The East Carolinian, February 14, 1984







?
She
daroUnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Happy
Valentine's
Day
Vol.58 No.r
Tuesday, February 14, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 P
ages
( in ulation 10,000
Strategy Against Defaulters Planned
By JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK
Nwi Editor
Students receiving money from
SGA loan funds in the future may
want to think twice before
defaulting if current plans for en-
forcement of payment are passed.
The SGA maintains two loan
funds. One, the emergency
medical fund, provides students
with up to $150 and allows them
six months to repay the loan. The
other provides loans of $25 which
are payable within 30 days.
According to SGA Treasurer
Becky Talley, $6,433.50 of
Emergency Medical loans are cur-
rently outstanding � approx-
imately 99 percent. She estimates
approximately $3,500 to be at
least two months overdue. Of
loans made from the regular loan
fund, approximately 84 percent
are outstanding and between
$2,000 and $3,000 is overdue.
Under current rules, students
delinquent in their loan payments
are warned and then contacted by
an attorney employed by the
SGA. If they don't pay they face
court action through the Small
Claims Court and may have their
transcripts tagged.
Unfortunately, according to
SGA President Paul Naso, the
system is not working. Students
with tagged transcripts are
graduating without repaying
loans. The Emergency Medical
Loan Fund has gone from $4,000
to almost nothing in the last four
years.
Because the problem of loan
defaults is so severe, a task force
was appointed to study the situa-
tion and devise plans to decrease
JIMMie MACKETT - ECU Photo Lab
Democratic Presidential candidate Rev. Jesse Jackson spoke at the
National Student Conference on Voter Registration last weekend.
ECU Student Leaders
Attend Conference
Six ECU students were
among more than 1,300 college
student leaders from
throughout the nation atten-
ding National Student Con-
ference on Voter Registration
last weekend at Harvard
University.
SOULS President Jimmie
Hackett, Assistant Student At-
torney General Rick Brown,
East Carolinian editors Jen-
nifer Jendrasiak, Ed Nicklas
and Darryl Brown, and
political science junior Jay
Stone attended the conference
which featured such speakers
as consumer advocate Ralph
Nader and Democratic
presidential candidate Jesse
Jackson.
The 3-day event featured a
series of workshops on conduc-
ting voter registration drives in
communities and on college
campuses. "I found the
workshops extremely helpful
Nicklas said. "I hope now we
can get some good things going
at ECU
The keynote speaker for the
event was the Rev. Jesse
Jackson. "It should be as easy
to register to vote as to pay
taxes Jackson said, telling
the student audience, "you
must Fight for basic, uniform
voter registration form all over
the nation
Jackson stressed several
ideas for increasing voter
registration. He said post-card
registration and deputy
registrars should be in every
state to make registration
easier. Specifically for colleges,
Jackson said there should be a
voter registration line beside
every class registration line,
and fraternities should restrict
membership to those who are
registered voters.
"At high school gradua-
tions, each high school student
should come across that stage
with a diploma in one hand
symbolizing knowledge and
wisdom, and their voter card in
the other hand, symbolizing
power and responsibility
Jackson said.
"In 1965, we found
ourselves with the obligation to
pay taxes, to salute the flag and
to pledge allegiance without the
right to vote. We found the
hypocrisy in democracy �
citizens who could not vote
Also attending the con-
ference in Cambridge, Mass
were representatives from
UNC-Greensboro, UNC-
Asheville, Duke University and
Lenoir-Rhyne College.
the default rate. A plan was pro-
posed and presented to the SGA
Legislature at yesterday's
meeting.
Under the new plan, students
delinquent in loan payments will
receive a warning from Talley,
Naso and Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent Life Elmer Meyer. If no ac-
tion is taken by the student, they
will then be summoned to appear
before the Honor Board and
receive a sentence varying from
voluntary work and fines to
possibly forced withdrawal from
school.
"It'll make people more aware
that they can't abuse the system
and if they do, the school can take
action against them said Stu-
dent Attorney General Harry
Dest. Dest stressed that students
will receive plenty of notice before
their Honor Board appearance.
"We're not going to get the
money back, but it prevents more
from going out Naso said. He
added that the new plan will
benefit everybody. SGA response
was favorable, he said, and the
proposal is currently being studied
by a committee.
James Mallory, associate dean
of orientation and judiciary, said
he feels the stricter action is
necessary. "I think it's bad when
students borrow money from
other students and then keep good
students from getting the
money he said.
A task force was appointed to
survey university officials on sug-
gestions for better control of the
loans. Scott Epting wrote a report
on the results.
According to the report, ECU
Business Manager Julian
Vainright suggested the possibility
of establishing an emergency
back-up loan similar to one used
by the Financial Aid Office. This
money would be banked and col-
lecting interest and only small
withdrawals would be made.
Vainright also releed to the
SGA a copy of the bad check list
compiled by the Cashier's Office
each semester. In the future,
students requesting loans will be
checked against this list, a list of
delinquent financial aid loans and
a list of delinquent SGA loans.
Gilbert Moore, ECU registrar,
suggested the use of computers as
a long-term solution. Computers
would provide a read-out of all
outstanding debts on an in-
dividual's record. He also stressed
the benefit of tagging registration
Epting
records ;ather than transcripts.
This would prevent a student's ap-
plying for a new semester if he
had outstanding debts.
"I think the SGA is making a
serious effort to tighten up pro-
cedures and we will help them in
any way we can Mever said.
Panhellenic Scholarship Banquet Conducted
Sororities, Members Receive Awards
The ECU Panhellenic Associa-
tion held its annual Scholarship
Banquet last Thursday night to
honor outstanding sororities and
individual members.
Four sorority awards were
presented during the evening. The
Beta Gamma Pledge class received
the Junior Panhellenic Outstan-
ding Pledge Class Award. The
Laura Sweet Award, given to the
outstanding sorority, was
presented to Delta Zeta. The
Alpha Phi sorority won the Most
Improved Intramural Award and
the Chi Omega sorority won the
Philanthropic Award.
Carolyn Fulghum, associate
dean and director of residence
life, presented the Scholarship
Award for the highest academic
average to Alpha Delta Pi. The
Alpha Zeta Delta sorority receiv-
ed the award for the most improv-
ed academic average. Laura
Sweet, Panhellenic advisor, said
the overall grade point average of
all eight sororities for the fall
semester was 2.4. She said the
average was "quite low" and has
gradually been dropping over the
past five years.
Hope Root, former Panhellenic
president and a member of the
Alpha Delta Zeta sorority, receiv-
ed the scholarship award of $100
for her 3.88 gpa. Sherri Everhart
from Alpha Delta Pi received the
pledge scholarship award of the
same amount for her 3.88 gpa.
The Lisa Turner Outstanding
Pledge Award went to June
Gunter, a pledge of Alpha Phi.
Myra Pinner received the
outstanding alumna award, the
Hera Award. Pinner is an alumna
of Chi Omega.
The Artemis Awards were given
to one outstanding sister in each
sorority. The recipients were
chosen by the members of each
sorority and are as follows:
Alpha Ptti. Amy Irnu Alpha Dalta PI. Cotaan
Lamrtah, Alpha Omlcron Pi, Dana Schacht;
Alpha Zata Oalta. Charyl Jonas, Chi Oma�a.
Shallay Nawall, Dalta Zata. Halan Floyd; Kappa
Oalta. Susan Moran, Sigma, Sigma. Sigma. Vita
Anthony
Tha Oraafc honorary award, tha Rho Lambda
Award, was given to tha following paopla Mr
Sarah Hughas, Vlcki Fraaman. Windy Skcilia
Dana Shacht. Lisa Stinnatt, Rhonda Parry. P�m
Maca. Shalla Roum, Jaan Campall, Tonina
Rotooi. Ardiath Lupton. Lana Helms. Cindy
Thompson. Kim Sandlin. Joy Ellis. Sua Morns
Amy Breza, Mary Louisa Butt, Deiorts Wor
thington, Robarta Watts. Gail Strom, Karen
Koonia, Lisa Burgwin, Kim Johnson, Fran Jonas
Sharon Mau. Mary Perry. Carolyn Hughes Susan
ToMetsen, Wendy Taylor, Kelly Poe. Eleanor
Sprague. Suson Freeman, Renee Riggsbee Cena
Burrougns. Lisa Schueti. and Hancy Croft
The Greek Hall of Fame Awards
were presented to those who
demonstrated outstanding service
to their sorority, campus, and
community. The recipients v,ere:
Alpha Delta Pi, Coleen Lemneh. Carle
TadlacSu Alpka Omkrw PI. Lw un nmj
Eileen Carraras. Delta Zata. Tina Peele Helen
Floyd; Chi Omega. DebtMe Kiniaw. Kefly Foe
Kappa Delta. Sarah Hughes. Dawn Kahlbau.
Sigma. Sigma Sigma. (Jiom Roberts. Wanda
Dotson
Root and Cindy Neilson, a
Jones Faces Political Attack
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Sun Writer
Congressman Walter B. Jones,
dean of North Carolina's congres-
sional delegation, has recently an-
nounced that he will run for
reelection. For seventeen years he
has represented the first district
and has generally been regarded
as an effective congressman who
responds to the bread-and-butter
issues of his constituency.
But Jones now appears to be
facing a tough primary scuffle
with Democrat John Gillam of
Windsor, a member of the
General Assembly. Gillam spoke
to the Greenville Jaycees Thurs-
day night and pointed to many
issues which figure to be promi-
nent in the Democratic primary.
Gillam first mentioned the con-
gressman's age and poor health.
He urged voters to "think hard
about whether Jones can provide
the kind of leadership that eastern
North Carolina so desperately
needs He argued further that
Jones cannot "feel the pulse of
the people in this area when he is
not physically able to campaign
and that he has tried to "represent
an important congressional
district through surrogates and
staff assistants
Gillam vigorously attacked
Jones' apparent inability to get
federal assistance to stabilize the
Oregon Inlet, which occupies the
Outer Banks off Dare County.
Nature has been shifting the
inlet's sands, and fishermen intent
on farming the waters of the
Atlantic thread through the chan-
nel, which is never more than
eight feet deep.
"The fact of the matter is
Gillam said, "our commercial
Fishermen are making suicide
voyages each time they venture
through this shifting inlet
Gillam attacked Jones' apparent
failure to get congressional ap-
proval for the jetty solution,
despite Jones' chairmanship of
the House Merchant Marine and
Fisheries Committee.
The challenger also charged
Jones with making a bad choice
when he exchanged his seat on the
Agriculture Committee � where
he was chairman of the Subcom-
mittee on Tobacco and Peanuts �
for the chairmanship of the Com-
mittee on Merchant Marine and
Fisheries. Gillam said the latter
post "has only marginal impact
on the 1st District of North
Carolina
The primary voting will take
place on May 8.
NHL JOHNSON � �CU .
Tkb female student it taking advantage of the Scott Residence Hall "tuck-in service The residents
are offering the service Feb. 13 through Feb. 16.
member of Alpha Delta Pi, recei -
ed the Outstanding Greek Woman
Award.
Special guests for the evening
were Chancellor John M Howell
and his wife Gladys, Associate
Dean of Orientation and
Judiciary James B. Mallory and
his wife Elizabeth, and Secretary
of Residence Life Branch Watson.
Dr. Edward W. Wheatley. pro-
fessor and chairman of the
Department of Marketing, was
guest speaker for the program.
Wheatley discussed the aspects
and advantages of "Being a pro-
fessional
New Panhellenic officers were
announced and are as follows:
president. Cindy fairhanks. vice
president. Lisa Stinnitt; recording
secretary. Tina Pilate; correspon-
ding secretary, Margaret Dais,
treasurer, Robin Hess; rush chair-
man, Lisa lager; parlimen-
tarian. chaplain. Dawn
Kahlbaugh; public relations. Jen-
nifer Johnson.
On The Inside!
t��wwoM"a�B�awBMMaass�Ma�asa�a��eaa�s�iiii i n-
Announcements 2
Editorials4
Entertainment6
Sports8
Classifieds 10
� Today's issue of The East
Carolinian contains special
Valentine's Day "Love Lines
See page 10.
� For a review of the ECL
drama department's "Tobacco
Road. see Entertainment,
page 6.
I
Scott Dorm
Offers Special
Sleeping Aid
From Monday, Feb. 13 until
Thursday Feb. 16, Scott
Residence Hall will be offering a
"tuck-in-service entitled "Bed-
time Enterprises"to all female
residence hails.
The service, which costs $1. is
being provided to raise money for
the dorm. For the fee a girl will be
visited by three males. The first
male reads the recipient a bedtime
story. The second man tucks the
female in and gives her a teddy
bear. Finally, the third man reads
the female a story and kisses her
good night.
Scott hall will continue to take
reservations through Thursday.
According to Jay Johnson, pro-
gramming assistant for Scott hail,
"We have been taking reserva-
tions already and we expect a
good turnout. "I feel like 'Bed-
time Enterprises' is a unique
idea Johnson added.
Bob Smith, a house council
member, initiated the idea. Smith
said he got the idea when he was
involved with a group at the
University of Maryland. The idea
was so popular, he said, that the
television show "Real People"
came out and filmed an actual
"tuck-in
"mmmmm
�-i�
a
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THB EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 14. 1984
?
Announcements
Reid
B THERESA Dl I M
M�ff Mnm
The East Carol lnimn
SarvfMit
commvxirv
1923.
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
log the summer.
The East Carolinian is me of
tidai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by me students of East Carolina
University
tehecrtpHwi Kate: �� yearly
The East Careflaiaa offices
ere tecated la the Old tewfh
1�1 e� the campus ef ECU.
�reawvlUe, N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
vine. NC 3734
TlloahSWS: 7J7-4J44, 4M7, uat
SWIMMERS NEEDED
Volunteer swimmers are needed to
help with mentally and physically
abused children at Memorial swlmm
ing pool on Fridays at 1:30 p.m. Ex-
perienced swimmers are not re-
quired, lust someone to give a helping
hand Ask for Toney Banks when
helping with "Ms worthy cause.
ECUHILLEL
The ECU Hliiel Councilorshlp will
be having a meeting on Sunday, Feb
if at MendenhaM Student Center in
room ZM at � p.m join us and let us
know what's on your mind or lust sit
back and listen
SOCCER TOURNAMENT
ZBT and Budweiser ara sponsoring
a soccer tournament March 24 1 25.
information is available at the cen
tral desk In Mendenhali student
Center Only the first 16 teams will be
accepted so turn your roster In early I
COLLEGE SENIORS OR
GRADUATE STUDENTS
College Seniors or Graduate
Students who have not previously
taken the MAT. One hundred (100)
students are needed.
Testing will require approximately
2 hours, 15 minutes. Subject will get
their Form M scores free (WO sav
ings), and these scores wli; be lm
mediately available to be Bent I red up
to 3 schools for a period of one year
The score from the second furm will
also be sent free at a leter date if the
equating proves satisfactory Scores
ere retained for S years
ECSCOTA
The East Carolina Student Commit
tee Occupational Therapy Associa
tlon (ECSCOTA) would like to en
courage all members and Interesied
students to attend their Feb 14
meeting at 5 30 p.m in room XO at
the Allied Health Building. Pictures
of the Club will be taken for the year
book and � meeting will follow
NATIONAL INSTITUTE
OF HEALTH
A representative from NIH.
Bemesda. MD will be on campus
March 19 and 20 to interview students
who would like to work in a clinical
setting es Normal volunteers
Students will be paid dally stipends.
All interested students must attend a
general meeting at 7 p.m. on Monday,
March It In Rawt 302 before having
interviews on me 20th. Students mi
loring in Allied Health, Nursing, and
related fields are encouraged to app-
ly Contact the Co op office. 313 Rawl,
for details and applications.
INTENDED SLAP
MAJORS
All General College students Inten
ding to maor In Speech-Language
and Auditory Pathology will pre
register for Fall and Summer Terms
on Tuesday, Feb 21 at 7 p.m. In
Brewster, D 103
CAR WASH
The PI Kapps will be having a Car
Wash this Saturday at the Plaza Shell
on Greenville Blvd. It will start
around 10:00 a.m. and last thru out
the day. So bring that nasty car by
and get It to look new.
There will be a PI Kaps "A" basket
ball game tonight at 6 p.m.at
Memorial and Thursday night at �: 15
p.m. at Minges. Come out and sop
port the PI Kapps. Help us retire me
Chancellors Cup. Just a reminder
"Parents Day" Is March 17.
CIRCLE K
Circle K: ECU'S coed service
organlzetlonl The Circle K Club In
vltes you to come out and oln us
every Tuesday this semester at 7
p.m. in Mendenhali, Room 221. Bring
your Ideas for protects. Hope to se
you mere I
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omlcron Chapter of Phi Beta
Lambda will hold Its next meeting on
Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 4 p.m. in Rawl
341. There will be a reception after
the meeting.
THE PARTY
Rumor has It that there is going to
be a Hell of a Party Feb 25 at the
Moose Lodge. Drive or ride the free
bus.
PARTY 50 KEGS
The East Carolina Rugbv Team
will have a pre-spring break party
Saturday Feb 25 from 7 12 pm at the
Greenville Moose Lodge Buses will
run to and from the party at no
charge. Pick ups will be made at apt.
complexes or on campus. Call
752-0041 if you have groups of 10 or
more.
BINGO ICE CREAM
PARTY
The Department of university
Unions is sponsoring a Valentine's
Day Bingo Ice Cream Party on Tues
day, Feb. 14 at 7 p.m In the
Mendenhali Student Center Multi
Purpose room All ECU students,
faculty, staff and their loved ones are
invited Admission Is 50 cents. Eight
heart warming bingo games will be
played and of course, all me delicious
flavors of Ice cream will be available.
BANKING
Beta Kappa Alpha, Banking and
Finance Fraternity will have a
meeting on Thursday, Feb. le. at 5:30
P.m. in Rawl 103. tto. Benlamm
womack of Planters National Bank
will speak on banking. We will also
have a picture made for the yearbook
during the meeting. Dress according
ly. New memberships and dues ara
still being taken.
BEDROOM
ENTERPRISES
Let us tuck you or your frland in
with the reading of a bedtime story by
one of our world renowned Scott Hall
Storytellers. For Si oo this service Is
yours. For more information and to
reserve en appointment, call 752 9330
9 p.m. 12 p.m. MonFrl.
ULTIMATE FEVER
The warm weather Is comlngl The
ultimate fever is rising, so get on
down to the field at the bottom of the
Hill on Tues Thurs and Sunday at
3:15 p.m for a real high. All interested
persons are cordially Invited to play
Ultimate today and enjoy the sport
that some say is better than sex. Im-
portant! Wed 2 15 from 7 9 p.m the
irates play ultimate under the lights
on Soccer fields behind Flcklen
Stadium. Be under the Neons tomor
row nlghtl
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House Is
offering one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume. Few
graduates get obs without some
preparation. Many employers re-
quest a resume showing your educa-
tion and experience. Sessions to help
will be held in the Career Planning
Room at 3 p.m. Come on any of the
following dates: Feb 1,9,14. 20
SCUBA DIVING
Spring Break Scuba Dive in the
Bahamas Seven days on the 45' dive
boet "Bottom Time Includes 3
meals, lodging and diving. Fly from
Ft. Lauderdale to Nassau. For
registration and Information call Ray
Scharf, Director of Aquatics at
757 6441 Or 756 9339 Total COSt SA60 00
includes a $100.00 non-refundable
deposit.
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting on Thurs,
Feb. 16 at 5:30 p.m. in room 212
Mendenhali All members should at
tend this meeting! We will be discuss
ing protects for this semester and in-
duction of new members. Please
mark your calendar, and don't miss
this meeting I
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
Yearbook portraits ere now being
taken in the Buccaneer Office until
Feb. 17. Portraits are for seniors,
underclassmen and grad students
Sign up for your appointment Now! 11
this Is the last opportunity to have
your picture appear In the 1904 Buc
caneer. Sittings ara conducted from
9-12 a.m. and 15 p.m. No charge or
obligation to purchase pictures. Your
portrait automatically appears in the
Buccaneer.
WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House is
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use In your job search. A
film and discussion of how to Inter
view through this service will be
shared. Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room at 3 p.m.
Come on any of the following dates:
Feb 2, �. 13. 21.
SEXUAL FULFILLMENT
Making It good for you and your part
nar � when? Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m in
Speight 129, Psl Chi presents Or
Knox from the Sociology Dept He
will be our guest speaker Come and
learn It all!
Remember � Psl Chi application
deadline is March 2 so get your ap
plications in today. You can pick
them up in Speight 202 during hours
ECU POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet on
Thursday (Feb. 16) in Mendenhali 248
at 8 00 p.m. Those planning to par
tlcipate should bring 6 8 copies of
each poem they want to discuss
Meeting open to all.
REAL ESTATE
Rho Epsllon, Real Estate Fraferni
fy, will have an organizational
meeting on Tuesday, Feb 14, at 3
p.m. in Rawl 104.
MAT ADMINISTRATION
There will be a special evening ad
ministration of the Miller Analogies
Test (MAT) held on Wednesday,
March 7 at 7 p.m In the Testing
Center, Speight Building, Room 105,
at East Carolina University. The fee
for the test Is S30, and candidates may
pay and register in the classroom at 7
p.m. Candidates will need some type
of picture ID (i.e Driver's License)
and two number 2 pencils. Since
school will not be in session on this
date, the regularly scheduled
Wednesday afternoon (230 p.mtest
will not be given.
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NTTE
$1.00
a
Including Skates
6:30-10:00
MUSIC TELEVISION
with MTV
16ft SCREEN
? STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - activity instructors in a private girls
camp located in Hendersonville, NC. Instruc-
tors needed especially in Swimming (WSI),
Horseback riding, Archery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics, Crafts, Also Basketball, Computers,
Soccer, Checrleading, Drama, Art, Office
work, Dancing, Nature study. If your school
offers a Summer Interchip program we will be
glad to help. Inquires - Morgan Haynes P.O.
Box 400C, Tryon, NC, 2T782.
DAIL
McLA fVHORN. D VM
announces the opening of
McLAWHORN ANIMAL
CUNIC
Corner of Evans St. 6 264 By-pass
355-6167 emergency 756-0972
Mon Tues Thur Fit, 8-1 and 3-6
Wed. & Sat. gi
BudweiserZBT
Soccer Tournament
March 24 & 25
Rosters and tournament information
available at Mendenhali Information
desk.
Only the first 16 teams will be accepted.
CLASSIFIED ADS
� u ay use the form at right
Of use a separate sheet of
paper if you need more lines
There are 31 units per lin�
Each tetter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit Capitalize and hyphenate
words properly Leave space
af eno of line if word doesn't fit
o ads w;ii be accepted over
the phone We reserve the right
to rejec an. ad. All ads most
be prepaid Enclose 75 cents
0 me or fraction of a line.
���se print legibly! Use
capai and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary Dy 3 p m the day
before put cation
N
Address
CityState.
No. Lines.
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,m a a aw a.

I T ' ' " r ' u � t








SCIENCE MAJORS
A.C.S.S.A. is selling CRC Hand
books for $24 and Organic Handbooks
for 120 A reference mutt for any
science major at a discount price.
Place order in the Chemistry Office,
Flanagan 207 between 11 13 and 12
thru Feb. 20 Payment due upon
ordering Checks will be accepted
MEDTINTENDED
MAJORS
Pre registration for Fall Semester
will be held as shown below The
faculty would appreciate It If students
would arrive on time so that everyone
can hear the general announcements.
Monday Feb. 27 7 Brewster O101
Freshman
Tuesday Feb 2i 7 Brewster D102
Sopnomore
Students who cannot attend either
one of these sessions should call Doris
Johnson at 757 6941 to schedule an ap-
pointment students who have been
admitted to the Department for Fall
will be notified by letter the week of
Feb 20 and may complete change of
maior forms at the same time that
they pre register
SUMMER WORK
IN FRANCE
Girls interested In summer work
(or longer) with a French family
please meet Wed. Feb 15 in BA 437 at
2 p.m. for further information.
MALE STRIP OFf-
The Sigma Phi Epsilon Little
Sisters ere sponsoring the First An
nual Male StrlpOff. Tuesday Feb 21
at the Elbo Room loo for the table
in front of the Student store tor sign
ups and more information
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of Gam
mj Beta Phi will be hed on Thurs
day. Fee U in the Jenkins Ar-
Auditorium Please attend' This s
the deadline tor semester dues Aisc
officer elections will be held
Advertise
your
typing skills
in the
classifieds
Dr Dennis Reid,
tor of Intensive Training
and Specialized Ser
at Western Carol im
Center in Niorganton
N C, spoke Frida
Speight Buildini
large group of. i
f and studer
New Pi
B RISn WOOl AR!
vuf I V. rHrf
row
have beer, iiui
Pitt Coun-
Heai-r.� .
to Lillian H
mation as i
tior
Den
" -
trol, tra
me-
- �
School ol
' . i
nolog
Ed the S
rcchi
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Coffee Breaks
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1984
1 1 1
III

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GAMMA BETA PHI
� e exi g,nerai meeting of Gam
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r Carnation Company
Reid Speaks On Technology During Lecture
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Wilier
Dr. Dennis Reid, direc-
tor of Intensive Training
and Specialized Services
at Western Carolina
Center in Morganton,
N.C spoke Friday in the
Speight Building to a
large group of. faculty,
staff and students who
are currently working
with or who have an in-
terest in mentally retard-
ed individuals.
The topic of Reid's
presentation was "The
Non-existence of a
Technology for Manag-
ing Staff Performance
Reid, co-author of a
recently published book
entitled Behavior
Modification with the
Severely and Profoundly
Retarded: Research and
Application, has also
published several articles
in professional journals
dealing with staff training
and leisure and social
skills development for in-
stitutionalized retarded
individuals.
"These built-in pro-
cedures can help train
staff and other in-
dividuals who work in the
human resource service
fields Reid said.
Reid focused his
presentation on three ma-
jor aspects and one com-
bined procedure for ef-
fectively training staff
personnel who work with
the mentally retarded
population.
Reid said the first
aspect focused on the
antecedent intervention
which uses written and
oral modeling and
manual sign language
that aids in com-
municating with mentally
handicapped individuals.
Reid also stressed the
importance of contingen-
New Programs Initiated At PCMHC
cy management or the
feedback approach to
staff training. "Con-
tingency management
focuses on feedback,
group contingencies,
punishment strategies
and performance lot-
teries he said.
Reid said the third
aspect of staff training is
self-controlled programs
in which the staff
monitors performance
through self-recording,
goal setting and rein-
forcement.
The final combined
procedure Reid called the
multifaceted approach to
behavior oriented staff
training.
The importance of
good staff training is
"critical to the welfare of
the client he said.
Anyone interested in
knowing more about
behavior modification
techniques with the men-
tally retarded is en-
couraged to read Dr.
Reid's book or to contact
Dr. Jeannie Golden in the
Psychology Department.
By RUSTY WOOLAJtD
Starf riter
Four new programs
have been initiated at the
Pitt County Mental
Health Center, according
to Lillian Huffy, infor-
mation and communica-
tions specialist.
The new programs con-
cern methods of depres-
sion control, weight con-
trol, transition manage-
ment and elimination of
self-defeating behaviors.
Archer Heinzen, a
psychologist, will coor-
dinate the programs,
which will begin in
February and March.
Groups will meet once
a week, and each session
will last approximately
two hours. The programs
will last six weeks, and
there is a $25 fee which
covers all six sessions.
In these structured
group programs, formal
teaching methods are
combined with ex-
perimental learning. Par-
ticipants relay their suc-
cesses and failures in ap-
plying the techniques
taught at the meetings.
On "homework
assignments group
members carry out simple
exercises in their spare
time based on what is
taught at the sessions.
However, interpersonal
confrontation is avoided,
and most interaction oc-
curs with the "group
facilitator or leader,
rather than with the other
participants.
Huffy pointed out that
these programs are
beneficial only for people
who are experiencing
mild distress, not for
those suffering major
personal crises. A brief
interview is conducted
with each prospective
participant to determine
whether or not the pro-
gram will be helpful.
Huffy said many peo-
ple are unfamiliar with
the variety of services
provided by the Pitt
County Mental Health
Center. "We help people
cope with everyday life
situations, not just people
who are chronically ill
she said. "These pro-
grams teach people how
to cope with everyday
problems. They make
people more aware of
themselves, and they
teach strategies for deal-
ing successfully with their
difficulties
School of Technology Receives New Robot
The world of high
technology has reached
ECU. The School of
Technology is purchasing
a robot that will cost an
estimated S3,000 and is to
be used as an "educational
tool by the Center for
Applied Technology.
Funding will come from a
$5,000 gift from Sperry
Univac to the School of
lecnnoiogy.
Robots are becoming
more popular in industry
as a way of freeing
workers from tedious or
dangerous tasks on pro-
duction lines, ine rooot
to be used by the center
will be of industry type,
with an arm and base
controlled by a
microcomputer said Jerry
Tester, director for the
Center of Applied
Technology.
The robot is designed
to teach students how
robots work,
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SUl iEaat (Earnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, cw����
Darryl Brown, m�,�,
Jl-NNIFER JENDRASIAK, ItaM. J.T. PIETRZAK. Mmtm,
Tina Maroschak. o m. mm Mike McPartland. �u�, ���,
Ed Nicklas. ,� gdtar Tom Norton, cr, v��,r
Gordon Ipock. m. �� Kathy Fuerst. ��� w
Mark Barker, oommmm Mike Mayo, �������
rebruarv 14, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Loan Defaults
ECU Student Record Shameful
The low deliquency rates reflect
the quality of East Carolina's
students. Most of our borrowers are
willing to repax their loans because
without them many could not have
made it financially. '�ECU loan office
Such was a quote from last Oc-
tober about ECU students repaying
student loans. But one isn't likely to
hear that from anyone in the SGA.
The student government's loan
funds are almost depleted, thanks to
an unbelievably high rate of student
defaults. About 99 percent of
emergency medical loans are over-
due, as are about 84 percent of
general, $25 loans.
Little blame rests on the SGA and
administration. They can tag stu-
dent transcripts to prevent gradua-
tion until outstannding debts are
paid, but students have been allow-
ed to graduate anyway, and then
have no reason to repay the money
save a sense of integrity, which most
defaulters seem to lack. Stricter en-
forcement of rules could be used,
but cases are difficult to get to Small
Claims Court. Besides, the SGA
and university shouldn't have to
take such action; it only further
wastes ECU's financial resources.
The SGA's decision to take the mat-
ter to the Honor Board, for suspen-
sion, fines andor voluntary work,
is a harsh but not undue one.
ECU Students defaulted on less
than 6 percent of state or federal
loans, yet defaulted on virtually all
loans obtained through the SGA,
money from fees paid by students.
Perhaps the federal government
seems more ominous, and the Set-
Off Debt Collection Act more
threatening. (It allows the govern-
ment to keep tax refunds for over-
due loans.) If that is the case,
perhaps suspension from school and
an enforced graduation prevention
procedure will be enough. The loans
are small and most should be able to
pay them back more easily than
larger loans. Too many loans are
for medical emergencies; students
borrowing from this fund should
remember their own need and repay
the fund a quickly as possible so
other student needs can be met.
Most borrowers would do well to
remember the importance loan
funds can have to many people, and
without them many could not make
it financially.
Campus Forum
Dorm President Opposes
Jarvis As Quiet Residence
Last Wednesday a proposal to establish
a quiet dorm on campus by the fall of 1985
was passed by SRA. Yet one question re-
mains to be decided � precisely which
dorm will go quiet?
SRA President Mark Niewald proposed
that it atfect either Fleming or Jarvis halls.
For many students an article which ap-
peared in Thursday's East Carolinian was
the first such exposure to the news. Since
the appearance of that article a number of
residents from both dorms have expressed
their disapproval to any such proposal.
Several Jarvis residents have questioned
the sudden, secretive manipulation of Mr.
Niewald to push the bill without adequate
student knowledge.
Mr. Niewald bases his proposal for
establishment ot a quiet dorm on a survey
taken well over a year ago. The survey ap-
parently questioned students as to whether
or not they felt there was a genuine need
for a quiet dorm on ECU's campus.
Howler, those surveyed were not asked
whether they would actually consent to
live in such a place. So whether or not
there is a significant number of students
willing to reside in a quiet dorm is not ac-
tually known, only that there may be a
need.
As to Mr. Niewald's choice of Jarvis to
become a quiet dorm, I feel it necessary to
point out that many interested students
may be discriminated against due to the
fact that Jarvis has no handicapped
facilities and also because of the extra
costs due to air conditioning. The fact that
Jarvis does have air conditioning may also
attract those students whose intentions are
less than sincere. It would seem that there
must be a location better suited to the
needs and demands of all students con-
cerned.
While I hope that those students with
sincere and honest desires to live in a
residence such as the one proposed will
make themselves known, it would seem a
terrible hame to see what Mr. Niewald
refers to as "only the displacement of 166
students" go to benefit another 166
students for the wrong reasons. Perhaps if
the residents of both Jarvis and Fleming
felt that the university's best interests were
being pursued then the proposal would not
be so upsetting.
Wendy Caibe
President of Jarvis hall
Abortion Acceptable
I am always disturbed when I read
something ignorant, and when Nan
George claimed that abortion is a one sid-
3d, no-exceptions issue, I was angry. She
says that rape almost never results in
pregnancy and that medical technology
can detect early pregnancy problems.
Therefore, abortion is wrong, no ques-
tions asked I don't like abortion as a
means of birth control more than anyone,
but there are times when abortion is
understandable Rape can result in a
pregnancy, and it has. Should the victim,
who has already gone through enough
trauma, be expected to go through the ad-
ditional trauma of carrying and delivering
a child? Of course not! There is also the
problem of a person accidentally getting
pregnant at such a bad time that trying to
deal with a baby could literally destroy-
that person. It is not right to bring a child
into this world if you are not capable of
caring for it. Adoption is a good alter-
native, but many people cannot stand the
idea of knowing that they have a child out
in the world. The Supreme Court decision
to legalize abortion was a good one, and to
reverse this decision could be a disaster. I
don't like it when people have abortions
when they don't really need to, but abor-
tion must be left to the individual and the
medical profession, not Ronald Reagan,
Jesse Helms, Jim Bakker, Billy Graham,
Campus Crusade and friends.
Bern McCrady
Freshman, General College
Editorial Vunerable
Last Tuesday's editorial entitled "Fund
Raising: Hunt Record Outshines Helms"
included some interesting points, but ex-
cluded some even more interesting ones.
The editorial is vulnerable, so I'll take
some shots.
The column gleefully pointed out that
Helms has raised more money from out of
state than Hunt. So what? Helms has no
choice but to build a broader fund-raising
base because the media, from The
(Raleigh) News and Observer to The East
Carolinian, is working against him.
Now I have some points. The average
contribution to the Hunt campaign has
been $69 compared to $29 for Helms. The
figures are more glaring at the national
level, where the average contribution to
the Democratic National Committee is
$300. The average contribution to the
Republican National Committee � $28.
Why do Helms and the Republican Par-
ty raise so much more money and in such
smaller contributions? Because both repre-
sent the middle class, which is much larger
and, as a whole, wealthier than the upper
class. Jesse Helms represents the common
man, the one who supports him with those
tiny contributions, not the fat cats who
vomit the big bucks for Jim Hunt and his
parij of the rich.
�&�
�.A5K NOTFOR WHOM M BEll TOLLS IT
TousroRTHee
Police Crime
Tobacco Road Economics Falter
By GORDON IPOCK
The audience's response was under-
whelming to the opening night per-
fomance of Tobacco Road by the East
Carolina Playhouse. With a life-size
cabin, a Chinbaberry tree and a few
tons of dirt on stage, the settings were
extraordinary. And the acting was good
as well, highlighted by a solid profes-
sional performance by Tom Hull, and a
superb piee of character acting by
Crisa Warren in a supporting role. It
was a production worthy of a standing
ovation. The response, however, was
languid; I sensed ambivalent feelings
around me.
The play Tobacco Road by Jack
Kirkland was adopted from Erskine
Caldwell's novel by the same name. As
the local press release on the play ex-
plains, the novel was written as a "com-
passionate social document" about
poor white share croppers living in a
rural pocket of poverty in Georgia in
about 1930. But the play has developed
into a comedy over the years with au-
diences finding it easier to laugh at the
miserable poverty and ignorance of the
Lesters rather than be moved to pity. I
have not made a comparative study bet-
ween Kirkland's play and Caldwell's
novel; thus, I'm not sure where the
heavy accent on comedy came in. But, I
am certain that between the snickers
and guffaws, the audience still picked
up on Caldwell's original message, and
no matter how superb the production, it
was difficult to shower enthusiastic ap-
plause on such a spectacle of human
degradation and suffering. Thus the
ambivalence: how does one react to an
excellent performance of something
that is both a farce and a realistic
tragedy.
Despite the contradictions, I enjoyed
the play � immensely � because it
made me think. That, I'm certain, was
exactly Caldwell's purpose. But what
was Caldwell's message; what was he
saying to the readers of his time? Let's
return to the 1930s.
The nation and the world was mired
in an economic depression of staggering
proportions. Many intellectuals of the
time saw it as indisputable proof of the
inherent flaws within capitalism. This
was the end, they said, of the Western
economic and social order as Marx had
predicted. Talk of revolution was
everywhere. Already Czarist Russia had
overthrown the old order. Socialist and
Communist intellectuals in the U.S.
watched the Soviet Union with a sense
of rapture looking for the worker's
Utopia to unfold and ignoring the
millions slaughtered in Stalin's purges.
Many intellectuals felt that socialism,
or communism, was the only real solu-
tion to the economic crisis and human
suffering in the U.S. The nation faced a
severe test. Something had to be done.
This was the scenario that Caldwell
wrote within and about.
Caldwell took the raw material of
what he saw and viewed it first as a
sociologist might, and then he
transformed it into art. He wrote of
economic degradation and racial and
class conflicts. No doubt, he hoped his
works would catalyze social and
economic change. But in what direc-
tion?
Many of his sharpest critics accused
Caldwell of being a Communist, a false
charge that had some credibility
because of his travels to the Soviet
Union and because his work was and
still is popular there, as is all American
literature that shows our society at its
worst. Whether he supported socialism
at the time is difficult to say, but
Caldwell did have strong liberal sen-
timents, and his graphic accounts of
hypocracy and injustice provided
strong fodder for the promoters of
Roosevelt's New Deal. The Lesters of
Tobacco Road and the Waldens of
God's Little Acre were composites of
an entire class of people. Caldwell gave
them names and faces and brought their
suffering into focus. There was purpose
and meaning in these works. Certainly
Caldwell advocated change.
After poverty, the second most noted
theme in Tobacco Road (it figures pro-
minently in God's Little Acre as wet!) is
the Christian religion. Caldwell's works
are a commentary on the gap between
its theory and its practice. His
characters use Christianity as a twisted
and warped crutch to prop up their
pitiful existences. It is an excuse and
justification for their ignorance,
laziness and immorality. Karl Marx
could not have written a sterner indict-
ment against Christian belief. Any
believer who sat through the play on
campus had to feel at least mild
chagrin, but a sophomore told me that
she became so livid she felt like walking
out of the theater.
Caldwell grew up the son of a
Presbyterian minister, a man con-
sidered to be something of a social
radical by his church's hierarchy in the
South. I know nothing of Caldwell's
personal religious beliefs, but in his
novel Tobacco Road he was careful to
point out that his characters' warped
brand of Christianity was an aberation,
an atypical extreme. Unfortunately, the
play's comedic twist turns it into a
mean non-stop joke that many people
will probably take as the gospel truth
about Christianity in general. The pro-
fanity in the play is easily recognized
and therefore not offensive. However,
the cruel treatment of Christianity in
the play is insiduous, a profanity not
readily recogonized as such, and
therefore it is offensive.
The overall message one gets from
the play is that of failure, the miserable
failure of the then-existing social,
economic and religious systems, ie
capitalism and Christianity. Even when
it's well done, an audience in conser-
vative Eastern North Carolina will like-
ly have difficulty applauding such a
condemnation of traditional American
values.
Though Tobacco Road's message
was intended for America in the '30s,
like all classics of literature, it has a
timeless message. Besides commenting
on the flaws of a contemporary societv
it also showcases the eternal elements of
human nature and thus gives reason for
even more thought: perhaps it is the
flaws inherent within some men that
causes their suffering rather than the
flaws within their society. Through
Caldwell's realism we can see the :ruth
about Jeeter Lester. He is what he is by
choice.The source of his poverty is his
own laziness, and he is immoral in spite
of Christianity, not because of it.
In reaction to liberals and Socialists
from the '30s, in reaction to men such
as Caidwell, government has given us
50 years of social programs, billions of
dollars worth of New Deals. New Fron-
tiers, Great Societies and Wars on
Poverty in an effort to change human
nature and achieve a greater degree of
economic and class equality. But todav
after SO yrmrs of back-door socialism a
present federal budget of $850 billion of
which about 50 percent is devoted to
social-welfare and entitlement pro-
grams, and a national debt of over $1
trillion, we still have not erased pover-
ty. We still have not achieved economic
and class equality. The Jeeter Lesters
are still with us. They live just down the
road in a trailer park.
Since the publication of Tobacco
Road, liberal politicians have mortgag-
ed this generation's economic future in
a blind attempt to change human
nature. They have not learned that
economic equality for everyone is not
only unatainable, but undesirable.
Their folly threatens to bring on an
economic crisis in the near future, a
total collapse of the U.S. monetary
system, a catastrophe that will make the
Great Depression seem insignificant.
Instead of trying to pave Tobacco
Road and replace its shacks with
government housing projects, instead
of trying to make sure that everyone
who lives in Tobacco road is well fed
and has health insurance, the govern-
ment should offer every young person
there and across the land a college or
technical education � free. With this
promise of equal opportunity � not
economic equality � those remaining
on Tobacco Road, like Jeeter Lester,
will do so by choice. All others will be
free to leave Tobacco Road and ad-
vance as far as their abilities and ambi-
tions will allow them. They will be free
to fulfill the American dream. And that
is something we can all applaud.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Junior, Political Science
Columnist Countered
Perhaps someone should set Gordon
Ipcock straight on a few facts. It's ob-
vious from his recent Life in
N.C.Klan Incident editorial that his
(I'm sure) good journalistic intentions
are being smothered by the same kind
of ultra-conservative, right-wing
philosophies that I'm afraid are
characteristic of the region.
First I'd like to congratulate Mr.
Ipock for opening his extremely
narrow-minded editorial with a conver-
sation sure to elicit a favorable
response from the majority of his
readers; that of our football team's
success and subsequent post-season
bowl bid rejection. After all, and I'm
sure Ipock realized this when he wrote
it, who could argue with someone who
realizes that the ECU Pirates should've
been in a bowl game? Not any true
North Carolinian; not any real, good,
old-fashioned American.
I find it interesting that (Ipock) pull-
ed out all stops to portray the CWP
party as something that is so repulsive
and undesirable that swift extermina-
tion is the only way to deal with them.
Really now, "responsible for the whole
tragedy "callous indifference to the
safety of women and children if I
may borrow a few of (his) more un-
biased observations, would you have
us believe that when the Klan and
Nazis opened fire they were concerned
with women and children? I think not.
I think that the only thing they cared
about was killing a few "commies" (a
term you seem to be fond of).
You state that the Klan places Com-
munists far above blacks on its enemies
list. (I suppose to reassure us that the
Klan is just looking out to protect the
"good ole American" way.) Yet I
don't think that your average
Klansman could even tell you what a
Communist is. Point of fact: you, a
supposedly educated college student,
can't even (Judging by your editorial
content) decide if the CWP is com-
munist or socialist. Also, if the Klan is
supposedly less rascist than you are,
why do they still spout such witty (and
manly) slogans as "Show us a nigger
with courage and we'll show you a
Klansman with a gun If the Klan is
so all-American (it's okay to hate
blacks as long as you also hate Com-
munists) why do they hang around
with the Nazi (Fascist) Party. Probably
because the Nazis and Klansman are
such good buddies from their days in
legislature.
Finally, I think it a sad state of af-
fairs when an open minded, educated
newspaper propagates the kind of
narrow-minded, Sen. Helmsian
philosophy that puts all evil under one
label. Perhaps we should realize that
when people are acquitted for murder-
ing five people solely because the had
differing economic beliefs, then the
greatest threat to a truly free people is
not the "Communists but a system
that condones their murders.
JefferyJ.Larrimore
Junior, Sociology
Mr. Ipock based the information in his
editorial on "The Communists and the
Klan " by Terry East land, an article that
appeared in the May '80 issue of Com-
mentary magazine. Mr. Ipock asks that
before anyone else accuses him of being
a racist they read this definitive article
Va
BvsTLPHAN
HARDING
SWt �-
Reports from the EC I
Department of Public
Safet were more than
double over last week. In-
cluded were seven reports
of vandalism, four of
theft and nine alcohol
related incidents. The
reports from Feb " thru
Feb 1? are
Feb 7, 11 25 a m -
vandalism of two win-
dows on third and fa
floors of Aycock dorm.
8:15 p.m. � Timoth. Lee
Kellv of 104-C Scot:
dorm was served a sum-
mons for a u-
check. 10 30 r
Carol Ann Hargrove was
served a criminal sum-
mons for a worthless
check. 1 1:0 n.�
report that R
of 202 C Scott d
thrown a burning -
paper into a trashcai
room 210- A of
dorm, cau as -
ft
I

Crime
B MOl I Bl H
5 � "
Next fall the SRA
a ca
Residence Watch p
gram. Last Od -
SRA approved the p
gram for the centra, cam
pus area Because il
such a huge s
uttttl nu�-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 984
ter
ie
i hen
sei
ke-
. such a
.an
nessage
!
has a
;ng
- c etj .
ents of
n for
:he
that
in i he
igh
c truth
e is by
Mis
pite
ists
nch
Ne rr
'A ars on
human
I ei degree
Uvivts Rui today.
ocialism, a
n of
nomic
esters
a n the
Tobacco
e mortgag-
onomic future in
:hange human
kot learned that
rveryone is not
But undesirable.
o bring on an
near future, a
U.S. monetary
hat will make the
insignificant.
pave Tobacco
shacks with
ts, instead
� that everyone
oad is well fed
ce, the govern-
srung person
nd a college or
- With this
rtunit) � not
hose remaining
e leeter Lester,
i thei will be
Road and ad-
es and ambi-
"he will be free
dream. And that
applaud.
so hate Com-
hang around
Probably
Jansman are
their days in
ate of af-
led, educated
kind of
Helmsian
il under one
realize that
for murder-
:ause the had
rfs, then the
f'ee people is
Kut a system
lers.
l.arrimore
tor. Sociology
ymation in his
unists and the
an article that
issue of Com-
ock asks that
him of being
fimtive article.
Police Crime Blotter
Vandalism, Arson Reports High
By STEPHAN
HARDING
Malt Mki
Reports from the ECU
Department ot Public
Safety were more than
double over last week. In-
cluded were seven reports
of vandalism, four of
theft and nine alcohol
related incidents. The
reports from Feb. 7 thru
Feb. 13 are:
Feb. 7, 11:25 a.m. �
vandalism of two win-
dows on third and fourth
floors, of Aycock dorm;
8:15 p.m. � Timothv Lee
Kelly of 104-C Scott
dorm was served a sum-
mons for a worthless
check; 10:30 p.m
Carol Ann Hargrove was
served a criminal sum-
mons for a worthless
check; 11:03 p.m.�
report that Rich Forero
of 202-C Scott dorm had
thrown a burning piece of
paper into a trashcan in
room 210-A of Scott
dorm, causing fire alarm
to activate.
Feb. 8, 9.55 a.m. �
Donna Deluise, resident
director of Umstead
Residence Hall, reported
the larceny of furniture
from the lobby of the
hall; 3:50 p.m. � report
of damage to truck
camper shell during snow
while being driven on
College Hill Drive; 8:23
p.m. � Kimberly Jo
Mercer of 617 Clement
dorm was transported to
Pitt Memorial due to in-
jury to her head; 10:30
p.m. � report of window
of the door to the
mechanical room in Scott
dorm broken.
Feb. 9, 2:05 p.m.
Kenneth J. Del Cogliano
of 408 Jones and Patrick
D. Lorimer III of 482
Jones were determined to
have pushed over the
Cushman vehicle at
Joyner Library, causing
approximately $50
damage.
Feb. 11, 12:25 a.m. �
Denise Muriel Miller of
214 Fleming was issued a
campus citation for
transporting an alcoholic
beverage with the seal
broken; 1:01 a.m. �
Larry Darnell White,
Michael Keith Coward
and Anthony Alexander
Carman, all of Winter-
ville, N.C were banned
from the campus for
icated; 1:25 a.m. �
James Marion Pearce of
309-B Scott was arrested
for DWI; 2:03 a.m. �
Charles William Huff-
man of 50H Sandy Knoll
Trailer Court was issued
a campus citation for
DWI; 3:20 a.m. � Tony
Ray Harris of 502 West
4th Street was banned
from campus for being
intoxicated and disrup-
tive.
Feb. 12, 1:10 a.m. �
Charles Szucham of 43 E.
Honor Board Action
Defendant Charge
PlM
Decision
Jones dorm; 12:15 p.m.
� report of larceny of a
shoulder bag from room
in Clement dorm; 5:45
p.m. � Sgt. Lawler
reported snack machine
in canteen of Tyler dorm
appeared to have been
vandalized; 6:10 p.m. �
report of vehicle van-
dalized while parked ad-
jacent to the band prac-
tice field on College Hill
Drive.
Feb. 13, 12:35 a.m. �
Report of protective glass
Freshman Stealing Guilty
Freshman Forging checks Guilty
Complete restitution
Suspension from the
university for one
year; must petition
the Honor Board for
lission
5th Street was obstructing from Fire alarm pull box
and delaying Cpl. Wat- on 4th floor of Aycock
son in carrying out his dorm broken; 1:15 a.m.
duties as an officer; 2:50 � Greenville Police
a.m. � Tammy McRae Department requested
of 277 Jones dorm and assistance in apprehen-
SGA
� report of larceny of bicy- posession of a controlled Carl W. Bailey Jr. of 235 yding Kevin Ralph Smith
cle from northwest corner
of Aycock dorm; 6:38
p.m. � Todd Hess of 172
Jones dorm was
transported to Student
Health Center by Green
ville Rescue Squad due to
injury while at Jones
Cafeteria.
Feb. 10, 1:15 a.m. �
substance and urinating
in public; 1:15 a.m. Ann
Michele Pridgcn was
found to be driving after
drinking; 1:15 a.m. �
Britt Douglas Campbell
of Elizabeth City, N.C
was banned from the
campus for suspicious ac-
tivity and being intox-
Garrett were
violation of
policy in 277 Jones; 3:45
a.m. � James Archibald
Campbell III of 435
Aycock dorm was ar-
rested for DWI; 2:07
a.m. � anonymous caller
reported a disturbance on
4th floor west wing of
found in f Aycock dorm who had
visitation taken a SGA bus from
Papa Katz nightclub
without permission; 1:35
a.m. � Milton Norman
White of 137 Aycock
dorm was arrested for
DWI; 210 a.m. � report
of glass broken out of
southwest curfew door.
Crime Watch Program Implemented
B MOLLY BUSH
Staff � rim
Next fall the SRA will
begin a campus-wide
Residence Watch pro-
gram last October the
SRA approved the pro-
gram for the central cam-
pus area. Because it was
huge success,
Wk
Mark Niewald, SRA
president, asked that the
program be implemented
campus-wide. "The
Residence Watch has
been a great success
Niewald said.
James B. Mallory,
associate dean of orienta-
program using Fines col-
lected from those who
committed crimes. "The
costs that run over that
amount will be absorbed
by the SRA Niewald
said.
The program is similar
out for each other.
Residents are taught to
watch for suspicious
behavior and how to
report it.
Pamphlets, which will
be distributed to the
residence halls, contain
information on the pro-
how to protect property
from vandalism.
Watch signs have been
posted on the entrances
and doors of residence
halls on central campus.
Attention:
All student organizations re-
questing student funds must
submit budgets beginning
Feb. 13 thru Feb. 29, 1984.
Please turn in requests to the
SGA office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Any ques-
tions, please contact either
Becky Talley or John Rainey
at 757-6611.
such
to the Neighborhood
tion and judiciary, is pro- Watch program whereby cedures used in reporting
viding funding for the residents know and look crimes and give tips on
mmmmmmm
4
until ��ui.
mm nm
A M�M

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from the
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For a heart ruggng
Valentine for Tuesdav
February 14. shop our
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Special Services and rates for students.
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All frames in stock 30joff
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CRAB LEGS
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P- - ' "
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� i





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 14, 19M Page 6
Robert Cox as Jupiter appeals to hurvdlce In the guise of a fly. The easily tempted Eurydice b Denise Miller.
Orpheus
Descends
On ECU
Singers, musicians and dancers from East Carolina
University's campus and local communities will be
featured in the Offenbach operetta, Orpheus in
Hades Feb. 16-18.
The production, directed by Dr. Clyde Hiss, is the
major ECU Opera Theater presentation for the
academic year. All performances are scheduled for 8
p.m. in the Fletcher Recital Hall on campus.
Orpheus, considered the first modern operetta, in-
cludes numerous musical parodies and presents a
comic retelling of a classic Greek myth. Its hero is a
musician whose playing ot the lyTe is so beautiful that
it casts spells even on wild armmais.
Deeply in love with his wife Eurydice, he deter-
mines to recover her from the underworld where she
has gone after dying of a serpent sting. Orpheus
charms Pluto, the god of Hades, with his music and
is allowed to lead Eurydice out of Hades provided he
docs not look back at her until he comes up from the
underworld. The loving husband forgets, turns
around, and Eurydice "dies" a second time.
The cast of characters includes the chief god and
goddess, Jupiter and Juno, and more than a dozen
other gods and mythical characters, along with
choruses and an ensemble of dancers.
The ECU production will be sung in English.
Tickets for Orpheus are on sale at ECL's Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhail Student Center,
telephone 757-6611.
'Tobacco Road'Provokes Laughter, Thought
B NDY ROBB1NS
S�tf Writer
Last Thursday evening Tobacco
Road opened to a receptive au-
dience. I was there, notebook in
hand. I shouldn't have brought it,
though, because I was too caught
up n the pa to take many notes.
Tobacco Road is a play set in
the deepest pains of the Depres-
sion. The one unchanging stage
set is a perfect representation of a
shack on a backwoods Georgia
road. The minute the curtain
open you get a definte idea of
where you are and what it's like to
be there. The lighting is harsh and
bright, but you get the impression
that the sun neer shines on these
poor farmers.
The show is divided into three
acts that show the passage of time
from late afternoon to the next
corning, and finally, dawn of the
next day. Two of the main
characters are Ada and Jeeter
Lester. They play "Ma and Pa
farmer Most of their childien
have moved away to the city to
work in the mills. The only
children left at home are Dude
and Ellie May. Jeeter's mother is
�.till around, but she doesn't speak
and is terribly neglected. If the
Depression was really like this,
I'm glad I was born in the '60s.
The play was written by Jack
Kirkland and was based on a
novel by Erskine Caldwell. Both
obviously realized that if they por-
trayed all the action as it might
have been, few audiences would
have enjoyed it. So there was a
comic touch all through it. Most
Theater
Review
of the comedy is centered around
Jeeter Lester. The one liners really
make the show. For example, in
one scene Lov Bensey, who is
married to one of Jeeter's
daughters, is complaining that she
never speaks to him and won't
sleep with him. Jeeter suggests
that maybe he hasn't done the
right things to make her talk.
"Tried kickin' her, throwin' rocks
and sticks at her replies Lov.
This is funny when you first hear
it, but if you think about it, it tells
you a lot about these people's at-
titudes.
There is a lot of cruelty in the
play, but the characters don't
seem to notice. The only one who
does is Ellie May Lester. She has a
hair lip and is constantly being
ridiculed for it. Jeeter is the usual
source of her torment, but Ellie
May gets it from everyone.
This brings out something that
should be recognized. It's difficult
to be a good actor when you have
a major role. But it's even more
difficult to turn a small part into
one that demands attention. Sure
Ellie May's part is a small one; in
fact, she has very few lines. She
spends most of her time off to the
side. Only a few times does she
enter the main focus of action.
That's why at first I didn't notice
her, but my editor did. When we
were discussing the show, he got
me thinking about her perfor-
mance. And the more I thought
about it, the more I realized Crisa
Warren had turned a small role in-
to something memorable. She
seemed so natural, and you could
tell everything she was thinking
just from her body language or
the way her expressions mirrored
the main action.
Tom Hull was superb as Jeeter
Lester. After seeing him, it was
tough for me to imagine anyone
else doing the part.
The play was filled with fine ac-
ting all around. Mike Pitts supris-
ed me in his role as Captain Tim. I
know him from his job as Pirate
Walk director last semester. He
too seemed a natural on stage.
Much of the credit for the suc-
cess of Tobacco Road goes to the
production staff and the technical
crews. Director Edgar Loessin did
a great job of making the entire
show look natural and unrehears-
ed. All of the set designers and
construction teams are to be con-
gratulated on a striking set.
This play was well done to sav
the least. But I don't think
everyone will enjoy it as much as I
did. If you go to see it strictly for
comedy, you'll enjoy it. But those
who look for meaning and drama
will enjoy it even more.
Risky Business9
Tom Cruise Debuts
By ANDY ROBBINS
Staff Wrtaar
GORDON IPOCK
FMrtar
This Thursday Risky Business
comes to Hendrix Theatre. Not
the usual horror flick that the Stu-
dent Union Films Comittee seems
so fond of in recent weeks, Risky
Business boasts a top-notch acting
debut by Tom Cruise and rates
high marks in production and
cinamatography as well.
This high-budget film mixes
comedy with serious drama and
throws in a healthy dose of good
clean sex in a way that keeps you
guessing what will happen next �
and sitting on the edge of your
seat waiting for it. Written and
directed by Tom Brickman,
Business is well worth seeing. One
critic even suggested we see it
6,000 times.
It's the story of Joel Goodson
(Cruise) whose upper-middle
class, restrictive parents go on a
vacation and leave him alone with
the house � and the Porsche. Joel
is a hard-working high school
senior trying to get into
Princeton. A friend offers him
some advice for handling life's
pressures, advice that leads Joel to
a call girl played by Rebecca
DeMornay. She and her friends
use him and his folks' house to
elude their pimp. What happens
next is a no-return situation for
Joel, and he has to try and refur-
nish the house before his parents
return.
Watch for the large crystal egg.
It's Joel's mother's prize posses-
sion. It also represents the change
in Joel's character. In the beginn-
ing the egg is flawless, but by the
movie's end there is a small crack
inside it. Joel observes that this
makes the egg unique. If this is
true, then Joel is different also.
I first paid $4 to see Risky
Business. It was worth it. But you
can see it for free this weekend at
Hendrix Theatre. Admission is by
student ID and activity card.

'Harlem Nocturne
Showcases Black
Musical Talent
Scott Joplin, Bert Williams, Bessie Smith, Duke
Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Lionel Hampton, Nat
King Cole and Cab Calloway are only a few of the
black composers and performers whose music will be
celerbrated in Atlantis Productions Harlem Noc-
turne: A Salute to Black Performers from the Cotten
Club to Broadway. The program will take place on
Monday, Feburay 20 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhail Student Center on the campus of East
Carolina University. It is sponsored by the Student
Union Minority Arts Committee, and there is no ad-
mission charge.
Featuring a cast of six highly talented young
singersactorsdancers, Harlem Nocturne will bring
you such songs as "Maple Leaf Rag "Sweet
Georgia Brown "Stc.my Weather" and "St. Louis
Blues" among others. Fully staged and costumed,
the production is an evening of music that will make
you proud of the contributions made by those who
first called Harlem their cultural home. It was in
places like the Cotten Club, the Savoy and Apollo
Theatre that many of the stars began their climb to
musical fame and fortune.
Harlem Nocturne is based on a concept by pro-
ducer Tad Currie whose previous work includes
From Harlem to Broadway and The Best of
Hollywood: Music from the Movies. Robert
Cleveland is associate producer and writer.
Harlem Nocturne is an evening of musical theater
you won't want to miss. For additional information
contact the Central Ticket Office. Call 757-6611, ext.
266 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Dear
Dear Mr. LaSaile,
I am a senior political
sience major. I am 5'8
125 pounds, and I hae
long brown hair and blue
eyes. Wherever I go, out-
side of Greenville, I am
considered extremely at-
tractive and popular f.
problem is that here at
school I can't seem to
find the right man for
me. You see. Mr
LaSaile, there is only one
type of man on Ed's
campus
Yes, he's the type of
guy who asks a girl out
about once a month He
blows big bucks getting
her drunk to enjoy the oc-
casion and he's, in-
variably, walking her
back to her dorm at
about 7:30 the next morn-
ing. This campus felloe is
described by friends as
seldom going out or -
ing girlfriends but ever)
morning on the way
my 8:00 class 1 see a dif-
ferent female up-toeing
OUt Of his ro 1
You see, Mr L iSaUe, I
enjoy having sex Just -
much as the next fir
feel it is a beautiful way
to express one's passion
for another. Ho�e.er I
like to wait until afic '
know the gu is a true
friend
some :if
enjoy edi
companX
what tf
"Good
those w;
a g.rl d
sack
on the
seldom
him aga
into hn
casuc
ackr
he doesl
I
stdt i
Mr
see h-
m
M -
'�

exc
r
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Giant
-v





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14. IV84
4 NH4
Page 6
heus
cends
ECU
mcers from East Carolina
d local communities will be
h operetta. Orpheus in
t) Dr Clyde Hiss, is the
eater presentation for the
ormances are scheduled for 8
Hall on campus.
modern operetta, in-
il parodies and presents a
reek myth. Its hero is a
c lyre is so beautiful that
d amimals.
(e Eurydice, he deter-
the underworld where she
a serpent sting. Orpheus
Hades, with his music and
e out o! Hades provided he
It until he comes up from the
i g husband forgets, turns
"a second time,
includes the chief god and
and more than a dozen
characters, along with
dancers
sung in English.
sale at ECU's Central
denhall Student Center,
ought
�us play was well done to sav
But 1 don't think
ne will enjoy it as much as 1
If you go to see it strictly for
you'll enjoy it. But those
� for meaning and drama
enjoy u even more.
ebuts
tide their pimp. What happens
1 t is a no-return situation for
and he has to try and refur-
sh the house before his parents
turn.
Watch for the large crystal egg.
Joel's mother's prize posses-
n It also represents the change
Joel's character. In the beginn-
the egg is flawless, but by the
vie's end there is a small crack
side it Joel observes that this
ikes the egg unique. If this is
le, then Joel is different also.
first paid S4 to see Risky
isiness It was worth it. But you
see it for free th;s weekend at
rndri.x Theatre. Admission is by
ident ID and activity card.
� f1.
Dear Mr. LaSalle,
Dear Mr. LaSalle,
I am a senior political
sience major. I am 5'8
125 pounds, and I have
long brown hair and blue
eyes. Wherever I go, out-
side of Greenville, I am
considered extremely at-
tractive and popular. My
problem is that here at
school I can't seem to
find the right man for
me. You see, Mr.
LaSalle, there is only one
tvpe of man or. ECU's
campus.
Yes, he's the type of
guv who asks a girl out
about once a month. He
blows big bucks getting
her drunk to enjoy the oc-
casion and he's, in-
variably, walking her
back to her dorm at
about 7:30 the next morn-
ing. This campus fellow is
described by friends as
seldom going out or hav-
ing girlfriends, but every
morning on the way to
my 8:00 class I see a dif-
ferent female tip-toeing
out of his room.
You see. Mr. LaSalle. I
enjoy having sex just as
much as the next girl. I
feel it is a beautiful way
to express one's passion
for another. However, I
like to wait until after I
know the guy is a true
friend. After we 've spent
some time together and
enjoyed each other's
company. You know
what they say, Mick,
"Good things come to
those who wait Well, if
a girl doesn't hop in the
sack with a guy at ECU
on the first date, she
seldom ever hears from
him again. If she does run
into him downtown, he
casually brushes past her
and may even mumble an
acknowledging hello, but
he doesn't associate with
her and he no longer con-
siders her a friend.
Mr. LaSalle, I don't
see how I can win. The
guys at ECU call the
women who do,
"tramps, " but they
won't even take the time
to get to know the women
who "don't I don't
know what to do, because
these college boys don't
know what they're miss-
ing.
Signed: A lone, and better
off that wav, in Green-
ville.
Dear Alone,
I wouldn't advise any
woman to get laid on the
first date. Sure, there are
exceptions and things
happen. But if you find
yourself with a guy who
expects it the first time
out, forget him,
sweetheart. The mug
ain't worth it.
Most men would rather
go to bed with a friend
than a stranger. But on a
first date, sometimes a
guy'll get anxious � or
nervous � or misread
signals.
Next time this happens,
tell him what you told
me. Then watch his reac-
tion. Most guys will say
the same thing in this
situation. But you're not
a kid anymore: You'll
know who's sincere.
Men train themselves
to seem in control even
when they're on the edge
of falling apart. Chances
are, half the guys who
brush past you mumbling
hello are just embarrass-
ed. They're remembering
the time they came on too
strong and blew it with
you. Be sensitive to that
facade, because the pret-
tier you are the more
you're gonna run into it.
And vou sound like a real
doll.
ECU isn't the best
place to find a boyfriend.
But right now there are a
few thousand guys who
just read your letter, and
each is convinced he
could solve your pro-
blem. All but a handful
are wrong. But if you
want to find one of that
handful, do a couple of
things. Don't be cynical:
When a guy meets you,
give him a chance. And
use your head: Don't
look for him downtown.
Mick will answer only letters
containing at least a semblance
of sincerity. Garbage letters,
sicko letters and set-up mail will
be trashed.
The following article ap-
peared in last Thursday's Style
section. An error in layout made
for difficult reading. Features
has decided to run the piece
again, in smaller type, for
Mick's many devoted fans and
ardent critics.
I'm sitting at somebody's
desk at The East Carolinian
looking at two piles of letters.
One pile is from the critics. The
other pile is from the sickoes.
Most of the letters could really
fit in either pile.
Ipock, my editor, busts in. So
I tell him what I'm thinking. "If
I answer the critics, it's like I'm
running my own Bum of the
Week club with me getting the
last word every time. And no
good's served by running letters
from sickoes, while I wind up
becoming some kind of P.T.
Barnum for ECU's geeks and
freaks
Ipock nods, walks over to the
desk and surprises me. He takes
the two piles and plops them in-
to the trash. "How's that?" he
says.
I smile. Sometimes a column
doesn't turn out the way you ex-
pect
But there's still one letter on
the desk. I had set it aside earlier
because I wanted to think about
it before I gave my answer. Now
I look at it again:
Eh, Mick!
I'm a 19-year-old, male, col-
lege sophomore, and I get my
share of co-ed ass on campus
I'm wondering, though,
whatever happened to the
morals of society? It seems the
ECU student body is mainly
concerned with when and where
they're going to get laid next.
Sure, 1 like some hooter-hole
too, but I'm getting tired of all
the one-night stands. Sex just
seems to be so casual that it
hardly takes any work or time to
get laid. I thought it was sup-
posed to be something special
between two people who are
very close. This isn 't to say that
I don't believe m premarital sex,
I do, and it's great to have varie-
ty too, but it seems that sex has
no importance when you don't
really know your partner and
share a common feeling of
togetherness. I just don't think
casual sex is all it's cracked up
to be. It seems that the morals
and values of today's youth are
changing very rapidly,
downhill What do you think,
Mick?
Signed: "Morally Confused
I shake my head. "Hooter-
hole That's one on me. Thei
guy is trying to impress me byf
being vulgar. Car salesman do
that too. But I'll let that slide.
The problem with "Morallyl
Confused" is he's kidding!
himself. Blaming the "morals!
of society" for one's sexual con-
duct is only a notch above roll-
ing off your woman and blam-
ing her So the letter annoys me
But not enough to dump it. I
stuff "Morally Confused" in
my pants pocket and forget him
and his problems for the next 24
hours.
A day later, a couple of girls
are in my room. I'm flat on my
back, in bed, and the room is
rocking. The girls, sophomores
they say. are here to take care of
me.
"It's just something goin'
'round, Mick one of them
says.
Whatever it is, I got it.
"Can we try on yer hat?"
It takes just one day with this
Greenville flu to completely
forget what it was ever like to
feel well. 1 keep dozing off for
half hours at a clip, but wake up
coughing like a jerk. And I keep
having the same nightmare
where I'm a door-to-door pencil
salesman trying to escape these
insane Miss America con-
testants who keep pelting me
with donuis
I wake up in a cold sweat
One of my nurses is patting me
on the head, asking if I'm "all
right yet " The other is on the
floor going through my pants
"You need this piece of
paper, Mick?" she asks, and
hands me the letter from
"Morally Confused "
Maybe when you get sick you
get nice � operating off the
outside chance you might croak
This time I look at the letter,
and all I say is. "Ladies, the on-
ly problem this guy has is he
doesn't know The LaSalle
Philosophy
"The LaSalle. what
And that's all I need. I start
mouthing off. saying things off
the top of my head I begin with
the obvious, like, "Necr hit an
elderly person with a baseball
bat " But the letter is in the
back of my mind So 1 come up
with a few things I wouldn't
mind telling "Morally Confus-
ed "
"Never kid vourself. Even
when you're doing wrong, ad
nut it to yourself � otherwise
you may forget what right and
wrong are
"Never use sex to hurt
anybody Don't tell some
young, vulnerable girl vou love
her, get in her pants and then
turn around and dump her. So-
meone's feelings are more lm
portant than you gettir.g iaid.
"If you keep on doing
something for pleasure, but
you're not enjoying it, use your
head and stop doing it "
That was three days ago To-
day I fed pretty good I reach
for the phone, and this Woody
Allen line comes xo me 'Sex
with someone you don't love is
an empty experience But as far
as empty experiences go, it's one
of the best "
1 laugh for the same reason 1
laugh at anything because it's
true Once you know wha:
you're passing up, it's reall
much easier to become "moral
ly confused "
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THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
FEBRUARY 14, 1984
Page 8
Pirates Bio w
Half time Lead
Record Falls to 4-17
By SCOTT POWERS
�.t. �� i - .
apwv wrfWT
After an impressive first half
against William and Mary Satur-
day night, coach Charlie Har-
rison's ECU Pirates fell apart in
the second half, allowing the In-
dians to win going away, 67-52.
The win was the sixth in a row
for the Indians, now 11-10 overall
and 4-2 in the East Coast Athletic
Conference. It was also their sixth
in a row over the Pirates, who fell
to 4-17 overall and 1-6 in the con-
ference.
The Pirates jumped out to an
early 4-2 lead on a follow shot by
guard Keith Sledge and a fast
break layup by guard Curt
Vanderhorst, who had a career-
high 29 points to lead all scorers.
After that, the teams traded
baskets for most of the first half.
The Indians did manage to pull
out to a 28-23 lead with two
minutes left in the half. The
Pirates took the halftime lead,
however, on a layup and two free
throws by Vanderhorst and a last
second jumpshot from the corner
by guard William Grady.
In the second half, the Pirates
fell apart, however. "It was caus-
ed by a total breakdown in our
guard plav Harrison said.
EC A C-South Standings
I eague Overall
Richmond 5-1 14-7
William and Mary 4-2 11-10
George Mason 43 16-4
Navy 3-3 17-6
James Madison 2-4 10-10
East Carolina 1-6 4-17
Saturday's EC A C results
George Mason 77, Richmond 74
William and Mary 67, ECU 52
Navy 79, James Madison 73
Vanderhorst had five turnovers
for the game, while his teammate
in the backcourt, Tony Robinson,
had seven turnovers and suffered
a dismal one of 11 shooting per-
formance.
Early in the second half, the
Pirates were ice cold. After a
20-footer by Vanderhorst at the
19.00 mark, the Pirates failed to
score until another long jumper
by Vanderhorst, nearly eight
minutes later.
During the ECU drought, the
Indians stretched their lead to
41-31. The Pirates cut that lead to
43-37 with 9:45 left on two more
Vanderhorst baskets, but that was
as close as the Pirates would get.
The Pirates managed to pull
back to within seven at 53-46 on a
follow shot by forward Roy Smith
with four minutes left, but the In-
dians scored 10 unanswered
points to put the game out of
reach, and never looked back, as
the Pirates hurt themselves with
poor shot selection.
"We can't afford to get impa-
tient against a smart team like
William and Mary Harrison
said. "We'll run when we get the
chance, but you can't take quick
shots or bad shots.
"It's tough to get the ball inside
on a team like the Indians. You
have to put it in from the outside
and hope to draw them out. We
did that for a while but then our
guards got soft with the ball
The Indians were led by Keith
Cieplicki with 22 points, many of
which came in clutch situations.
Other Indians in double figures
were Tony Traver with 17, and
Herb Harris with 10 second half
points.
Vanderhorst was the only
Pirate in double figures, while
Grady added 8 points.
The Pirates will attempt to
break their three-game losing
streak when they host Howard
University 7:30 Tuesday night at
Minges Coliseum.
Women Defeat AU;
Lose To ODU, GM
� ICU PlWt La
Forward William Grady Drives
East Carolina (52)
Sledge 1 0-0 2, Battle 0 0-0 0,
Bass 0 0-0 0, Vanderhorst 13 3-4
29, Robinson 1 4-6 6, Turnbill 1
O-O 2, Grady 4 0-0 8, Smith 2 12
5.
William and Mary (67)
Richardson 3 2-5 8, Bland 2 1-2
5, Harris 4 2-2 10, Cieplicki 10 2-3
22, Traver 6 5-8 17. Mc Far lane O
0-0 0, Coval 0 3-43, Boddy O 2-4
2, Brooks 0 0-0 0.
By RANDY MEWS
Aallllil Sport J-dJiof
The ECU women's basketball
team took to the road last week,
losing to nationally ranked Old
Dominion on Thursday and split-
ting a pair of games over the
weekend.
Top ten ODU-had little trouble
with the Lady Pirates, as they
wrapped up a 7247 victory.
The Monarchs scored the first
nine points of the game and never
looked back as they rolled to leads
as big as 20 points in the first half.
ECU was able to slim the lead
to 33-17 by halftime, while play-
ing against the ODU substitutes,
but the second half was just as
disasterous as the Monarchs mov-
ed out to a 26 point bulge on
several occasions.
"I think they're awesome in
terms of what they're capable of
doing ECU head coach Cathy
Andruzzi said. "We weren't going
to run with them, we weren't go-
ing to press them and we didn't
want to let the crowd get into the
game
Tracy Claxton led ODU with a
game-high 19 points and 10 re-
bounds, while ECU was led by-
Lisa Squirewell and Delphine
Mabry with 14 points each.
Saturday night the Pirates "did
real well under a tough
situation as they earned a hard-
fought 59-49 victory over
American University.
Andruzzi was pleased with her
team's win, but was upset with
conditions under which her team
was forced to play.
The Pirates first arrived at the
game five hours early when they
were uninformed of a time
change, and then discovered the
gym floor had a number of "dead
spots According to Andruzzi,
"Their place was worse then
Memorial Gym.
Squirewell paced the Pirates
with 20 points, but Andruzzi said
ECU won the game on defense.
"Offensively we didn't get our
game going, but we played as a
team on defense she said.
The Pirates' aggressive defense
was most evident inside, as they
held a 36-23 rebounding advan-
tage, with Squirewell pulling
down a game-high 13.
George Mason held off an ECU
rally in fhe final minutes of play
to take a 58-54 ECAC-South vic-
tory in the Pirates' final road
gJme of the season.
Trailing 53-41 with 5:34 left in
the game, the Lady Pirates reeled
off ten unanswered points to nar-
row the margin to 53-51 with 1:22
remaining, but the Patriots were
successful from the line in the
final minute to escape with a four-
point victory.
Mabry scored eight of the
Pirates' 10 points during the rally
and finished the game leading
ECU with 15.
"The girls played real hard and
real intense Andruzzi said.
"Everybody played, and
everybody did well
Although she was plaesed with
her team's play, Andruzzi said
turnovers were the Pirates'
downfall. ECU committed 30 for
the game, while George Mason
had only 16.
The Pirates now stand at 2-2 in
league play and 10-13 overall and
geared up for the Converse Lady
Pirate Classic to be held this
weekend in Greenville.
The tournament is only one of
four throughout the country
sponsored by Converse. Other
teams participating will include
Marshall, Fan field and Cheynev
State.
r-A Look At Karate From The Inside
East Carolina (54)
Squirewell 2 2 6, Phillips 2 3-4
7, Hedges 13-4 5, Rodriguez 2 0-0
4, Bragg 4 5-6 13, Mabry "1-215.
Bethea 0 0-0 0, Grier 1 0-0 2,
Anderson 1 0-0.
George Mason (58)
Daunoras 7 6-10 20, Douglas 0
O-O O, Aunidon 3 O-O 6. Pugh 5 3-3
13, Jones 1 7-8 9, Ragiand 1 0-0 2,
McCoy 0-0 1-3 1, Braxton 3 1-47.
Karate
Wants
By RANDY MEWS
aMwl Spona Mttor
He lifts weights, jogs, takes
aerobics and works out every day
helps beginning students on the
weekends and coordinated all the
tournaments in which he and club
members attend.
What does someone get out of
Club
spiration for me
Johnson hasn't done so bad for
himself in tournaments either, as
he recently came in second in the
kumite (fighting) division at the
the playoffs Johnson said.
"There will be over 10,000 par-
ticipants, and people like Chuck
Norris, Bill "Supcrfoot" Wallace
and many of the PKA World
� ii-ii j- ,�� ,u , ii u i j- � � ivumiiv i"gB uiviaiuii ai mc iuiu many oi me rr
deJelon mHM " P dedlcalin� a lar8e P1 of his life North Carolina State Champion- Champions will be there
develop my skills
ECU Karate Club president
Chuck Johnson is more devoted
to the art of karate then one could
ever imagine.
As club president, the black belt
conducts three classes a week,
to a sport that is barely recognized
or understood in American
athletics? "I know I want to teach
karate one day Johnson ex-
plained, "and when I see one of
the club members do well in a
tournament, it serves as an in-
ships in Jacksonville. According to Johnson, the club
This spring Johnson and several is going through a transition
club members will be headed for period because many of the
the "Battle of Atlanta one of veterans recently graduated, but
the largest karate tournaments in said he has a goal to make the club
the United States. as strong as it was in the past.
'This is Karate's equivalent to "We have a really good beginner
class, and a lot of them could be
on their way ud
The club operates under the
direction of sixth-degree black
belt Bill McDonald, who is head
sensei (creator) of the Goju-
Shorin style of karate.
Johnson recieved his black belt
in another style, but says he en-
joys teaching under McDonald's
system. "Goju-Shorin offers a
well rounded variety of techni-
ques. It blends traditional karate,
self defense and sport (fighting)
all in one

All the different styles is one of
the things that makes Karate so
interesting to Johnson. "I've
IcaAied a lot of katas (a series of
kicks, blocks and punches per-
formed in rapid succession) in dif-
ferent systems, but there's always
more you can learn. I want to
branch out and grow as much as I
can.
See KARATE, Page 9
Baird Shuffles Outfield For Stability
Plans To Move Slugger Evans To Left
PATTMtON - SCU MWte to
"They're going to be good, there is no
doubt in my mind. But whether it is
going to be this year or not remains to
be seen HjU Baird
By ED NICKLAS
Last in a series
While the rest of the starting
positions on the ECU baseball
ttj-m appear fairly certain, the
spots in coach Hal Baird's out-
field, at 'his point in pre-season
training, stii! remain vague.
"The outfield situation, in a
general sense, is maybe the most
unsettled that we have says
Baird, who plans to move last
year's leading hitter, Todd Evans,
from first to left field to provide
leadership in that area.
With freshman Jeff Ginn show-
ing the potential to take over the
first base position, Baird has no
qualms with placing Evans in left.
"Right now, he's our leftfielder
he says. "I think that is where he
will end up
Baird commented on the pro-
bable starting outfielders:
Todd Evans (Senior, left field.
Last year: .310 batting average, 25
runs, 20 RBI's, 7 doubles, 2
triples, 3 HR's) "Todd was a star-
ting first baseman for a couple of
years and will probably be one of
the all-time record holders in hit-
ting before he leaves. He's our co-
captain.
"Since he has played first base,
there may be times we will slide
him in to play first against certain
pitchers
Mike Williams (Senior,
rightfielder. Last year: .195 bat-
ting average, 6 runs, 5 RBI's, 1
triple): "It looks like he will be the
starter in right field. Mike pro-
bably had a better fall than he has
had since he's been at East
Carolina, but last year he hit only
.195 in the spring.
"That job is his right now, but
we are going to have to have more
out of him than that (last year) to
Baseball Preview
be able to hold it this year. Based
on what he did in the fall, we
think he will do that
Football star Ricky Nichols and
returner Mark Shank will battle
for the center field position:
Ricky Nichols (Junior): "He is
one of the finest athletes at East
Carolina right now, without ques-
tion. He can fly and has just
outstanding ahtletic ability.
"He needs to polish has
baseball game a little bit as far as
technique, but the sky's the limit
as far as potential with him
Mark Shank (Junior. Last year:
.237, 9 runs, 8 RBI's, 5 stolen
bases): "He also runs very well.
His bat needs to be more consis-
tent, but he may be a shade ahead
defensively right now
Overall, the potential of this
year's baseball team is perhaps in
the same category as past ECU
clubs that have produced profes-
sional baseball material. The skill
is there, says Baird; the question
involves when that skill will
develop to the caliber of Baird's
expectations. "We think we had a
really good recruiting year he
says. "We are going to be an
awfully young team, but I believe
it is a talented group.
"I think really it is just going to
depend upon how quickly these
kids are going to adjust. They're
going to be good, there is no
doubt in my mind. But whether it
is going to be this year or not re-
mains to be seen
Although the team is inex-
perienced, it does not lack the all-
important leadership aspect. "We
are going to be starting three
freshman or probably even
more But, Baird says, "We've
got good leadership in Todd
Evans and David Wells. They've
been through it long enough to
help these kids along, so I think
we have a good matrix.
"We have a couple of heads
that have been through it a few
times
Todd Evans hit .318 hist year

ECU Karate Club President I
into eye a
and folk
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 14, 1984
at AU;
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Karate so
Johnson. "I've
aas (a series of
and punches per-
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but there's always
:an learn. I want to
a as much as I
IkXRATt Page 9
m
f
40
pattmson - icu
fans hit .310 last year
Karate Club
Continued From Page 8 turning professional, but Johnson got his start in
for now I only want to Newport News, Va
Another aspect of the keep on teaching where he received his
sport Johnson has ex- Many people associate black belt at the age of
perimented with is full- karate with mind control, IS. In that year his family
contact competition but Johnson says there's
karate. He has a profes- nothing magical about his
sional record of 2-1, with sport. "In any kind of
one victory coming by athletics you build con-
knockout. All three fights fidcnce over time. After
have been local bouts several years you begin to
sponsored by McDonald, know yourself and realize
with another planned for your capabilities are
iMiaiiMiiuu
i
m
Flying High
ECU Karate Club President Chuck Johnson demonstrates a flying side kick
Bdusch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPI�T�
indndes initial eye examination, lenses, care ldt,
instmctfons and follow-np visits for the moath
ECU stndmts I.D. required.
anoMenuc
�YCCARC06N1CK
0 GrwMviMt 9 A
7MGWEKMVILLI IIVO
TirrOMAMMBX
much more then what
you originally thought
Johnson added that if
you start with your body
and let the mind follow
it's much easier to direct
your will at any task that
confronts you.
E
moved to Manteo, and
Johnson had to begin
working out on his own.
"I had a punching bag
and weights in my garage,
but for the first six mon-
ths we were down there it
was hard to get any work
done Johnson said he
worked out with a kung
fu stylist several times,
and gradulally got back
into the swing of things.
"It became an addiction
after a while, and now I
can't stop
mmn
M
m
I
l
a
w
m
i
m
LADES NIGHT AT
YC f0 THE KING AND QUEEN NORTH
Tae a BIG BITE ot -tie BIG APPLE'
SPRING BREAK IN NEW YORK
March 2 - March 9. 1984
-
3 - j�rv ,
I -
S �
�-� � �
�r
SKiH UP "� � FtB&UAftT l� t ' THf
CtHTHAL TtCRf I OFFiCf
HIIllllliiuiniiniM�t��iM�tTrrr
Valentines Special
For 2 v
2 Ribeyes, 2 Salads
tea or coffee and 2
glasses of Wine
$16.95 plus tax
315 Stsntonsburg Rd.
Across From Docters Park
758-4600
Not valid with other coupons
Void 2-17-34
Present Ad When Ordering
m
m
MMMMMMMMMM
TIE
CD and
Wed. Fab. 15
The Fantastic
Shakers
8-12
All Dining cosrumers admitted free.
Coming Feb. 22-Choirmon of the Board
Oueen
NORTH
College l.D. - FREE Admission
TU 7:30
Happy Hour 6-8
Watcfc For Spedal Satarday Night Bas4s'
SRA
presents a
Mardi Gras Party
February 25, 1984
7:00-12:00
HOLIDOME, HOLIDAY INN
Drinks and Hors d'oeuvres Will Be Served
Tickets Must Be Purchased In Advance
Through Your Residence Hall
Must Present Valid ECU ID and SRA Card
Tickets Will Not Be Sold At The Door
SINGLE $3.00
DOUBLE $5 00
&
&u
LADIES
"THE ULTIMATE FANTASY"
HAS ARRIVED
To give you the Best
"LADIES NIGHT OUT'
you have ever experienced
The Ultimate Fantasy show presents:
6 of the Top Male Exotic Dancers
from across the U.S.A.
in a High Powered Show
that's guaranteed to please!
FEATURING:
THE HOLLYWOOD SWINGER
T.N.T. e ACE
GQ e ITALIAN STALLION
AND Special Guest From the
Peter Adonis Show
"LORD JIM"
SO LADIES LET YOUR
"ULTIMATE FANTASY"
COME TRUE!
Ladies The Ultimate Fantasy
will be coming to the
Tuesday, February 14,1984 Ladies Lockout til 10:00 p.m
Admission $3.00 Doors Open at 7:00
Show Starts at 7:30
Don't Miss Our Valentine's Day Special
JUST FOR YOU!
, y �-�
I





T
I
?
HS
Valentine
Love Lines
ALECIA: PImm share your body
with me on Valentino' Oeyi All
my iov� and body C HP
FREODCTTI, lfs maka up for
o�t tlmt and lot! enf ay tx mm
on Valeriuses Night HHBl
TO ALL MY FRIENDS and ac
quatntancat whom hopefully
knew who you art. Thanks for all
your unseltish lovt, laughtar.
tears, and support � hava
shared together Happy Valen-
tine's Day l lova you. Rachal
Pope
HAPPY VALENTINE S DAY to
all m� iistars of Chi Omega! Wi
Lova Yowl
TO ALL MEDIA Employees:
Have a Happy Valentine's Dayi
From: Mark Niewald, Chairper-
on, Media Board.
BEHJIE A iGGY Happy Valen
tine's Day to one in the seme-you
trt the king of weirdness but I
love you anyway � Karen.
PAUL Ma Ball is starting to
worry about your telephone
abuse � relax! Have a wonderful
valentine's Dayi Jennifer.
JEN JEN - It was a great
weekend, except you v got to
break that habit of always steal
mg the blanket I'll come up
from Yale to see you a' Harvard
Business School. fOA gerz. ma tad
da s gonna kill me , Mario

WENCHES � V D Is a lot more
fun than you think, just check
your desks tomorrow.
TO DEMISE M Hope your Valen
tin Day is a great on lovc B
H
TO CAPERS We're always in
��� e no matter how close or how
far so take this valentine, don't
worry my darling my love is trut
Charlotte's PK
HAPPY VALENTINE S Day
Gail! I love yal S more months!
Your fiance. Rusty (alias YT
SUB)
DEAR HOBBYHORSE. Just a
valentine to remind you that
you're the best thing that ever
happened to this cowgirl)
Remember the State Fair, tickl-
ing matches, snowball fights, los-
ing things in the ocean, and
sk mny-dipping in the
moonlight?? And especially Sir
watlsi All this and much more is
why there's "No one like you
Baby, I lova you with all my
heart, more and more each day.
Happy valentine s1 Lova, Nita
Bug.
HEY O tip Happy v Day love
V�J
TOMMY E. How about some
serious sea.
WILL, Do you need a showery
WE love you ROBERT! DingBat
Twin.
BRIAN, Wanna go to my room?
Darling.
BILLY, I Love You. Sandra.
ROB, These past two years have
been the best out of my 21. Look-
ing forward to spending all the
rest with you 1 Forever Plus,
Lela.
angel Happy Vals. Oay.
Ready for another romp through
the shaboo trees in Valerina? I
luv ya. Mike.
SEXY M Claire, Happy V Day
to I of the prettiest D.Js I know
I do believe its still my turn. Your
number 1 fan.
AE. Thanks for all the very
special times over the years
Happy valentines Oay. Love.
CW
karen � Valentine's Day Is
made for sweethearts Prom one
sweetheart to another have a
happy Valentine's Day. Love
ROXANNE,
ny Kleenex.
I bum for you. Ken-
TO MY CANDY GIRL. Happy
valentines Pay, Mr. Bill
Dmc After 10 months, your still
the sunshmt of my life I love you
a lot Ginger
TULIP. Happy 2nd valentine's
Day with m That is enough to
make mm the greatest Your
love is th� most special thing in
my life You're all I want!
Foreveri Damn jti
TO MARY O on th.rd floor
Jones Wc really do lov you!
Why don't you ever wave to us?
Love, second floor front Aycock.
WENDY, Soon it will be II mon
ths for you and m and you know
what. I lov you even more Hap-
py Valentine's Day Robbie.
PAUL. Happy Valentine s Day!
I'll always love you Pals
Foreveri
BOBBY RAINES. Bobby Raines,
your so fine � 1 sur will be
happy if you'll be mineni
DONNA K, Be mine today What
else can 1 say, who loves you?
The Hay.
RTK. I'm glad you're mine.
Always and forever, my Valen
fine I love you all the way from
MO. ALB
THE SUN SHINES, the moon
beams. You're the rose who
makes my dreams. The sun
beams, the moon shines. Will you
forever and always be miner I
love you. Honey HUNS
BOB � You're my favorite red-
hot, red-eyed ad salesman. Hap-
py Valentine's Day. Shorty.
RANDY Happy Valentine's Dayi
The past � months have been
great. I Love Youl You're my E.
T. Love Hiboy.
DARRYL, will you come play in
the dark with me. Kathy.
MARIO ANDRETTI � Yes you,
DKB The tour of Cambridge was
great, its wonderful to have a
level-headed, "Big Brother
Happy Valentine's Oay anyway.
Cows DON'T snore 1 J.
TEN Happy 1st Valentine's Day.
How I love these days, you're my
Home 1 lov you forever and
always. Brick.
PAIGIE Happy valentine's Day)
What ar you doing tomorrow
night? You ntvr know, it could
be fun, Like they say. What
the in Love. Pepper. Casey
and HAM.
FELIZ DIA De San Valetin Lycia
Monett Ross, con todo mi
carlnoi XOXOXOXOX JCV.
MARIE: I only wish l could have
loved you my first 21 years but
I'll settle for the rest of my life
To the prettiest lady there ever
was or will be. I Love You. Mark.
CRAIO, To our first and definite-
ly not our last. 1 love you, Lynn.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S Oay to
Ginny w. and all her friends on
the fourth floor. May your day be
full of red tin and okeedok With
Love. Bill.
I LOVE
T.K
YOU Chris D tor�vr
CAPPSAROONO - Have a hap
py Valentine's Oay. and maybe
I'll see you sometime DO.
GUMBY if you're lucky you can
be mine. I promise pleasure for
my sweet valentine.
RF, I love you and will as long as
you want.
OLIVE EYES men cower eat tou
lours avec roi Happy Valentine's
Day. I lov you more than ever.
Gumby.
LISA Happy Valentine's Day
Baby 1 Love Jim �
TO MY TOOTIE, Roses are Red,
Violets are Blwo, The Bony
Chicken will always love yowl
Happy Valentine's Oay II
KATHOI May this Happy Valen-
tine's Day message be as special
as U R 2 me. Love yow, Mary.
2 MY CRAZY Scrambled g
gbrain roommates. You're
nothing but the best. Happy V.D.
Oay. Love Ya's. Mary.
TO CELESTE. Beth, Chris,
Sigma Al sisters and Phi Mu
Alpha brothers, the cast and crew
of Orpheus and Buc staff Happy
Valentine's Day � Bryan H
MR. c . You've got the "ticket" i
go "f.OOO miles" more with my
heart and that's a "grade A"
"standing invitation" l-Arrow
Cub Scouts Honor now who's the 1
who's "delirious"?? Happy
Valentine's Oay Love Mary.
EIOOOB, H.F. Lova, Liiard
NAN Happy Valentine's Dayi
Life is filled with seasons full
ofmemories of the past, hopes
of the present, dreams of the
futureLet my love be the spice
to help guide you through yowr
liteI love yowl ML. E. S.
FROM CUPID to Chief and
Diane Go for it before it's too
late 11
HAPPY VALENTINE'S Day to
the best bunch of sweethearts on
campus � our Alpha Sigsii Lots
of Love from ail your little
sisters 11
TO A CHAMELEON from a cab-
begem
TO PAM B A DALE S: I sent
your doien roses, you should get
them on Feb. Mthii Even though
I never say it enough, you both
are no 1 in my heartlt Happy
Valentin s Day � Tory R �
L E S The sun shines, the moon
beams, you're the rose that is my
dream The sun beams, the moon
shines, will you forever and
always be mine? I love you,
Honeylll N. A. N.
RUTH Happy Valentine's Day
Your the best big sis anyone
could ask for. Love ya Jane.
SUZY Happy Valentine's Day
Honey. To the girl I lev with ell
my heart Today A everyday yds?
�re Use beat honey 1 iove-N Boot
Love Russ.
L.O. Had a fantastic time Jatvr-
day night Hope to see you toon.
Happy Valentine's Oay. Lov
KIT.
KALYNN, Yew �ru as unicswe as
yowr name and we are well on owr
way. I'll care tor yow always the
same as on this Valentine's Oay.
Love Tommy O.
WENDY, I lave yow. Bug.
ANDY. You r my Valentin! i
Love, Lisa. j
MY HALL FRIENDS, Thanks tor
always being there I love yow - j
Mellon head.j
TO THE OUYS in the lounge,
Happy Valentines Oay. ToM ya
we'd do Iti J
KERMIE: One year since yow
first called and look where we
are. My heart burns for yew. I
love yow always - Happy valen
tines Pay i. Star.
TONY, Happy V-Dayi Love Ui
Oin
LUANNE. This Valentine's
Message, is as full of love as It
could ever be because you ere my
Sweetheart, and you mean so
very much to me I Happy Valen-
tine's Oay Sweetheart. 1 love
yowl
JENNIFER J . You are the
smiles of the paper it's nice hav-
ing you around. Have a groat
Valentines Day. Guess whet
POOKUMS. If I step using all the
Kieenix, can 1 be yowr valentine t
now that I have e clue I think 1
can get a grip. I love you for all
eternity. Miss Casino.
johnny woods I have the
Oreos if yow have the milk.
AD. Happy Valentine's Dayi
From the one who loves yai
From JRK at The EC.
TO KATE. Tee. Lissa. HOlly B
Suxenn, Karl, Ellen, Tracy �
Lisa W Oina, Amy, Oenise.
Kiki, Corey, Judy. Laurie,
Jackie, and Reg. Happy Valen-
tine's Dey and please � take real
good care of them thengs. Huggs.
gropes, and fondles. CW
JOHN The best Big brother Hap-
py valentine's Oay � Kris.
Q
AOVf HTiSEO
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price m each A4P Store except as
specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU VSsvt. Ft. It i AT A&P IN ijrwtniUt. N
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE MOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
Clip MFCs "Cents-0ff" Coupons from your mail, newspapers
and magazines. . . then bring them to your A&P Food Store.
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND,
WE WILL DOUBLE FIVE
MANUFACTURERS COUPONS
EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS.
S20 PURCHASE � 10 COUPONS. AND SO ON
GOOD ONLY IN Greenville. NC
)
airmen no and F�� i � � �n Hum naoofwl mm-
utacturw s cents-o coupon up to So for eoubl the
vu Oftw good on notional manufacturer centa-oft
coupons only (food tsOaBsi coupon not accepted I
Customer must purctwo coupon product n spaciftad
� � Expired coupon �W not bo Honored On coupon
pot customer pot isom No coupons doubted lor be
micrfi'id� Onr dos not spew o AAP or otnar nor
coupons ihotno manufacturer is mentioned or not
When th vtu o m coupon icsds SO or m retswi
of th itsm mis onor is hnutad to th rotor! pave
SALE
S PiECBS of Den Furniture; couch,
iovs�jf, coffee A J nd tables. Ex-
cellent condition, was ttOO new, now
13.00 Phone after � 00 7s 407
Cherry Peas development.
PUPPIES, Half breed � Lab,
r�tri�y�r � all black t for give, call
TMSS44 before j 00 pm
MISC.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Oebra What is
It now 151 Love Mik and Bobbie Jo.
SPRING BREAK M Is right around
th corner Don't miss this years
BEST PARTYl Round trip trans to
DAYTONA BEACH with KEGS 7
nights accom. OCEAHFRONT at the
Kings inn. J FREE KEO PARTIES,
Pool-side. Bands, Contests and more.
For more into call Mike at 7S4-707 or
Buddy at 7H-eB after M
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problem, remind them that the audio
techniciens at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
�II?7�0 The TECH SHOP.
TIME IS RUNNING Out fasti If you
are interested in some SERIOUS
PARTYING this Spring Break with
no hassles, check this outi Round trip
trans to Dayton Beech with Kegs. 7
nights accom. oceantront at the
Kings inn FREE Keg Parties,
pooiside. Bands, contests, hell raising
and morel For info, call Mike at
75A-707 or Buddy at 7M-�M.
lost and
FOUND
LOST ECU class ring, gold.
Blue Zircon, BSBA. If, initials
FGBIII insid. rtwird call
753-4443.
REWARDH Lost White silky
scarf with white fringe � sen-
timental value Lost n�r Austin
Bldg. Can Lynn Siddaii
CIS 7J7-O401
SAVE 51- LB.
Pork Chops
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
Combination
Package
8 lbs. or
more b
128
SAVE 26- LB.
Box-O-Chicken
U.SD.A. INSPECTED FRESH
10
ib.
59
jiE FARU:
FOUND Men's pair of glasses.
Brown with plastic rims. Con
tact case inside glasses cast
Found on corner of sth and
Maple St. Call after s 00
7M-07S3
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED starting in
Summer continuing thru tall. Looking
for apt now � Call Laurie 7M
WANTED
call
TYPING SERVICE neat,
reasonable Call 355 202
fast.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service-
experience, quality work, IBM Selec
trie Typewriter Call Lanie Shiv
7M-S30I
QUALITY TYPING" TbM
Typewriter, is years experience. Full
time typing for faculty 4 students
7SA-3AM
ROOMMATE
752-�4.
PART-TIME Telephone work 4-� pm.
Call Southern Credit Adlustor at
717-111).
WANTED: Full Blooded German
Sheppard puppy Need by March 7.
Contact Kathy Harrell, MSC. Room
307, 757411, ext. 313.
REGIONAL A LOCAL Reps wanted
to distribute posters on college cam-
pus. Part-time or more. Requires no
sales. Average earnings MM plus
per hour. Contact: Commission Plus
Place Work, American Passage, SM
Third Ave. West, Seattle, WA Milt,
l-BM-43-3Mo.
PART-TIME worst processor to work
for local law firm. Good secretarial
skills required. Programing ex
perienc helpful. Call 7M-e3M.
Sponsored BV.
INTRAMURAL
WRESTLING J.
Entry
Dates
Feb. 20-22
J)
PLAY BEGINS-28.h
SAVE S1.00
White Potatoes
EASTERN U.S. �1
' 10, b 169
ba9 I n
jeat Groce7
SAVE 5� EACH
Navel Oranges
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
only
Savings jk
SAVE 80'
Sandwich Bread
Orange Juice
JROPICANA GOLD N PURE
24-oz.
loaves
- gai
ctn.
f
SAVE 10
Pillsbury Flour
f PLAIN � BREAD � SELF RISING
JE3 uWt
SAVE 60'
Flav-O-Rich '&�,
Mi gal.
ctn.
If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army hands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month In every-
thing from concerts to parades
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills.
It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hollywood, CA 91603
ARMYBANDl
BEALLVOUCANK.
SAVE
Viva Towels I Pepsi Cola
(DESIGNER � DECORATED
fiP Je A&P COUPON
SAVE 50 ON
1-LB. BAG
VACUUM BAG
Coffee
LBWfOsai WITH COUPON AMD 7 M
OOOOTMWUSAT FIB MAT AM
627
DIET PEPSI � MTN. DEW
2 Lite Bottle
$1.05
1 CPJftp coupon n
SAVE 50� ON
HELLMANNS
32-OZ JAR
Mayonnaise
i
i. .wmfm
rCPJ A&P COUPON
! SAVE 50 ON'
1 25OFFLABEL
j 49-OZ BOX
! Tide Detergent
UsssTT OSS SUTM COUPON i
rjeoNote.
a OOOO 7MPJU �AT ft SI AT u� 623
-BAM
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
L
A&P COUPON '
Senior Citizens
Discount
5 off Total Purchases
Op WedneuUyi
I LB.
mm
�����'��'�
� � m� m r'ititi
� 1
ft
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(





Title
The East Carolinian, February 14, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 14, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.320
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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