-N�w� fcditor
A group of ECU archaeologists
and students are continuing a
four-year excavation project on
the coastal plain of N.C. The pro-
ject, which began last year, was
designed to give a better
understanding of the native
Americans who were here before
the English settlers and also the
contributions they made.
"The Carolina Algonkians Ar-
chaeology of the Native
American" is the title of their cur-
rent project. "The first year of
the project has emphasized studies
of native American towns where
the English Algonkians actually
had contact said David S.
Phelps, anthropology professor
and project director. Phelps said
the team's work at Roanoke, the
capital town of the Ci! moke
society of ths '� olina
Algonkians, is one "f thoe loca-
Phelps
tions.
The Choanokes were the largest
and most politically powerful of
all the Carolina Algonkian socie-
ty. In 1586 the village was believ-
ed to have had about 2100
residents. "It has a lot of infor-
mation still intact Phelps said.
"What we're looking for literally
is the city's center The site
Arnold To Speak At Graduation
under study stretches tor a mile
along the Chowan River near
Harrelsville.
Two aims the team has are to
find the Roanoke village which
was located near Fort Raleigh and
to find evidence outside of Fort
Raleigh on the actual English col-
ony settlement that is yet to be
found, Phelps said.
The project is sponsored by tl
-America's 400 Anniversary Con.
mittee project under the Depart
ment of Federal Resources Fun
ding Agency. This vear's
$140,000 budget is funded
through the Z. Smith Revnolds
Foundation. Phelps said he ex-
pects the budget to remain the
same for the next three years.
The excavation team consists of
three staff members, Paul Green,
assistant to project director, Ken-
neth Hansell. archaeologist.
and Loretta Lautzenheiser,
assistant archaeologist
ECU News Bureau
Judge Gerald Arnold of the
N.C. Court of appeals, a
distinguised alumnus, will be the
speaker at the 75th commence-
ment at ECU on May 5.
"We are very happy that Judge
Arnold has accepted our invita-
tion to be the commencement
speaker Dr. John M. Howell,
ECU chancellor said. "He has
been a very strong and en-
thusiastic supporter of this univer-
sity and is actively interested i all
of our programs Howell said.
Arnold, a resident of Lill-
ington, is a i963 graduate of ECU
and a graduate of the University
of North Carolina school of law.
He has practiced law in Lillington
and Raleigh and served as county
attorney for Harnett County. He
was elected and served two terms
in the N.C. House of Represen-
tatives and in 1974 was elected to
the N.C. Court of Appeals.
In 1981, he was honored as a
recipient of ECU's annual
Outstanding Alumni award.
The 1984 commencement
ceremonies will be held in Ficklen
Stadium.
Arnold
New Phone Bills Cause Confusion
(UPI) - The public is not mour-
ning Ma Bell's court-ordered
demise � just trying to Figure out
the new, thicker phone bill.
Confusion over thicker
telephone bills has been the only
widespread complaint since the
Jan. l divestiture of American
Telephone & Telegraph, said
telephone company spokesmen
for several Southern firms.
'I suppose the most significant
ea of interest is in the billing, of
course said Charlotte Southern
Bell spokesman Ladd Baucom.
"Actually, we've been very pleas-
ed with the response in North
Carolina
Fatter phone bills are
misunderstood as higher phone
bills, he said.
"It's now broken down into
various segments he said. "But
the customer is still paying one
bill. That's been a big help
Nashville South Central Bell
spokesman John Ed Miller said
the bills have confused Tennessee
phone users, too.
"The thing that frightens peo-
ple is that the bill is so thick. In
the past it meant a lot of long
distance calls.
"South Central Bell no longei
provides long distance service ex-
cept those calls that originate and
terminate in the same
geographical area he said.
Other long distance calls are
provided and billed by AT&T or
See NEW, page 6
Come Again Some Other Day
Theae girls are enjoying weather atypical of Greenville In the springtime
MA�K M�H - ecu NMi L.fc

f


(





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 28, 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Strv4n$ the campus community
�tag MB
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian Is the of
flclal newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University
Unless otherwise noted, unsign
ed editorials on the opinion page
are the newspaper's opinion,
generally written by the manag
ing editor
Subscription Rate IX yearly
The East Carolinian offices are
located In the Publications
building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. NX.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
2nd Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville, NC. 27834.
Telephone: 757 6366, 6367, 6309
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS
Now is your chance to become an
umpire. The Department of
intramural Recreational Services
will hold the training clinic for in
tramural Softball officials beginning
Tuesday, March 13, 1984 at 600 p.m.
in room 102 of Memorial Gymnasium.
Rules, interpretations and mechanics
will be discussed. Officials will be
hired based on practical and written
tests
WEIGHT TRAINING
The Department of intramural
Recreational Services is offering a
weight training class. Registration
will be held February 27 through
March 2 Cost for students, tour
dollars for one class per week, eight
dollars for two classes per week
FacultyStaff, five dollars tor one
class per week, ten dollars for two
classes per week.
PSICHI
All those who were Initiated in Psi
Chi In Fall S3, Certificates & initla
tlon Cards can be picked up in the Psi
Chi Library now! Deadline for
membership In Psi Chi for Spring 84
Is Mar. 211 Initiation for these new
members will be Mar. 10 at 7:00 In
Rm. 244 Mendenhall All members
are urged to attend! Elections tor Psi
Chi officers for 84-85 school year will
be held after the initiation Ceremony
Also, info & applications for the Wray
i. Prewett Scholarships are in Psi Chi
Library.
IRSAQUARBICS
The Department of intramural
Recreation Services is offering an
aquaroblcs class Registration will be
held February 27 through March 2.
Cost for students, four dollars for one
class per week, eight dollars for two
classes per week FacultyStaff, five
dollars for classes meeting once per
week, ten dollars tor classes meeting
twice per week
FASHION MODELS
The Advanced Photography class
at the School of Art is Screening
Models on Monday, Feb 27 and Tues
day Feb 28 at the Student Supply
Store from 11 00 to 7:00.
ART EXHIBITION
Mendenhall Student Center and the
Art Exhibition Committee would like
to Invite everyone to visit American
Drawings IV, showing till March 2 In
the Student Center Don't miss this
unique event!
HONORS PROGRAM
Any undergraduate with a 3.5 GPA
is eligible to take courses in the
Honors Program fall 1984 while space
permits. Honors seminars In women
writers. The Latin American connec
tlon, the human body, psychology,
and technology andor survival, and
Honors sections of many introductory
level courses are listed with asterisks
in the preregistratlon schedule. Con
tact Dr David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale
(757-6373) for permission join the
reception Mon , Feb. 27, 4-6 p.m
Ragsdale 201 Lounge
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Remember the meeting toc'iy, Feb.
28 in room 212 of Mendenhall. Sister
Happy will be speaking to us about
the CROP walk Attendance Is man-
datory! ! See ye' there sisters.
NIH
A representative from National In
stihjte of Health, Bethesda, MD will
be on campus March 19 and 20 to In
terview students who would like to
work in a clinicaf setting as Normal
volunteers Students will be paid dal
ly stipends All interested students
must attend a general meeting at 7:00
p.m. on Monday, March 19 In Raw!
302 before having Interviews on the
20th Students majoring In Allied
Health. Nursing, and related fields
are encouraged to apply Contact the
Co op Office. 313 Rawl, for details and
applications
PI KAPP
The Pi Kapps will be having a Din-
ner Out in celebration of Brotherhood
this Wednesday night at 6:00 p.m. at
the Golden Coral This ceremony will
be dedicated to David Martin and the
Village Green incident. All brothers,
pledges, little sisters, and friends are
encouraged to attend this special oc
casion
DEFENSE CLASS
The Department of intramural-
Recreatloan Services is offering a
personal defense class. Registration
will be held February 27 through
March 2 Cost for students; four
dollars, cost for FacultyStaff; five
dollars
HONORS PHIL 1100
The Honors section (no. 299) of
PHIL 1100 was listed at an Incorrect
time in the Honors correspondence. It
is correctly listed in the newpaper
schedule as being taught at 10:00
MWF Students should prereglster
tor section no 799 at 10 00 MWF
MINGESPOOL
Minges Pool will not be opened for
Rec swim on Wed night Feb. 29 and
Fri night. March 2 Minges pool will
reopen following normal schedule
March 12
LIBRARY HOURS
joyner Library hours for Spring
Break; please note that the hours
have been extended (beyond those
appearing on printed schedules,
calendars, etc.) for the following
dates:
Friday, March 2, 8 a.m. 9
p.mSaturday and Sunday, March 3
&, 4 closed; Monday, March 5 � Fri-
day, March 9 8 a.m. 5 p.m Satur
day, March 10, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m Sun-
day, March 11, 1 p.m. 12 Midnight.
AEROBIC EXERCISE
The Department of intramural-
Recreational Services is offering Spr-
ing semester aerobic fitness classes.
Registration for the second and last
session will be held February 27
through March 2. Cost for students:
four dollars for one class per week,
eight dollars for two classes per
week. FacultyStaff, five dollars for
classes meeting once per week, ten
dollars tor classes twice per week.
IRS TAX FORMS
Joyner Library has received a ship-
ment of tax forms from the Internal
Revenue Service to be used In prepar
Ing 1983 Federal tax returns.
The forms are at the Information
desk in the Documents Dept. and
North Carolina Collection, In the
basement of Joyner Library, West
wing.
LOGO CONTEST
The Student Union Special Events
Committee Is sponsoring a Logo con
test for "Barefoot on the Mall Bring
your entry to Mendenhall (room 234)
by March 2. The year 1984 Is re
quired on all entries, if you have any
questions, call Bruce at 752 3065 or
John at 757 6611 (ext. 213).
WEIGHT CLUB
Attention ECU students and faculty
- there will be an organizational
meetlno of the ECU Intramural
Weight Club on Tuesday, February
28, In Room 102 Memorial Gym. The
faceting will last from 7 until 8 p.m.
All Interested individuals should at-
tend because elections will be held.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of Gam
ma Beta Phi will be held on Thurs
day, March 1 at 7:00 p.m. In the
Jenkins Art Auditorium. All
members and persons Interested In
loining Gamma Beta Phi please at
tend.
ALL SING MEETING
Hope everyone is getting psyched
for ALL SINGH There will be a Presl
dent's meeting with all the sororities
and fraternities tonight at the Alpha
XI Delta house at 9:30 for further In
formation.
PHI SIGMA PI
Brothers! Pledge meeting Wednes
day at 5:00. Business meeting at 5:30
in Austin 132 as usual. Thanks go out
to Jody and Beth tor the use of their
Haunted House for the Mardl Gras
Throwdown. Also � Ken's on ZMB
Tuesday night 1200 until 2:00
MEMORIAL POOL
Memorial Poof will be cloaed for
noon hour Rec swim on Feb. 29 and
March 1. Memorial Pool will close at
5:00 p.m. on March 2 Memorial Pool
will reopen following normal
schedule on March 12.
FELLOWSHIP
Bill Black from William and Mary
will speak on "God's Plan for the
World" at tomorrow night's inter
Varsity Christian Fellowship
meeting. It will be held In Jenkins
Auditorium at 6:30. See ya there!
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omlcron Chapter of Phi Beta
Lambda will hold its next meeting on
Wednesday, February 29, at 4 p.m. In
Rawl 341. There will be a guest
speaker at the meeting.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The Sign Language Club is having a
silent dinner on Thursday, March l.
We'll be meeting at the Tree House
about 6:X Come downtown and join
us.
phone
752-3172
Cliffs
Seafood
Specials
Monday thru Thursda
located I mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw 35- extra
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
i
I
I
1
1
I
1
1
1
MORE ADVENTUI
A BLIND
THaAN
Can you picture yourself
swinging down a cliff? Or
shooting the rapids? Or
crossing a river using only
A rope and your own two
ihands?
You'll have a chance
to do all this and more in
Army ROTC.
Adventure training like
this helps you develop
many of the qualities you'll
neea as an Army officer.
Qualities like self-
confidence. Stamina. And
the ability to perform
under pressure.
If you'd like to find out
more, make a date to see
Captain Helduv Liivak at 757-
6967 or come by Room 324
ROTC this fall.
ARMY ROTC
BEALLVOUCANBE.
lMIUlHll!llflflMllll@
HANDBALL OFFICIALS
Would you like to be an Intramural
team handball official? If to, attend
the training clinic to be held by me
Department of intramural-
Recreational Services Monday,
March 12,1984 at 600 pm in Room 102
of Memorial Gymnasium. Rules,
mechanics and interpretations will be
discussed. Officials will be hired bas-
ed on practical and written tests and
experience.
LIBERAL STUDENTS
There will not be a meeting of the
Society of United Liberal Students on
Thursday, March 1, 19�4. Officer in-
ductions will take place on Thursday,
March is, 1984.
SOPHOMORES
If you plan to major in physics,
math or computer science this could
be your last chance for the AFROTC
two year program. Would you like a
guaranteed ob starting at nearly
J18,000 per year? Take the Air Force
Officer Qualifying Test on March 1,
1984 at 12:30 In Wright Annex to see if
you qualify. For further details con-
tact Major Patton at 757-4597 or stop
by the AFROTC office on the second
floor of the Wright Annex
RHOEPSILON
Les Turnage will be the guest
speaker. He will discuss Real Estate
Brokerage on Tuesday, Feb. 28, at
3:00 In Rawl 104.
SPAGHETTI DINNER
Come to the Delta Zeta house Wed
Feb. 29 between 5:00 and 8:00 for an
all you can eat Spagetti Dinner!
Tickets can be purchased from any
sister and they will be sold at the
door.
PEACE MEETING
Going to be In Greenville over me
break Take this chance to check out
the Peace Committee, 6 30 Friday
nights, 610 S. Elm St lust east of
Austin For Information, call 758-4906.
ETACHI CHAPTER
The Eta CM Chapter of Kappa
Delta PI will meat on Wednesday,
February 29, In the Willis Building at
7:00 P.M.
Our speaker will be Mr. Johann
Blelcher, Principal, Agnes Fulillove
Community School His topic will be
about the Quality Assurance Pro-
gram (Q.A.P.). We encourage all
Kadelplans and their friends to at
tend this meeting. Refreshments will
be served. We look forward to seeing
you there.
HAPPY HOUR
The PI Kapp Brothers will be nav
Ing their Happy hour this Thurs. night
at 200 West. Come out to 200 West and
enoy your favorite beverage at
reduced prices. Party with all your
friends one more time before Spring
Break.
The Ft. Lauderdale Crew will meet
this Thurs. night at 9:00 p.m. sharp In
the Ghetto. Have your money on
hand.
SIGMA THETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the national
honor society of nursing, will hold its
annual business meeting on Thurs-
day, March 1, 1984, at 7:30 p.m. in the
School of Nursing, room 203. All
members are urged to attend.
HAPPY HOUR
The Brothers of Sigma Phi Epsiion
would like to invite everyone to the
Elbe Room, TONIGHT, Tues Feb
28. for DIME DRAFT NIGHT. Ex
cuse me, I don't think you fUiy
understand this will be a party, so,
we're expecting to see all you party
donkeys there tonight
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development
ClassesMarch 13 Survival Italian,
A New You, Money Matters, Career
Change, Dreamt Contact Continuing
Education, Erwin Hall.
SOCCER COACHES
NEEDED
Youth Soccer coaches work part
time, 10-20 hours weekly, with some
Saturday coaching. Hours from
3' 30-6.00 p.m. Salary rate S3.30hour
Applicants must possess knowledge
of soccer skills and have ability to
coach young people ages 6 12. in soc
cer fundamentals.
Applications will be accepted
through Monday, March 19, at the
Personnel Office, City of Greenville,
corner of West Fifth and Washington
Streets.
Contact Margaret McGlohon,
752-4137, ext 259 for further Informa
tlon.
ATTENTION
The Gamma Beta Phi National
Honor Society invites all interested
persons with a grade point average of
above a 3.0 to attend an orientation
session on either Tuesday, Feb 28 or
Wednesday, Feb 29 at 630 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multl Purpose
Room.
BIBLE DISCUSSIONS
Co-ed Group Bible Discussions
Tuesday 7:30 p.m. Rm. 212
Mendenhall Everyone Welcome!
TKE HAPPY HOUR
The pledges of Tau Kappa Epsiion
would like to invite everyone to Hap
py Hour at the Treehouse Wednes
day, Feb 29. 800 12 00 pm tl ed
mission and 82 pitchers. 60 oz
Everyone Invited
Need a
Roommate?
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Student Supply Store

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS. 9fU
This blank space
mid be filled with
ourannouncement
Let us help
publicize your
meeting.
1
L. r
i
f
U. j - ��11 u
sck
Fulfillment
By SHARON LEWIS
Staff �Mn
A seminar on sexual
fulfillment was given by
ECU sociology professor
David Knox Tuesdav
night.
Knox began the
meeting with a defining
of the elements of human
sexuality. Masturbation
was suggested as a way of
becoming familiar with
one's body. Oral sex, in-
tercourse, kissing and
touching were all men-
tioned as a normal part of
sexuality.
Seminar
Values were said to be
another part of sexuality.
"Sexual behavior takes
place inside the context of
a value framework
Knox said. What one
does or doesn't do is bas-
ed on one's moral
teachings, he said.
"Human Sexuality is
highly variable. It is also
variable in the same per-
son. There are times
when you will be a very
sexually active and in-
volved person and there
are other times when you
will be sexually dead.
There is a terrific range
Knox said.
The meaning of sexual
fulfillment to different
individuals was then
discussed and the
characteristics of a good
sexual partner described.
Primarily, being in love
and being cared about
were concerns of the ma-
jority. However there are
those who want variety,
aggressiveness, patience
and endurance in a sexual
partner. Knox quoted one
woman as saying, "If he
can't stay erect for two
hours, I don't want
him
"The couple who never
has intercourse may be as
sexually fulfilled as the
couple who has inter-
course a lot There is
more to life than inter-
course Knox said. The
frequency of intercourse
in a stable relationship
was said to always go
down. But that doesn't
mean it isn't fun or en-
joyable, according to
Knox; just the opposite is
true. "As the frequency
goes down, the enjoy-
ment goes up as the se-
cond language of sex
comes in. The first
language physically in-
volved (is when) you are
rubbing pleasure zones.
The second language of
sex is one in which you
are rubbing souls
He then talked about
the pre-requisites of sex-
ual fulfillment, beginning
with sexual knowledge of
oneself. Knowing what
one finds enjoyable is
essential. A good rela-
tionship is the second ele-
ment. "The best sex you
will ever have is sex with
someone you love
Knox said. Open sexual
communication was said
to be the third prere-
quisite.
Women don't want to
hear about other women,
Knox said. They also like
men to be more responsi-
ble concerning birth con-
trol. More caressing,
gentleness, kissing and
talking before and after
intercourse is desired by
most women. Also, sex
can be enjoyable to
women without climax-
ing. Most agree
tenderness is important.
Men also have their list
of things they'd like
women to know, Knox
claimed. Men do not
always want to be the
dominant partner. Men
want women who can kiss
passionately and who
aren't inhibited in bed.
They want to enjoy sex in
different positions and at
different times of the
day. Most would also like
more oral sex, Knox add-
ed.
Attitudes range from
"sex is sinful" to "if it
feels good, do it A man
cannot learn to have an
erection and a woman
cannot learn to vaginally
lubricate, Knox said.
"Women are the more
sexual animal. They've
got the equipment that
doesn't need a lot of
recharge in between he
said.
Knox also stressed
good physical and mental
health as primary to sex-
ual fulfillment.
The lecture concluded
with a raffling off of a
copy of the latest book by
Knox, Human Sexuality:
A Search for Understan-
ding. Knox is a certified
marriage counselor and
the author of six books.
Wiggins Addresses
SAM About Small
Business Strategy
Read The Classifieds
B MOLLY BUSH
Suff W rtlr
Clarence Wiggins, a
recognized expert in
growth strategy for small
businesses and president
of Century Data Systems,
Inc. in Raleigh addressed
the EC ' Society for the
Advancement of
Management (SAM)
Thursday.
Wiggins shared his ex-
perience and knowledge
in the growth of Century
Data Systems, Inc.
Century Data Systems
has grown in size and
employs over 135 people
working out of nine of-
fices throughout North
and South Carolina and
Georgia. In the United
States it is one of the
largest independent elec-
tronic cash register
distributors.
"Century Data
Systems contributes its
growth to people � the
Tight people" said Wig-
gins. "Quality people are
the most important
asset
For three consecutive
years Century Data
Systems has been ranked
by Inc. Magazine as one
of America's fastest
growing private com-
panies.
We Do Chicken
Bight
z nicttCMekM
Buttermilk Biscuit
IfN
G�t 2 pieces of the Colonel's Original Recipe or Extra
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with this coupon. Coupon good only for combination white
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only at store locations listed In tab ad W5 East 5th Street
Kentucky Fried Chicken
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Phone 756-0625
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(Pizza Only)
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Not Good With Any Other Specials
Buy One Pizza at Regular Price
And Get Another of Same Value
Or Lees FREE
ECU
LASAGNE
JUST $1.99
� TO GO $2.29 �
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.35)
(Not good with other Lasagne Specials)
.EXPIRES MARCH 31,1984
SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST $1.99
� TO GO $2.29 �
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.25)
(Not good with other Spaghetti
Peppi specials)
Support
the
PIRATE
WALK
757-6616
LIFEGUARDS
The City of Greenville Recreation and Parks
would like to interview qualified applicants for
swimming instructors and lifeguards,Full-Time
and Part-Time summer Work.Please contact
Jim Parker at Greenville Recreation and
Parks. 752-4137 extension 205
Carolinian
mi Tyfer
caruhna east mall Sqreenville
MEN'S �reA&
SPRING SAVINGS
Monday February 27th through Saturday, March 3rd
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Daily Drawings for Terrific Prizes:
T-Shirts
Suntan Lotion Sun Glasses Sun Visors Frisbees
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(No purchase necessary Reg.sler Da.lv beg.nn.ng Hornby. Feb 27th ,n the Men s Deparlmen.
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LAUNDROMAT
Lounge
Video Games
Large Screen "Cable" TV
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Fluff & Fold Service
Dry Cleaning Pick-Up
Ample Parking
Attendant On Duty
Cold Beverages
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight, 7 Days A Week
Located Next To The Pizza Hut
2510 E. 10th Street Greenville, N.C.
752-5222
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$ ��- .�� �� i'i





?
3Jie ffaat (Earnlfnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. cw���
Darryl Brown, �, &�,�.
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mmmm j.t. pietrzak. ��� ,��,
Tina Maroschak. cn� ��,� mike McPartland, m
Ed Nicklas. spok Ea,or Tom Norton, o��, v��
Gordon Ipock, �, kathy Fuerst. oo, ���,
Mark Barker, c�w.��. m�h Mike Mayo, r��io &��.
February 28, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Voting Rights
Students Must Work For Rights
While the SGA Legislature spent
45 minutes Monday arguing over
one, small rule for the SGA elec-
tion next month, they could have
been planning more substantial ac-
tion for even more important elec-
tions � the state and national ones
coming up in May and November.
Instead of fueding over what
kind of "sound mechanisms" a
student candidate can use when
running for an SGA office, the
legislature could take the lead in
really representing the students
against what amounts to
discrimination in Pitt County. The
group heard a report last week
outlining how students are denied
the right to register to vote in
Greenville � denied by the same
state law that somehow permits
students in other areas of the state
to register in the town where they
go to college.
The SGA should be taking the
lead in this fight against the disen-
franchisement of students from
local (and to some extent state and
national) politics. Students live in
Greenville at least nine months a
year and contribute irreplaceably to
.the economy of the town; they
-Campus Forum
make up almost a third of the city
population (and more of its voting
populace) but most can't vote in
the city.
Students are required to prove
they pay taxes in the county and in-
tend to live here perrnenantly
before they can register in the area.
Otherwise, they must return to
their hometown, where they pro-
bably spent no more than a couple
of months each year, to register.
And they must return because
North Carolina does not permit, as
many states do, citizens to register
by mail.
Needless to say, the inconvenience
of the process keeps many studnts
from voting. And students have
virtually no voice in local housing
laws and rent regulations, though
without students the Greenville
apartment business would collapse.
The laws are interpreted and en-
forced differently in different N.C.
cities; there seems to be no reason
ECU students can't register in Pitt
County like UNC students do in
Orange. Until students move to
change the problem, they will re-
main disenfranchised citizens.
Student Grateful For
Sports Medicine Facility
I would like to take a moment to call
special attention to the Department of In-
tramural Sports Medicine. I became
aware of the existence of this department
several months ago, and have since receiv-
ed a great deal of assistance from their
staff.
The department operates under the
direction of Dr. Wayne Edwards, and is
staffed by Jamie Moul and Trudy Lewis.
Their office is located in room 111 of
Memorial gym, and these folks are on
hand Monday through Friday to aid
students in the prevention or treatment of
any sport-related injury.
I understand that this is a one of a kind
service that is unique to ECU. Funds for
the department are obtained via our tui-
tion, so there is no fee per visit. All each
student is asked for is his or her name and
ID number, which the department keeps
on file so they can justify the existence of
such a service to those who appropriate
available funds within this university.
To all those involve with this depart-
ment, I congratulate you on your effort,
and appreciate your help.
Craig Collie
Senior
Physics
Big Pat Attack
For awhile, it seemed as if some objec-
tivity and integrity were developing at The
East Carolinian; this odd occurrence
began with the dismissal of Patrick
O'Neill. But, O'Neill's letter in last
Thursday's edition of the paper indicates
he still maintains some influence on The
East Carolinian.
O'Neill ran an extremely long letter in
the Campus Forum. In fact, it constituted
the entire Campus Forum. More impor-
tantly, O'Neill's letter was twice as long as
any student letter that has recently ap-
peared in the section. If anyone else had
sent such a letter in, it would have been
edited and severely reduced in length. In
other words, O'Neill's letter grossly ex-
ceeded the length limitations of the Cam-
pus Forum. Apparently, O'Neill's trash
warrants special attention at The East
Carolinian.
According to sources at the paper,
O'Neill intended his letter to be ran as an
editorial. Evidently, the editors realized it
would be improper to run a nonstudent
editorial in a student paper.
Instead, The East Carolinian disguised
O'Neill's lengthy editorial by putting it in
the Campus Forum. This blatant act is an
abomination and disservice to the campus
community.
One must question the intentions of
The East Carolinian, which allowed the
lengthy editorial of a known left-wing
radical to dominate the Campus Forum.
Does O'Neill still have influence at the
paper?
O'Neill dominated the paper for too
long before his dismissal, and after his
editorial in last Thursday's Campus
Forum, it is evident O'Neill still holds
some influence on the paper; this must
not continue.
Since O'Neill is no longer a student at
East Carolina, he should not be allowed
to propogate his left-wing, radical beliefs
through editorials that The East Caroli-
nian disguises by putting in the Campus
Forum. The Campus Forum is for com-
ment; it should not be used as an editorial
forum for political activist trying to
advertise a cause.
Joseph Olinick
Junior
Accounting
(Editor's note: Mr. O'Neill, like any
other person, has a right to submit opi-
nion to the Campus Forum. No letters to
the Campus Forum this year have been
edited in length. The two page limit is en-
forced only when an overabundance of
letters denies space to some opinions;
many letters this year have exceeded our
two page limit. Also, Mr. O'Neill's letter
was the only one submitted for last Thurs-
day's edition. No letters were denied
print.
Cafe' 01T
Due to your editorial statement on Feb.
16, "How Comea cup of coffee costs
$.60 in the Mendenhall cafeteria and you
can't get refills, when around the corner
McDonald's sells the same size cup of
$.30 and you can have all you want?" I
felt it necessary to determine whether the
East Carolina Dining Service facility,
Mendenhall Student Center Snack Bar,
was being unfair.
To learn exactly what was offered at
each account, I bought a large and small
cup of coffee from both locations and
asked if refills were available. This is the
information taken of Feb. 17, 1984:
MSC Snack Bar: small cup $.358 oz.
cup; large cup $.4512oz. cup; and refills:
yes.
McDonald's: small cup .308oz. cup;
large cup .4010oz. cup; and refills yes.
You can see that both places offer two
sizes of coffee and refills are available at
each location.
Thank you for allowing me the oppor-
tunity to clarify your statement.
Ira L. Simon
Director of Dining Services
(Editor's note: I wish they'd give me a
refill.)
Don't Attack Sen. Jesse Helms
By GORDON IPOCK
As I passed through Mendenhall the
other day, I overheard a one-sided
tirade. A white male ECU student was
declaring emphaUcally, "I'm not that
crazy about Hunt, but I'll vote for
anybody � anybody � who runs
against Helms There was an in-
gratiating tone in his voice as he address-
ed a black student reading the day's
News and Observer. The reader, a male,
listened politely.
"The guy is a clown, an imbecile
continued the orator. "We've got to get
rid of him
An ardent supporter of our senior
senator, it hurt me to hear him so
viciously maligned.
"Are you referring to Senator
Helms?" I asked my fellow student.
"Yeah
I assumed an exaggerated tone of in-
credulity. "Surely you don't mean the
things you're saying about Jesse, do
you? Why, I can think of no greater or
more important cause than insuring the
re-election of Jesse Helms
The black student folded his paper
and calmly observed the unfolding
tableau from his cushioned chair.
"You've got to be kidding said the
orator with great disgust. "Surely you're
not for that crackpot Helms?"
"Why, certainly I am I replied firm-
ly.
He shook his head in utter bewilder-
ment.
"What is it about him that you so
dislike?" I asked.
"Everything
"Everything?" I queried. "That's a
pretty broad statement � and rather
vague. Forget about 'everything Just
one or two specific points will do
The orator stammered for a moment,
confused. "Well, everything. I just
despise everything about the guy,
everything he stands for
"You're perfect proof of how the
liberal media has succeeded with its
smear campaign against Jesse Helms I
said. "Most of the college students I
know strongly dislike Helms and for no
definite reasons. It's a purely emotional
reaction, a programed reflex, not a
logical, thoughtful response at all I
knew I had the guy figured right, so I set
him up for the kill. "So come on. Don't
give me this 'everything' routine. Give
me one valid reason why you hate
Helms
"Well the man's stupid
"Be exact. How is he stupid?"
"Just look at the stuff he writes. The
man doesn't make sense. And John East
writes everything he puts out, anyway.
Helms is so stupid, he can't even write
"Oh. So Jesse Helms can't write?
That's why you despise him?"
"Yeah
"Have you ever actually read
anything that Jesse Helms has written?
Have you read his book? The man writes
beautifully lucid prose. And did you
know at one time Jesse Helms was the ci-
ty news editor for The Raleigh Times,
and a reporter for the very newspaper
your friend is holding?"
When knowlegeable critics who know
what Sen. Helms stands for give me their
reasons for rejecting him, I listen to and
accept their opinions. When someone
says, "I prefer the social welfare state to
the free enterprise system or, "I prefer
to live in a society based on atheistic
principals rather godly morals or, "I
believe in supporting Third World
socialism at the expense of American
taxpayers or, "I support the spread of
world communism by disarming
America then I can say: "Yes, you
have logical and reasonable grounds for
disliking Senator Helms
It is a pity, however, that most people
read no deeper than the cruelly slanted
political cartoons that litter most
newspapers' editorial pages. They listen
only to the local TV news, broadcasted
by stations owned by powerful
Democrats who allow their reporters to
interview Hunt cronies referring to
Senator Helms as "an embarrassment to
A majority of the voters will agree with
what I've already discovered: Jesse Helms
is America's most unjustly maligned and
castigated statesman � and perhaps its
greatest.
The orator's mouth hung slightly
agape, and he had a perplexed look
upon his face.
"Yes, Helms was a professional jour-
nalist and writer for years before he
entered politics. Writing was his career.
Now, how did an illiterate manage to do
that?"
The orator had no answer.
"What's your next point. What other
characteristic about Helms disgusts you.
That he's a racist? What? Toss up
another fiction, and I'll blow it full of
holes too
The young orator turned on his heels
and stormed away.
our state cronies who won't talk about
Helms' record and let the people decide
if he's an embarrassment. They listen to
the media quoting other politicians and
statesmen who rarely challenge the
substance of Helms' stands, but find it
easier to attack the man personally. That
is why many college students, who fanc
themselves young intellectuals, despise
Jesse Helms but can't articulate why.
I am convinced that before Nov. 7,
the truth about Helms will be made
known. And a majority of the voters will
agree with what I've already discovered:
Jesse Helms is America's most unjustly
maligned and castigated statesman �
and perhaps its greatest.
� �
. Until You Know A Few Things
By DARRYL BROWN
It is no secret to astute American
political observers that Soviet pro-
poganists and KGB have infiltrated
many Western institutions, spreading
the filthy slime of communism in an at-
tempt to undermine democracy.
It is also well known that atheistic
Communists have no less goal than to
overthrow the Christian, Democratic
West and rule the world with their
godless totalitarianism. They dupe the
Western press and innocent (or
sometimes not so innocent) Americans
into working for their filthy cause.
Every kid on the street knows The
Washington Post, The New York Times,
Time magazine andNewsweek, to name
but a few, are run by communist sym-
pathizers or puppets of the Soviet
Union. And of course the liberal think
tanks, the Smithsonian Institution and
the most university policical science
departments are funded directly with
KGB money. We don't even have to
mention the peace movement and
nuclear freezeniks � Soviet puppets all.
And every political action committee left
of NCPAC gets hand-written checks (in
red ink) from the Kremlin, vomiting up
the big bucks for their filthy cause.
The multi-billion dollar Russian pro-
paganda blitz against the West has flown
right in our window of vunerabili ty, and
now has sucked in powerful members of
the United States government no one
would ever suspect. Worst of all, one of
them is from North Carolina. That's
right, I believe Jesse Helms is a puppet
of the Soviet Union, a Russian bear with
a Southern drawl, a communist dupe, a
KGB sympathizer. (He even bleeds red.)
Oh sure, he's good at hiding it. Most
people would never suspect his filthy
commie leanings. But they are there, and
his is endangering the soverienty of this
God-fearing nation.
Just look at his record. Look at
defense. Not only does he support
military spending increases comparable
to those of the Soviet Union, thus mak-
ing us a militarized state just like the
commies, but he does it when he knows
it will increase the deficit to the point of
bankrupty, crippling the last bastion of
Christian Democracy and causing
America to fall to its economic knees.
And race relations. Helms has over
and over again opposed the Voting
knowing it is the slow death of millions
of Americans, killing us puff by puff
and further weakening our defenses
against the godless commies.
To the far ends of the Earth he
spreads his dirty deeds. Look who sup-
ported the military dictators of Argen-
tina in the Falklands War � Jesse. And
he knew we'd waste more guns and
equipment taking Grenada than we
would snatch from the commies, so he
said "yea, Reagan, give that Caribbean
everything you got. We ought to be
scared of that island
A majority of citizens will agree with
what I've already discovered: Jesse Helms
is America's most misaligned and
conspiring statesman � and probably its
gravest.
Rights Act and the Martin Luther King
holiday. He did this not only to chip
away at the democratic institution of
voting, making us more tike the com-
mies, but he deviously heightened racial
tension in the country with the King
holiday move, pitting American against
American and fermenting the social
scene for a full-fledged people's com-
munist revolution.
And even more subtle is his anti-
commie rhetoric. Oh, it's the perfect
cover. He blasts the Soviets, worsening
East-West relations, adding ice to the
Cold War and readying the world for a
commie surprise attack. Besides, all
those commies speak in code; his blab-
ber is probably really secret messages to
the Kremlin that everything is going
A-OK with the Ruskie's scheme in
America.
Oh, oh, and tobacco. Shameless. He
supports that crop to the- bittfr end,
The list goes on. He used to work for
The Raleigh Times-News and Observer
company, which even his own political
organization calls a biased, ultra-liberal
(read commie) media. He was a TV news
commentator, subtly wooing the pro-
teanat trough the biased, poisoned
S m!5J1c Con�r�sional Club is.
when spelled m Russian and put in a
mirror, The Communist Club. He acts
to focus attention on himself personally,
thus some don't see the deeds he's really
working for. He poses as the last guy to
team up with the commies, but you
know who s going to be at Lenin's right
hand in Kremlin heaven.
Yes, the is almost too sad to tell, and
too horrible to believe. But a majority of
citizens will agree with what I've already
discovered: Jesse Helms is America's
most misaligned and conspring
lUte,n�n � �nd perhaps its gravest.
,rt
� �
'�� ' ��� m �?�
Campu,
B STEPHEN
HARDING
Crime was up drastical-
ly this week due to an in-
crease in vandalism and
larcenies. There were also
several reports of break-
ing and entering as well as
alcohol related viola-
tions. The reports for
Feb. 20 thru Feb. 26 from
the Department of Public
Safety are:
Feb. 20, 11 a.m. - a
report of breaking and
entering into a medical
storeroom in the Brodv
Buildhg and larceny of
several housekeeping
items; 3 p.m. - A report
of a larceny of a licence
plate from a car parked
north of Scott Hall; 3:40
p.m. - A report of break-
ing and entering and
iarcen :i
14th and I
ing lot,
report ti
machine!
Building
7:30 p. rr.
source
trolled s
489 Aye
was lat
cupants
Ethendj
Erne
room 4'
which
occupant
Rar.
J. �
blue lighj
c phoi
iseur -l
Fer ;
report
center
Jones H�
per;
Maritime
By STL ART MORGAN E C I
sufT�ni� ba
on An e
Students can earn five ten
to six semester hours' shipbui
credit through participa- and agr
tion in a unique project Parti
this summer. ECU and in d
the Confederate Naval bece
Museum of Columbus, a r.
Ga will co-sponsor a insti
field school in maritime tion. H
history and underwater nun-
research from June 4 to teres:ej
July 13 in Columbus. history i
Students of all majors diving at
are encouraged to attend, ticipate
and all participants will project
receive a basic introduc- tion.
tion to American "Coi
Maritime history, under- portan:
water archaeology and cento
related subject material. War.
To assist in the inter- N 1
pretation of material ma- j
located during the pro- "Hea
ject, two weeks of parts.
classroom instruction at mar.
Use Th
Announce
IjllllltlllllllllllllllllfllllllllflllllllllllfllMllllliiP!
inn
OPTICAL i PA
Soft Contact L
$59 a paii
All frames in stoc
with this couj
Expires Feb. 2J
CHRISTIAN DIOR HAISTON KR. A. Al
ARDEY GLORIA VANDERBIIT Ri I , :
PLAVBOY and man mor1
v Url
t u "S im On
The
OPTICAL
S 703 Grt��rtH� Brvd (ro� From P.n P1�,
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v.smm
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1984
v x
M
Vims
egeabie critics who know
stands for give me their
cting him. I listen to and
Unions When someone
tr the social welfare state to
sc sstem or, "I prefer
y based on atheistic
morals or, "I
g Third World
e expense of American
"1 support the spread of
sm by disarming
i 1 can say. "Yes, you
nd reasonable grounds for
iior Helms
eer. that most people
kr than the cruelly slanted
toons that litter most
iitorial pages. They listen
cal TV news, broadcasted
owned by powerful
pio allow their reporters to
in! cronies referring to
I an embarrassment to
gree with
Jesse Helms
iligned and
erhaps its
I who won't talk about
and let the people decide
tssment. They listen to
V - er politicians and
I bo rareh challenge the
Helms' stands, but find it
k the man personally. That -
ollege students, who fancy
intellectuals, despise
articulate why.
Kneed that before Nov. 7,
cut Helms will be made
majority of the voters will
lat Pvt already discovered:
America's most unjustly
castigated statesman �
- greatest.
Things
the slow death of millions
i, killing us puff by puff
wakening our defenses
kodless commies.
ar ends of the Earth he
liny deeds. Look who sup-
lilitary dictators of Argen-
talklands War � Jesse. And
led waste more guns and
I taking Grenada than we
In fro the commies, so he
Tleagan, give that Caribbean
Vou got. We ought to be
at island
"ee with
Jesse Helms
and
Probably its
oes on. He used to work for
Times-News and Observer
hich even his own political
i calls a biased, ultra-liberal
re) media. He was a TV news
r, subtly wooing the pro-
rough the biased, poisoned
V The Congressional Club is,
pd in Russian and put in a
e Communist Club. He acts
jention on himself personally,
lon't see the deeds he's really
r. He poses as the last guy to
kith the commies, but you
sjoing to be at Lenin's right
lin heaven.
is almost too sad to tell, and
i to believe. But a majority of
agree with what I've already
Jesse Helms is America's
aligned and conspring
and perhaps its gravest.

Campus Crime Takes Dramatic
By STEPHEN
HARDING
Crime was up drastical-
ly this week due to an in-
crease in vandalism and
larcenies. There were also
several reports of break-
ing and entering as well as
alcohol related viola-
tions. The reports for
Feb. 20 thru Feb. 26 from
the Department of Public
Safety are:
Feb. 20, 11 a.m. - A
report of breaking and
entering into a medical
storeroom in the Brody
Building and larceny of
several housekeeping
items; 3 p.m. - A report
of a larceny of a licence
plate from a car parked
north of Scott Hall; 3:40
p.m. - A report of break-
ing and entering and
larceny to a vehicle in the
14th and Elm Street park-
ing lot; 6:10 p.m. - A
report that the cigarette
machine in the Belk
Building was vandalized;
7:30 p.m. - A confidential
source reported a con-
trolled substance in room
489 Aycock Hall which
was later raided. Oc-
cupants were Brian Lee
Etheridge and Gilbert
Emerson McMillan; In
room 453 Aycock Hall
which was also raided,
occupants were William
Randal Sugg and Lloyd
J. Hepler; 9 p.m The
blue light of the emergen-
cy phone at Minges Col-
iseum needed repair.
Feb. 21, 1:20 a.m. - A
report the first floor
center stairwell door of
Jones Hall was broken by
person(s) unknown; 5:11
p.m. - Kim F. Griffith, a
non-student, was
transported from the
athletic field south of the
Irons Building to Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital; 10:50 p.m. - A
report of an attempted
breaking and entering of
a clinical storeroom at the
Brody Building.
Feb. 22, 1:30 a.m. -
Tonia E. Thomas of 312
Clement Hall and
Stephen Reid of Farm-
ville, N.C. were found in
violation of visitation
policy and campus
curfew; 2:30 a.m. - Dris-
tian B. Tyson of Winter-
ville, N.C. was arrested
for DW1; 3:20 a.m. -
Cary Burton Shaw of 18C
Aycock Hall activated the
fire alarm on fourth flooi
east Aycock Hall; 10:4C
a.m. - A report of the
larceny of four rolls of
tape and one bucket from
rooms SE-83 and SN-67
of the Brody Building;
2:15 p.m. - A report that
money was stolen from a
file cabinet of room SE-
106A in the Brody
Building; 5:00 p.m. - Ed-
ward Earl Alphin of
Kinston, N.C. was placed
in protective custody for
being publicly drunk;
Feb. 23, 12:13 a.m. - A
female student was stuck
in the elevator between
third and fourth floors of
Tyler Hall; 12:15 a.mA
burning electric cord was
found in the gameroom
of Mendenhall Student
Center by housekeeping
personnel; 12:20 a.m. -
The alarm for the univer-
sity telephone system was
activated at the police
department; 12:50 a.m. -
The Greenville Police
Department advised cam-
pus police that the
burglar alarm systems in
Mendenhall Student
Center and the Student
Supply Store were ac-
tivated; 1:21 a.m. - A
report of a gasoline odor
on sixth and seventh
floors in White Hall; 2:45
a.m. - A report of van-
dalism to the northeast
curfew door of Garrett
Hall; 12:35 p.m. - A
report of the larceny of
clothes and a piece of lug-
gage from Clement Hall;
2 p.m. - Lt. Barnes
reported he lost a key ring
with 14 keys somewhere
on campus; 2:15 p.m. - A
female student in Cotten
Hall reported receiving
an obscene telephone
call; 6 p.m. - A report of
the larceny of a bank card
from Fleming Hall; 10:30
p.m. - A female student
in White Hall reported
receiving obscene
telephone calls; 10:40
p.m. - A report of van-
dalism to the southwest
curfew door in Jones
Hall.
Feb. 24, 1.15 a.m. - A
report the east door in
Jones Hall was malfunc-
tioning; 1:25 a.m. - The
vending machine in
Aycock Hall's lobby was
vandalized; 1:40 a.n. -
Wanda Sue Flanagan of
Rt. 13, Greenville was ar-
rested for DWI; 3:30
a.m. - The mechanical
room door in Minges
Coliseum was reported
unsecured; 9 a.m A
report by two female
students of an
unauthorized moving of
their bicycles; 11:10 a.m.
- A report of the larceny
of a certificate from the
lobby of Green Hall; 6:53
p.m. - A report of a
suspicious white male in
the canteen of Belk Hall;
7:20 p.m. - William E.
Hopkins of 208-B Belk
Hall was written up for
creating a fire hazard;
10:55 p.m. - A report of
the receiver, cord, and
face plate of the Belk
Hall house phone stolen.
Feb. 25, 12:01 a.m. - A
report that a vehicle was
vandalized west of Belk
Hall; 1:30 a.m. - A win-
dow of 210-A Belk Hall
was broken out; 8:48
a.m. - A window by the
southwest curfew door of
Jarvis Hall was found
broken; 8:50 a.m. - A
report of a broken win-
dow on the Jarvis Hall; 4
p.m. - A report of the
larceny of a bicycle east
of Mendenhall Student
Center; 4:50 p.m. - A
report of a breaking and
entering of a locker and
larceny of art supplies in
Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
Feb. 26, 1:20 a.m. - A
room in Scott Hall was
broken into and contents
vandalized; 1:44 a.m. -
Ronal Leigh Lindquist
and Benjamin Eugene
Buie of 338 Slay Hall
were found in possession
of drug paraphenalia;
1:50 a.m. - Gregg Alan
Gainer of Camp Lejeune,
N.C. was arrested for
DWI; 3 p.m. - A report
of the larceny of a stereo
from the basement of
Jones Hall; A report of
vandalism to the lobby
phone of Scott Hall.
Maritime History Project To Be Offered
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Wittar
Students can earn five
to six semester hours'
credit through participa-
tion in a unique project
this summer. ECU and
the Confederate Naval
Museum of Columbus,
Ga will co-sponsor a
field school in maritime
history and underwater
research from June 4 to
July 13 in Columbus.
Students of all majors
are encouraged to attend,
and all participants will
receive a basic introduc-
tion to American
Maritime history, under-
water archaeology and
related subject material.
To assist in the inter-
pretation of material
located during the pro-
ject, two weeks of
classroom instruction at
ECU will provide
background information
on America's trade pat-
terns, transportation,
shipbuilding, industry
and agriculture.
Participants interested
in diving activities must
be certified in SCUBA by
a nationally recognized
instructional organiza-
tion. However, a limited
number of students in-
terested only in maritime
history research and non-
diving activities can par-
ticipate by supporting the
project at the site's loca-
tion.
"Columbus was an im-
portant manufacturing
center during the Civil
War said Dr. William
N. Still, professor in
maritime history at ECU.
"Heavy guns, machinery
parts, boilers, etc were
manufactured there ft. r
Confederate warships
Columbus, as the site
of a Confederate
shipyard, was also an im-
portant center for
railroad and water
transportation
throughout the ninteenth
and early twentieth cen-
turies. In fact, as Dr. Still
further explained, Col-
umbus was the head of
navigation for the
Chatahoochee River;
Because vessels could not
travel any further
upriver, many docked at
Columbus to load and
unload passengers and
cargoes.
After two weeks of
classroom instruction at
ECU, participants will
move to the project site in
Columbus. For the next
four weeks, they will
survey and investigate
cultural resource material
preserved beneath the
Chattahoochee River, in-
cluding the remains of the
Civil War vessel Chat-
tahoochee and a Con-
federate navy yard.
Survey activities will
utilize state-of-the-art
remote sensing electronic
equipment to locate
historical structures,
features and vessel re-
mains submerged and
buried beneath the Chat-
tahoochee River.
Material identified during
the survey will be in-
vestigated to provide data
relating to age, origin and
cultural significance.
For North Carolina
residents, cost of the six-
week course will be about
$250 for five hours' credit
and at least $296 for six
hours' credit. For non-
residents, cost will be
about $540 for five
hours' credit and at least
$610 for six hours'
credit.
Costs will include tui-
tion, laboratory fee, and
room and board at the
project site and room for
two weeks, without
board, on the main cam-
pus of ECU. Total cost
will be $45 less for
students not wanting
university housing during
the first two weeks at
ECU.
For more information,
contact the offices of the
Program in Maritime
History and Underwater
Research.
Buy, Sell
Ana Trade
With The
Classifieds
Use The
Announcements
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OPTICAL
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All frames in stock 30�off
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OPTICAL
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ATTIC
THUR.
WZMB Ladies
Light Night
65CHappy Hour
FRI.
$1.00 Off
Adm. with
PKM or Attic
T-shirt.
THUR.
MARCH 1
FRI.
MARCH 2
I
OFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
MARCH 1
HENDRIX THEATRE
ALL ACTS
INVITED
TO AUDITION CALL 757-6611
selected acts will be
paid to perform
public welcome
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
for iust M.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
$2.25 for a Pitcher of Beer
fACO
CfQ
Feista Time
Everydav
5:00 until
LADIES NIGHT AT
THE KING AND QUEEN NORTH f
WED. Feb. 29
Poor Souls
Harden
All College Students 12 Price before 7:30
All Dining costumer admitted free.
Coming Mar. 7 North Tower
Happy Hour f-8
W.lc For Special Saturday Night
TOP THIS!
Then top it again!
Introducing Hardee's New Baked Potato Bar
Hardee's baked potatoes are sauce . Sour Cream � Cheese
better two ways: They're bigger And if you finish the toppings
than most fast-food potatoes, and before you finish your potato.
you can stuff em yourself, any
way you want, with all the top-
pings vou want. Figure out your
favorite combination from such
Potato Bar items as.
Bacon bits � Broccoli cuts � Cheese
bring it back and top it again at
no extra charge.
Also available at drive-thru
with Broccoli & Cheese Sauce or
Bacon Bits & Cheese Sauce onlv.
v�
- �
�iiwii� " i� mm-f'tmitHm1! � �'� ��i�rtn mi m m � �-�? .m





6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1984

Campuses Succumb To Major Flu Epidemic
(CPS) � Lookinng
over her list of students
waiting for care at Emory
University's Student
Health Service on Valen-
tine's Day, Nurse Joyce
Carlone noted that, for
the umpteenth day in a
row, seven of the 10
students were complain-
ing of flu symptons.
"One week after winter
break, the students were
breaking down our
doors Carlone
remembers.
They've been besieging
campus healtii centers
over most of the country,
too, especially in the
South and Southeast, as a
flu epidemic spreads
without much control.
Administrators are jug-
gling appointment books
and infirmary beds to ac-
commodate the rush of
flu victims. At the
University of Vermont,
for example, appoint-
ments are not to be had.
At Southwest Missouri,
at least one junior gave
up on the health center
and went home to suffer.
At other campuses,
teacher illnesses have
threatened to force
cancellation of some
classes.
Most of the suffering
results from Russian
Type A influenza,
although there is also
Type B circulating
around.
Both accompany high
fevers, body aches,
coughs and sometime
sneezing and sore throats,
says Jeff Taylor of Texas'
State Health Department.
About 175 students �
twice the normal number
� have been visiting the
University of Texas-
Austin's health center,
forcing doctors to treat
students in triage screen-
plane to California and
suddenly it was spreading
nationwide
At Southwest
Missouri, however,
physicians blame Texans
for the 200 flu cases they
New Phone Bills Cause Confusion
Continued From Page 1
anuiner vendor, such as MCI or
Sprint, he said.
"With two companies pro-
viding the services, you have to
have two long distance sheets and
two portions of the bill he said,
explaining the thicker bill.
Another sheet takes care of the
equipment costs. Miller said the
customers
All of those separate sheets are
confusing, he said.
"Other than that, we haven't
had people calling to say it's any
better or worse since the change
Miller said, "by and large, most
people haven't had a problem. We
don't see any evidence of it
The president of a small in-
telephone sets transferred at mid- dependent telephone company in
night on New Year's Eve to Nashville said he believes the
AT&T, so "now customers are
leasing them from AT&T which
contracted with South Central
Bell to continue to bill
public will react.
"We're waiting until those
customers get the second phone
bill of the year said James Ber-
Reproductive Health Care
TrlEfUfniNCj
CCvtERs,
L
Understa : . � � � . ��
I� abort loc � � I , .
�we bothpartm � .� ,
Special Services and rates lor students
Call 781 5550 days, evenings, and weekends
ryman, Southern Communica
tions president.
His telephone equipment com-
pany started in 1978 to sell and
service small business telephone
systems.
"The whole market is up in the
air and people are going into a
panic said John Perdue, Jr
management consultant for a
small company.
Berryman said phone calls to
inquire about his telephone equip-
ment have more than doubled
since Jan. 1 and he expects the
trend to continue.
2 Pleas CMckin
ing rooms, reports Dr.
Jack Crosby.
"There was some talk
of altering class
schedules" because so
many students were sick,
he adds, but absentee
levels are decreasing now treated during the first
"after four pretty severe weeks of the semester,
weeks "Young people are
Texas A'M, Baylor, harder hit because most
Southern Methodist and of them were not exposed
Southwest Texas State to it when they were
students are equally hard growing up, so they're
hit, Taylor says. more vulnerable. People
But closing schools, he over 30 were more likely
says, "isn't an effective to be exposed to it in their
control of an epidemic. It youth, so they're less
doesn't stop the spread of vulnerable now
the virus. But it is Kappus says this par-
necessary when there is ticular form of Type A
no one left to teach the first hit the United States
class
"There's not a heck of
a lot anybody can do to
prevent it counsels Karl
Kappus of the Center for
Disease Control in Atlan-
ta.
"It spreads too quickly
� within 24 hours � to
know where it starts
Taylor says. "It could
have been introduced on
the East Coast, then so-
meone there got on a
in 1977. It hadn't been
detected in America since
1920.
"We don't know where
it's hung out since then
he adds.
Not in Ohio, according
to Dr. Robin Cottle of
the University of Miami
in Oxford. The Ohio
Public Health Depart-
ment told him the flu
epidemic wouldn't be hit-
ting Ohio too hard this
year, "i agree, but I may
eat my words in a few
weeks
"There've been so
many cases in the last two
weeks says Ruth Set-
terlund of the Student
Health Service at the
University of Minnesota
in Duluth. "We don't ex-
pect it to level off this
week, either, because it's
the week before finals,
and people are always
more susceptible to illness
then
At Pepperdine Univer-
sity in California, Jane
Hirt says "it's been hit-
ting us for two weeks and
it's not leveling off she
says.
But one shouldn't be
quick to term the out-
break "an epidemic
warns Dr. Robert Murras
of the California Public
Health Department.
"Type A has hit man.
college-aged and younger
adults he says. "But in
many places that's nor-
mal for the season. Flu
breaks out every year
At Boise State, in an.
case, "We've been ter-
ribly busy for the past
week and a half one
nurse says, "which is wh
the doctor can't talk to
you
Z2S
M���1�M��,�,1W .���,�
Buttermilk Biscuit
We Do Chicken
Bight.
Cm CMdw Md i Buttermilk Biscuit for only $l 19
with thi. coupon. Coupon good only for combination white
dart order, and m.y not be used with .ay other special of-
�1� .TnrT Pr1COUP?n Cb9,�� WU �PPllcble
only at store locations listed in tab ad.)
Kentucky Fried Chicken
600 W. Greenville Blvd.
and
2905 East 5th Street
Advertise
QUIXOTE TRAVELS
Start Your Summer Right
Take a BA HAMARAMA CRUISE on
the Sunward II.
Leaves on May 7, 1 984
Relax on this 4 night cruise visiting
Nassau and Freeport.
Just $403 per person, not in-
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3 people per room
Call Quixote Travel before Springbreal
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
319 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N. C. 2aJ4
yQ Phone 757-0234.
T
Student Organizations Receive
A 50 Percent Discount
When They Advertise With
The East Carolinian
�Js �� ��.�� �M
IMPORTED ;
�cP
s
V
OF
CAR V x
PARTS INC.
XN cO 05 Greenville Blvd. GREENVILLE, N.C. u
r&
y
mw
J
7
V
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We carry a complete Ine of parts & accessories.
NEW LOCATION
SIXTH
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SALE
FANTASTIC
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30 to 60 OFF ALL
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ATHLETIC GOGGLES With MOST S �
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UNIVERSAL KOKO MATS 8
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8 Quality Parts at a Reasonable Price
ECU MEDIA BOARD
We Are Now Accepting Applications
For Media Heads (East Carolinian,
Photo Lab, Rebel, Buccaneer, Ebony
Herald, and WZMB Radio Station)
Apply AAon Feb. 27-Thurs Mar.
15,1984 At The Media Board
Office In The Publications Building.
GET INVOLVED
For Further Information Call 757-6009 or Come
By The Media Board Office In The Publications
Building Behind Joyner Library.
Is Your Car Ready For That Trip To
NEW & USED The Beach?
Retread Tires
17.00 It Up
ERVlCjf
Complete 5 Point
Brake Safety
. Check
Ccou0
CUR SHAKES?
"$14.88
For
Alignment.
C �� �� 5
COOOH�
4.Cyltnder
V?9 95 I AU -size
6and�cylindeT tires
aighily higher j available.
OFFICIAL NCRIH CAROLINA S1AIIINSPICIIQN STAKN
Wf SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
BFGoodrich
&TIRE CENTER
SATURDAY
� :00 A.M. 1:00 P.M.
OPENMON. FRI
(:00A.MS: 10 P.M.
' 'Consider us your cars'
� Home Away From Home'�'
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd
25�40 J REDUCTIONS
Wednesday, February 29th thru
Friday, March 2nd
Fling
Selected group of:
Jerseys
T-shirts
Jackets
Sweaters
Children's Outfits
and more!
Before
Spring
Break
Sale
We accept
mastercard &
VISA
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina University
THFEASTt AEOI NJ
Mick
BestF
In To
I A-ish I had a dime for even
up to me and sajd.
and distinction I g
contact with bea
some mug tppreciate :he
literature good mi,
I'm sick of hearing i
about the restaurant:
whiners think they're
think they're .
this town
Mick
LoSalU
Face it: Nobod) is ft
LaSaile. And I car. tdl
Greenville has a I
because 1 eat dinner out c
kind of guy I am.
If there are two things 1 ki
find something good to e
let the cat out of the bag
LaSalle's Best lr.
The Best Deal In Town
Restaurani, you .
For S3.85 youg
a hockey puck, a I
refills on soda and tea.
salad bar as j
The salad bar has the
these little biscuits. I
dozen of them and
clip. Included in
dessert bar which ha
different pudd
Western Che c
Boulevard in the b
Bonanza. If you
your place.
Best Breakfast Deal in 1 -
Student Special
and sausage fc s W
in town. The price
Mendenhall's, but here
If you're low or. Xmkk.
this for dinner
24 hours and runs
Best Steak House i
throw a rock, vou
E.C.
By DARim BROUN
Muafutf V4ltor
The East Carolina Dan
Theatre literally put its b
forward last weekend in its
I
:
The RakigB-based roci
evening at Greenville's Al
record the event.
According to Steve Boy
he marketed with an uf
wH consist of the live perf j
video will be submitted
mmemi will he used in ti
Boyle has a hacfcgroui
-






emic
l says.
But one shouldn't be
quick to term the out-
lo break "an epidemic
Id warns Dr. Robert Murray
of the California Public
Health Department.
"Type A has hit many-
la college-aged and younger
adults he says. "But in
many places that's nor-
mal for the season. Flu
breaks out every year
At Boise State, in any
case, "We've been ter-
ribly busy for the past
week and a half one
nurse says, "which is whv
c the doctor can't talk to
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 28.14
Pate

TRAVELS
bt on
se v siting
jbreak.
INC.
2 :J4
7-0234
Mick Rates
Best Food
In Town
I wish I had a dime for every time someone came
up to me and said, "Mick, you're a man of taste
and distinction I guess it's obvious. Constant
contact with beautiful women would make even
some mug appreciate the finer things in life:
literature good music food.
I'm sick of hearing numbskulls piss and moan
about the restaurants in Greenville. Maybe these
whiners think they're impressing me. Maybe they
think they're city slickers who can look down on
this town.

�&
Mick
LaSalle
� -hP-
� �. '?���.
BOARD
Applications
Carolinian,
aneer, Ebony
io Station;
ThursMar.
Board
3ns Building.
Dff?
� ��
757 6009 or Come
The Publications
ry.
Face it: Nobody is from a bigger city than Mick
LaSalle. And I can tell you for a town this size,
Greenville has a lot of nice places to eat at. I know
because I eat dinner out every night. That's just the
kind of guy I am.
If there are two things I know, one is where to
find something good to eat. That's why it's time I
let the cat out of the bag and released Mick
LaSalle's Best In Food in Greenville.
The Best Deal In Town. At Western Choice Family
Restaurant, you can stuff yourself into a coma.
For $3.85 you get a flame-broiled burger the size of
a hockey puck, a full-plate of fries, unlimited
refills on soda and tea, and as many trips to the
salad bar as you can stand.
The salad bar has the usual items. But it also has
these little biscuits. I usually smear butter over a
dozen of them and pop them in my mouth two at a
clip. Included in the price of the salad bar is the
dessert bar which has jellos, chocolate mousse and
different puddings.
Western Choice is located on Greenville
Boulevard in the building that used to house
Bonanza. If you want to eat yourself sick, this is
your place.
Best Breakfast Deal in Town. The Crow's Nest's
Student Special breakfast - 3 pancakes, 2 eggs,
and sausage for $1.89 � is the best breakfast deal
in town. The price is about the same as
Mendenhall's, but here's food you can swallow.
If you're low on fundsryou might want to have
this for dinner one night. The Crow's Nest is open
24 hours and runs the SDecial around the clock.
Best Steak House. If you go anywhere in town and
throw a rock, you'll probably hit a steak house.
. dprA
But Western Sizzlin' Steak House on 10th Street is
the best restaurant of its kind in Greenville. The at-
mosphere is cozy, and the service is excellent. But
most importantly, everything just seems to taste
better there.
Pitchers of tea are let on each table, so you
don't have to treat your glass like it's a canteen.
Barbara, who waited on me last time I was there, is
the perfect waitress � friendly, but not all over
me, and fast.
Depending on what you order, the Sizz will cost
you about five skins.
Best Date (Under $25.00). If Villa Roma were more
expensive, it would still be a good restaurant. It has
the best Italian food in town. Not only that, it has
good Italian food � and that means something.
I sometimes eat at Villa Roma with friends. If
you order a drink and dinner, you can walk out
spending about five clams. (With the tip, Figure
six.) All the drinks come with unlimited refills, and
the waitresses keep bringing baskets of garlic
bread until you stagger out of the place.
ptioto by GORDON I POCK
Considering the quality of Villa Roma as a place
to bring a date, it's amazing it's so cheap. If you
both get dinner and a carafe of the house wine, you
can walk out drunk and stuffed for under 15
smackers. If you go the distance and order ap-
petizers and salad, you'll still escape for less than
25. And that's not bad.
I take a girl to Villa Roma when I'm not sure
how I feel about her, or on a week-night, or when
I'm broke. But face it: Most of you guys are broke
all the time.
If you're not rolling in dough, yet you want to
show a girl that you've got more class than these
other slobs around here, take her to Villa Roma.
The atmosphere is romantic, and Italian food is the
best kind of food there is.
The Best Restaurant in Greenville. If the best is as
important to you as it is to me, you should check
out Sweet Caroline's. Don't take a stupid girl here.
Take a woman who is intelligent enough to ap-
preciate a compliment without you having to spell
it out for her.
Sw CMnmmt'u
Sweet Caroline's serves a variety of seafood,
beef and poultry dishes. If you like seafood (which
I don't), try the Trout a la Brettonne. Everybody
seems to love it, and they give you enough fish
there to choke a horse.
As for myself, I usually order Beef Bordelaise,
or, my favorite, Tenderloin a la Beef Marengo
(which sounds like the title of an old Bogart pic-
ture). They're both delicious.
My favorite appetizer of all time is at Sweet
Caroline's. Mushrooms are cooked in some kind of
batter and are served in a cheese sauce. Sometimes
I go back there just for that.
Sweet Caroline's is not the most expensive
restaurant in town. It's just the best. The wait-
tresses aren't a bunch of kids; you get treated with
respect, and the tables are far enough apart to
allow for private conversation.
In a big city, a place like Sweet Caroline's would
cost twice what it does here. At least once while
you're in Greenville, put on some clothes and go
somewhere you'll be treated right.
E. C. Dance Theatre Puts Best Feet Forward
By DARRYL BROWN
Maaagiat Editor
The East Carolina Dance
Theatre literally put its best feet
forward last weekend in its annual
"Evening of Dance The ECU
dance program's annual event was
conspicuously without any
classical ballet, an ommission pro-
bably better for the department
and the performance.
The ECU dance program, like
most college campuses, is usually
more effective when training
modern and jazz dancers than
those in ballet. Occasional profi-
cient classical dancers are produc-
ed at the university level, but they
are, for the most part, few and far
between. And with the departure
thru
e accept
stercard &
VISA
RE
a University
:
It's Video Time
DAVB SCIAMftASI
I
The Raleigh-based rock band PKM will perform this Friday
evening at Greenville's Attic Nightclub, and Videocraft, Inc. will
record the event.
According to Steve Boyle of Videocraft, the finished video will
be marketed with an upcoming PKM album, about half of which
will consist of the live performance at the Attic. Boyle also says the
video will be submitted to MTV and Nightflight. Five separate
cameras will be used in the production.
Boyle has a background in rock musk and TV production. He
majored in television in college and also played In a rock band In
New York. He left rock to work for WRAL in Raleigh before con-
necttng with Videocraft. Besides working within the growing
business of musical video production, Videocraft also produces TV
commercials and other commercial video productions.
In the above photograph (left to right) are Kenny Soule and
Wee Watson of PKM, Pat Regan and Steve Boyle of Videocraft,
and Mike Gardner of PKM. Photo by Dave Sdabarasi.
of dance faculty member Petrus
van Muyden, the department
would probably do just as well to
concentrate on modern and jazz.
That, anyway, is how the an-
nual showcase turned out. Not a
toe shoe or tutu all evening.
"Evening of Dance" worked best
when worked with its best �
modern and contemporary
dancers and the excellent staging
facilities of McGinnis Theatre.
Art addresses life most effec-
tively when it does so on its own
terms. Those who think aloud in
print know all too well the short-
comings of the written word, and
how something expressed inade-
quately in five pages can be clear
in two minutes of music or in a
small drawing. That art works
best which knows its form of ex-
pression most thoroughly, and
uses it most effectively.
East Carolina Dance Theatre's
program followed that theory
much of the time, but when it
broke with it at times, it showed.
Portions of Jerome Jenkin's
Why is case-in-point. It fell
through the cracks at times,
weakest when it was too literal,
strongest when most kinetic. The
piece was an admirable attempt to
address the grief of families of the
Marines killed in Lebanon and
was effective when it offered im-
ages reflecting emotional anguish,
but it faltered when it became
pantomime. A clinched fist or
clutched heart are too obvious ex-
pressions of grief, hollow in com-
parison to a dancer's full-body ex-
pression of emotion.
Choreographer Patricia Weeks,
however, worked in pure dance
and stage craft, and it worked
well. She proved again this year
she's as avante garde as anybody
on the Down East dance scene,
creating the interesting multi-
media work Knots, reminiscent of
progressive choreographer Senta
Driver, and a Pilobolus-
influenced piece, Crooked Sky.
Both works were excellent and ef-
fective, Knots using lighting ef-
fects as well as any stage produc-
tion can, and Crooked Sky show-
ing a knowledge and respect for
living shapes and silouettes that
the troupe Pilobolus has brought
to the American dance scene in
the last dozen years. Her duet for
two women was less effective, but
stilled retained a certain pleasing
lyricism.
Other faculty-produced pieces
also made good use of McGinnis'
excellent technical facilities, pro-
ducing special effects that
heightened the evening. Pat
Downey-Kuhn's Et Lux Perpetua
Luceat Eis used large projections
of stained glass and medieval
paintings to create a mystic tone
buried deep in the Middle Ages,
matching the religious choral
music.
The first act closed with a routy
barnyard square dance Down the
River and Up the Creek, replete
with bluejean overalls and calico
bloomers. The dancers generally
showed little more technique
than, say, the Carteret County
Cogging Club, but little more was
called for. At times they seemed
less than convinced of their own
yeeee-haaaawws, and a little un-
sure on their feet. Throughout the
ramble-rouser I had a resistabie
urge to yell OOOooooklahoma
and all through intermission I
couldn't help humming when
the waving wheat sure smells
sweet
The Moods of Jami was pro-
bably the audience favorite, and
deservedly so. Dancer Jami
Wilkerson was delightful as a fan-
ciful girl Living out a series of hap-
py imaginings choreographed by
Mavis Ray to the Americana
music of Scott Joplin. Her
sometime partner Aubrey Barnes
was perfect in his role, but
followers of ECU drama for the
Last year or two know Barnes can
hardly go wrong when he's on
stage.
Moods of Jami should have
traded places with Olavi to finish
the evening, for the dosing
number was almost a '60s genera-
tion jazz number with musk that
sounded Like the score to Em-
mamteOe. The dancing was at
times interesting but only a little
outshined its musk. Olavi left one
feeling Like he should return to the
age of the flower child, endorse
free love and Listen to Moody
Blues albums. And so it goes.
inhaMMA " ' ���� � �� aflMfW4�Wa9atiMMaJ
ii � �� � iifi m ,a,� ,� i �, m
���-� �-�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1984
r
A
Real Life's 'Heartland' Hypnotic
ByPATFELTON
M �rtu�
Real 1 itc
is basically an optim
album. Although n
of the songs initially
sound less than : �
colored, a thoughtful
listening suggests :hat
despite present
ficulties. there is alv
tomorrow to nspire
hope. This hope centers
around lyrics of love,
e and happiness.
Send Me an Angel" is
the mosl familiar song on
this album Full of hope
foi Hue loe, the song is
enhanced by its accompa-
nying video. The smokey
setting, in what seems
medieval times, is an ef-
ba. kground for
the white stallion, fair
maiden and local beast.
This romantic vision
typifies the tone of the
album.
On Heartland, some
underlying war themes
and strife for peace are
noticeable in the title cut
and in "Exploding
Bullets In "Bullets"
the protagonist is in-
nocently waiting for his
First taste of war. In the
slow-tempo title cut
"Heartland an allusion
is made by the artist to his
longing to be back in his
home land, but not being
able to return because of
war.
Even more, evident
than the peace plea on
Heartland is the recurring
theme of love; from lost
love, to new love, to
everlasting love, Real
Life's wailing words are
Filled with emotion and
backed by soothing, en-
chanting music.
The two songs on the
Author Harold Robbins Says,
Except For Money, The Rich
Are No Different Than You
album that probably have
the most potential for the
Top 40 are "Always"
and "Catch Me, I'm Fall-
ing "Always" is one of
my favorites. Although
the tune reminds me
somewhat of Bowie's
"Modern Love it
definitely earns its own
merit, and its lyrics are
catchy:
We keep it to ourselves
about our love affair.
If no one ever knows
about it, we don't care.
We know our love is
forever,
Always never ending,
always never pretending.
"Catch Me I'm Fall-
ing" comes across as a lit-
tle giddy, but it is melodic
and dreamy and may
become popular. The ma-
jority of the songs on the
album are better for
listening to than dancing
to; however, some songs,
such as "Always are
danceable and could be
made more danceable
with a remix.
A couple of other good
cuts on Heartland are
"Openhearted" and
"Burning Blue The
former is infectious,
mysterious and has plenty
of rhythm. The latter,
which deals with undying
love, has a rich, deep
sound and heavy bass
throughout.
If it seems I don't have
many bad things to say
about Heartland, it's
because I just can't Find
any. Overall, this is a
hypnotic, percolating
album.
Heartland
�ss,SsSssSSSSSSSSff.
By VFJR iO
l PI Hxlri �, ir,
HOI LYWOOD (I n
� Authoi Harold B
bins' 18 noelb ha sold
300 million co ies on the
premise that e sells
books and sex plus w ealth
sells more books.
Ergo, Robins els
are peopled h
and oversexed.
His best kn
are The C at
The Betsy, The L a
lad and Wi
Another (
The formula
him one ol histoiv� I
selling a I
almost dN Filthy is hi;
protagonists, fi
owns opnii.
Beverly Hills. Acapulco
and the south of Frai
The latter
establishments I
urious yachts
k I f R o b b i �.
about movie moguls like
Howard Hughes
Middle East oil t
like Adnan K, hoj .
with more creduiri
other authors, it
because he can afford to
rub elbows with them in
real life.
Lnlike tl
downtrodden h imai
Robbins doe n
the rich in av. e
"The rich are
essentially different i.
other people K, I
observed the other dd
"They have theii in-
securities, but then
blems are different, that's
all. They are ina
about their manhood,
growing old and
families. The oni pro-
blem the big rich don't
have is monetir. Money
clones itself once you get
enough. It multiplies in
its own right.
"The extrav-rdi.io
rich have one great fear,
changes in government,
whether revolutionary or
peaceful, like the recent
socialist government in
France. Their fortunes
can be wiped out. That's
why so many flee to the
United States to invest in
the only safe bastion of
capitalism.
"The best thing about
very great wealth is not
having to answer to
anyone
Robbins acknowledges
that becoming a
multimillionaire jet settei
himself makes it easier to
write on the scale that he
does. He laughs at the no-
tion that he approximates
the fortunes of his friends
on the Riviera and the
Mexican gold coast.
"My yacht is only
90-feet long with a year-
round crew of four he
said. "Koshoggi's yacht
is 400 feet with a crew of
60. I live in their world,
but I don't compete.
They accept me because 1
don't want anything from
them. I've never been in-
volved in any of their
business deals
Twelve of Robbbins'
novels have been sold for
theatrical films, TV
movies or miniseries. He
expects his new book,
Descent From Xanadu,
already a literary guild
selection, to Find its way
to the screen.
This time around Rob-
bins has zeroed in on high
drugs. His hero
multi-billionaire who
all
tovs
a jaded
mail could desire �
homes, yachts, planes,
women What he wants is
immortality.
"There's a lot of ex-
perimental work being
done in this field behind
(i Curtain and in
the tinted States,
� � among politi-
cian-
"He represents a cer-
ed of
icated, cynical
men who a e not into
id who keep
� profiles i ee them
time in the south

"hoi a time, during the
international oil crisis,
Middle Easterners
dominated the scene.
Now that the crisis is over
they aren't as evident.
But, hell, they're still so
rich they don't bother to
count their money.
Descent From
Xanadu is set in Calilfor-
nia, Florida, South
America, Europe, Cuba
and China and involves
amazing insights into
drug trade.
"One of the things that
urprised me most is that
the banking center of the
United States today is in
Miami. Florida banks
clear billions of dollars of
drug money every week,
but nobody does
anything about it. If they
busted the cocaine trafFic
in Florida, it would
seriously affect the entire
economy
Robbins' own
economy is flourishing.
Simon and Schuster, his
publisher, is printing a
First order of 200,000
copies of Descent From
Xanadu, a fact that br-
ings a wry grin to the
author.
"I've never writte.
anything less than a best
seller he said. "I don't
know how. But my
publishers worried about
the last four books, say-
ing 'they won't sell
anymore But they did,
and I'm confident
Xanadu will be a best
seller too
990
Subs 99C
14 lb. Hamburger 99C
French Fries 650
Onion Rings 650
Only At The Blue Moon!
205 E. 5th St.
(Acrosj from Apple Records)
HiWffTOtWiWiW
STEAIf HOUSE
2 Locations
2903 E 10th St.
500 W. Greenville Blvd
Alon & Tues
Nite
12 chopped
sirloin &
Salad Bar
$3.99
Wod & Thurs
Nite
3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
cr?fi c 8oz sirloin
FrLSat & Salad Bar
Nite
$4.69
The GAMMA BETA PHI HONOR SOCIETY
INVITES
Ail Students With A Grade Point
rage of Above 3.0 To Attend An
Orientation Session on Tuesday,
February 2 8 or Wednesday,
February 29 at 6:30pm in
The Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room.
Now Featuring Fix it
yourself potato bar
Free with meal. I
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
WWALJ
105 Airport Rd
GREeNViLLfc. NC 27834
(919)758-0327
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
J
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
4'0 Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 HRS
PLAZA SHELL
?4 hour Towing Service
L-Haul Renta.s
Available
ii�nimiiiirffinfiuiiimiiiniiniiimiiiiiin�
ECU Intramural Budweiser
Arm Wrestling Chamnmni
�CELEBRATE-
SPRING BREAK '&4
" Ft. Lauderdale
16
on the beach
FT. LAUDERDALES PREMIERE
CONCERT AND DANCE CLUB
10 am to 6 pm POOLSIDE PARTIES
LIVE DJ. EMCEEING POOLSIDE CONTESTS � FREE BEER CHOO RELAYS
FREE T SHIRT RELAYS � THE BELLYFLOP CONTEST . COPPERTONE
LIMBO CONTEST AND CLIMAX THE DAY WITH THE WETTEST
WET T-SHIRT CONTEST FEATURED IN PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
CASH PRIZES � FREE T SHIRTS � AND OTHER GIVEAWAYS
7 pm to 8 pm COLLEGE HAPPY HOUR
East Carolina University Mar. 7
f� ADMISSION Km ABOVE COU.EQC STUDENT ON TMB MTC
BETWEEN 7 O CLOCK AMD � O'CLOCK WTTN PMW COtXSM LB.
ALL BAR DRINKS AND DRAFT BEER - S0�
COMPETE IN THE BEER CHUGGING CONTEST FOR TROPHIES,
EVENINGS
SUMMERS on the beach presents
FT LAUOERDALE S FINEST ROCK N ROLL BAND NIGHTLY FLUB OUR
INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED DJ. SPINNING THE BEST DANCE
MUSIC AND ALL DAY, ALL NIGHT MUSIC VIDEO.
� f �NO SAlF "
MONDAY:
Dance Contest
Prizes and giveaways
TUESDAY and FRIDAY
Best Buns on the Beach" Contest
HaraUad by Playboy Mapartna
$175 00 Cash Prizes
" CLm ANO SAVE "
East Carolina University Wed Mar 7
NIGHTLY EVENTS
SATURDAY
Com and Party tW 3 AM!
THURSDAY:
Look tor National Concert Acts
WEDNESDAY:
Special Events Night
("hack ��!� Calandar
ONE FREE BAR DRINK OR DRAFT
GOOD FROM 7-8 PM NIGHTLY
SUNDAY:
Video Music Night
Oa�iea to ew eMl ww
��si iNjNt mow an�i
i ken MM.
SIjMMEBS on ma bMcr. � 219 S Aawwc Blvd. PI UwtanM. Ftortds 33316 � (30514�2-S�7S
(Localaa ona-haW Woe North ol Las Ota WwJ on AIM
SPRING BREAK 'WiJ
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Service and Jeffrey's Beer
and Wine Co. (Budweiser) would like to
congratulate these strong arm winners:
From L to R Laura Quisenberry
135-under, Lori Greene 136-over; Carl
Kratz 150-under, Chuck Northcutt
176-199, Kelly Smiley. Budweiser Col-
lege Rep Chris Kelly 200-over, and Reg-
gie McDonald 151-175. Jeffrey's
Beer & Wine
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Budweiser
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L.lllll��maa,aiia��e.MMM.a�lrrr
Ramada l
Eventually, nature gangs
with ugly women.
Nature forces us to sleej
Like the kind you find
This is tbe hell that lest
He's lost his looks, his
Bat if be takes this barn
Nature forces us to sleej
She's fat, unwashed, aci
He's drunk and, seeing
This is the hell that iem
He makes his move. an
"Yes she says, in brei
Nature forces us to sleei
In bed, he chances upo
"Do you have you ki
This is the hell that leai
He wakes to sermonett
And a face that's uglier
Nature forces us to sle
This is the hell that lea
Auditions Set
For 'A
Auditions will be held for hirr
Wednesday and Thurs- parti d
day, Feb. 29 and March ancr
1, from 7:30 p.m. until 10 quires
p.m. in room 206 of the mania.
Messick Theatre Arts lone ac
Center for Angel City, posses
the fifth and final major and wi
production for the 1984 dance
season of the East Ange.
Carolina Playhouse. cor
Under the direction of wh�
Cedric Winchell, the play the act
offers roles for five men role ;
and one woman, all who veteran
must have some specific Yeager
performance skills. One ture Th
of the men in the play ac- additi
tually has no Lines, but he tion he
must be an accomplished the m.
saxophone player. a.so b
Another man is needed in "the
a speaking role that calls young
iaritiaJ eye examn
aad foUow-Lu
ECUftadrats I.D. require
�K
DON'T USE
$1.
Any foo
with Dtfrchof
Expires
aSU
205
Gf
IF TOO MANY PEOl
WE'LL LOSE MO!
IFYOI
rf m r , � �l.
f � -
-� auMkaaN
I "�





� I BRL ABV 2�, 1984
8
yartland
t
JSE
2 Locations
2903 E 10th St
A Greenville Blvd
�d
Wod & Thur;
Nite
3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
l 802 sirloin
& Salad Bad
$4.69
turing Fix it
potato bar
Kith meal.
n
i�a
IRS
A SHELL
ua
iser
)ions
tramural-
ey's Beer
Id like to
winners:
isenberry
'ver; Carl
Northcutt
iser Col-
and Reg-
ffrey's
kr & Wine
i
Ramada Inn Villanelle
tkuglZZ.g0n8S UP �n andf�rCeS m f� Slee
This Is the hell that leads men Into heaven.
But If he takes this hand, he thinks hell win.
Nature forces us to sleep with ugly women.
H?lSd�nWShed; 'Cned yet "ty-aeven.
�. i J?.d' Seeing youtn' "ys. "I want In
This is the hell that leads men into heaven.
"VSL m�re'�nd this �� hh head's swimmin
�, she says, in breath that ages skin.
Nature forces us to sleep with ugly women.
In bed, he chances upon the crucial question,
Do you have you know?" he asks with a win
This is the beU that leads men into heaven
He wakes to sermonette that's just beginning,
And a face that's uglier than sin.
Nature forces us to sleep with ugly women.
This is the hell that leads men into heaven.
Scott Franklin
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2�. 1984
N.Y. Timesman
Reveals Life
Inside Vatican
Auditions Set
For 'A ngel City
Audition will Km 1-h.i-i r t: � .�
Auditions will be held
Wednesday and Thurs-
day, Feb. 29 and March
1, from 7:30 p.m. until 10
p.m. in room 206 of the
Messick Theatre Arts
Center for Angel City,
the fifth and final major
production for the 1984
season of the East
Carolina Playhouse.
Under the direction of
Cedric Winchell, the play
offers roles for five men
and one woman, all who
must have some specific
performance skills. One
of the men in the play ac-
tually has no lines, but he
must be an accomplished
saxophone player.
Another man is needed in
a speaking role that calls
for him to play the tim-
pani drums, and still
another male role re-
quires expertise in the
martial arts. The play's
lone actress must also
possess martial-arts skills
and will be expected to
dance in the production.
Angel City is a satirical
comedy by Sam Shepard,
who is better known as
the actor who portrays a
role patterned after
veteran test pilot Chuck
Yeager in the motion pic-
ture The Right Stuff. In
addition to the recogni-
tion he has recieved from
the movie, Shepard has
also been heralded as
"the most influential
young playwright in
America by the New
York Post.
In Angel City,
Shepard deals with the
landscape of American
mythology, the greatest
American myth of all:
Hollywood. A young
stuntman is hired by a
movie producer to save
his $8 million picture
from disaster.
By STANLEY DARDEN
O, Vatican! by Paul
Hoffman (Congdon and
Weed, 306 pp $18.95)
(UPI) The Vatican: the
very name conjures up
diverse images in the
minds of those who hear
it, ranging from pious to
malign.
Yet, what is the
Vatican? Paul Hoffman
sets out to answer this
question based on his
wide experience gained
through covering the
Vatican from the Rome
bureau of the New York
Times.
Hoffman is at his most
effective when he writes
about the labyrinthine
ways of Vatican finances
and the difficulties a
journalist encounters in
covering the Holy See,
the oldest and, some
would say, the most
cumbersome of all
bureaucracies.
He also gets high
marks for his analysis of
the shadowy society of
the ultra-conservative
Catholics known as Opus
Dei (Works of God). The
Work, as it is known
among its devotees,
recently achieved a
diplomatic coup when
Pope John Paul II gave
the society its own ar-
chbishop.
The book is full of
anecdotes about the
popes and the power
structure of the Vatican.
The current pope, John
Paul II, emerges as a
strong-willed man who
installed his own Polish
presence in the Vatican,
sometimes to the dismay
of the Roman Curia,
which is dominated by
Italians.
Hoffman characterizes
himself in the introduc-
tion as a former altar boy
who became an agnostic.
His writing betrays no
trace of an anti-Catholic
stance, however. He is, in
fact, very unbiased in his
treatment of all things
related to the church.
The publishers Con-
gdon & Weed get low
marks, however, for their
choice of a subtitle for
this book: A Slightly
Wicked View of the Holy
See. It promises a
prurience that it simply
cannot deliver. Another
lack is the absence of any
black and white or color
plates that might have
helped the reader unders-
tand more about the
Vatican.
����O��OMOQQ�on
TAmvn
OOOOOOOOOOQ
The performance
dates of the production
are April 18-21 in
McGinnis Theatre on the
ECU campus. ECU
students, faculty, staff
and local residents are all
invited to audition. For
further information call
757-6390 in Greenville
Bovsch&Lomb
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fl





I HE FAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 28, 1984 Page 10
&v
Pirate Grit Falls Short
By RANDY MEWS
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU women's basketball
team played their final game of
the regular-season Saturday night,
losing 64-55 to the University of
South Carolina.
"We did a pretty good job con-
sidering who we were up against
Pirate head coach Cathy Andruzzi
said. "South Carolina is a fine
team and has a very solid lineup
Andruzzi said her team played
with a lot of heart, and never gave
up. "We were down by 23 points
with seven minutes left, but were
able to outscore them 20-7 down
the strech
After Renee Najarian drove the
length of the court for an easy
layup giving the Lady Gamecocks
a 57-34 lead with 6:54 remaining,
the Pirates called timeout and
then went to full court pressure.
The strategy was successful as
ECU caused three consecutive tur-
novers, converting all into layups
to make it 57-40 with 4:31 left.
After an exhange of baskets,
the Pirates were able to trim the
score to 63-50 when Anita Ander-
son sunk a turn-around-jumpcr in
the lane with 1:24 left in the game.
After another Pirate basket and
a free throw by Najarian,
Delphine Mabry ended the game
by successfully completing a three
point-play on a drive to the
basket.
"Defensively we played a great
game Andruzzi said, "but our
weakness on offense showed
The Pirates shot a miserable 32
percent from the field, while not
doing much better from the free
throw line, connecting on only 44
percent of their attempts.
Starting guards Sylvia Bragg
and Jody Rodriguez had perhaps
their worst shooting performances
of the year, as the two combined
for 9 of 36 shots from the floor.
ECU played on even terms with
the Gamecocks for most of the
first half, as Bragg poured in 10 of
the Pirates' first 14 points.
But with the score 15-14 with
6:06 left in the first half, USC
went on a scoring binge in which
they knocked in 10 unanswered
points. Amy McAlister and Na-
jarian combined for eight of the
Gamecocks ten points during the
rally.
The two teams traded baskets
for the remainder of the half, as
USC went into the lockerroom
with a commanding 29-18
halftime lead.
The opening minutes of the se-
cond half were a repeat of the
opening period of play, as the
Gamecocks quickly ballooned
their lead to 47-24.
USC maintained their advan-
tage for most of the second half,
until the Pirates staged their late-
game rally.
Andruzzi commended her en-
tire team for their defensive effort
after the game, noting that they
held USC's leading scorer, Sharon
Gilmore, to a 2 of 14 shooting
performance.
ECU was also impressive on the
boards, outrebounding th
Gamecocks 60-46, and caused 20
turnovers, most of which came
from their last-minute full-court
pressure.
Delphine Mabry scored a game-
high 15 points for the Pirates,
while also contributing a team-
high nine rebounds and four
steals.
The Pirates will be in action
again this Saturday at 1:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum for the first
round of the ECAC-South Tour-
nament.
East Carolina (55)
Bragg 6-18 0-2 12, Phillips 4-9
0-4 8, Hedges 2-4 0-0 4. Mabry
5-13 5-7 15, Grier 0-4 0-0 0,
Rodriguez 3-18 2-3 8, Bethea
0-10-0 0. Anderson 4-9 0-0 8.
South Carolina (64)
Southers 6-12 0-1 12,
McAlister 5-10 0-0 10, Gilmore
2-14 6-8 10, Lynch 2-6 0-0 4.
Ballon 3-7 4-5 10, Williams 2-4
1-6 5, Frost 0-2 0-1 0, Najarian
5-6 3-6 13.
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
Mabry A voids The Charge
Lady Pirates in scoring Saturday night with 15 points
Emory's H.S J.C. Recruits
Quarterbacks
Robbie Bartlett, 5-10 185,
Citrus JC, Azusa, Calif.
Lewis Wilson, 5-10 180, Foley,
Ala.
Todd Abrams, 6-0 185, Mobile,
Ala.
Dean Bumbaco, 6-2 190,
Bergenfield, N.J.
Running Backs
Bobby Clair, 6-0 200, Miami,
Okla.
Terry Williams, 6-0 190, Kan-
napolis, N.C.
Gary Richardson, 6-2 190,
Fredericksburg, Va.
Jarrod Moody, 6-1 200,
Nashville, N.C.
Tim James, 6-0 220, Hartsville,
S.C.
Receivers
Andre Fields, 6-0 175, Norfolk,
Va.
William Carver, 6-2 195, Fayet-
teville, N.C.
Melvin Ford, 6-5 250, Wallace,
N.C.
Offensive Lineman
Ken Bourgeous, 6-0 240 Gulf
Coast, Miss.
Tim Orr, 6-4 240, Hampton,
Va.
Mark Minshew, 6-5 250
Wallace, N.C.
Defensive Tackles
David Kramer, 6-3
Chowan JC
Walter Brvant, 6-3 235.
folk, Va.
Joseph Molineaux, 6-3
Tabb, Va.
Defensive Ends
Robert Washington, 5-11
Troy, N.Y.
Rodney Glover, 6-6
Jacksonville, Fla.
Willie Powell, 6-5 215.
boro, N.C.
Shannon Boling, 6-4
Asheville, N.C.
Linebackers
260. Ojah Vasser, 6-3 225,
Charlotte, N.C.
Nor- Ken Taylor, 6-1 210, Hampton,
Va.
220, John Britt, 6-1 225. Hampton,
Va.
Defensive Backs
Keith Ford, 6-0 185, Sacramen-
to, Calif.
205, Barriet Easteriing, 6-3 190
Raeford. N.C.
215, Robert Majette. 6-3 185, Nor-
folk, Va.
Tar- Roswell Streeter, 6-0 175,
Greenville, N.C.
210, Winston Guy, 6-1 180, Hamp-
ton, Va.
Everyone Supporting Purple Pirate Progress
Pirates mil A ttempt to 'Capitalize' On Last Season's Exposure
B ED NICKLAS
Nporti Kdllnr
spacious office on the second floor of
large couch, desk and long con-
take up little room. Purple and gold
ihe design. In place of a wall is a large win-
hat looks out onto Ficklen Stadium � a win-
hich one can gaze and dream of a na-
hampionship.
mlight through the looking glass illuminates
;ar-to-ear smile and causes his eves to
Hands folded across his stomach, he smiles
when he pauses between expressed thoughts;
words carefully.
ere we have to go, we have to sell the
of the future says Karr, who has been
Jirecte: of athletics at ECU since his arrival from San
Die. e in July 1980.
the "promise of the future" is invariably
ed w.th the football program. Presently. 75 per-
f the athletic budget goes to the major sport's
ograms. And after last season's successful football
more and more money should flow into
:he program via ticket sales, Pirate Club or private
lonations and student activity fees
trink we gained tremendously with last season's
ace says Karr. "I think the media gave us
posure, especially with the Cinderalla image.
We should try to capitalize on it
To capitalize, ECU will have to incrementally
develop a change in image, says Karr. Quality teams
will have to come to Ficklen, fan support will have to
increase even more so than last year, and the coaches
and players will have to try to equal last season's
record, despite losing several important seniors to
graduation.
"Bowl bids are based more on ticket-selling
capability than necessarily what their record is says
Karr, mentioning Notre Dame as an example. "The
bowls are prone to go with established names. Notre
Dame has a quality association
Karr has been instrumental in the attempt to bring
high quality teams to Ficklen. The 1985 home foot-
ball schedule will be the toughest since ECU became
an independent in 1977. Through "a lot of
contacts he was able to lure Miami and Temple to
Ficklen. However, says Karr, the 1986 schedule has
"holes" that need to be filled.
"I think we have shown some improvement, im-
provement in the quality of opponents, especially in
football, and improvement in the quality of our
team's performance to be considered at the top of the
NCAA football teams says Karr.
"He's well known around the country says
Assistant to the Chancellor Charles Blake of Karr.
"He's always looking at schools with average at-
He gets favorable
1
Returning starter P.J. Jordan (63) will be a force to be reckoned with. " AT�io" meu
w
tendence of 50,000 or more
guarantees
According to Blake, the ECU athletic budget is
now totaled at $3.4 to $3.5 million. The sources of in-
come are broken down as such: $900,000 guaranteed
revenue from away games; a $234,000 bonus for ap-
pearing on television against N.C. State; $300,000 to
$400,000 from season ticket and concession sales-
$450,000 to $550,000 from the Pirate Club; and $1
million from student tuition fees. Blake says each
student will be paying $85 next year in activity ex-
penses.
The present budget will certainly grow, but it has a
great deal of ground to cover in order to reach, what
Blake estimates, a budget of $8 to $10 million that
other established universities acquire.
"We have limited budgets compared to other
schools says Karr. "I think we are always in a
catch-up role being in the bottom 15 to 25 percent of
the selected group of institutions (in terms of
revenue). If you consider the goals set by our consti-
tuency, we are not spending too much
The Pirate Club, which expends most of its
revenue for football scholarships, continues to play
an important role in the upgrading of the football
program, as it nearly doubled its membership in
1983. The club now consists of 3,000 members, but
Blake says its goal is to reach 10,000 in the near
future. This is quite a feat, he says, when one keeps
in mind that UNC-Chapel Hill's Ram Club member-
ship is 5,500.
Furthermore, the Pirate Club intends to reach the
$1 million mark, and Blake thinks it should occur in
the "not too distant future
In addition to the Pirate Club and the athletic
department's attempt to bring in more revenue, the
school's administration has also put in its two-cents
worth. The most obvious example occurred in
January 1982. "The first order of business was to ex-
amine the athletic program and see what had to be
done to compete with the top teams in the nation
says Blake. The result was the launching of a
"million dollar fund drive instrumented by then
Interim Chancellor John Howell.
A committee was formed and chaired by Dr. Ray
Minges, a local retired surgeon, and co-chaired by
Bill Clark, an ECU alumnus who heads a construc-
tion firm in Greenville. The goal of the committee is
to raise the money in five years, then become self-
supporting.
"The committee has assured us success says
Blake. "He (Howell) has spent a lot of time on it
"Howell has been very supportive of athletics
says Karr. "His first goal was to get a million dollar
fund drive for the football team. To me that shows
tremendous administrative support
ECU is moving in the right direction, monetary
�trategies developed and the like. But the bulk of the
responsibility remains tied to the football program,
the bread and butter of college revenue sports.
Because success brings national exposure, and na-
tional exposure results in increased ticket sales,
private sector and television dollars, the team must
continue to improve under head coach Ed Emory.
"If we wish to spend more, we have to show the
�ARV PATTERSON - ECU
'We Have To Sell The Pro-
mise Of. The Future'
� Dr. Ken Karr
ability to bring in more admits Karr. "We have t�
be the strongest independent in football that we can
and we have to turn to the ECAC for the �ro
balance of competition for our future " 8
ECU has come a long way since its Southern Con
ference days, rep acing Furmans mJiA-S. .on'
States with Miarnis andI PhSErS? hTttS
don't even need the North Carolina Ta?Hu"
their schedule to bring fan attention "Aen" we cS
mg well without them says Karr.
l
Mabry has been named
against Richmond and S
points for both games.
Classifie
SALE
��P Ml TtoreehOta; 40� -A Amp P
'�" Preoma rm M or bet' Mm
over. Flrstreto 7t-rat
ROOM for BSMT. Mm � Mada
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WM. �v�n now iwiin �mT
RENT A FULLY FURNISHEC
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MUST SELL SCO Good cond.fxv
u Cam 7si mo
MISC.
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P�EI
WHEN A FRIEND hot Stereo system
problems NXl mem mat �� avdc
technicians at me TECH shop aor �
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At 7S7-1�1 THe TECH SHOP
PROFESSIONAL TYFINO SER
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K





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 194
11
rt
h came
ourt
game-
ates,
v
-
ns 2-4
ruits
2 li
Hamo-
gress
Harrison Embarrassed
With UNC-W Loss
ByEDNICKLAS
UNC-Wilmington
avenged a 44-43 loss to
ECU earlier this season,
defeating the Pirates
7047 Saturday night at
Wilmington.
The Pirates did not
score a point in the first
five minutes of the game,
and shot only 31.2 per-
cent for the contest to
lower their record to
4-21. The loss was ECU's
seventh straight.
UNC-W, however,
shot SO percent to raise its
record to 10-15.
In addition to poor
shooting, turnovers also
plagued the Pirates. ECU
coughed the ball up 17
times while the Seahawks
committed only eight
mishaps.
"I was completely em-
barrassed ECU coach
Charlie Harrison said.
"My sincere apologies to
my coaches and my fans
as I've got to shoulder
something like this.
"We had the oppor-
tunities early, but never
took advantage of them.
We got nothing inside
when we put the ball in
there.
We played like we
practiced and acted over
the last three days. I
threw them out of prac-
tice yesterday for the
same thing
Brian Rowsom led the
Seahawks with 13 points
while Tony Anderson and
George Durham each had
10.
Jack Turnbill played
his second straight strong
game, leading the Pirates
with eight rebounds and
coming in second to
William Grady's 15
points, scoring 12.
UNC-W jumped out to
a quick 20-11 lead after
outscoring ECU 11-2
over a six minute stretch.
ECU cut the lead to
20-19, but the Seahawks
ran off eight straight
points in route to a 28-21
halftime lead.
In the second half, the
Pirates shot no better,
and fell to a 16 point
deficit, 55-39, on a basket
by UNC-W's Hank Har-
ris.
The Seahawks then
raced to a 25 point lead,
68-43, with 1:55 left in
the game, to further em-
barrass the Pirates.
�A�r pattmson - ecu mh l�
Coach Charlie Harrison looked on as his team was
crushed Saturday night by UNC-W
NCIL JOHNSON � 1CU PlMN) La
Mabry has been named to the ECAC-South honor roll for her performances
against Richmond and South Carolina in last week's play. She averaged 15.5
points for both games.
Classifieds
SALE
KIP l�St TkrMhoM 400 Amp. PS
A�li� rVeemp SttOO.M or best offer
ever. Flnrrete TSe-JMe.
ROOM FOR RENT. Houie 4 blocks
from campus, hoc mo. plus It util.
7SS-HM, awtl. now, fomala only.
RENT A FULLY FURNISHED 1
bedroom apt. for ftie Summer. Kings
Row too A-i Air cond Dish washer.
mvmonttl. Call 7M-S5� or 752-351.
MUST SELL BED. Good condlfton.
iso call 7st-mo.
MISC.
WHENAFRIEND has stereo systtm
problems, tell them that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at 757 )W0 The TECH SHOP.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: All typing needs;
7So-S4�t7So-��l.
AUTO ACCIDENTS Speclaliilng In
personal lnury litigation. J. David
Dutfus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
Building, Greenville, North Carolina,
7SO-4M0
IF ANYONE SAW a red Honda get hit
in the parking lot between Qarrtf and
the Art Building on 210 please call
iS5-714 or 733 5353
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service-
experience, quality work, IBM Selec-
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7U-5M1
QUALITY TYPING. IBM typewriter,
IS years experience. Full time typing
for faculty and students. Se-Soec.
LOCAL CHURCH would like parson
to keep church nursery 10:45-12 noon
each Sunday. Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person, u each Sun-
day. Send resume to: Nursery
Helper; JO Prince Rd Greenville,
NC 27H4.
TYPING SERVICE Neat, Fast,
Reasonable. Call 155-2042.
FREE PUPPY to a good home. Call
Ellen at 751-IUl Wed. or Thurs. after
five.
BAGEL BRUNCH, Mendenhall at
t 30 on Sunday, February it. BE
THERE!
PERSONAL
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARDl Lost rust colored velcre
wallet. Thought to be lost on the Hill
by basketball courts between J:M
and 5:00 Sat Fab. Islti. Call 7SM110
or 757-eUe ask for Jim.
ECU vs. James Madison University
WANTED
THE SISTERS of Sigma Sigma
Sigma Sorority would like to welcome
their new sisters. We Love You l
PHI TAU LIL SISTERS: Thursday
night was quite nice, as we sipped our
liquor and ice. Their could not have
been a better crowd, as Dewson knew
we got real loud. Once again we prov
ed we are best, so we deserve � week
of rest Let Spring break do you well,
when we get back we'll have show
and tell. Have a great break.
I WANT TO BE RICH. Will
everybody who reads this ad please
and me a dollar. Thank you. Mail to:
Rich, 145 Slay Hall.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private
Room fully furnished � House
Privileges clean, neat, responsible
only behind Belk Dorm tlK 750-7470
ROOMMATE WANTED: 752-SW4.
WANTED: Responsible female
roommate as soon as possible V
rent-utlllties-Wllson Acres. Evenings
call 752-0515.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted:
5117 30mthf tm.SO dap. Bryfon
Hills Apts Naat and responsible need
only call 751 151. Ask for Tori.
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed for
summer school andor fall semester
Call Karen at Stratferd Arms,
7SO-37M.
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED: to and from
BeaufortHilton Head area, S C over
spring creak. Will pay half of gas.
Contact joe at i�o Slay, rstVAeaS.
Minges Coliseum, Saturday, March 3rd at 7:30 P.M
qwi
Come and cheer on the Pirates as they play their last home game of the 1984
I??k- th? actJ,�.u ls,It"s Saturday night when ECU takes on James Madison
Also this week-end the Women s ECAC Tournament-all atthe Minges Coliseum
Plus you can win T-shirts, a trip for 4 to Disney World (sponsored by PTA) or
Pony athletic shoes. y ,u
So, be a part of the action at Minges! Be there.
-�Si"?r?'77 �vwyK'vsr?
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NITE
$1.00
Including Skates
6:30-10:00
MUSIC TELEVISION
with MTV
16ft SCREEN
Custom crofting
4
Jowlory Repair
fair prices
guaranteed work
Bring This Ad for
25OFF
14X Chain Rfjpoin
by Us lewlery
120 E. 5th Street
758-2127 10-5 TuesSat.
MM
k�r �TTC�MN eCU LMt
Sell The Pro-
future'
Or. Ken Karr
j admits Karr. "We have to
it in football that we can
It ic ECAC for the strong
lr our future
;ge, second floor Minges
w mr ability to fill theex-
185-86 seasons, we might
f savs.
av since its Southern Con-
Purmans and Appalachian
J Pittsburghs. The Pirates
fh Carolina Tar Heels on
attention. "Aren't we do-
lays Karr.
PAPA
KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Presents
9th Annual
TKE Boxing
Tournament
RING GIRL
Competition
Tues. Feb 28th
at PAPA KATZ
Papa Katz
10th Street Ext.
at River Bluff Road
Ticket on Sa Now!
S4.00 in Advance
M.00DayofShow
�pring Break T-SkirPs!
various printed designs on long sleeve &shirmtelshtPs
perfect� for'sprintfweather, etonedftre iprleave
so evenpne will' know ifou're fromEastCarolina!
ML HOMES OCX
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i
Weight Training
Equipment
BARS (All Types)
"Featuring"
-Olympic Curl Bars $79.95
-Standard Curl Bars - 29.95
SETS (Includes Bar)
-110 lb. (Standard) $79.95
-310 lb. (Olympic) $399.95
ALSO - Health Shoes (For men & women), Collars, Dumbell Sets,
& Misc. Equipment.
Students (ECU & Pin Community) Receive a 1 Discount As
Always wValid I.D.
PLATES
-Olympic - $.80lb.
-Standard - .75lb.
-CAST IRON
DUMBELLS - $.80lb.
CAST IRON IHOOIbs)
I .
'


I





'
A i
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 28. 1984
EC Trivia: Knowledge Test
Bring your answers to the
East Carottnain, Publica-
tions Building (across
from Joyner Library).
Winner's names will be
published in Tuesday's
sports section.
1. Who is the present
ECU head coach for the
men's and women's ten-
nis team?
2. Who is the former
Lady Pirate Basketball
standout that will most
likely be selected for the
1984 U.S. Olympic
Handball team?
3. Which former Olym-
pic gold medal winner
holds a record at Minges
Pool?
4. A freshman on the
1983 soccer team was
featured in Sports Il-
lustrated "Faces in the
Crowd" section, who is
this athlete?
5. Which sport has had
the most winning seasons
at ECU?
6. The ECU Educational
Foundation is the formal
All-Americas?
8. What new sport was
initiated this fall at ECU?
9. Who is the former
ECU women's golfer now
active on the pro tour?
10. Which sport is
recognized as NCAA
Division II at ECU?
11. Who is the former
ECU men's basketball
player that played in the
NBA in the late 1970's?
12. Which ECU team
sport finished the 1981
regular season ranked
number one in the coun-
try and went on to finish
third in the national tour-
nament?
13. Who was the first
ECU all-state volleyball
player?
14. Who was ECU's 1st
Team All-America in
football?
15. Who is a current
member of the Physical
Education faculty that
served as a former ECU
head coach in women's
1959?
17. Who was the former
ECU athlete that received
the 1981 Brodrick Award
for being the most
outstanding softball
player in the country?
18. Who was ECU'S first
recipient of an NCAA
post graduate scholar-
ship?
19. Which former ECU
football great wears a
Super Bowl ring?
Answers to last week's
questions:
1. The ECU Sports Hall
of Fame was initiated in
1974.
2. DEAN JIM
MALLORY, former
Pirate Head Baseball
Coach, is presently an
Associate Dean of
Students at ECU.
3. DANNY KEPLEY is
the former ECU football
player recognized by the
nickname of Captain
Crunch now playing in
the Canadian Profes-
sional Football League.
4. SHEILAH COTTON
was the first female
athlete inducted into the
ECU Sports Hall of
Fame.
5. COACH JOHN
WELBORN, Assistant
Athletic Director, was the
former Head Wrestling
Coach at ECU.
6. The East Carolina
athletic program was a
member of the
SOUTHERN CON-
FERENCE until 1976.
7. ROSIE THOMPSON
is the ECU basketball all-
time leading scorer and
rebounder.
8. DR. KEN KARR is
the present Director of
Athletics.
9. The current Pirate
head coaches who
graduated from ECU are:
Imogene Turner �
Volleyball; Jerry Lee �
Golf; Ed Emory � Foot-
ball; Hal Baird �
Baseball.
9
name for the organiza-
tion that raises athletic
scholarship money. What
is the more common
name for this organiza-
tion?
7. Which ECU NCAA
sport has had the most
basketball, volleylball,
field hockey, gymnastics,
tennis and golf?
16. Who was the former
ECU swimming coach
who lead his teams to win
the NAIA national cham-
pionships in 1957 and
s,
gma Phi Epsilon
Present
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MOVIE
M A (. A Z 1 N E
I
H
EEfflBJES
n
THE LAST
STARFIGHTER
.4w Earthlmg kid Uikl s
wmi outer-spaci denizens
FIRESTARTER
Stiphi i King's tn
I)r lin t mort
STREETS OF FIRE
i :i tai Michael Pan q
m Wallet Hilfs latest epu O
TANK
il'rit � (niriiit liit tin road
ni I'll, h In; 11 mat hirn
SIXTEEN
CANDLES
Molly Ringuald �
in ti i nagi dili
12
COMING SOON
Film in thi u mgs A i
OUR COVER
Michael Pan vtan in Streets oJ
hire, photographed In Stephi t,
Vaughan Sifm Prt w.
Moth k � p. ikl k-ti
stars � Sixteen (in-
dies. I �� I
k wrrtci ' "
- . ; . �� '
Tank right
man .n ih his
li lllltagt � I
tt.i: II Sin
I 1.iint - t � tg .
houses, and I �
in Firestarter
trom Stephei K n
bestst n : I hrew H.i!
inlit s (hi
' ' � - : I
10 2
� ' � .t '� .� Hill
-
I R I
The Ijm
Starhghtrr
V1
ihrei VVa
- Street- of Fire.
1 he Lonelv Guv Contest Winner!
w
I . Kj
Ktv 1jv
�j i
1 t.l I �� �:�
LYNN I BARSTOW
� 1983 l.m WfHi.in Publishing, .t ditisi
��mi Hollvwood 90O2M K �in!
ihrii copvrighi owner.nitersal t its Si
assumes no resporisitnlili tur unsolicited
to ordei subscriptions oi I
IHRB st HMITT M ss. SKBR1D1
v.1! N'Y HHiII . � �
- � . � .
I ARRS. SMI IMIR
� i.in Weston t on n � - r. Sum
Krt President- All rights rest 5 � : - v
tifiiiN Ent Letters hi �
shed �- - .
I address, write fv M U . � - � line. Suite H
1 IX RAND W. ACHEEJ1H I)l( kfSJ t MSN M Pr rt HINik
t � � � �� J( DITH SIMS i : : � BYRON LAI BENHIS N(.H fs � - inc. S � � � � . 162 . sR H (. 1 IS Puttmil MXRI1N I rOOHEI
IrtOrn CHIP JONES DAN EICHOl.T ' ii n 1. ndgi � ROXANNE PADILLA '�� W.�� BARBARA HARRISJENNULRoVsJNs NORMA KRIls - . 1 glol - hi. ie' -BR1 N IMM1KMW '12 M-l)VOl) llanu
I
ir Wintei -
rig
gt
(�lt struck mt - : � � � �
���
- i rti . t � ritei �. Sit " -

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S��k. I wJmit thai 2 '�
S; mus bet
� ii .
toes Mi Stej�
iboul It exj
� � � .
Perl
� : ' t
I might � esi
2 A Spe I it
- �
Vrthur t irkt - �
� '� I � - ' - : J
Iked bs it � mt t I. ai I
Drag irl S g
I
i irli lHiii
I'm glad S M
i m is si i -
him ��
DINE
A fan club for the movie
Dune b currently being
formed somewhere in
the arid sands of Hollywood.
Those readers interested in join-
ing, or receiving more informa-
tion, should send name and ad-
dress to:
DUNE FAN CLUB
Box 699
Hollywood, C A 90078
Details will be mailed as soon as
thev are available.





Ml '






F1RESTARTER
B ANTHONY I) E (I K I IS
f mes it takes Ik i half .m hum to
irv. Mimriimt's Directoi l.uk
kJ 1 t -it i - voice trails off fi. i jut u IK
Lestei si iddled with producei Frank
1 apra i in the forty-degree cold on the
sei of �� tartei in Wilmington, mth
( arohna I he subject ol this nnit.il i- the
rable the word comes instmctivelv .u
tin- point. ,i- it ii were hei title-) Drew Bai
more, who i harmed the world in hei
stat i mg ii tie in hi I xti . � � �� n
I j ; has had nothing but good things in
a about Drew, but tonight, .i- the produe
tii m comes within .i week oi so of wrap
ping well, iin imr wants am iitfi ulties
ii arise now
Vei Drew - initial problem drawing tears
whal Lestei describes a- .i "ver emo-
tional scene puts hei in verv good com-
pany nil tin- -ti S'obodv's doing much
weeping oei tin- SI ' million production.
uhiih aftei more than tun months of
shooting m ,i location virtualh virgin in
filmmaking, i- both within budget and
within foui davs ol the original schedule
In fact, spirits around here couldn't !��
highei
Based on tin- best-selling novel l
Stephen King lauthoi of Came, Tht Shin
� c and Tht Dead m Firestartn boasts
Imth an all-stai cast and fire effects ol ,i
scope .iin) dimension thai haven't been en-
countered Mine General Sherman used the
South ,i- ,i -He tni some epie mi fiiih.it
scenes during theivil Wai Ilu- m i ipt In
Stanley Mann i Collector, Omen II -titk-
iliisch to King's riveting storv of two tol-
lege students who, in earn some extra
buck participate m .i drug-related expei
imeni secretly funded b the sinistei De
partment of Scientific Intelligence, .1
I A -like governmeni agencv referred to
,i- I he sinii In addition in the cash, the
students, plaved In David Keith ' Offuei
. ' I .� � .till! � � � 1 It .11 llt'l
I i ii k It .ti. u k up extra-sensory powers
.nitl some hot t m - ih.ii enableli.nlu
Drew Barrvmorel. the daughtei thev
eventually produce, in inn h .ii will anvone
oi auvthmg thai m.ikt - hei angry I he
Shopkeepers sec veilingb.u In as a prune
i .inilitl.iit foi some tuiilui experiments,
and then efforts te e aptuie and eventualh
eliminate hei and la i lathei provtdi the
Milt I it ��� -II- It II M t 111 .11 III III
In addition to Bai I v more. Ktiih and
1 .e ic k I ea i, � � � 11 .111111 - 11111 t
i .aIt iiis. Vward-winners foi Besl Vim
i !I t� .t i .1 g Seeitl i I al lit and
lnui- Flete hei Scotl plavs ohn Rainhud.
a deranged hit-man foi the Shop who
vearns to at hit t a kiiul of spiritual union
withharlie b bashing hei brains in ai
ne and Kletc hei peirtrav a trusting farm
� nililt who shekel hal lit ami lit i father,
mh. a- they flee ilu simp- murderous
pursuit Martin Sheen, who reienth iioi
travel! ohn I Kennedy in the B(
mmiseries Kennedy appears a- the Shop's
genial ai Inunist i an .i
Directoi Mark l.estei is delighted with
these tasting eciups t have people that
we nevei imagined won lei evei be in the
meivie. people hkt (leorge Scott. Martin
Sheen and itarnev he points out en
ilm-ia-iit alh 1 hi- tni .tine a iinii h . lassiel
project because we had this greal talent in
it 1 In last i- hevond what I had extx'cted
when I started the liltn Because it was so
expensive in tin the effects. we thought
that we wouldn't be able in afford a large
ia-t Hut everyone was so confideni in ihc
script that the raised tin- budget ami put
more stai - in
Ihi- film's effects, however, will defin
iteh give the stars a run foi theii monev
SpeciaJ effects fen Firestartei were handled
In efl arvis ami Mikt Wood, win, have
collaborated mi such eve-stunners a- Pol
f�iMf ant) tnit. ill, l Firetarter's dc
mands presented tin two with a real dial
lenge Mikt- ami mvseli have tried to tit
velop some new. interesting, ami different
ways nt burning people ami burning
houses down arvis reports with imdei
-Iatt-tI i mil 1 It- i- a large, hinat man ulmv
silvery grav hail ami beard make him seem
Dreu Harrymore itop right has the gift and
tht curst of fire one look from her. and
flames envelop her unlucky victim Itop left).
Her parents I Da: id Keith and Heather
I ticklear. above), uerc themselves victims of
secret goitrnment experiments, and nou re-
negade agents are after their "talented"
daughter.
a i Miiilnii.il mil glllll ami glamoill bov
wif-tlti inl we've tome up with some
things that've nevei been done before
I ikt the -mi thai the -nun people gel into
ten then lull bodv bums We've actually
i in tlu -uit down i" almiii one quartet the
sie thai it not inalK i- hen vou see a lull
liodv hum in the movies, tin suits are al-
ways -ii big ami hulkv ii looks hkf ilu guv
i- twelve times hi- normal sie! Foi this
film, we Mnt ii down so that ilu suits are
approximated an eighth in a uuartei ol an
null ihhk We've been able in achieve as
much a- a minute ami lonv seconds nt
burn turn before hi have in gel the man
i nit
We've also developed lace masks from
molds nt the actors thai we put ovei the
suil, so Mm tan look through the hit- ami
actualh -ft- some lacial characteristics
ii'l there are a nuinhei nt gels that have
been invented n. help pn itee t the -unit
I It I- Vt () V I I M A (; A I N r





An All-Star Cast Brings
Stephen Kings Firestarter to Blazing Life
I"�l . sii we . .in tini ii � iiplf with .1
minimum .iiiimini ol lire retardam i kit lies
ii I hev i .in tin n with then open ��km
(.linn k.mil.ill. whose credits in hide
Stiu H ti � � ��, I � 1 ,�
.hi intensely soft spoken man whose mil.l
manni i .imi I.I. iid mi i he wIwoi k
looks In Ik .i familiantv with dangei that
would make Mi I shuddei lit is the man
who li.i.l to devise tin movie's pvrotei hiui
slums .is well as ass, mill, , te , apahle ot
passing these trials ol lm Normally set
'HI- Hlt (.11 lite Is .1 slltlll III lls,t.
K.m.I.ill explains Hut we've heeti intot
loiating othet stunts tli.it invoke not onl
ih. in.il sunn. I.in iIk hie .is w, , ii
ished Rtudn I! when thev contacted me
t.u the projei t 1 i ead the s. i ipi and
realized ili.it we .lul have some huge prob-
lems ii.1 it was ,i . hallenge lve been in
tin business twenty-three vears and haw-
sen almost everything and done almost
everything I'm always looking tot some-
thing new .imi different llu t reaiive .in-
;� . ,t the tiiismcss is h.it appeals to � .
.ii tins si o rnv tareet got some
vet v imiisii.il shis tot this mo � ,
In en ,il.l iiik up with s. ,n it things that
have not Urn pin n tiln el � I'm well
pic.is.
�'�� opening Mas II. u.(s hinted
enttrelv in ttliaroltna. with the bulk (
diawing people u tables, staging high
I.ills. it.ipuli slits. ,i lot ( various gags
ih.ii are usually trickv enough without the
additional problems 1 putting people in
limn suns' 1 his degree ol artistii chal-
lenge is .i gI part , t what drew Randall
to Firetartei in the In si plate "I'd insi tm-
George. Scott tabort left). Art Carney and
Louise Fletcher lahoie. uith Dreu Barr-
mari i. all Academy Award winners, ��tar in
Firestarter. Director Mark Lester ifar lef'ti
and producer Frank Capra.Jr. i near lefti
confer on location in North Carolina
the shooting taking place on the 258-
v� .ii old, I'i.lMM-ai i t rton Plantation
Producei I-rankapra. t. an unpretenti-
ous li.id ol tlu- manot who wanders the set
with .i glad hand and easy smile � and a
watchful eve itimis the spectaculai
Orton site, which lies on an intercoasial
waterway and formerly ias a rice planta-
tion, as a real hnd tot looked a long time
before u tound this place he recalls
. l.x.kcd m Mexico, we It Hiked in Rome.
we looked m ItA.is and m and around
Louisiana When we tinallv tound this
plan whit h was a combination of seeing a
puture ol ii ii the covet ol a magazine
and Ha. knit; u down through the Film
( ommission t North l arohna, we came
here and said, 1 his is jki feet lot us
full-sie replica "1 tlu- enormous plan-
tation lu,use ami stables was erected foi
the production, and a pond uas dug into
tin- grounds On this night I shooting, the
gloomy, heavily lorested plantation bore
brooding witness as tin- stables lit the night
IMI- M i I t M A ( A I I
sk with ti.ttt-nts ot flam - u d I r ba -
hurtled hundreds ol feel across ih s
. tash m thunderous i � igainst
mansn n house
No strangei to su h violent
atmospheres, tatk Lestei exudes an
pressive .aim amid the firestorm Lestei
an intense, distracted man with a -
hlai k hail swept bat k ft n his fact
perpetually darting ev� s i :�
tion with such action-packed extra igai is
� s A' p, s � ; , ,
hut it was the multidimensional �.
Stephen km; s novel thai � U
i nit- that I �� �.���� whu h t- � g �
� "ii, eived as a vehicle for John
was the t ltfht projt I was givei
���.���� � i ie mve produiei
I aurentns t it �� � � �rst
Stephen King Uk 1 : �. :�: 1 . -�. � � .
nd I !i ived it It works oi -
flit levels I- : � . :s .
as si.sp, � as a supernatura � . N ii -
what attracted me. tlu- book list I
I i st, , s ��� : � the essentia .��. �
Kings storv is v sti that he is not
.in ei tied that �.�.���� eve-boggling el
leits will overwfu n
aspei ts "It di ,t s s,
t-lfrt ts port
math portion ol th. I lirectoi
admits But v it the huma
ships ami , : trailers i � 11 is nevei
Uulk U, . sir- s . .��.
niov ies. and Itei thi imai storv s
Si in tins I want) I I make sure that th
human stt is th n md thai :� �
the iharaiters and art involved esp
with tin leads Vndv andharlie 1 wai
ti � make sure thai ie storv hetweei
the lathei and daughtei was th
:� � is. s v, hen ti.r effeu - t thev wi ild
I �. ,i plus I wh i �
1 t siei ;sonvmt ed th it the toi
it �� �� is also om ' � - great
strengths lni a vei v politically
(isn rnvselt. so that aspect - : th� -
really interested me he comn i ts
VI hile the movie works on th� entertan
� in level. 1 also kept in thai s, � . .
thai was m the lok. which invi Ives
i iv il liberties ol people, and gtivernmeni
ag� in ies .t) theit use ol . � I �� -(
search in wavs those people don't know
about All th,s, .ssts thai are in the book
and that made it sm h a populat if si s , -
we kepi those in the movie, though thev :t
very subtly done I think people whi art
lHkmg lm that will hnd it m thr movie
Asked what he'd like his audiences to
feel as thev leave tlu- theatei aftei sni;
' �����. Lestei replies, I hope they'll
leave on an uphfat note because w ti i I
t keep it .iiui from in-mi; ,i realh gi a
some him 1 think they'll be very excited
lu begins to laugh and anxiously aw ail
the sequel. ���-�� . oi mavbe ��-��
per, uh. directed bv Richard FU s, � c �
Vftei more than two months on kxai
and with a hnal week ol heavy shooting
left, Mai k Lestei is cracking jokes It
must Ih- going well.
V. -





STEVEN VAL'GHAN MPA PRESS
Michael Pare Stars in
Walter Hill's Streets of Fire
B Y
D A V I N
S E A Y
An elevated tram roars through the
squalid cit in the dead of night.
From somewhere a woman's voice,
hoarse and world weary, talks on. as it only
to herself. "M brother's name is lorn she
sas. "Iom Cody Whiskey and coffee
blunt the edge m her voice. "He was com-
plicated. A lot more complicated than
people thought. He had a lot ot backlxne
at a time when it was kind of scarce . . As
she speaks a lone figure hangs on the
overhead straps of the subway car. He
wears a long coal and a c hambrav shin
and at his side is a battered suitcase.
Thus Walter Hill introduces, with all the
portentous significance his directorial skills
can muster, the mvthic lead of his latest
film. Street oj Fire, the first in a project-
ed film trilogy titled The Adientures of Tom
Cody. Subsequent installments have been
dubbed The Far City and Cody's Return
Cody is. from the get-go. a character con-
siderabh larger than lite � a kind ot I)irt
Harrv.Travis Bickle concoction with liberal
doses ot Brando and Dean added tor the
appropriate smolder and menace.
Streets of Fire takes Hill full circle. le-
yond the grim black humor of his biggest
hit 4H MRS past the queasv bloodletting
of Southern Comfort and Long Riders, hark-
ing all the way back to an especially grip-
ping modern urban nightmare called The
Warriors. Hill's first directorial effort (he
started out as a screenwriter). The Warriors
told the tale of roving, rival street gangs
and sported speed-editing, street talk and
a surfeit of spectac ular violence. Billed as a
"rock and roll action fantasy Streets of Fire
takes place in some gloomy, dim future
and revolves around the kidnapping of a
rock and roll smget (played In Diane Lane
of The Outsiders and Rumble Fish tame) In a
gang ot bizarre bikers.
"The following story takes place in the
Other World w i lies Hill and co-scenarist
Larry Gross on the very first page ot the
film's script, "a tar-oft place where genres
collide � in this case, futuristic Fantas)
meets the Western, gets married and has
Rock and Roll babies . . On that same
page- is a couplet from the Bruce
Springsteen tune from which the movie
draws its name. "I live now onl with
strangers howls The Boss. "I talk onh to
strangers � I walk with angels that have no
place � Streets of Kite . . No one could
ever accuse Walter Hill of not knowing
exacth the kind of movie he has in mind.
Hill needed a face, a personality to
mate h his consuming vision of the ultimate
action hero. The search tot an actor to
portray, project and embody Iom Cod)
stopped dead at the clean lines ot Michael
Pane's aw.
"He had the right quality Hill savs. "He
was the onh person I found who was right
for the part a striking combination of
toughness and innocence
It takes some kind ot toughness to en-
dure the scorching set on the San Fer-
nando Yalle backlot where the shooting ot
Streets of Fire is in its final week. To seed
up the schedule, the entire set, six blocks
of carefully detailed New York Cky streets,
complete with elevated train tracks and a
full-scale movie marquee, has been rooted
over with an enormous expanse of plastic
tarp to allow night shooting during the
day.
In the midst ot this sweltering chaos
I H E M () V I E M A G A Z I N E
The brooding, smoldering face of Michael
Pare (above left) as hero Tom Cody, mythical
creation of veteran action director Walter
Hill (above). Streets of Fire harkens back to
one of Hill's biggest hits. The Warriors:
both films take place in their own time,
neither past, present, nor future, where
Western legend combines with fiery urban
madness (below).
Diane Lane (opposite), who debuted as the
precociously adorable young girl in A Little
Romance, has grown up; she's a rock stf roll
singer, Tom Cody's former lover, whom he
must rescue from a gang of leather-jacketed
motorcycle bullies.





o
i
Michael Pare sits calmlv smoking a
Marlboro, watching Walter Hill set up vet
another take of a shot thev have been
laboring over all afternxn. The 24-vear-
old actor is. incrediblv, dressed in heavy
suede britches and a long-sleeved woolen
undershirt � Tom Cody's costume and a
horrifying reminder of the price stardom
sometimes exacts. Pare seems to mind
neither the gruelling heat nor the hurrv-
up-and-wait pace on the set. He has ap-
parently wound some internal clock to half
speed, his lids at half mast over pale blue
eves, his blond hair occasionally re-ruffled
by a harried make-up woman. He seems to
be saving himself up. holding himself in
careful reserve, forcing himself to move.
talk and react with slow deliberation. The
impression created is striking and a little
unsettling � its uncertain whether Michael
Pare is about to explode or fall asleep.
"Walter has a vivid picture of what he
wants Pare observes, pulling the final
cloud of smoke from the Marlboro and
expelling it into the saturated air. "There"s
never a question of 'do I have what he
needs You wouldn't be here if you didn't
He has a point. The reason Pare is here
is precisely because Hill saw in his classi-
cally enisled features and tightlv self-
contained presence the makings of a
genuine American hero � Hill's own de-
(idedh jaundiced version of the right
stuff. Pare, even on first impressions, is
uniquely qualified to ht Tom Cody's boots.
He bloods and Hares with all the panache
ot a Matt Dillon or Richard (ere. resem-
bling, albeit slightly, a considerably
younger and healthier Nick Nolle with a
touch of down-home Gerard Depardieu.
- !�
ft
"Of course I'm lucky" Pare admits, while
around him crew and extras slog through
their jobs like penitants in hell. "I'm the
luckiest guv I know Biographical details
bear out the assertion. Born in Brooklvn.
eighth in a line of ten children, Michael's
earliest ambition was in a held far from
acting. "I went to the Culinarv Institute in
Hvde Park he explains, "because that was
the first real job I had after mv father died
and I got out of high school. It was some-
thing I could do and get at least a middle-
class income. But I never considered it my
life's work
Well, mavbe. If cooking was a temporary
gig. Pare certainly took it seriously. He
graduated from the Institute with a cook-
ing degree and quicklv landed a series of
apprenticeship jobs that would in time cer-
tainly have resulted in full-fledged chef-
dom. At 21 he became an assistant baker at
New fork's tres chic Tavern on the Green.
It was just about then that Opportumt
knocked, or rather tapped.
"Streets of Fire is a
rock & roll fable
Hill says, "in the sense
that the situation and
totems of the fibn are
identical with the con-
cerns of most rock fcf
roll songs.
99
"I was waiting in a bar for mv girl-
friend he recounts, "when I felt a tap on
m shoulder Beckoning him to stardom
was a New York-based talent scout who
eventuallv put the rather bewildered Pare
in touch with the late legendary agent
Joyce Selnick "She helped me get acting
lessons he explains. "I quit cooking and
gave mvself a vear to make it as an actor
Even someone with Pares phenomenal
good luck can hardlv be expected to hit the
big time in 12 short months. It took two
full years before he landed a supporting
role in a short-lived TV series called
Greatest American Hero, where he staved for
another vear-and-a-half. leaping in a single
bound over the obl.gatorv acting hurdles
of oft-off-Broadwav. soap operas and
commercials. "It was a good experience
he allows. "I learned how to hit mv mark
and get to make-up and wardrobe on
time
He also, it seems, learned how to project
a considerable on-camera appeal. Writer
director Martin Davidson, spotting Pare on
Greatest American Hero, recognized the
former sous-chef's natural talent at convev-
ing all manner of alluring and dangerous
undercurrents and cast him in the title role
of the turgid rock and roll melodrama
called Eddie and the Cruisers. "It was a big
gamble for both of us Pare confides. "I
THE MOVIE MAGAZINE
reullv felt the prevsure. but in the end.
being able to get up on stage and let lcw.se
it all tell together Apparentlv it didn't tall
together tar enough One ot the most sub-
stantial emlwrravsments ot the "83 film sea-
son. Eddie and the Crmism perished despite
a massive publicity campaign, but Pare
hardlv went down with the ship Even be-
fore the movie's release he'd been cast tor
both Sttfetts ut Fire ("Saw him in Eddie and
tht Cruisers Hill sas tersely; 'Met a tew
times. Talked. That nas enough tor me "i
as well as a co-starring spot m Umirra ��
an Australian effort directed b David Ste-
vens ot A Bm Like Atkt tame "I plav a
New York promotion man in the 1920s
who goes Down Under to sell corsets.
Pare explains, while stage hands roll a
tire-engine-red. chopped and channeled
Mercury onto the set "Undettmoei is a kind
ot C.arv Grant and Dons Dav screwball
comedv and it was a lot ot tun to make "
Hill summons him to the set (. limbing
into the Merc. Pare waits tor his cue. then
jumps out and strides through a collection
ot vintage '51 bullet-nose Studehakers.
decked out to look like 2Kt Century squad
cars. He glares menacinglv at the camera
lens and Hill cries "cut"
One gets the impression that Pare is not
as interested in keeping his private lite
private as many a more established and
warv him star might be. What he does with
his off-camera hours seems calculated to
be quite normal and average T spend
lime with mv wife he vivs with a shrug
"Sometimes we go out with friends Some-
limes we stav at home and watch TV
Michael met Lisa, a lavs student who works
as an assistant m the l.os Angeles IVA's
office, in New York. "She was a blind date
tor mv brother lerrance, who writes ro-
mance novels tor a living We were mar-
ried two years ago and moved out to Hol-
lywood. When she finishes school well
find a little place in upstate New York
It all sounds quite, well, idvlln. but one
wonders whether Pare, given his current
status as a bankable propertv. will ever
have the chance to indulge his bucolic
dreams. It. as seems certain. Streets ot Fin
is another Walter Hill hit. Pare will be
caught up m the destinv of Tom Codv for
the foreseeable future when the film opens
June 8. It's a fate that suits him well
A
U.A





Where Does
James Garner Drive His Tank?
Anywhere He Wants To!
BY CHRIS MORRIS
James Garner is tank jockey Zack Carey
in Irwin Yablans' forthcoming produc-
tion Tank, directed by Marvin J.
Chomskv from a screenplav by Dan Gor-
don. It's a plum role for Garner. Carey is a
tough, acid-tongued professional soldier
with some sturdy, old-fashioned ideas
about love, duty, familv and honor. He ar-
rives at his new post. Fort Clemmons in
the rural South, with his wife LaDonna
(Shirlev Jones) and his son Billy (C.
Thomas Howell), davdreaming of his im-
minent retirement. His arrival at the fort
attracts some immediate attention � after
all, it isn't every officer who arrives on base
with a completely restored tank in tow.
The tank is Zack's hobbv; it's been pain-
stakingly reconditioned over the past fif-
teen years. Asked why anyone would want
a Sherman tank, he replies, "Because the
odds against accidentally shooting vourself
while cleaning it are incredible
The trouble starts for Zack Carev when
he leaves the base one night and drives to
neighboring Clemmonsville in search of a
cold beer and a friendly alternative to the
dull pleasures of the officers' club. In a
Clemmonsville roadhouse, he strikes up a
conversation with Sara (Jenilee Harrison),
a young prostitute who works for the local
vice lord. Sheriff Buelton (G.D. Spradlin).
10
The two stars � Shermans finest vin-
tage armament (above, crushing a car
and at least one brick building), and
James Garner (inset left) as the Sergeant
Major who restores the World War II mobile
destroyer and then finds good use for it.
When one of the sheriffs deputies roughs
up the girl. Zack retaliates by beating the
deputv senseless.
Buelton then strikes back at Zack by ar-
resting his son Billy in a trumped-up drug
bust. When Billv is finally sentenced to the
state prison farm, Zack decides he's had
enough of Southern justice and moves his
own armament into action.
Zack Carey's vengeful tank raid on the
Clemmonsville jail is just the beginning of
an uproarious, explosive cross-country
chase which pits the crazed Sheriff Buel-
ton and his minions against the armor-clad
firepower of the Sherman tank manned bv
fyvinA was just a joy. It will be a great
1 little part for me Jenilee Harrison
says of her role as the 17-year-old pros-
titute Sara. "The best thing for me was
wearing absolutely no makeup, with my
hair up on top of my head in a
ponytail. They only cared about my act-
ing, they didn't care how I looked A
welcome relief for the actress after her
stint on ABC's Threes Company and her
"surf chick" role in the TV movie,
Malibu, where much fuss was made
over appearance.
"James Garner is great, we became
good friends she says enthusiastically.
"We played cards every night for three
months. We played Jerry's Rules. Jerry
is his chiropractor. It's a great card
game
As for the near legendary difficulty
of star Garner, Harrison is clearly on
Garner's side. "He takes an authorita-
tive position many times, but that's just
THE MOVIE MAGAZINE
Z.u k. Billv and Sara.
Tanks high-spirited action is perfect-
ly suited to the talents of James Gar-
ner. The durable and charismatic leading
man, known to millions as TV's Bret
Maverick and Jim Rockford, is himself no
stranger to the role of military man.
Some of Garner's best-remembered films,
including The Creat Escape, Sayonara and
The Americaruzation of Emily, featured the
actor as a wise-cracking American in
uniform.
Shirlev Jones has been one of America's
most wholesome actresses since the Fifties.
to protect himself. James Gamer has
made himself a star, nobody else has
done it. He never got out of line, never
dictated anybody else's job
Tank spent those three months on lo-
cation in Georgia, "in some small
towns, and we worked six days a week
Ms. Harrison remembers. And how was
Georgia? "A lot of red clay she says
succinctly.
When asked about her career after
Tank, Ms. Harrison replies, "I take it
day by day. I plan on being in this busi-
ness my whole life
Judith Sims

-






when she rose to stardom as the singing
star of the film versions of Rogers and
Hammerstein'sOAaiowM and Carousel. She
graduated from girl-next-door roles to her
latter-dav identification as everybody's fa-
vorite Mom via her stint in the long-
running TV series The Partridge Family,
which co-starred her real-life stepson
David Cassidv. But those accustomed to the
squeakv-clean Shirley Jones may be in for
a shock: Screenwriter Dan Gordon has
conceived the distaff Carey as a tough,
sometimes tart-tongued Army wife.
C Thomas Howell comes to his role as
Billy Carev fresh from his starring debut
as Ponvbov Curtis in Francis Ford Coppo-
la's film of ST Mm ton's The Outsider. Tank
is only Tommy Howell's third film (his first
screen role was as one of Henry Thomas'
bike-riding buddies in FT), but he's al-
ready getting a chance to display his ver-
satility � the fast-paced action of this cur-
rent project is in marked contrast to Cop-
pola's introspective drama.
Not that Tommv Howell isn't at home
with action. His dad, Chris Howell. is a
well-known stunt man, and Ibmmv him-
self is quite the cowbov � he was California
Junior Rodeo Association Champion in
1979.
Rounding out Tank's cast are a master
screen villain and a vivacious young ac-
tress. CD. Spradlin is a superb and well-
traveled screen heavy If a pan demands a
menacing Southern or Southwestern tvpe.
Spradlin is the man for the job. The
square-jawed, steelv-eved actor is well-
known to connoisseurs of movie evil as the
hard-nosed coaches m orth Dallas Forty
and One on One. the corrupt Nevada
senator in The Codfather Part II. and the
grim general who dispatches Marlon
Brando's assassin in .pocahpse Sow.
Tank marks the screen debut of Jenilee
Harrison, but she should be no stranger to
tans ot the long-running TV comedv
Three's Company The blonde, curvaceous
auress was prominently featured on the
show as the bubble-headed roommate of
John Ritter and Joyce DeWitt.
Tank- solid cast is put through their
sometimes exhausting paces bv Marvin
A little family get-together � Shtrley Jones
(center) joins Harrison, Gamer, C. Thomas
Howell and the tank -for a joyous homecom-
ing after a very tough journey.
Chomsky, a veteran director whose credits
include some of the most noteworthy TV
films of recent years: Holocaust. Roots and
Inside the Third Reich (tor which he won the
prestigious Director's Guild Award for best
director).
The Georgia locations serve as a colorful
backdrop for a bnghtlv variegated story
Tank, opening March 16. offers audiences
intimate iamilv drama, raucous comedv.
and. most of all. full-tilt action, much of it
supplied bv its eponvmous centerpiece. As
Zack Carev's Sherman slogs toward the
state line at the climax of the film, crouds
of onlookers roar � a response that's sure
to be duplicated in movie houses around
the country.
THEIAST
SDWIGHTCR
(Continued from page 4)
thing Coes, the younger Castle was a film
school buddy of John Carpenter. Thev saw
The Resurrection of Bronco Billy, a project on
which they combined talents, win an Oscar
in the "short subject" division. Castle later
assisted Carpenter with the ahead-of-its-
time science fiction movie Dark Star and,
also with Carpenter, co-wrote the Kurt
Russell-starring Escape from Xew York. The
masked role? Castle was seen (anci yet not
seen) as the psycho killer in Halloween.
The in-kitchen mysteries connected to
the preparation of The Last Starfighter con-
cern, and I quote the only material avail-
able to the press at present, a facility
that can fully utilize the most powerful
graphic software ever written, for the most
powerful computer that has ever been
built, combined with an extremely high
level of man-machine interaction
Digital Productions, an independent
company headed by John Whitney. Jr. and
Gary Demos, has been tabbed to make the
battles among the stars come alive. Until
now, computer-aided images have been lit-
tle snippets here and there � the rugged
bolts that spin down on a Chevy truck
emblem, to cite one often-seen example.
Rather frequently, computer-generated
images have been part of a live action
scene, a minor overlay intended to create a
short-lived "How did thev do that im-
pression. For the first time, whole blocks of
movie time are going to be high-resolution
computer graphics, thanks to what's called
the Digital Computer Scene Simulation
Process. What appears on the screen will
have come directly from the mind of the
programmerartist, with the substantial aid
of a $6.5 million CRAY' IS1000 computer.
Compared to the secrecy surrounding
their work at Digital Productions. Demos
and Whitnev make the people in charge of
Russia's missile programs seem like com-
pulsive blabbermouths. At this point only
two things are conclusively known outside
THE MOVIE M A G A Z 1 N E
Robert Preston (above, with Lance Guest)
plays an intergalactic con man � a sort of
Music Man in Outer Space. TheUrn's pro-
ducer, Gary Adelson (above left), is proud of
his movie's technical achievements in special
effects � which have remained top secret.
the inner circle of The Last Starjighter's
makers: The costumes for the aliens are
the weird and whimsical creations of a
master costume designer named Robert
Fletcher and the space battle sequences are
going to be a step bevond anything ever
done before. It could be a feast. The Last
Starfighter opens June 22.
11
S.
lc





Teenage Agony and Ecstacy,
From the Writer of
National Lampoon's Vacation
BY MIKE BYGRAVE
What's the worst thing that can
happen to a teenager? According
to Molly Ringwald. having the
whole family forget vour sixteenth birth-
day mav not be the worst, but it comes
i lose. Thai just happens to be the plot of
Rtngwald's new him, Sixteen Candles, open-
ing May 11, and a subject close to her heart
in real life. Her own sixteenth birthday is
in February, 1984.
"Sixteen is so major. F.xpeciallv if you
live in Southern California, like I do.
where you really can't go anywhere with-
out driving. Turning sixteen and getting
vour driver's license is reallv like getting
your freedom
No one is likely to forget Ringwald's
birthday. Indeed, some months prior to
the event, negotiations were under way as
to what kind of car she would receive as
her present. "I want a Rabbit but mv par-
ents want me to get a BMW. 1 don't want a
BMW because it'll look like I'm driving mv
parents' car. A Rabbit is so cute � a white
Rabbit convertible
Ringwald has earned her car. She's been
performing since she was 4, singing with
her father's Great Pacific Jazz Band. She
played one of the orphans in the West
Coast production of Annie and later be-
came a regular on TVs Facts of Life. But it
was her role as John Cassavetes" daughter
in Paul Maurskv's The Tempest which put
her career into overdrive. Since then, she's
made a couple of TV movies and the sci-fi
epic Spu ehuntei. Adventure m the Forbidden
Zone. Sixteen (.undies is one of two films
about teenagers in Chicago In-ing made
back-to-back bv writer-director John
Hughes, both starring Ringwald.
"John savs he basically writes about
teenagers because he finds them more in-
teresting than adults, and I think that's
great Ringwald sas. "Sixteen Candles will
remind people what it's like to be a teen-
ager again. When I read the script I
thought, ves. this is exactly how it is to be
lb. "
Although she's been working most of
her young life. Ringwald is the opposite of
a "stage kid She's fresh, unspoiled and,
according to the highly regarded character
actor Paul Doolev, who plavs her father in
r
Sixteen Candles, "a typical teenager off the
set. But w hen she acts, she's charming and
interesting to look at on film. You get the
camera in close and there are ever-
changing, subtle expressions going on un-
derneath the surface. She has a face on
which emotions play. Meryl Streep has that
kind of face, where vou see three or four
emotions going on as she says one sen-
tence, and Mollv has it too. There's more
to her acting than just the words
Ringwald acknowledges her life has been
extraordinary, but says she never missed
"having a normal childhood. I think I've
gained much more than I've missed. I
haven't had to waste half my life figuring
out what I want to do. I've been able to do
something sooner than most people and. if
1 don't want to keep doing it forever, at
least I've had the choice and I know what
it's like
Her film work has introduced her to
other things besides acting. For Tempest
she spent two months in Greece and a
month in Rome ("the first time I'd ever
been abroad"). Working in Canada and
meeting French-Canadians on Spacehunter
led to her current interest in studying
French. "I'm going to a French school now
and I hope to learn enough so that, when
it's time for me to think about college, I
could go to a college in Paris
Ringwald credits the support of her fam-
ily with helping her to keep a perspective
(Continued on page 14)
It's Molly Ringwald's sixteenth birthday, but
she has to spend it as a member of her sis-
ter's wedding party (above). Michael
Schoeffler (top left and left, with Molly and
writerdirector John Hughes) helps her cele-
brate more romantically. Paul Dooley (oppo-
site, above) is her harried father � if he
looks familiar, it's because he played Dennis
Christopher's harried father in Breaking
Away.
12
THE MOVIE M A G A Z 1 N E
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himihai to lanta- i I ih ; � , uin told, is a twisted !� ,il ,i Ri,ll,i S,otl
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I M (. I I
Judith Suns





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Title
The East Carolinian, February 28, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 28, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.324
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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