The East Carolinian, December 6, 1983







?
Bhz Saat (Earoitntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5SNor XL)
Tuesday, December 6,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Foreign Student Enrollment Declines
ECU Not Pai
- �CU MMLM
Ebony Herald editor Donna Carvana speaks at Monday's meeting.
Minority Paper's Fate
Debated By Students
L
Spurred by editorials in The
East Carolinian and Ebony
Herald, more than 100 black
students came to Mendenhall
Student Center Monday to
voice their opinion on the fate
of ECU's minority newspaper.
The meeting was originally
scheduled as a committee
meeting of the ECU Media
Board, but after the editorials
it became open forum for
students. The unusual turnout
came about after a front-page
editorial in the Herald asked
students to decide whether they
wanted to keep the minority
paper of incorporate it into The
East Carolinian. The East
Carolinian responded with an
editorial against the idea.
Minority Affairs Committee
Chairman Buddy Conners in-
voked Roberts' Rule of Order
to accommodate the argument
of the large crowd. The East
Carolinian, represented by
Managing Editor Darryl
Brown, presented arguments
against incorporting the paper
as a separate section into The
East Carolinian.
Although there were a
minority of students who felt
no minority paper was needed,
most people present called for
the continuation of a separate
paper to adequately cover
black needs on campus.
The meeting was supposed to
center on ways the Herald
could be improved, but the
issues discussed took on a clear
blackwhite conotation.
Arguments presented by East
Carolinian staff members were
rejected summarily; the
prevailing opinion in the room
was to keep the Herald as an
outlet for all black issues.
The committee held a closed
meeting after the forum,
deciding little except to bring
the issue before the Media
Board today and to suggest a
professional survey be taken to
determine the opinion of
minority students on the issue.
From itiff and
college preu service report!
For the first time in a decade,
the foreign student population on
American campuses has leveled
o f f the Institute of International
Education reports.
Some foreign student observers
attribute the population change to
political adventurism in Iran and
Libya.
For the last ten years, foreign
student enrollment in the United
States has been growing at least 10
percent a year. The growth rate in
some years went as high as 16 per-
cent.
But new figures indicate foreign
student enrollment grew by a mere
3.3 percent in the 1982-83 school
year from 325,865 students for
the 1981-82 school year to 33,983.
According to ECU Foreign Stu-
dent Advisor Lucy Wright, ECU
is "usually not affected by the na-
tional trends In the fall of 1982,
98 foreign students attended
ECU. This fall, 140
foreign students are enrolled, an
increase of 38 percent.
"I think (the foreign student
population) is basically peaking
because of the decrease in (the
number of) Iranian students
said Alfred Jullian, research
associate for the IIE's just-
released "Open Doors" survey of
enrollment.
The Iranian student population
� still the largest contingent of
foreign students from any
foreign country � has dropped
from a high of 51,310 in the
1979-80 school year to only 26,760
in 1982-83. According to Wright,
"ECU has never had a large
number of Iranian students
There are currently five Iranians
enrolled in the university.
"The Libyan student popula-
tion has also declined by 26.9 per-
cent Jullian notes, "from 2,900
for the previous school year to
2,120 for 1982-83 Wright said a
Libvan student has never attended
ECU.
"I think probably political
upheaval in Libya and Iran could
account for some of the decline in
students from those two
countries he speculates.
Indeed, "in the case of Iranian
students, for the last couple of
years it has been difficult for them
to get exit permits (from the Ira-
nian government), and then they
had to go to a third country to get
U.S. visas beause there is no U.S.
embassy in Iran explains
Georgia Stewart with the National
Association of Foreign Student
Advisors in Washington, D.C.
But more Iranians may come to
American campuses in the next
few years, she adds. The Iranian
government "may be lifting some
of its restrictions on exit permits.
I've heard from a number of in-
stitutions who have noted in-
creases in the number of applica-
tions from Iranian students
According to Wright, Iranian
universities have been closed since
the U.S. hostage situation in 1980.
In order to be college educated
Iranian students must leave the
country.
The increase in South American
students is due mainly to an influx
of Venezuelan students.
A rise in the number of foreign
students from Malaysia, Jullian
notes, helped increase the Asian
student enrollment on U.S. cam-
puses. There were also smaller in-
creases in the number of Korean
and Chinese students coming
here.
At ECU, students from
Malaysia make up the largest
percentage of foreign students, of
the 140 foreign students, 32 (22.8
percent) are Malaysian.
"We know there is a trend of
increases from the Asian countries
in the last two or three years
agrees NAFSA's Stewart. "With
the Malaysian students, we had an
awfully big increase when the
British government raised tuition
for foreign students
Receipts and Disbursements
of Charlie Daniels Concert
EXPENSES
Fee for bands,
sound, lights
Auditorium costs
personnel, equipment
General Costs
tickets, CTO fee, etc.
Advertising Costs
posters, media ads
GROSS REVENUE
Single tickets
Commission from
program sales
$36,500
$7,360.52
$893.10
$2,653.64
Loss From Daniels
Concert Is $13,545
$32,986
$968.95
Total Expenses
$47,407.26
tgfggJgM�
$13,545.31
FT
WBWMJBJWtW-MI
� .�IMIIII
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Witt
The Statement of Reciepts and
Disbursements for the financially
unsuccessful Charlie Daniels-
Marshall Tucker concert was
recently released. The final deficit
for the concert was $13,545.31.
Attendance at the Homecoming
weekend concert was low, so low
that ticket sales did not even
generate enough money to cover
the fees for the bands, their sound
and light equipment and promo-
tional fees.
The Major Attractions Com-
mittee, which sponsored the event
had to borrow money to back the
concert. However, according to
Jerry Dilsaver, chairman of the
committee, they were able to pay
the loan.
The Daniels concert was only
the 2nd financially unsuccessful
concert in recent history. The
other money�losing concert was
the Evelyn Champagne King con-
cert last spring.
The Student Union Board will
hold a meeting on Dec. 8 to
discuss the Daniels concert and
also to make plans for the handl-
ing of future concerts. All in-
terested students are invited to at-
tend.
School Plans
Memorial For
Kent Victims
(CPS) � Thirteen years after
four of its students were killed at
the climax of the anti-war move-
ment, and after 13 years of almost
unrelieved confrontation between
students and administrators over
how to remember the tragedy,
Kent State University trustees
finally voted last week to work
with students to conceive and
build a campus memorial to the
dead students.
KSU's unwillingness to accede
to student and faculty requests to
build a memorial was arguably the
last vestige of the anti-war move-
ment of the sixties and early
seventies.
"We aren't shouting at each
other any more says Steven
Thulin, now a grad student at
Kent State.
"The feelings of ill will have
largely disappeared adds Ken-
neth Calkins, head of KSU's
Faculty Senate.
The trustees voted to join com-
munity groups and the May 4
Task Force � the student-faculty
group that has led the long strug-
gle to memorialize the tragedy �
in a committee to find an ap-
propriate physical memorial to
See KENT, Page 6
Anthropology Department Adds New Courses
� i vvv.v.v. �;� �
Dr. Michael Orbach
By STEPHEN SHERBIN
Staff Writer
The Department of Sociology,
Anthropology and Economics is
adding new courses and faculty as
well as expanding its student-work
program in anthropology, said
Dr. Michael Orbach, the new pro-
gram coordinator. According to
Orbach, the department is focus-
ing itself to "give anthropology
students a useful and common
core training
There are two new courses on
the anthropology curriculum. One
course, "Global Issues and Con-
temporary Human Problems
will be available in the upcoming
fall semester. It follows the course
"Introduction to Ethnology
which was added last year.
Campus Arrests Drop
Under New DWI Law
Students in the social sciences
will have the opportunity to get
"hands-on" experience through
field work programs. One such
program is currently underway.
Dr. David Phelps is overseeing an
archeological excavation on
Roanoke Island. The project,
which employs ECU Students,
was given a Z. Smith Reynolds
Foundation grant totaling
$140,000. The America's 400th
Anniversary Committee is the
sponsor.
Another such program is still in
the planning stage: a study of the
impact of the Oregon Inlet con-
troversy on the commercial
fishing industry. The project
would be sponsored by the Divi-
sion of Marine Fisheries in the
Department of Natural Resources
and Community Development.
The students would be working
under Orbach and Mike Street,
director of the Fisheries Manage-
ment Division. The students
would be employed as interns and
be residing at the Marine Research
Center at Manteo, N.C.
A second fieldwork project has
been proposed by Dr. Holly
Mathews, an assistant professor
in the department, for six ECU
students to work in conjunction
with six students from Georgia
State University in Costa Rica for
three months this summer.
Leading the group will be
Mathews along with Carol Hill
and Tony Brown, both from the
anthropology department at
Georgia State.
The goal of the project will be
the assessment of medical delivery
services in three small coastal
communities. The project's fun-
ding would come from the U.S.
Department of Education under
President Reagan's Caribbean
Basin Initiative.
They would also live with dif-
ferent families in the three com-
munities to get a better view of the
problems with the medical
delivery services.
The purpose of the changes
within the department, says Or-
bach, is to provide an "oppor-
tunity for students to engage in a
practical application of the skills
and knowledge they learn in the
deparment
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style1
Sports10
Classifieds12
� Don't forget to try the
crossword panie today oa
� For the story on ECU
Pirate's 75-44 loss to Virginia
Commonwealth, see Sports,
12.
Don't miss Art
I's latest comma oa
the Editorial page, see page 4.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Wrttar
In the two months since the
Safe Roads Act took effect, Driv-
ing While Impaired arrests on the
ECU campus have dropped,
though whether this is a direct
result of the new law is debatable,
according to ECU public safety
officials.
"I can't say that it's related to a
particular thing because it (the
total number of arrests) will fluc-
tuate from month to month
said Francis Eddings, assistant
director of public safety. "Maybe
it's just circumstances
Campus DWI arrests during
October 1982 totaled 13, and ar-
rests in November of that year
totaled eight. The number of DWI
arrests this October was seven,
and there were three arrests in
November.
Eddings said he doesn't see a
great change on the part of either
officers or students since the in-
stitution of the Safe Roads Act.
The campus police officers, he
said "use the same procedure.
They have a multitude of things to
attend to and can't just concen-
trate on DWI's
Students arrested for DWI are
generally stopped because of some
sort of driving violation, Fdd�"g�
said. If the police officer then
suspects they are intoxicated, they
are requested to perform bask
coordination tasks and, if
necessary, take a breathalyzer
test. Persons registering .10 or
higher on the test are taken before
the magistrate. At this point, Ed-
dings said, the student is within
the court system and is no longer
in the jurisdiction of the campus
police.
The magistrate decides whether
there is probable cause to issue a
warrant for the student's arrest.
Following this, they are either
released on bond or incarcerated.
James Mallory, associate dean
of orientation and judiciary, is ad-
vised of the arrests and the court
decision. The individual Is then
notified of this. "If they go to
court, we do not ask them to go
before the Honor Board
Mallory said. Students convicted
of DWI in court are also required
to go through an alcohol
awareness program and thus are
not required to attend ECU'S
See LAW, Pmgc
New Computer Coming To ECU
By MILLIE WHITE,
ECU's Austin building is
undergoing a big change. The
computer center, located in the
building's first floor, is being ex-
panded to provide room for a new
Sperry 1100-70 computer.
Currently, the center has two
computers: a Burroughs com-
puter, used for student
assignments, and a Sperry
1100-63, used to process data tor
the university, the medical school
and Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. According to Donald
Dunlap, associate director of the
ECU Computing and Information
Systems, the Sperry 1100-63 was
formerly an 1100-62, but the re-
cent addition of a processor
upgraded the computer and in-
creased its work load by one-
third.
Dunlap said the new computer,
which has been ordered and is ex-
pected in the near future, will be
used to develop programs to aid
the university in procedures such
as drop-add and registration.
By the next summer school ses-
sion, ECU hopes to be using the
computer for drop-add and
registration, Dunlap said. He add-
ed that before the year is out the
center hopes to start an Apple
computer lab which will house 20
Apple computers.
i
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 6, 1983
Announcements
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
Due to limited space. The East Carolinian re-
quests that organizations submit only important
announcements about upcoming events that
students need to know about in advance. Please
submit such messages as "thank you" and "con-
gratulation" notes to the Personals section of the
classifieds in The East Carolinian.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
would like to have an Item
printed In the announcement
column, please type it on an an-
nouncement form and send It to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrlt
ten copy on odd sized paper can-
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want gr,3 suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements Is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesday tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
MARCHING
PIRATES
Christmas Mardi Gras at the
American Legion Hut (maps In
the band office) Tuesday Dec. e
from 9:00 until $1.00 for
members. S3 00 for guests Food
and beverages provided Tous
frata Salts
ECU STUDENTS
The ECU College Republicans
wish a cordial MERRY
CMlRSTMAS to all our fellow
students!
PHI
SIGMA PI
Congratulations Tau pledge
class! New brothers Inducted
Saturday art. Susan Kelly,
David Miller, Susan Jarrell,
Carla deMendonca Jill
Clodfeiter, Veronica Borders,
Louise Smith. eannle Song.
Stacey Long, and Jodi Sager
Give yourselves a hand!
CONGRATS
PI KAPPS
Congratulations goes out to
the new brothers this semester
They are: David Bass, Jamie
Brlley, Jr Rusty Carter, Hank
Core, Ed Dennls.Randy Koonce,
John Paul H Lyons, William
Mann, Kevin Manning, Jim
Rackley, Bob Schultz, and Lee
Whltaker Good job fellowsl!
Congratulations also goes out to
the Pi Kapp "A" and "B" bowl
ing teams and the Pi Kapp "A"
volleyball team for winning the
fraternity championships Good
luck to the "B" volley ball team
in the championship game
The PI Kapps would also like
to invite everyone out to Papa
Katz this Tuesday night for Pre
Exam Happy Hour Party with
the Pi Kapps!
MEMORIAL
GYM
The Memorial Gym equip
ment room will close for the fall
semester on Sunday, Dec 11 at 5
p.m All Items checked out must
be returned by that time The
equipment room will resume
operations on Friday, Jan 6 at 9
p.m
TEACHER
EDUCATION
STUDENTS
ATTENTION: ALL
TEACHER EDUCATION
STUDENTS APPYING FOR
UPPER DIVISION
The Department of Speech
Language and Auditory
Pathology will be providing the
speech and hearing screening
tor all students eligible tor ad
mission to the upper division of
teacher education on
Wednesday January 11, 19S4and
Thursday January 13,1984.
The Department will be able
to screen approximately 15
students every 15 minutes. In
order to maximally utilize
tacliltes and avoid excessive
congestion The procedure will
be as follows:
I. Students must call the
clinic (757 6961) to arrange for a
specific time and day Appoint
ments will be scheduled for
every 15 minutes beginning on
the hour (I.e. 8 00 8 15. 130.)
Fifteen students will be schedul
ed tor each 15 minutes
3 Appointments must be
made prior to Wednesday, Jan
11, 194. but not before the end of
Fall Semester
3. Students are to report to the
secretary upon arrival for their
appolntmenl and must be on
time
BIOLOGY
CLUB
Attention biology club
membersl If you are planning to
attend the Christmas party on
Dec 10th, please sign up on the
Biology Club door by Reading
Day
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening,
Dec. 6 In the chapel of St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 406 4th St.
(one block from Garrett Dorm).
The service will be at 5:30 p m
with the Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
An "Open House and Supper will
follow at the home of the
chaplain 1600 E Sixth St.
S.A.B.
SUPPER
The Student Athletic will have
its final meeting of the year on
Dec. 8 at Abram's Bar B Q. All
members are asked to meet at
Mendenhall at 5:15 p.m in order
for everyone to ride to the
restaurant. Please come
prepared to eat and have a good,
social time! 11
PHI
KAPPATAU
The Brothers, Pledges and
Little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
hopes everyone had a great time
at the annual Chill Thrill party.
Congratulaltons of Jon Abbot
and Ann Irving for selling the
most tickets for the Chill Thrill
raffle The new Executive Coun-
cil took office last week Con
gratulations to Pres: Todd Pat
ton. Vice Pres; Mike
McPartland, Tresurer; Tom
Norton, Recording Sec; John
Peterson, Corresponding Sec;
Lingesh Srlraman Also, con
gratulations to Bob Rucks on an
outstanding ob as President
this past year.
INTER VARSITY
Come to Jenkins Auditorium
at 630 pm on Wednesday
nights to sing praises and wor
ship God Everyone is invited to
Inter Varsity
AEDPLEDGE
DINNER
AM AED Pledges are invited to
dinner at Mr Gattis on 10th St.
at 5 p.m on Wednesday Dec 7
Please bring Christmas Gag
Gift for exchange
AED CHRISTMAS
PARTY
AED will have Its Christmas
Party at Mr. Gattl's on Wednes-
day, Dec. 7 at 5 p.m. Gifts will ba
exchanged. AM members,
pledges, and their guests ere In-
vited to loin In the Christmas
spirit before exams begin!
REC FACILITIES
CHRISTMAS
BREAK
HOURS
Memorial Pool
Dec. IMS11:30-1 A
3 30-6:30
Dec. 14 � It-Mi1:30-1
Dec. 23-Jan 4.Closed
Jan. 5-411:30-1 A
3:30-4:30
Jan. 7Resume
Normal Hours
Memorial Equipment
Room
Dec. 12-Jan. SCIosed
Jan. 4Resume
Normal Hours
Memorial Weight
Room
Dec. 12-14 A 19-229-5
Dec. 23-28Closed
Dec. 29-309-5
Dec. 3l-Jan. 2Closed
Jan. 3-59-5
Jan. 4Resume
Normal Hours
Minges Weight Room
Dec. 9-Jan. 8.Closed
Jan. 9Resume
Normal Hours
Minges Pool
Dec. 12-Jan.7Closed
Jan. 8Resume
Normal Hours
PHYE MAJORS
AM students who plan to
declare physical education as a
maor should report to Minges
Coliseum at 10 am Thursday,
Dec. 8 for a motor and physical
fitness test. Satisfactory pertor
mance on this test is required as
irerequlslte for official admit
tance to the physical education
maior program. More detailed
information concerning the test
Is available by calling 757 6441
or 6443
Any student with a medical
condition that would contraln
dlcate participation in the
testing program should contact
Dr Israel at 757 6497 Examples
would Include heart murmers,
congenital heart disease,
respiratory disease or signlfl
cant musculoskeietai problems.
If you have any significant
medical conditions, please
notify Dr. Israel If you plan to be
tested.
PEACE COMMITTEE
Don't ust wait for the day
after get active Greenville
Peace Committee, Fridays at
6:30. 610 S Elm St beginning
with dinner.
FINANCIAL
AID
MEETING
The annual financial aid
meeting will be held Wednes
day, Dec 7 at 3 p.m and 4 p.m.
In Hendrlx Theatre,
Mendenhall The purpose of the
meeting is to distribute applica
tlons for the 1984 85 school year
and to discuss the application
procedure. All students current
ly receiving financial aid or in
terested In financial aid are
strongly urged to attend
SAB SUPPER
The Student Athletic will have
Its final meeting of the year on
Dec. 8, 1983 at Abram's Bar BO
All members are asked to meet
at Mendenhall at 5 15 in order
for everyone to ride to the
resturant. Please come
prepared to eat and have a good,
social time" I
IM REC
FITNESS
CLASSES
Spring semester non credit
IM-Rec Fitness class reglstra
tion will be Jan 16 30 for the 1st
session Classes will begin Jan
33 and run through Feb 34 We
will be offering weight training,
personal defense, aquarobics
and aerobics Registration is In
room 304 Memorial Gym
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
The ECU College
REpublicans will have their
final meeting of the semester on
Tuesday night in the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse at 5 30 pm Anyone
Interested is welcome to attend
Old members are reminded that
the Pitt county Republicans will
have their monthly meeting
following ours at 8 p m Gene
Baker will be their guest
speaker
PHI BETA
LAMBDA
The Omlcron Chapter of PM
Beta Lambda will have a
Christmas Dinner at the Bonar
za Restaurant on Wednesday
Dec 7. at 5 p m
THANKS
AD. PI'S
The Brothers of Pi Kappa P
Fraternity would like to th�n�
the Sisters and Pledges of the
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority tor �ne
wonderful surprise social ias
Wednesday night we an hao a
great time!
CONGRATULATIONS
The Brothers and Golden
Hearts of Sigma Phi Epsnor
would like to congratulate Natte
new Brothers Glad to have re,
with us! See ya'H Wednevaa.
ready to throw down
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
sine 1925
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
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and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: SN yearly
The East Carolinian offices
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POSTMASTER Send ad
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Telephone: 757-6364,6367,
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BUYING -
LOANS
TVs, Air Conditioner!
Stereos, guns, gold silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerator (dorm size on-
ly), video games a car
tritfeei. power tools,
musical instruments.
Microwave evens, video
recorder, bicycles, and
aaytaing else of value.
Souther Pawn Shop,
located ess Evans Street,
7S2-3464.
& Kappa Sigma
Present
10th Annual
Christmas Party
8:30 til 1:00AM
18-$2.00
Tues. Dec. 6,1983
Adm. $1.00
Happy Hour Prices All Night
Hundreds of Free Prices To Be Given Away
Plus A Free Pinball Machine.
Come Early
Tues. Dec. 13,1983
$1.50 Adm.
Sponsored by:
That 's A more Pizza Pie
K-mart
Baskin-Robbins
Chocolate Chip Cookie Co
For Head Only
Brody's
King Sandwich Deli
Todd Stereo
Mr. Gattis � P. T.A. 'Cheese
Draft Site
10C Draft All Night
Jefflay's Beer & Wine
Huckleberrys
Buccaneer Theater
Wash House
Krispy Kreme
H.L. Hodges
Record Bar
Godfather's Pizza
Archies Steaks
House "Chico's 'Domino s
IrWl
KINGSTON
PLACE
Kingston Place is es
for the student at ECU
An ideal alternative to the crowded dorm is at hand. Kingston Place offers two bedroom, two bath Garden or two
bedroom, two and a half bath townhouse condominiums, fully furnished, including all accessories, easy access to
tennis, on-site pool and clubhouse with laundry facility. With the spacious size of each condo, the Quality fur-
nishings and appliances and the well planned amenities, Kingston Place will become the standard by which all
student housing will be judged. Yet, with all these quality features, the best part of Kingston Place is the ability to
select the roommate you want. Call the Kingston Place Sales Office at 756-0285 or come by 3101S. Evans Street and get
the facts and figures to take to your parents. A limited number of these quality condominiums are available at the
utTmi
to live, compare the fo
end at end of December
the following: amenities, sq. footage, quality, construction, and privacy. Preconstruction prices to
ember.
?
If you are a freshman or sophmore attending
ECU and would like to register for a free three
� Hilton Head Island
South Carolina
fill out the attached form and mail to the
Kingston Place office or stop by and register
and pick up a free brochure.
Name
ID number
Home Address
Home Phone
School Phone.
Only freshman and sophmores eligible for vacation offer.
Drawing to be held by Dec. 15th,
Incre
Y
i
Ni
� Hi
,
it
NEW YORK (UP1)
Nearly three cents
of every dollar shop
pers spend this
Chirstmas season will
go to offset the cost of
merchandise theft, ac
cording to a con
suiting firm that
studies the problem
"On the average,
shrinkage represented
2.2 percent of
retailers' sales in 1982
and the cost of securi-
ty represented 0.5 per
cent of their sales
said Carol Cook, a
Call Pi
Tuto
The following dq
thesc services is deter- i
for further inforn
Department
Bioiogy
Chemistry
English
Foreign Languages
and Literatures
Geography and
Planning
Geology
History
Mathematics and
Computer Science
Physics
Political Science
The following orgar
cost of these service-
tact the department i
Organization
ECU Biology Club
Phi Sigma Tau
Society of Physics
Students
Lambda .Alpha Beta
Alpha Phi Sigma
Pre-Professional
Health Affairs
Design Associates
Accounting Society
Phi Sigma Pi
ECU Music Therapy
NOW is t!
CASH f o
Tilt: l SITE! �
t
5161
GR
- -�' ��
'

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nmi�UaA.m





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HANKS
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A 1 ULATIONS � oiaen � � Eoshoo �� ����
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Domino's
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 6, 1983
Increased Shoplifting Results In Higher Prices
NEW YORK (UPI)
� Nearly three cents
of eer dollar shop-
pers spend this
Chirstmas season will
go to offset the cost of
merchandise theft, ac-
cording to a con-
sulting firm that
studies the problem.
"On the average,
shrinkage represented
2.2 percent of
retailers' sales in 1982
and the cost of securi-
ty represented 0.5 per-
cent of their sales
ssui Carol Cook, a
partner at Arthur
Young, the accoun-
ting and consulting
firm.
Arthur Young con-
dts a yearly study
on shoplifting for the
National Mass Retail-
ing Institute. The
study found pilferage
itself � primarily
theft by customers
and employees � had
risen 10 percent from
the previous year.
Retailers are spen-
ding about 8 percent
more for security this
year, with an em-
phasis on prevention
rather than apprehen-
sion, the survey
found. But apprehen-
sions were 23 percent
higher than 1981 and
the conviction rate of
those prosecuted rose
from 77 percent to 87
percent.
The survey, involv-
ing 180 large retail
organizations with
total sales of $97
billion, may have
been the most am-
bitious study ever at-
tempted on the sub-
ject, Cook said.
Retailers believe
shoplifting itself ac-
counts for only about
30 percent of their
shrinkage problem,
the study found, with
50 percent attributed
to employee theft and
20 percent to poor
paperwork control.
Contrary to
popular belief, most
employee theft occurs
on the sales floor
rather than the
stock room, Cook
said. "It's a
misperception that
most is leaving by the
back door. In fact,
it's leaving by the
front door he said.
Popular methods, he
added, are under-
charging friends for
items they purchase,
or simply taking cash
from the registers.
The typical
shoplifter, the study
found, appears to be a
young adult between
ages 18 and 35. But,
Cook said, "It's quite
conceivable you have
a good number of
shoplifters below 18
who are not pro-
secuted or apprehend-
ed.
The thief is as likely
to a man as a woman,
the survey found.
That surprised Cook
and many other ex-
perts, who believed
women were more
likely to steal mer-
chandise than men.
"There are two
women shopping for
every man Cook
said, but a higher pro-
portion of the males
shoplift and profes-
sional shoplifters also
tend to be men.
Of those ap-
prehended in 1982 for
shoplifting, 62 per-
cent of the men and
51 percent of the
womenwere
employed. But that
statistic may not tell
the whole story, Cook
said. "Most are
employed, but are
their earnings as high
as they were?"
economy had been
hard hit for a number
of years and retailers
adjusted their security
forces Cook
theorized. "In the
Southwest, last year
was the first bad year
after some very big
Sunbelt growth. A lot
of retailers didn't
react in time
Devices like mir-
rors, employee lie
detector tests and
television monitors
are proving to be
relatively ineffective
in controlling mer-
chandise theft, Cook
said. Newer ap-
proaches, like elec-
tronic strips and tags,
offer more promise,
he said.
The strips or tags
are attached to the
merchandise and will
set off alarms to alert
security guards unless
they are deactivated
before the merchan-
dise leaves the store.
Call Pirate Walk, 757-6616 Bush Visits N.C. Today. Backs Helms
Tutorial Services Available
The following departments maintain a list of tutors for interested students. The cost of
these services is determined by the individual tutor. Please contact the department office
for further information.
Telephone
757-6718
757-6227
757-6041
757-6232
757-6230
757-6360
757-6587
757-6461
757-6428
757-6030
The following organizations also maintain a list or tutors for interested students. The
cost of these services is determined by the individual tutor and, in some cases, is free. Con-
tact the department office or faculty advisor for more information.
DepartmentLocation
BiologyScience Complex
ChemistryFlanagan
EnglishAustin
Foreign Languages and LiteraturesBrewster
Geography and PlanningBrewster
GeologyGraham
HistoryBrewster
Mathematics and Computer Science PhysicsAustin Science Complex
Political ScienceBrewster
Organization
ECU Biology Club
Phi Sigma Tau
Society of Physics
Students
Lambda Alpha Beta
Alpha Phi Sigma
Pre-Professional
Health Affairs
Design Associates
Accounting Society
Phi Sigma Pi
ECU Music Therapy
Department
Biology
Philosophy
Physics
Anthropology
Correctional Services
Center for Student
Opportunity, med school
Communication Arts,
School of Art
Accounting
Decision Sciences
Music Therapy
Location
Science Complex
Brewster
Science Complex
Brewster
Belk
Brody
Jenkins
Rawl
Rawl
Fletcher
Telephone
757-6718
757-6121
757-6428
757-6883
757-6961
757-2500
757-6665
757-6055
757-6893
757-6851
NOW is the best time to sell!
CASH for your textbooks.
U.B.E.
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) � Sen.
Jesse Helms will
welcome Vice Presi-
dent George Bush to
North Carolina Tues-
day, seeking political
support from a man
Helms strongly op-
posed for the vice
presidency three years
ago.
Bush will be the
featured speaker at a
$250-a-plate dinner
for Helms. Claude
Allen, press secretary
of the Helms for
Senate campaign, said
about 200 people are
expected to attend the
North Carolina
Republican's fund-
raiser.
Bush also will at-
tend a private recep-
tion at an undisclosed
location. He did not
schedule any news
conferences.
Allen said the din-
ner is intended to
show the Reagan Ad-
ministration's support
of Helms as he enters
what is expected to be
a bruising re-election
campaign against
Democratic Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr.
"I think this
recognizes that
Senator Helms is very
important to the
Reagan effort in
Washington, in main-
taining the majority
(of Republicans in the
Senate) and in the
leadership he pro-
vides Allen said.
"This again shows the
solidarity of the
Republican Party
On June 16,
Reagan spoke at a
banquet for Helms in
Washington. Helms
campaigners have
been playing cuts
from the president's
speech in commercials
ever since.
Helms has shakier
ties with Bush. In
1980, Helms carried
the conservative stan-
dard at the
Republican conven-
tion when his wing of
the party fought to
keep Bush from bec-
ming Reagan's runn-
ing mate. Helms ques-
tioned whether Bush
showed the kind of
conservatism the
Senator wanted.
But now Helms is
fishing for support to
beat Hunt, and the
Reagan administra-
tion needs Helms in
the Senate to help
keep the GOP's ma-
jority in the chamber.
As a result, Bush
w ill sperd 4 hours 10
minutes in
Greensboro, and
Helms staffers are
quoting the vice presi-
dent as calling Helms
his good friend.
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS
40
Off
All
Designer
Frames
THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT:
Ail Campus Party
PHI KAPPA TAG 2nd ANNUAL
m E
v�"
v�
v, ��

in
7"
30
0 Off
All Other Frames
30�o
Off
Ray Ban Sunglasses
Prices Good Thru Dec. 31, 1983
GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
PnOrtf?
NT52-14�
pucians
US Parlretaa Common
Acrou From Doctor� Part
0pm IA M -S.a P.M. MonFrl.
Baachar Klrloay Dtapanting Optician
CALL US FO� AN
EVE EXAMINATION
WITH THE DOCTOR
Of YOUR CHOICE
1
'Honor of the Pirates'
THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:
Panuni Bob
Heads Up
Cro s Nest
King Sandwich
King and Queen North
T odd's Stereo
Klean Jean's Laundromat
Golden Corral
Hodges
Pugh's Tire Center
Overton s Supermarket
Peppi's PIzm
UB.E.
Tree House
Apple Records
Pizza Transit Authority
Domi'
-
Sam
i . . -
SuDstation II
� .
ket
ShacV
M j'athon
Jeffrey s & �� ne
Chico s
Elbow Room
ClakBran, - - : �.
�i. Jl
Prize Winners
Greg Mangum -10 speed Bike
Loo Ann Mangum - $50 dinner at King & Queen North
John Hawa - $25 PTA pizza
Steve Lewis � $50 Radio Shack gift
Mike King - Golden Corral Dinner
Sarah Watson - Marathan Dinner
Jeff Foster - Free Pugh's Tire Co. Oil Change
0ife
RIGHT
BROI HtK
BCrCLES �CP4�S
7517J03
ATTIC
�A
FREE
ALL YEAR
ALL
GIRLS DORM
WED.
lOHl Annual
Christmas Party with
Over $1000 worth of
Christmas presents
Thurs. Closed
Fri. Doc Holliday
Sun. Washington vs.
Dallas on a V ft. TV in
the Phoenix Room.
Tues: South of the
Border Night
Wed: Pearl Harbor
Night
Fri: Pick Your Price
Happy Hour 4:30-5:30
Cam
� !��
7SHW7 f
gpS
Tao lost
la Towa
AH turf Am ��
Put aa. Ground track,
Patty tmm ftiiartaaa.
�tmmj rate aaV10 Off
Any lea
Soft tea
Ml
�at� ��?��
Wad. Mm� Mrta JO c�x AM
MM. few A4m �M ICU ID
TW Caaaaa MM 90 c��
HtU4t7S�HNlll4C
M. M � � W�a4 Favtf T0
vmmmm
tat B�ttol
Maa tim a�
0 9 SaWaWt wtWS ff
"WE LEAVE THE
DRINKING TO
YOU"
"LEAVE THE
DRIVING TO US.
?0 TIL 200
Across trim U.B.I.
S13 Cetaacfc St.
L
7 4av�aw�o
A "OJVATl CUM HOT OHM
TOTMtOaNttALt
HAPPY HOUR
EVERYDAY
4:00-7:00
Thurs. -Mitch Bowen
Fri. �ft Sat. -The Trend
SUPER HAPPY HOURS
4:00-3:00 2SC DRAFT
Tues. -Dec. 6 & 13
iiluitaKiRYii
Tues. -Dec. 20
a
SUPPORT THE
S.G.A. BUS
a
Nhf ��,
God
Fleming5 after hour
English Hin.10 after hour
10th t the Hill' i after hour
College Hu,U after hour
Stratford -4rmApt- � hour
Hargett Drug'your
Home Federutnt hour
Purple:
1 ntv CondolOaJtf hour
Canrm Court12 afte' hour
EasthfHtk13 after hour
RiverNuf20 after hour
Kings Rowy hour
V'ttliat Green: til hour
College rfra24 til hour
vjwrsj 23 til hour
Home Federal15 til hour
m � '
mp ' -
-






-
Wnt Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Hunter Fisher. u��r� .��.��
Darryl Brown, ,m, Editor
J.T. PlETRZAK, Director of Advtrttsmt ClNDY PLEASANTS, Spom Editor
Robert Rucks, subc Ma Greg Rideout, Ednonai rd��r
ALI AFRASHTEH, Credit Manager GORDON I POCK, Entertainment Editor
Geoff Hudson, cucuumon Manager Lizanne Jennings, � Editor
MICHAEL MAYO, Tecnmcal Supervisor TODD EVANS, Production Manager
December 6, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Excellence
Forum Step In Right Direction
The month of January will be
one ECU and its students can be
proud of. An event will occur that
will further mark the academic
coming of age of our university. In
this decade, we have created a
medical school; in this year, we
have attained nationwide recogni-
tion for retrieving the anchor of
the Monitor, and, now, as 1984 is
ushered in, we will be sponsoring a
major forum for gubernatorial
candidates.
To host an event of this
magnitude � one that affects
North Carolinians from Manteo to
Murphy � is a privilege and an
honor that is befitting a university
whose students and administrators
are striving for academic recogni-
tion. ECU will stand up and be
counted by its 15 sister universities
in the UNC-system. The school
and, especially, the students
deserve it.
In fact, the students organized
it. Members of the Student
Government Association and the
ECU chapter of the North
Carolina Student Legislature
worked hard to bring ECU into the
spotlight. The coordinators are in
efiect saying that the students of
ECU care about what is happening
in their state and want to par-
ticipate in the electoral process.
The caring is synonymous with the
intellectual curiousity that a in-
stitution of higher learning seeks to
imbed in all its students. And,
after all, the seeking of knowledge
is what we are here for.
So, when the state's media des-
cend upon Greenville, we must be
aware that once we start to be an
academic leader we cannot stop.
We, the students should become
tougher on ourselves to give a
quality effort to our classes. Party-
ing is fine in its place, but an
honest effort to become intellec-
tually involved with the academic
process must replace the urges to
go downtown, and soon those
urges must disappear.
And, as the candidates file into
our halls of learning, the ad-
ministration must begin to exclude
students whose academic qualifica-
tions are inadequate. The message
emanating from the students
because of this forum is that some
of us care about the learning pro-
cess. We thank those student
organizers that made this message
nn&sihle
pWIWyUfltt
ISRt THAT W0NPERFUL,DEAR?OUR DAUGHTER'S TW NEW
ANCHORWOMAN AT CHANNEL SIX
Campus Forum
Pirate Walk Thanked
I would like to publicly thank
Michael Pitts and the escorts of the
Pirate Walk. This service, which is not
only offered to women students but
also to members of the faculty and
staff, is appreciated by the women of
ECU. The escort service has made it
possible for women to take part in ac-
tivities after dark and still feel secure
about their well being.
I also believe that the escort service
has earned a note of congratulations.
In their second semester of operations,
they have doubled the number of walks
made and escorted students as far as
Village Green. And on top of all this,
their being clearly indentifiable as of-
ficial Pirate Escorts, they have
established a positive effect in assisting
with campus security.
I believe I speak for all the women of
ECU when I say, I greatly and sincerely
appreciate the good job the Pirate
Escort Service is doing. We all need to
recognize all those involved with the
Pirate Escort Service.
Kimberly G. Cox
Freshman, Biology
'Yikes Smoking
In this ultra-liberal age, imagine the
shock when an old-fashioned mom,
raised in the strict, conservative ancient
past, learns that professors and
students are routinely lighting up their
cigarettes before class. (Shame on
those profs especially. Where is the
good example?) My, what king of lear-
ning is going on? Not to mention
teaching. Remember the good old days
when chewing gum was unacceptable?
It seems that it used to be that smoking
was something you do when things are
over. At least that's what the ads say.
What is there left to do later? Chain
smokers are you listening?
N on smokers out there rise up! This
air pollution is being foisted upon you
by unthinking individuals. Nothing
will change until the majority speaks
up. M. Sprill in the Oct. 4 issue is right!
Besides, it just is a horribly anti-
intellectual thing to have going on in a
college. Kids, can't it honestly wait at
least until class is out. It would really
taste better if you had to wait for it,
anyhow. Practice those good old
fashioned virtues of self-control, good
example, manners and respect for
others.
Yikes, this ultra liberal age is killing
an old fashioned ma. And I thought
you were old enough for college!
Barbara Ingenito
Greenville
OM VOUR RIGHT IS7HS SENATE CAUCUS ROOM ANP BOMB SHELTER
AM ON WR LEFT ISTHE MA3DR1TV latEfU BUNKER
Military Costs Go With Bureaucracy;
Heck, It's Only Way To Find A Job
A Pentagon auditor charged in a
document made available the other day
that the armed forces pay outrageous
prices for weapons because the officers
in charge of procurement are hoping
when they finish their careers to get a
job with the defense contractor they are
dealing with.
Those who play along with the
defense industry are rewarded with
cushy positions when they leave the ser-
vice, and those who gave the contractors
a hard time need not apply for a job
when they retire. The average retirement
age for a middle-ranked officer is 43, so
whether they like it or not, military of-
Art Buchwald
ficers in charge of procurement have a
bigger stake in their futures than in sav-
ing their government money.
This is how the scenario is played out.
"Colonel Druthers, we have a slight
overrun on the armored dogsleds you
contracted our company to build for
you
"But you said you could produce
them for $500,000. Now your're telling
me they're going to cost $1,700,000
apiece
We overestimated the strength of the
dogs and underestimated the weight of
the armor they had to pull. So we had to
add an engine in the back to push the
sleds along
"But that's outrageous
"It certainly is, and believe me, the
chairman is furious about it. He's fired
the manager of the dogsled program
"Who is taking his place?"
"We're looking for somebody now
who will bring it in somewhere near the
price I just told you. We'd like a person
familiar with the weapon carrier,
preferably a retired military officer who
knows procurement and is willing to
work his heart out for $150,000 a year,
plus bonuses and stock options. Of
course, the person would have to live in
California, but we'll pay all his moving
and living expenses for the first year
"I've been working on the military
side of this program for three years. I
pushed this program through
singlehandedly, and I'll never make
general when I tell our budget people
about the overrun
"What happens when you don't get
your star?"
"Then I'll have to retire and find a
job
"Maybe we could help you
"The law says I can't work on any
military program I've been involved
with while I was in the service
"We have many other military-
weapons programs you could handle.
Our chairman is always looking for
good soldiers
"That's very kind of you, but I've
checked your figures on the dogsled pro-
ject and they're way out of line
"In what way?"
"You charged us for a million dollar
chalet in Aspen
"We have to test the dogsled
somewhere
"And 12 million dollars for a private
Gulfsueam III airplane
"How are our research people going
to get to Aspen? By the way, when we're
not using it on the dogsled project the
plane is available for our other program
managers and their families
"I'm going to have to show these ex-
penditures to mv superiors before I oleav
them
"Colonel, you don't look like a
whistle-blower to me. If there is one type
of person our chairman won't hire, it's a
whistle-blower He's told me time and
time again, 'I'd rather have 10 retired
military officers who can't read a
balance sheet to one rotten apple who
knows how to run a cost-effective pro-
gram
"I gather then if I don't go along with
your figures I don't get a job
"1 didn't say that. But the last colonel
who complained about cost abuses in
one of our weapons programs is now
selling shoes at Macy's
"Are you sure you can bring these
dogsled armored vehicles in at
$1,700,000?"
"You have mv word for it. Mr. Vice
President
"Didn't I tell you? The title comes
with the job
(c) 19C9. Lo� n�e4ej Tuna Sv-ndK�ie
Proliferation Is The Issue
TRB � The New Republic
The most eloquent liberal rallying cry
of the past decade � Ted Kennedy's
"The Dream Shall Never Die" speech at
the 1980 Democratic convention � con-
tained a long list of reasons for pas-
sionate dissatisfaction with the status
quo, but not one word about the peril of
nuclear war. No one at the time thought
this was an odd omission
Today every liberal politician, in-
cluding Kennedy, avers that there is no
more urgent item on the political agen-
da. The suddenness of the frenzy of
alarm, when nothing fundamental has
changed, is one of the things that makes
me wonder how serious the current anti-
nuclear campaign really is.
The best evidence that the movement
against nuclear weapons isn't really
serious is its almost exclusive concentra-
tion on the glamorous prospect of war
between the superpowers. Any politician
or citizen truly eager to reduce the risk
of nuclear war ought to be worrying in-
stead about the problem of nuclear pro-
liferation and ought to be contemplating
solutions that would be anathema to
most anti-nuclear activists.
Proliferation is the serious issue for
four reasons. First, the next nuclear
bomb to be exploded in anger is not like-
ly to belong to the United States or the
Soviet Union. The system of mutual
deterrence carries no guarantee, but it
has worked for a third of a century. It
depends, though, on stability (the game
and the players don't change), on sym-
metry (each side knows the other side
can respond in kind to a nuclear attack)
and on rationality (no loonies at the but-
ton). None of these comforting condi-
tions that make deterrence work will ap-
ply when smaller countries engaged in
intense local disputes and run by zealots
or worse start getting the bomb, which
could happen soon.
A second reason the energies of the
anti-nuclear movement are misdirected
is the superpower nuclear confrontation
is something we're stuck with. Prolifera-
tion is not. A negotiated slowdown or
even reversal of the Soviet-American
nuclear arms race might make the world
a bit safer, but not much. That's because
neither nuclear superpower will abandon
that status voluntarily.
A third reason serious anti-nuclear
energies ought to be directed against
proliferation has to do with politics. The
anti-nuclear movement has far more in-
fluence over the democratic govern-
ments of the West than it can ever have
over the Soviet Union. Critics therefore
charge that whatever the intentions of
anti-nuclear activists, the one effect they
have on the contest between the super-
powers is to create pressure for
unilateral Western disarmament.
But what might be called instant disar-
mament is in keeping with the logic of
anti-nuclear rhetoric, which holds that
the prospect of nuclear war puts conven-
tional war in the shade.
This assertion may or may not be true
(recent developments in conventional
warfare are pretty horrific), but nothing
would make a major outbreak of con-
ventional war between the superpowers
more likely than elimination of the fear
that it could go nuclear. Why not, then.
a little pre-emptive conventional war, if
necessary, to eliminate the prospect of a
nuclear one?
But maybe the anti-nuclear movement
is not that serious.
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. . ��� - MiMMMilMHCMlM
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ECU Che.
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Pirates. C to aer
saults. ECU's chr
team morale and
But our
behind the scenes
v i b
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entry.
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Chapel Hill, the I
Kentucky, the L'nuc'
Florida and North Care
University, last
to winner Ohio St
regional winners �
all-expen Ha
for the Janua " I
televised b ESPN v
Network
Reagan a
With Shut
SPACE CENTER.
ouston 1 C PI �
esadeni Reagan
rst German Helmut
mI talked the
ace
eagan said the un-
precedented ra :
television I
from two continents
demonstrated that
�technologN can be
ased to bring people
gethe:
Mission m-
mander John Young.
a veteran of M space
nights, told the two
heads of state he saw
space "as a place
where humann can
live and work and
make things better for
people on Earth
Reagan opened the
space conference call
at 9:45 am EST by
noting that V est Ger-
man physicist L'lf
Merbold is a member
of the Spaceiab crew
aboard the shuttle and
said. "It is fitting that
on this German-
American tricenten-
nial, a German
astronaut is pan of
the shuttle team.
"The shuttle is
demonstrating 'hat
technology can be us-
ed to bring people
together in i ne
spirit of enterprise
and cooperation, to
better their lives and
to ensure the peace of
mankind.
11

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 6, 1983
mm
cRM�
lion dollar
dogsled
a private
i people going
hen we're
j project the
er program
these ex-
ef ore I okay
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cost abuses in
rograms is now
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hehicles in at
for it, Mr. Vice
The title comes
sue
vnth the logic of
which holds that
ar puts conven-
r ma not be true
in conventional
� , but nothing
mtbreak of con-
the superpowers
nation of the fear
Why not, then,
fnventional war, if
the prospect of a
Inuclear movement
MYUKCLe,
tQ To KiLL
I
KiLL.
N.n Johnson � ECU Photo Lab
ECU Cheerleaders Vie
For Championship Title
B STEVE SHERBIN
Muff W rtler
With eerything from "Go,
Pirates, Go to aerial somer-
saults, ECU's cheerleaders boost
team moraie and ignite fan spirit.
But our cheerleaders are also busy
behind the scenes.
With coaching from Kim
Bievins, the cheerleading squad
entered the National Cheerleading
Competitions sponsored by the
Ford Division of the Ford Motor
Company. Entrants were required
to submit a three-minute video for
consideration. Greenville's
WNCPTV Channel 9 taped their
entry.
The competition is divided into
tour regional contests. fcCU, be-
ing in the Southern Region, com-
petes against such schools as the
University of Virginia, the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, the University of
Kentucky, the University of
Florida and North Carolina State
University, last year's runner up
to winner Ohio State. The
regional winners will receive an
all-expenses-paid jaunt to Hawaii
for the January 7 finals to be
televised by ESPN Sports Cable
Network
The routine used by ECU's
cheerleaders for competition was
highly acrobatic. Jennifer
Cooper, one of two captains, ex-
plained that more partner stunts
were used because of the brief
time limit placed on the video en-
try. "Getting from formation to
formation was really all we could
do she said.
The squad, said coach Kim
Bievins, decided to compete only
three weeks prior to the close of
the entry date. They were under a
lot of pressure and practiced for
three additional hours each night.
"They even gave up their
Thanksgiving break said
Bievins. "The squad's really
dedicated this year, and I think
the fans are very responsive to
them. They (the cheerleaders) are
working hard to improve the rela-
tions between the cheerleaders,
the band, the "Golden Girls" and
the athletic program
The team includes Kim Bievins
(coach), Jennifer Cooper (cap-
tain), Cindy Batson, Patti Harril,
Nell Reeves, Karen Hall, Lisa
Chandler, Scott Perry (captain),
Brian "Showbiz" Foye, James
Elkins, Chris Shore, Terry Ingram
and Chuck King.
Reagan and Kohl Talk
With Shuttle Astronauts
SPACE CENTER.
ouston (UPI) �
esident Reagan and
st German Helmut
Ml talked to the
ace shuttle
tronauts today, and
eagan said the un-
precedented radio-
:elevision hookup
from two continents
demonstrated that
'technology can be
ased to bring people
gether
Mission com-
mander John Young,
a veteran of six space
flights, told the two
heads of state he saw
space "as a place
where humanity can
live and work and
make things better for
people on Earth
Reagan opened the
space conference call
at 9:45 a.m. EST by
noting that West Ger-
man physicist Ulf
Merbold is a member
of the Spacelab crew
aboard the shuttle and
said, "It is fitting that
on this German-
American tricenten-
nial, a German
astronaut is part of
the shuttle team.
"The shuttle is
demonstrating that
technology can be us-
ed to bring people
together in i new
spirit of enterprise
and cooperation, to
better their lives and
to ensure the peace of
mankind.
"I know
Chancellor Kohl
agrees with me that
this shuttle mission
with its German and
American crew,
represents the highest
aspiration of our two
peoples Reagan
said.
Young, Merbold,
co-pilot Brewster
Shaw, Byron
Lichtenberg, Owen
Garriott and Robert
Parker completed
their night research
today. They will be in
constant daylight for
the rest of the flight,
which � barring un-
favorable weather
will end Thursday at
Edwards Air Force
Base in the California
desert.
Kohl, speaking
from Athens where he
was attending a Euro-
pean Economic Com-
munity meeting, told
Merbold and his col-
leagues that he and
fellow Germans have
been following the
flight closely.
"We are proud in-
deed that Europe's
participation in this
highly successful ex-
periment is at this
time demonstrating in
such an impressive
way the close ties bet-
ween Europe and the
United States
�'We're delighted
you could visit with us
today Young told
the two heads of state.
Young, Merbold
and Lichtenberg par-
ticipated in the talk
with Reagan and Kohl
and then answered
questions from Euro-
pean journalists. The
three astronauts
floated at one end of
the Spacelab in shut-
tle's cargo bay while
television beamed the
scene to Earth.
Young praised his
crew and said he ex-
pected "big things
scientifically and
technically" from the
results of the most
ambitious interna-
tional space science
mission.
Merbold talked to
German Science
Minister Heinz
Riesenhuber earlier
today, with television
from the shuttle pro-
viding a breathtaking
backdrop of Earth as
blue as the Danube.
An unprecedented
communications
setup involving a
spaghetti-like network
of five satellites,
thousands of miles of
land lines and sc res
of technicians on both
sides of the Atlantic
made possible the
first-ever talk between
two heads of state on
two different con-
tinents and astronauts
in space.
Pictured here, the ECU Varisity cheerleaders perform at
an ECU football game this season. The squaud will be
entering a national cheering competition, competing
first in the Southern region against such teams as UNC-
Chapel and N.C. State.
a
s
t
C
1
a
s
s
Tomorrow!
Pearl Harbor
Night
Wed. Dec. 7
Special Prices All Night
122 EAST 5TH STlfXT
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
(919) 7583114
Private Club for members & guests
"A Night which
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Wright Night
Sat. Dec. 17
Come help us
celebrate the 80th
Anniversary of the
First Flight of the
GRAND OPENING
Friday Dec. 9
Super Happy Hour 5:00-9:00
Free T-shirts Pig Picking
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�� (i� m w�
� ���� mm �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 6, 1983
?
Kent State: The Tension Is Easing
Coot. From Page t
the slain students.
The students were killed on
May 4th, 1970. Students nation-
wide had declared a national
strike to protest President Richard
Nixon's sudden invasion of Cam-
bodia, which marked the first
widening of the war in Vietnam.
The reaction at home was marred
by occasional violence, some of
which occured in the town of
Kent.
Ohio Gov. James Rhodes called
in the National Guard to maintain
order on the campus. But on May
4, guardsmen abruptly opened
fire on a peaceful campus
demonstration, killing four and
wounding nine.
The outrage and tension that
exploded at Kent State long
outlived the anti-war movement
and the war itself.
Ongoing lawsuits against the
university and the National
Guard, and the university's often-
bungled efforts to downplay the
tragedv's significance in subse-
quent years often aggravated the
tension.
Among the more notable con-
frontations over the last 13 years
was the university's 1977 proposal
to build a gym annex in the area
of the shootings. The proposal led
to large protests and sit-ins to try
to stop construction workers from
starting. The gym was finished in
1978 despite the protests.
Also in 1978, a Cleveland foun-
dation commissioned world-
renowned sculptor George Segal
to build a memorial for the cam-
pus.
But when Segal presented the
finished sculpture to KSU ad-
ministrators, they rejected it.
Segal's sculpture depicts the
biblical story of Abraham and
Issac, showing an older man
holding a knife over a kneeling
youth, whose hands are tied.
"It was inappropriate to com-
memorate the deaths of four per-
sons and the wounding of nine
with a statue which appears to
represent an act of violence about
ACROSS
1 Sprint
5 Vipers
9 Mountain
sheep
12 Region
13 Father
14 Chicken
15 Long (for)
17 Motorless
vessel
19 Checked
21 Night birds
22 Caprice
24 Preposition
25 Genus of
cattle
26 Hurry
27 Classify
29 Rupees
abbr.
31 Urge on
32 Hebrew letter
33 Parent:
colloq
34 Eat
35 Compass
point
36 Tried
38 Beverage
39 Mournful
40 Teutonic
deity
41 Nuisance
42 Unlock
44 Public
speaker
46 Foreboding
48 Stage
whisper
51 Bushy clump
52 Choir voice
54 Lambs pen
name
55 Declare
56 Musical
instrument
57 Depression
DOWN
1 Period
of time
2 Exist
3 Scorching
4 Seraglio
5 Conjunction
6 AMuring
women
7 Goad
8 Stitch
9 Presen-
tations
10 Cure
11 Emmets
16 Symbol for
nickel
18 Footwear
20 Part of
face: pi.
22 Singing bird
23 Massive
25 Wire nail
27 Imitated
28 Musical
drama
29 Regrets
30 Quarrel
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
34 Unproductive
36 Makes into
leather
37 Cylindrical
39 Shabby
41 Sat for
portrait
42 Chooses
43 Malay canoe
44 Eye
amorously
45 Symbol for
tantalum
47 Swiss river
49 Noise
50 Dine
53 Hypothetical
force

1963 United Feature Syndicate. Inc.
512 E. 14th Street
(2 blocks West of Mess Donas)
to be committed KSU President
Brage Golding explained at the
time.
Princeton quickly asked to take
the sculpture, and placed it on its
campus in 1979.
Golding then proposed to build
a roman arch as a memorial, but
met almost unanimous disap-
proval. Critics noted the tradi-
tional military connotations of the
arch, while others complained it
looked like a fireplace.
Golding withdrew the proposal,
and no substantial memorial pro-
posals emerged for years after-
wards.
About the only official
acknowledgements of what hap-
pened at Kent State were a library
room dedicated to the victims'
memory, a small plaque at the
campus Hillel Foundation, and an
annual candlelight vigil on May 3
and 4.
But last week's meeting in-
dicates times have changed.
"I feel there is a more receptive
climate on campus now, and there
is a general feeling that we need
some kind of public memorial,
some kind of physical thing
says Dr. Jerry Lewis, a sociology
professor and advisor to the May
4 Task Force, the student-faculty
group that unsuccessfully has
pressed the trustees for a
memorial for 13 years.
"We've been through this
before says Thulin, who used to
be a task force member. "But for
the first time, all the concerned
groups � students, faculty, ad-
ministrators, alumni � seem to be
on the same general wavelength
"The state of KSU concurs
Robert McCoy, an English pro-
fessor who was a KSU vice presi-
dent under the Golding ad-
ministration, "is one that
acknowledges the events of what
happened here
Faculty President Calkins at-
tributes the change of heart "to
the time that has passed, a new
administration (Michael Schwartz
succeeded Golding in 1981), and
new people on the board of
trustees who don't feel as closely
involved with those events
Lewis attributes it to the unveil-
ing of the Vietnam War Memorial
in Washington, D.C last year.
Once the nation has begun to put
the war in perspective, the logic
goes, it can put the domestic tur-
moil over it in perspective.
Law Reducing DWI Arrests
THFFASTCAtog
Coat. From Page 1
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro-
gram.
As far as the actual effec-
tiveness of the Safe Roads Act
goes, "I think it's doing a real
good job as far as DWI's
Mallory said. Eddings said he
thinks the effectiveness will be
determined by the number of
repeat offenders. "It's going to
take two or three years before you
can put it together and go back
and see how many people
repeat he said. "A lot of our
people are in their late teens and
very early twenties, and, most
generally, that's their first time
around
Rejected Memorial
Kent State refused George Segal's memorial sculpture, which now i�
on display at Princeton. The sculpture depicts the biblical ston of
Abraham and Issac, showing an older man holding a knife over a
kneeling youth, whose hands are tied. KSL' President Brage Golding
thought the sculpture was too violent to commemorate the deaths of
four students.
1234 567891011
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Correction
In last Thursday, Dec. 1 edition of The
East Carolinian, Danny Scott was misquoted
in a student opinion survey. The quote
should have said that he celebrates Kowansa,
a cultural celebration, instead of the tradi-
tional Christmas ceremony. We regret the er-
ror.
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OM1 mHIO DAY Ot MONT �
THEREMING
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
Alt Greenville Blvd.
754-3023 �24 HRS.
PLAZA SHELL
TWO FREE MEALS
When you sign up for a meal plan
for a month at Sammv's
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(good for daily jpecials)
Regular Plate and Large Plate Meal Plan Available
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I -Haul Rentals
Available
"Mary Pinchot
Meyer was Jack
Kennedy's last
love: Why was she
assassinated? "
� Tim Leary
in the premier issue TlliliGOfcS
at your local newsstand
SUre iEaat (Karnlintan
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The East Carolinian offices, seccnd floor, Publica-
tions building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $25 for one year and $15 for six
months. See Geoff Hudson, circulation manager.
Don't settle for
a lunch that was
made right after
breakfast and stored
in a styrofoam box. Enjoy
a fresh sandwich or salad from'
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choice shced meats and cheese, garden fresh vegetables,
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ECU
On 5
B GORDON IPXk
Stage and film actress.
ducer and director Beth Gn
1972 graduate of ECLs De
ment of Drama and Spe?
of four North Ca-
featured in Maya Ar.gr
play On A Southern J
which opens with a i
premiere at Spirit Squai
Charlotte, December 16.
18.
Grant grew up in
Wilmington, and ivfe -
at New Hanover High S
was selected to atter
Carolina Governor! N
That's when she
association with othr
and cast members tf a
Southern Journe
tress Berhnda Tolberl -
pears as Jenr. � a the
sion show The leffa
tor Ron Dortch, a former di
at the Duke Elhngtor.
Performing fcrts
Defoy Glenn. Ee.
of GM Productions �
ducing the play
Glenn grew up in Chi
Dortch is a native �
It is also worth noting
Maya Angelou b
fessor at Wake Foresl
in Winston Satan She -
for her best-selling -
deal with the South: A a
the Caged Bird Sings.
Together In 1 ame i. j
and Swinging and Getting
Like Christmas
The play is set in
somewhere in the Sc
three are traveling to the "j
young black woman �
shooting a white,
politico, her boss wh;
posedly raped her. Grant
politician's sister; Telber.
professor at Columbia Unr
First place i" the first
Competition went to Grj
ECU an major His rep
the characters in the B.C
$300 cash prue and a
Grog's.
The reason for the c
First. Grog's of Greenvj
whose decor is based or.
wanted to become morel
School of An. Secondh.
sary of the B.C. comic
produced daily by Johnm
Dyla
Bv MIKE HAMER
I first listened to Bob
'63 or '64 when Pete
others were raving about tlj
songwriter in a folk mi
ed Sing Out There e?
healthy group of t
songwriters who had been
influenced by Woody
They included Peter
Tom Paxton, Phil Oci
Dylan. Dylan was clearly
of the bunch; his songs
anthems for the growii
Vietnam War movement,
quickly became a lei
figure. He pissed off all
purists when he
Newport Folk Festival
electric guitar in 65, and
i
w
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THFFASTCAROHNIAN
Entertainment
l)H EMBER s ix'
Pagr 7
ECU Graduate Leaves Hollywood
On Southern Journey
B GORDON IPOCK
'�wuiani Mtot
stage and film actress, pro-
per and director Beth Grant, a
i72 graduate of ECU's Depart -
of Drama and Speech, is one
tour North Carolinians
ired in Maya Angelou's new
lay On A Southern Journey
lich opens with a world
rmiere at Spirit Square in
harlotte, December 16, 17 and
g
orant grew up in Charlotte and
w ilmington, and while a student
New Hanover High School, she
vas selected to attend the North
olina Governor's School.
hat's when she began her
viation with other production
cast members of On A
uthern Journey. They are ac-
ss Berlinda Tolbert who ap-
rs as Jenny in the CBS televi-
show "The Jeffersons ac-
r Ron Dortch, a former director
!he Duke Ellington School of
r forming Arts and director
Glenn, Executive Director
M Productions which is pro-
the play. Tolbert and
nn grew up in Charlotte, and
)ortch is a native of Goldsboro.
jo worth noting that writer
lya Angelou is currently a pro-
;ssor at Wake Forest University
Winston Salem. She is known
her best-selling books that
Mth the South: Know My
the Caged Bird Sings, Gather
ogether In My Same a.n�Singing
and Swinging and Getting Merry
I ike Christmas.
The plav is set in a train station
m-where in the South. The
are traveling to the trial of a
mg black woman accused of
shooting a white, Southern
politico, her boss who has sup-
posedly raped her. Grant is the
politician's sister; Tolbert, a law
professor at Columbia University,
is the accused girl's sister; and
Dortch plays an AP reporter, a
white Southerner who has fled his
homeland to work in the North
and is now returning to cover the
trial. The three gradually learn
each other's identity and must
deal with their feelings as the play
unfolds. After traveling afar and
becoming successful in their
fields. On A Southern Journey is
in a real sense a homecoming for
the three North Carolinans as
well.
During a telephone interview,
Beth Grant spoke about her years
at ECU and how they prepared
her for the varied career she
has led since leaving Greenville.
"1 was basically on the five-
year plan at East Carolina she
recalled with a laugh. "In '69, I
just couldn't wait any longer and
left school and went to New York.
But when I got there. 1 realized 1
was pretty ill prepared for big-city
life and the competition. So I
returned that same year and went
back to school and eventually did
graduate. I'm so grateful that I
did because that senior year was
the most learning part of my
education
Beth explained that the advanc-
ed acting and directing classes she
took her senior year proved in-
valuable, laying a foundation
for later success.
"I tell you said Beth. "I
didn't have terrific grades at East
Carolina. The only things I really
did well in were my drama classes
and some literature classes. I was
not the best student. was
politically active. I was president
of the College Democrats, and
this was during the 60s; so there
was a lot of political activity In
1968, I campaigned vigorously for
Hubert Humphrey, and to do that
in Greenville. North Carolina
took a lot of time, energy and
devotion Gradewise, Beth ad-
mitted, "I barely squeaked
through
I asked Beth if the degree itself
had been an asset. "I've never had
anyone ask me if I have a
degree she said. "In fact, I've
told people and noticed that they
didn't seem to really care She
explained that earning the degree
was valuable because it proved to
her she could finish something.
"There are a lot of people �
especially in the arts � who are
very creative, exciting people, but
who don't have the discipline to
finish things Beth said. "And
I've seen a lot of talent and a lot
of genius not make it and not suc-
ceed because of that
After graduating from ECU
with a BEA, Beth returned to New
York City. Her first role was in
the off-Broadway production of
Siddhartha "It was pretty bad,
pretty wild she recalled. "It was
written by this psychiatrist who
lived in the Village. I played the
food lady, and my only lines were,
'Food, food so it was a pretty
modest debut
After working for a while as a
junior editor for a publishing
house, Beth landed a job directing
a children's Broadway musical. A
weak script resulted in a short
run, so at the seasoned age of 22,
Beth's decided to form her own
theater company. After rounding
up financial backers, Beth set
about producing Holy Ghost and
hired Edgar Loessin, her former
teacher at ECU, to direct the play.
Beth had played a leading role in
Holy Ghost her senior year at
ECU. and Loessin had directed
the play then � its world
premiere. It dealt with an Ap-
palachian religious cult who
handled poisonous snakes as part
of their worship services, live
See GRANT, p. 8
GROG
First place in the first annual Grog's Sculpture
Competition went to Gregory W. Shelnutt, an
ECU art major. His reproduction of Grog (one of
the characters in the B.C. comic strip) earned him a
$300 cash prize and a lifetime membership to
Grog's.
The reason for the competition was twofold.
First, Grog's of Greenville, a private nightclub
hose decor is based on the art of the comic strip,
wanted to become more involved with the ECU
School of Art. Secondly, 1983 is the 25th anniver-
sary of the B.C. comic strip originated and still
produced daily by Johnny Hart. Created in 1958 in
Endicott, NY the strip is carried by hundreds of
newspapers worldwide.
Schelnutt's sculpture of polychrome, styrofoam
and wire will be presented to Johnny Hart in
December as an anniversary gift. A $100 purchase
award went to Bryan W. Massey for his clay, mar-
ble and bronze interpretation of Grog. Steve Jones
also received a $100 purchase award for his clay,
wood and stone Grog titled "Cruisin All three
winners are ECU sculpture majors. Tom Haines,
co-owner of Grogs, thought the quality of the en-
tries was exceptional and immaginative and is
already looking forward to next year's competi-
tion.
Beth Grant (right) returned to East Carolina Playhouse's summer theater production of Vanities.
Live snakes were used in productions of Holy
Ghost.
Beth Grant ready for On A Southern Journe
Playhouse's Album
Reviewed, Analyzed, Scrutinized, etc,
By (JORDON IPOCK
Following an enormous ensemble of dancers,
singers and actors like the crew who filled the
McGinnis stage in Jesus Christ Superstar is a tough
challenge � especially for a cast of four. Those,
therefore, who expected Album to be theater on a
similarly spectacular scale with Superstar were pro-
bably disappointed. Granted, The East Carolina
Playhouse's second production of the year is not as
grand an effort as its first, and probably not as
entertaining either, but it is perhaps even more en-
joyable, especially for anyone between the ages of
30 and 35. More about this age factor in a moment.
The play covers four years, the high-school years
to be exact, of four teenagers. Rene Meyer plays
Peggy, a teenage girl blessed with what every girl
her age wants: a pretty face and a pretty figure.
Peggy is the stuff high-school homecoming queens
are made of, and she knows it. Larry McDonald
plays Billy, Peggy's handsome on-again-off-again
boyfriend. He's even more sure of his good looks
and winning abilities than Peggy is of hers.
But not everyone in life is a swan. Laura Leigh
Quisenberry plays Trish, Peggy's average looking
friend. At age 14, rather than admit she's not cut
out for the cover of Seventeen, Trish keeps telling
Peggy and herself that she's hopelessly v�ierd
And finally, Eric Tilley plays Bob, an adolescent
struggling to find some sort of identity other than
that of simply being Billy's screwy friend. Bob also
constantly invokes the "I'm wierd" defense
mechanism that is, whenever he's not burning
with pubescent lust for Trish.
There's an old argument that goes, if a horse
runs around a mile track, when he finishes he's
gone nowhere. Several of my friends who saw
Album feel similarly about the play's plot. The
Dylan Still Has Plenty To Say
By MIKE HAMER
Staff WfMar
1 first listened to Bob Dylan in
'63 or '64 when Pete Seeger and
others were raving about this new
songwriter in a folk magazine call-
ed Sing Out. There existed a
healthy group of topical
songwriters who had been heavily
influenced by Woody Guthrie.
They included Peter LaFarge,
Tom Paxton, Phil Ochs and
Dylan. Dylan was clearly the best
of the bunch; his songs became
anthems for the growing anti-
Vietnam War movement, and he
quickly became a legendary
figure. He pissed off all of the
purists when he appeared at the
Newport Folk Festival with an
electric guitar in '65, and he soon
thereafter became one of the big-
gest influences on rock music with
his finely crafted, lyrically
stimulating songs. He showed Tin
Pan Alley that songs didn't need
to be banal; people were attracted
to the lyrics in Dylan's songs.
Dylan's career has certainly had
its ups and downs; since he began
proselytizing Christianity in Slow
Train Coming, he has lost a
healthy part of his audience. But I
remember the last time I saw him
play, at the Greensboro Coliseum,
Dylan said to the audience, "I'll
be back; I'm not ready to let them
put me out to pasture yet In-
fidels, on Warner Brothers, may
be the record that places Dylan
back into the rock mainstrean.
I believe the question many
listeners have regarding Dylan is:
"Does he still have anything to
say to us in 1983�" It took me a
while to get into this record, but
after spending some time listening
to the lyrics I would have to say
yes. Dylan still has plenty to say.
In fact, given his moralistic stance
and his Biblical imagery, I cant't
help but look at Dylan as
operating out of the Hebrew pro-
phetic tradition. Our poets and ar-
tists have always been prophetic;
Dylan is just more obviously so.
From the opening notes oLn-
fldels, we realize Dylan l playing
with one of the best bands he has
ever played with on record since
The Band. Mark Knopfler and
Mick Taylor shine on guitar
See DYLAN, p. 9
i
play opens and closes with the four teenag
ing strip poker. In between thee scenes they grow
four years older and lose their virginity; b
whether they become vsier is debatable. Seve-
conflicts during the interim, however, are ol in-
terest.
Bob's love hate relationship with Bill) is the
most interesting ana dramatic or these, an ere
are any kudos for acting in Album. Eric Tilley
deserves them for exploring this friendship of une-
quals.
Billy is bigger, handsomer and more athle: ;
than Bob. He's a natural and charismatic leader
among high-school boys. Bob. of course, wants to
be Billy's friend. He gains prestige and a sense of
identity from the relationship. In return. Bob lets
Billy punch and slap him around whenever Billy
feels like it. Bob both adores and resents Billy. As
the years pass. Bob searches for his own identity,
one that doesn't feed off Billy. He empathizes with
the homely-looking rock superstar Bob Dylan, lm-
mitating Dylan's accent and articulating his own
pent-up frustations by quoting Dvlan lyrics. With
age comes a growing male pride, and Bob finally
tries to break his role of underling friend to Billy
As tension builds. Bob and Billy argue and then
fight in the most dramatic scene of the plav. For
just a little while. I forgot 1 was watching actors.
The play became touching during the closing
moments of Act I. MacDonald wa good, and
Tey was especially good. Director Cedric Wna-
chell achieves a convincing level of realism here
with the two young actors, and his fight scene is
superbly staged.
A less physical and slightly less dramatic alterca-
tion occurs between Billy and Trish late in Act II.
Trish has blossomed into young womanhood and
decides to run away with Bob, now a rebel ("I ran
away from home the day 1 was born") with ab-
solutely no cause. A motel-room scene filled with
yelling, screaming, light comedy, crying and tussl-
ing is the dramatic high point of the second half of
the play.
Moments of dramatic tension, however, are
rare. Most of the play is a mixture of varying
shades of comedy, sometimes light, sometimes sar-
donic. Sexual concerns highlight the dialogue.
As a youthful Peggy, Rene Meyer's blithe acting
is well suited to these scenes. Her and Trish's
discussions on sex proved particularly funny.
Peggy's description of the male penis ("a little
mushroom with an eye at the end of it") brought a
show-stopping guffaw from one gentleman in the
audience. However, not everyone appreciated the
frank humor. An elderly couple walked out of the
theatre following Billy's masturbation song, a
coarse take-off on the Beatles' 'You've Got to
Hide Your Love Away
Besides the two actors and two actresses, the
fifth principal in the play proved to be the music.
The Beach Boys, the Beatles, Del Shannon, Johnny
Rivers, Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones and other
rock-and-roll groups and soloists from the mid-60s
hold center stage throughout Album. Nothing in
literature or theater should ever be done arbitrari-
See ALBUM, p. 9
T
,





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 6, 1983
'Lords Of Discipline' Semester's Final
For over a century,
the Carolina Military
Institute has taken in
boys and turned out
men. Each year, a
new group of novice
cadets is sadistically
initiated into an ar-
chaic, militaristic life
style.
The Ten is a self-
appointed secret
society that exists
within the school as
one of these tradi-
tions. Its origins are
veiled by time, but the
Ten's goals are clear
� members of the
group consider it their
duty to protect the
school's sacred honor
code against "con-
tamination
Psychological ter-
rorism, violence and
even murder are the
methods used to
achieve their goals.
First-year student
Pearce, who is black,
is considered an
"undesirable and
the Ten attempt to
humiliate him by
means of harrassment
and violent physical
attacks. But the Ten
didn't bargain for
senior cadet Will
McLean (David
Keith, An Officer
And A Gentleman), a
young man who
forges his own per-
sonal code of honor in
defiance of the very
rules that shaped him.
The Lords of
Discipline is a
remarkable film
depiction of tradi-
tional military values,
an unsettling expose
of an anachronistic
system. It's the story
of how one individual
can prevail, driven
solely by what he
believes is right. The
twists and turns of the
plot lead to a startling
climax that will leave
audiences stunned.
Grant Takes Southern Journey
Cont. from p. 7
snakes from the ECU
Biology Department
were used in both pro-
ductions.
"We borrowed
them said Beth,
"and 1 was supposed
to ship them back. We
left them in a crate
still has life and is be-
ing done she said.
Beth made the tran-
sition from stage to
film and television by
a circuitous route
through national
politics. She worked
as a celebrity coor-
dinator for the Carter
down in the basement presidential campaign
of my apartment putting together fund
building in New York,
and they disappeared
within a couple of
days. I don't know if
some poor custodian
found them and got
scared and threw
them away or what
happened. I guess I
still owe the ECU
raisers and rallies that
featured film and
music stars. She
worked with Cher,
Dianna Ross, Hal
Linden, Warren Beat-
ty, Gabe Caplin,
Shirley McClain,
Dionne Warwick and
others. Herb
Biology Department Stienberg of Universal
some snakes. Studios was so im-
"We produced Ho- pressed with her work
ly Ghost at the Gar- as an organizer that
rick Theatre on
Bleecker Street across
from the Bitter End in
the heart of the
Village. It was well
received. We didn't
get rave reviews, but
he hired Beth to learn
film and television
production. Her first
job was as apprentice
producer for the
television series
"Switch" with Robert
we did get respectable Wagner and Eddie
reviews, particularly Albert.
from the New York
Times Beth added
that even though Holy
Ghost was not a big
hit for her, it has
While working at
Universal, Beth
studied acting and
screenplay writing at
Sherwood Oaks Ex
become something of perimental College,
a cult piece and has The faculty of well-
been produced in San known professional
Francisco, Los
Angeles, Texas and
other areas. "It
makes me very proud
that something I con-
tributed to in New
York, and something
that began at ECU
actors and writers
stressed profes-
sionalism in a way
very similar to her
training at ECU,she
said. During this time,
she also played the
recurring role of Mary
the waitress in NBC's
"B.J. and the Bear"
television scries.
Besides minor suc-
cesses in acting, Beth
continued in writing
and producing. For
the past four years she
has served as Director
of Creative Services,
writing, producing
and directing
segments for George
Schlatter Produc-
tions, producers of
"Real People
"Real Kids" and
"Look at Us
Despite the growing
prospects of real
financial security for
the first time in her
life, Beth felt un-
fulfilled. Acting and
writing were her first
love, not production
and management. She
left Schlatter and
"Real People" in
Febuary.
Between that move
and her present role in
On A Southern
Journey, Beth has
continued writing and
studying. She is cur-
rently trying to sell a
screenplay she recent-
ly finished and is
finishing work on a
largely
autobiographical
novel Know What
Happened to Scarlet
O'Hara.
"The main thing I
learned at Sherwood
Oaks she said,
"was that writers
write. Writers don't
talk about writing �
they write, and that's
what I'm trying to do.
I write all the time,
whether it's keeping a
journal or taking
classes. I believe in
studying. I will always
study. I'm in class
now Beth is taking
acting classes from
director Milton
Katselas. Classmates
included, among
others, Tom Selleck
before he landed his
role in "Magnum
P.I
Three years ago,
Beth returned to
Greenville to act in an
East Carolina
Playhouse summer
production of
Vanities. Edgar
Locssin recalled his
impressions of Beth.
"She's always been a
very vivacious, very
energetic girl who I
think will make it big
someday if she stays
with it Loessin said.
"She has no fear; she
just charges in, and
she's got tremendous
hutzpah and dedica-
tion and some
talent as well
For ECU students
from the Charlotte
area � and there are
many � On A
Southern Journey
should prove a pro-
vocative play, one
well worth seeing.
After its premiere in
Charlotte, the cast
and crew hope to take
it to New York.
Veronika Voss
German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder brings a tantalizing mystery story to the screen in Veronika Voss. J
sumptuous, Uterally dazzling, Hendrixs Wednesday evening feature promises suberb entertainment for ECC s roreign-
film buffs.
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?
fr4
Albu
Coat, from p. 7
ly, and certainly the
music has a purpose
here. It is both canvas
and paint, foreground
and background
permeating ever
aspect of the play. If
there is a serious
message between
these two hands of
strip poker, it con-
cerns the music and
how it figures in
teenage life.
Peggy and Billy.
more sure of their
own identities, never
fall heavily under the
spell of rock and roll
Trish and Bob, with
fragile egoes and no
notion as to who the
are, latch onto the
music with a religious
fervor. Whether in the
form
or Ji
musid
with
loei
mat!
real
falls
undej
spell
ceas
pers
brea
fnghj
he
Tnsn
any
poinJ
final!
divK
depej
rock
Bi
:
pla(
7 � 1
onsu
Dylan
Cont. from p. 7
throughout the
record. Robbie
Shakespeare and Sl
Dunbar are possibh
the tightest rhythm
section in rock music.
and Alan Clark's
keyboard work is
solid throughout. The
music hasn't changed
though; it all sounds
the way his records
have sounded since
Dylan first went elec-
tric.
"Jokerman" is the
most melodic song on
the record; it's also
the most lyrically am-
biguous � full of
Biblical and dream
imagery depicting a
hedonistic alter-ego
for Christ. In the
chorus Dylan sings.
"Jokcrman dance to
the nightingale
tune Birds fly high b
the light of the
moonOh
Jokerman
"Sweetheart Like
You" is Dylan's song
!
rat:
a lit
and
kins
Babj
land
li
the
the
Dyii
choi
a
bio
a
to
met
9A
c
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s





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 6, 1983 9
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(PM
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irges
'Album' Brings Back 60s
font, from p. 7
ly, and certainly the
music has a purpose
here. It is both canvas
and paint, foreground
and background
permeating every
aspect of the play. If
there is a serious
message between
these two hands of
strip poker, it con-
cerns the music and
how it figures in
teenage life.
Peggy and Billy,
more sure of their
own identities, never
tall heavily under the
spell of rock and roll.
Trish and Bob, with
fragile egoes and no
notion as to who they
are, latch onto the
music with a religious
fervor. Whether in the
form of Brain Wilson
or John Lennon, the
music provides Trish
with a safe, surrogate
lover until she is
mature enough for a
real boyfriend. Bob
falls so completely
under Bob Dylan's
spell that he almost
ceases to exist as a
person. He finally
breaks the music's
frightening grip when
he groans sickly to
Trish, "I don't need
any music At this
point late in Act II, he
finally becomes an in-
dividual no longer
dependent on Billy or
rock and roll.
But even when the
music isn't being
played on a record
player or radio
onstage, it filters soft-
ly through the theatre
speakers, a backdrop
to the action, setting
tone and pace. Ob-
viously then, how one
fells about the music
figures in how one
reacts to the play.
This is where the age
factor comes in.
For those in their
late 20s and early 30s
who grew up with 60s
rock. Album pro-
bably proves an en-
joyable play. This was
the music they heard
each morning while
getting ready for
school, while going on
dates, while living
their adolescent lives.
The music is an old
familiar friend and
Album is a slice of
their past served up
before them. Besides
the music, the play
contains a treasure
chest of mid-60s
minutia. The dialogue
is filled with once-
common, now-
archaic teen epletives
like, "you dip shit
and "sit on it and
rotate
Patrice Alexander
and Greg Buch add
their talents to insure
the play rings true.
Whether it is 14-year-
old Peggy's flip hair
style with matching
knee socks and hair
band, or 18-year-old
Trish's mini-skirt and
long straight hair, the
costumes are ab-
solutely convincing.
Buch shows an even
greater concern for
detail. The boys' dor-
mitory walls are
covered with pictures
of nude girls from
Playboy magazine
but not just any
Playboy pictures. The
large-breasted girls
were vintage 60s
models, and the back-
issue pictures were
ordered specially for
the play. These are the
sort of details that
make the play come
alive for anyone old
enough to notice.
Within a few more
decades, as the 60s
fade even further into
society's collective
memory, Album may
lose it's appeal com-
pletely. Its music,
slang and identifying
details will be totally
unfamiliar to an au-
dience. And like
Shakespeare's play's,
we may need foot-
notes on our pro-
grams to enjoy its
subtleties.
Dylan Still Has Plenty
Cont. from p. 7
throughout the
record. Robbie
Shakespeare and Sly
Dunbar are possibly
the tightest rhyihm
section in rock music,
and Alan Clark's
keyboard work is
solid throughout. The
music hasn't changed
though; : '1 sounds
the way nis records
have sounded since
Dylan first went elec-
tric.
"Jokerman" is the
most melodic song on
the record; it's also
the most lyrically am-
biguous � full of
Biblical and dream
imagery depicting a
hedonistic alter-ego
for Christ. In the
chorus Dylan sings,
"Jokerman dance to
the nightingale
tune Birds fly high by
the light of the
moonOh
Jokerman
"Sweetheart Like
You" is Dvlan's song
of innocence and ex-
perience. It's also a
great song. Dylan
sings, "They say that
patriotism is the last
refuge to which a
scoundrel clingsSteal
a little and they throw
you in jail, steal a lot
and they make you a
kingThere's only one
step down from here,
Baby, it's called the
land of harmony and
bliss. What's a
sweetheart like you
doing in a dump like
this0"
In "License to
Kill" Dylan explores
the tension between
the aggressive male
psyche and the passive
female psyche. Here
Dylan sings in the
chorus, "Now there's
a woman on my
block Sitting thereIn
a cold chill,She
says-Who's goin to
take away his license
to kill0" This state-
ment has been made
before, but Dylan
sings it effectively.
In "Man of Peace"
and "Union Sun-
down Dylan ex-
presses conservative
sentiments. He warns
the listener of "Man
of Peace" to choose
his heroes carefully
because "Sometimes
Satan comes as a man
of peace "Union
Sundown which
features some fine
background vocal
work by Clydie King,
castigates the unions
in the country for
having become
greedy. Here Dylan
sings, "Well it's sun-
down on the
unionThat was made
in the USASure was
a good ideaTill greed
got in the way
"I and I" is a gem
of a song that con-
tains some exquisite
guitar lines from both
Knopfler and Taylor.
It is basically a
religious song in
which Dvlan explores
a creation spirituality
in which nature
"neither honors nor
forgives This song
has a great opening
stanza: "Been so long
since a strange woman
slept in my bed, Look
how sweet she
sleeps How free must
be her dream In
"Don't Fall Apart On
Me Tonight Dylan
acknowledges the
tenuous grasp that
either person can have
in the midst of a sex-
ual relationship.
This isn't Dylan's
best album: these
aren't his best songs.
but this is a very
strong record that gets
under your skin.
There are enough im-
ages on this album to
keep anyone intrigued
for a good while.
THE FINEST SCHOOLS
TURN OUT THE
FINEST LEADERS
LORDS OF
DISCIPLINE
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
This weekend's feature film at Hendrix Theatre.

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?
THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
DECEMBER 6. 1983
Page 10
Bucs 'Butt-Kicked' By Tough VCU
Bv CINDY PLEASANTS
�awrtaE4ttor
Virginia Commonwealth held
the East Carolina Pirates to just
one field goal for more than 12
minutes before shattering the
Pirates, 75-44, Saturday night in
Richmond Coliseum.
Head Basketball Coach Charlie
Harrison was at no loss for words
when summing up the gist of
game. "It was just an old-
fashioned butt-kicking he said.
"This shows the kids that we have
a long, long way to go
With 6:50 remaining in the first
half to 14:20 in the second period,
the Pirates scored only one of
their 15 field goals. By holding the
Bucs, the Rams tied their record
for fewest field goals by an oppo-
nent.
Leading 28-21 at halftime.
VCU outscored the Bucs, 20-5, in
the first minutes of the second
half after ECU had some trouble
shooting from the floor. The
Pirates shot 28.3 percent overall,
while VCU finished with a 50.9
field goal percentage.
Despite the low percentage,
Harrison said poor shot selection
wasn't the reason the Pirates were
blown out. "I thought we got
great shots tonight Harrison
said, "but they didn't go.
"I thought we had a good game
plan. It was not what they did, but
what we didn't do
Harrison said VCU's second-
half rally eliminated the Pirates'
chances. "At the half, I thought
we were in good shape he said,
"but they made that quick spurt
on us, and our shots didn't drop.
"They were not ahead at
halftime; we were behind because
of what we were doing. We
thought we could catch up on a
shot or a defensive gamble
Many of VCU's baskets were
scored underneath, and Harrision
wasn't too pleased with the team's
defensive play up front. But Har-
rison doesn't blame the loss on
defense, or rather, the lack of it.
"The defense didn't beat us
Harrison said. "We simply did
not execute
Unlike VCU, the Bucs weren't
able to penetrate inside effectively
in the first half, and the Rams
close shots wouldn't fall. That
kept the game tight score-wise un-
til the latter part of the first half.
VCU eventually gained an
11-point lead.
The Rams got off to a four-
point lead, but freshmen William
Grady and Roy Smith each scored
to tie the game, 4-4. The Bucs' on-
ly lead came when Tony Robinson
sank a freethrow with 12:14 left to
make the score, 9-8.
VCU's Don Franco and Alvin
Robinson put the Rams back up,
16-11. Just minutes later, Franco
made a steal to score, and Mike
Schlegel made a basket to push
the Rams further ahead, 24-15.
VCU quickly jumped out to a
28-17 advantage, but ECU's final
four points narrowed the Rams'
lead to 28-21 at halftime.
In the second half, VCU ran off
four straight baskets to spark a
48-28 rally with 12:41 remaining.
At one point, the Bucs trailed,
70-36.
A frustrated Harrison had two
technicals called on him with
10:54 left, giving VCU four
freethrows and a basket.
"I just said that (a VCU player)
hit Curt (Vanderhorst on the
arm) he said. "The second one
came when I asked what he called
the first one for
ECU's Barry Wright was the
only double-figure scorer for the
Pirates with 11.
VCU's Michael Brown led with
14 points, while Schlegel and
Calvin Duncan had 12 each, Fran-
co scored 11, and Robert Dicker-
son had 10.
VCU is now 2-0.
The Pirates now 2-1, will take
on the Duke Blue Devils this
Saturday, and Harrison said the
Bucs have quite a bit of work to
do before then.
"We've got a long way to go to
be a good team he said. "Our
mental concentration is just hor-
rendous, even in practice. We
don't sustain or complete a play.
"They (the players) are nice
kids, but they have to come to
realize that things don't come
easy
� East Caroltaa 44, VCV 75
ECU
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Allen
Davis
Dickerson
Franco
ARobinson
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MT FG FT I A f Ft
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II
24
22
36
3
19
18
12
3
II
313 5-6
0-3 2 2
13 0-1
4-11 1-2
3-4 3-4
11 2-2
2-4 0-1
1-6 0-0
0-6 CH
0-1 0-0
2

6
4
I
0
2
4
5
0
13 1
11
2
2
9
9
4
4
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0
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15-53 14-21 3J 23 3 44
MT FG FT � A F P�
22
15
3
13
2
14
12
26 5 10 4-5 5
17 3-5 0-0 3
20 6-12 0-0 7
30 2-7 8 10 5
2-2 0-1 2
I 2 0-0 3
0-0 0-0 2
o o-i i
3' 4-5 4
4-5 3-4 3
2-3 0-0 2
iOO i-55 l�-i� 42 2� M
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KaXCaroMaa 21 2J - 44
i (ouoiitlik '� 47 � 7S
Turnovers � East Carolina II VCV 14
Technical Fouls - Ed2
Officials � Houseman. Fraim
Attendance � 6.21
Player Highlight
Smith Just Doing His Job
Bv JIMMY DONATELLI
Suff Writer
One of the bright new faces on
ECU's young basketball team is
6-8 freshman Roy Smith.
Smith scored 18 points and
grabbed 12 rebounds in his first
NCAA game when the Pirates
defeated Campbell University,
75-66.
"I came out ready to play
Smith said. "They depend on me
to score, rebound and play good
defense, and that's all I try to
do
Smith impressed ECU head
coach Charlie Harrison even
before the season began. "Roy
knows how to score Harrison
said. "He's extremely quick
aroand the basket and a quick
jumper.
"We felt good about Roy be-
ing a player for us right away
Smith, who hails from a small
town named King's Mountain,
N.C played basketball at
Hunter Huss High School. He led
his team to a 21-4 record and a
berth in the state 4-A playoffs by
averaging 21.6 points and 12.8 re-
bounds per game.
Smith said one of his biggest
thrills was being named con-
ference player of the year in the
Western 4-A conference. His
other most momentous moment
was beating a crosstown rival
twice in one year.
Following the successful
season, Smith was selected to
play in the East-West All-Star
game.
His accomplished high school
career caught the eye of such
schools as Tulsa, Oklahoma and
Clemson. Smith narrowed his
choices down to Western
Carolina and ECU before
deciding that he wanted to
become a Pirate.
"I liked the campus a lot
Smith said. "1 also got a long
with the players pretty well, and I
liked Coach Harrison.
"Harrison seemed to be
honest, and I'm an honest per-
son, so 1 decided to come to
ECU
When asked how he felt about
starting as a freshman, Smith
didn't hesitate to reply.
"I know I'm only a
freshman he said, "but I don't
think about that when I step on
the court.
"I just consider myself another
player trying to do his job
ECU Football Players
Sweep All-South Teams
ECU offensive guard Terry
Long and four of his Pirate team-
mates made the Associated Press
All-South Independent football
first team.
East Carolina led the first-team
selections with five players, while
landing four more in the second
unit to have a total of nine players
named.
In addition to Long, others
named to the first team were
tackle John Robertson, running
back Earnest Byner, defensive end
Jeff Pegues and defensive back
Clint Harris.
Named to the second team were
wide receiver Henry Williams,
tight end Norwood Vann,
quarterback Kevin Ingram and
defensive lineman Hal Stephens.
Miami, headed for an Orange
Bowl date with top-ranked
Nebraska, placed four players on
the first team and six on the se-
cond.
Hurricane quarterback Bernie
Kosar became the first freshman
selected to the quarterback posi-
tion when the news service's 16th
annual all-star team was announc-
ed Thursday.
Miami's Howard
Schnellenberger was named the
Coach Of The Year for the second
time in four years.
Schnellenberger, who led Miami
to a 10-1 record, drew seven votes
for the coach of the year award
from a panel of regional sports
writers. ECU head coach Ed
Emory was the runnerup with
four votes.
m
MICHAIL (MITM��CU
Pirate freshman Derek Battle shows his close-range shooting form
against Christopher Newport, an earlier opponent this season. Battle
grabbed four rebounds for the Pirates against VCl Saturday night.
Men Swimmers Crush,
Lady Bucs Split Meets
By RANDY MEWS
11HII Sports EJtkiot
The ECU men's swim team won
both of its dual meets this
weekend, defeating Georgia
Southern 74-34, and taking South
Florida 83-30.
The men were so far ahead in
the. final stages of the meet that
the last three eents were not
figured into the final point total.
"This was a good win for us
Coach Rick Kobe said. "We ex-
pected the meet to be closer
against South Florida, but as it
turned out we dominated them
Juinor Stan Willims and senior
Kevin Richards each had three
first place finishes for the Pirates.
Both won two individual events
and had a realy victory.
The Ladies split their meets,
defeating South Florida 60-53,
while bowing to GSU 69-44. "Our
defeat of South Florida was one
of the biggest victories ever for the
women's swim program Kobe
said. "Last year they finished
sixth at the NCAA Division II Na-
tionals
Scotia Miller and Cindy
Newman were double winners for
the women. Miller took both
distance freestyle events, while
Newman was victorious in the
200-meter freestyle and was pan
of the first place 200 medly relay
team.
That relay team, consisting of
Caycee Poust, Jessica Fineberg,
Nancy James and Newman,
qualified for the Nationals with a
time of 1:53.1
Both ECU teams will train in
North Palm Beach. Fla Dec. 2"
through Jan. 4, to keep in shape
for their busy 1984 schedule.
Men's Results
400 medly relay: 1. Hidalgo.
Mathieson. Richards, Breece.
1000 freestvle: 1. Larranaga
9:56.8 2. Smith 10:08.55
200 freestvle: 1. Pitelli 1:452
2. McMillan 1:49.11
50 freestvle: 1. Williams 21.83
200 IM: 1. Richards 2;01.06 2.
Wray 2:02.35
One-meter dive: 1. Eagle 2.
Swanson
200 butterfly: 1. Wrav 1:58.4"
2. McMillan 2:04.06
See Statistics. Page 12
Lady Bucs Stopped By Charging 49ers
By RANDY MEWS
Aartrtaal Saoru EatttOf
The ECU women's basketball
team let a 14 point first-half lead
slip away from them, as they
dropped a 56-50 decision to UNC-
Charlotte.
The Lady Pirates jumped out to
leads of 6-1 and 22-9 in the early
going but weren't able to maintain
their advantage.
After Sylvia Bragg sank a jump
shot with 9:32 remaining to give
ECU its biggest lead of 25-11, the
Pirates were held to just one point
the remainder of the half.
Meanwhile, the 49ers used a
balanced attack of inside and out-
side shots to score 17 points and
take a 28-26 halftime lead.
The Lady Pirates moved ahead
again in the second half, but
UNCC took the lead for good on before the game and is considered
bounder and third leading scorer,
could not dress out for the game
because she missed practice on
Friday.
The play of point guard
Delphine Mabry was the one
bright spot for ECU. Mabry held
Candy Lucas, UNC-C's leading
scorer, to only 13 points. Lucas
had been averaging 23 points
�aby PkTmntom acu
Lady Pirate He�d Coach Cathy Andrazzi shouts to her players in Sunday's game against UNC Charlotte.
a Margueritte Parker layup with
9:41 left in the game.
Coach Cathy Andruzzi said her
team was beaten by the 49ers in-
side play. Darlene Hedges was
able to grab eight rebounds for
the lady Bucs, but as a team, ECU
was out rebounded 45-27.
"They just killed us inside
Andruzzi said. "We didn't pull
away with the game when we had
the chance
The Pirate's inability to get an
offensive rebound hurt them the
most down the strech. Although
UNCC only shot 43 percent in the
second half, they were able to get
second and third shots almost
every time down the floor.
Andruzzi experimented with a
new starting lineup for the game,
as Lynn Nance substituted for
Bragg, and Anita Anderson took
Lisa Squirewell's place.
Squirewell, ECU's leading re-
one of the best scoring threats in
the state.
On Thursday night, the Lady
Bucs bowed to Favetteville State
64-53.
The Lady Broncos applied a
tough full court press most of the
night, forcing ECU to turn the
ball over 36 times.
FSU jumped to an early 10-0
lead and did not allow the Lady
Pirates to score until Mabry con-
nected with 12:51 remaining in the
half.
ECU closed the gap to 15-13
with 6:17 left, but the Broncos
"Delphine had an outstanding managed to pull away again, and
game Andruzzi said. "She
played well at both ends of the
court and did a great job on
Lucas.4
ECU scored the first seven
points of the second half and held
a 31-28 lead with 16:36 remaining,
but once again were unable to
maintain their advantage.
The lead changed hands four
times before the 49ers took the
went to the lockerroom with a
28-21 halftime lead.
Anderson hit three straight
jumpers early in the second half to
bring the Lady Pirates to within
32-29, but that was as close as
ECU came.The Broncos con-
nected on 30 of 38 free throws
down the strech to seal their third
win in six games.
"We just played a terrible
lead for good on a Parker follow- basketball game Andruzzi said
shot. UNC-C's lead continued to "Thirty-six turnovers is
grow as they controlled the unbelievable
boards, but it wasn't until Kristen Phillips led the Pirates in both
Wilson made it 52-44 with 1:46 re- categces, scoring 12 points and
maining that the game was put out pulling down 12 rebounds,
of reach. ECU drops to 2-3 with the two
Mabry was the game's leading losses, and will return to action
scorer with 19 points, while An- Saturday night when they com-
nettc Phillips was the only other pete in their first conference game
Pirate in double figures with 13. against James Madison.
SECS
(UPD � Coming
Up short on the foot-
ball field isn't a finan-
cial disaster her. ou
belong to
Southeastern Con-
ference
For the second veax
in a ro. the
iO-member SEC
berths in seven bowls,
and the three schools
which didn't get
vited still get a piece
of all thai act
Last '
SEC's overall be-
take was almos: S'
million and. &'
expenses.
member :eu
eluding those
staved home �
$225,000 Kd
shared incon
season tele
pearare-
$50-a-ea-
chaiged for � . -
to the
looks like
best
arour.j
The SEC � .
bowl sea-
ing Saturday
posted

B -
De
-
ECU's Darlene Hedges M
Bragg '25 looks on in �unj
r
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Contacts
$59. (X)
r
OPTIC
. -
Gan. N HanH
iiimiiiihiiuum
Fall
rien
Third Regimeni
People's Choi
Sensation
0KT
Garrett
Dixie Stn
m
Enforcei
Co-sponsol





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 6, 1983
11
u
t
9 I
'w-lCU
t shooting form
this season. Battle
Saturda night.
rush,
eets
?ubie winners for
liller took, both
lyle events, while
3nous in the
ktvle and was part
200 medly relay
jam, consisting of
Jessica Fineberg,
and Newman,
e Nationals with a
;ams will train in
ich, Fla Dec 27
I, to keep in shape
1984 schedule.
Results
eia: 1 Hidalgo,
Ihards, Breece.
lie: 1. Larranaga
i 10:08
1. Pitelh 1:47.52
ll Wilhams 21.83
pchards 2;01.06 2.
ive; 1 Eagle 2.
. Wrav 1:58.47
.06
Ics. Page 12
49ers
night, the Lady
1 .etteville State
roncos applied a
press most of the
IFCL to turn the
tes
to an early 10-0
t allow the Lady
until Mabry con-
1 remaining in the
the gap to 15-13
but the Broncos
1 away again, and
:kerroom with a
lead.
it three straight
the second half to
Pirates to within
was as close as
Broncos con-
W 38 free throws
I to seal their third
flayed a terrible
Andruzzi said.
turnovers is
�e Pirates in both
fng 12 points and
rebounds.
2-3 with the two
return to action
when they com-
conference game
ladison.
EC Schools Head For Bowls
(UPI) � Coming
p short on the foot-
all field isn't a finan-
lal disaster when you
elong to the
outheastern Con-
erence.
For the second year
n a row, the
0-member SEC has
icrths in seven bowls,
nd the three schools
hich didn't get in-
ited still get a piece
f all that action.
Last year, the
EC's overall bowl
ake was almost $5.5
Imillion and, after all
(expenses, each
member team � in-
cluding those which
staved home � netted
$225,000. Add on
shared income for in-
season television ap-
pearances and the
S50-a-year dues
charged for belonging
to the conference
looks like one of the
best investments
around.
The SEC begins this
bowl season this com-
ing Saturday when
Ole Miss (6-5), which
posted its first winn-
ing campaign since
1977 by closing with a
five-game winning
streak, takes on 16th-
ranked Air Force (9-2)
in the Independence
Bowl at Shreveport,
La.
In the weeks ahead:
Dec. 17 � Ten-
nessee (8-3) meets
1 5th-ranked
Maryland (8-3) in the
Citrus Bowl at Orlan-
do, Fla.
Dec. 22 � Ken-
tucky (6-4-1) meets
19th-ranked West
Virginia (8-3) in the
Hall of Fame Bowl at
Birmingham, Ala.
Dec. 24 �
Alabama (7-4) meets
6th-ranked SMU
(10-1) in the Sun Bowl
at El Paso, Texas.
Dec. 30 - 11th-
ranked Florida (8-2-1)
meets lOth-ranked
Iowa (9-2) in the
Gator Bowl at
Jacksonville, Fla.
And Jan. 2 � 7th-
ranked Georgia
(9-1-1) meets 2nd-
ranked Texas in the
Cotton Bowl at Dallas
and 3rd-ranked
Auburn meets 8th-
ranked Michigan in
the Sugar Bowl at
New Orleans.
"Some people
question us going to a
bowl game with a 6-5
record said Billy
Brewer who took over
at Ole Miss last winter
when Steve Sloan,
after five straight los-
ing seasons, switched
to Duke. "But
finishing as strong as
we did, winning our
last five games, made
us a better team than
our record.
"Like I told the
kids after the (season-
opening) Memphis
State loss said
Brewer. "It's not how
you start something
but how you finish it
that counts.
"I really feel that
this football team in
1983 did more for Ole
Miss than any that has
ever been here. It's a
delight to look at
where we had been
early in the season
(losing five of the first
six games) to where
we are now
While this will be
the first bowl game
for Ole Miss in 12
years, it's the third in
a row for Tennessee.
"With the best Ten-
nessee record in 10
years, our squad
definitely deserves to
play in a bowl game
said Vols coach
Johnny Majors. "It
worked hard to get
where it is this season
and we view the
Citrus Bowl as a
reward for that
work
Jerry Claiborne
feels the same way
about his Kentucky
team, especially since
last year, Claiborne's
first back at his alma
mater, the Wildcats
did not win a game.
Bowl games are old
hat for Alabama
which will be playing
in one of the post-
season contests for
the 25th consecutive
year. But the Sun
Bowl is very impor-
tant to Crimson Tide
coach Ray Perkins
because a loss there
would leave Perkins,
in his first year as
Bear Bryant's suc-
cessor, with
Alabama's worst
record in 13 years.
But THE bowl for a
Southeastern Con-
ference team is the
Sugar Bowl because
that berth goes to the
conference champion.
Auburn dethroned
Georgia to win that ti-
tle for the first time in
26 years and now the
Tigers are counting on
some outside help to
give them a shot at the
national crown as
well.
If � and this is a
very big if � 4th-
ranked Miami (Fla.)
should upset top-
ranked Nebraska in
the Orange Bowl and
Georgia should upset
Texas, Auburn just
might vault into the
No. 1 spot. Another
hurdle to that is that
even if the bowl
results work out that
way, it is likely that
Miami would be
rewarded for con-
quering the Cor-
nhuskers by leapfrog-
ging Auburn in the
final rankings.
"There's no ques-
tion that going to the
Sugar Bowl is �
tremendous plus to
our football
program said
Auburn coach Pat
Dye. "That has been
our goal the past two
years, one that started
when we first went to
Auburn three years
ago. It's a culmina-
tion of three years of
work
Georgia, which had
won 23 consecutive
SEC games before
losing, 13-7, to
Auburn last month,
had hoped to go to its
fourth consecutive
Sugar Bowl, but sees
the Cotton Bowl as a
chance to make
amends.
"We all felt bad
about the Auburn loss
(only Georgia's se-
cond regular-season
loss in four years) and
we all felt like we
could have done
things a little better
than we did said
Georgia coach Vince
Dooley. "Playing
Texas in the Cotton
Bowl gives this team,
especially our seniors,
a chance to end on a
positive note
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Christmas Cards
make the season merry,
and show you've remembered
someone special!
Htn4 &MuAfe6 iauiiW
-awamm
OAHY PATTBKSOM�CCU
�I
ECU's Darlene Hedges (30) goes for loose ball, while teammate Sylvia
Bragg (25) looks on in Sunday's I NX Charlotte game.
American Greetings with Rose Design"
MCMLXXXIII American Greetings Corporation
Ziggy
MCMLXXXIII Universal Press Syndicate (
v w '
.KiMrV .s
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Contacts
$59.00
1
i$15.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
I PAIR OF EYEGLASSES
Must present this ad for discount. .
The)
OPTICAL
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Monday thru Thursday
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Men
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Women
Third Regiment Heartbreakers
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Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
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MICMACL SMITH��CU Wf La
Pirate Freshman Keith Sledge guards a Christopher Newport player in
an earlier game thi season.
Student Condos
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At Tfie Gwnpus � East Carolina University
Were building j spcu.il place for East Carolina University students to live � next to
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Three tloorplans jrc available, and units are completely furnished Each unit will Ee
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Recent changes m tax laws make ownership of this tpe property advantageous for both
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 6, 1983

Statistics
100 freestyle: 1. Williams 48.31
2. PiteUi 49.57
200 backstroke: 1. Richards
1:59.88 3. Hidalgo 2:05.7
500 freestyle: 1. Larranaga
4:51.9 2. Smith 4:55.66
200 breaststroke: 1. Mathieson
2:18.9 2. Robaczewski 2:20.4
Three-meter dive: 1. Eagle 2.
Swanson
400 freestyle relay: 1. Williams,
PiteUi, McMillan, Breece 3:17.2
Women's Results
200 medly relay: 1. Poust,
Fineberg, Newman, James 1:53.1
1000 freestyle: 1. Miller 11:01
3. Hope 11:32.2
200 freestyle: 1. Newman 2:00.8
2. Livingston 2:06.8
50 freestyle: 2. James 25.7
200 IM: Poust 2:18.8
One-meter dive: 2. Seech 3.
Miller
100 freestyle: 2. Keating
200 backstroke: 1. Poust 2:16.6
3. Livingston 2:18.4
200 butterfly: 1. Burton 2:17.4
2. Consalvi 2:28.5
500 freestyle: 1. Miller 5:27.5
2. Hope 5:32.8
200 breaststroke: 2. Fineberg
2:38.2 3. Gaydosh 2:42
Three-meter dive: 1. Miller 2.
Seech
200 freestyle relay: 1. James,
Keating, Livingston, Miller.
1:44.2
Duke Destroys
South Florida
DURHAM (UPI) �
Undefeated Duke
grabbed a lopsided
95-66 victory Monday
over South Florida as
freshman Tommy
Amaker used his ex-
plosive speed to score
17 points and four
other Blue Devils
scored in double
figures.
Amaker also had
nine assists as Duke
improved its season
record to 4-0.
Mark Alarie, a 6-8
sophomore forward,
hit an assortment of
jump shots, tallied 21
points and grabbed 18
rebounds. David
Henderson, a 6-5
sophomore swing
man, came in as a
substitute and scored
20 points in 23
minutes of action.
Johnny Dawkins,
Duke's leading scorer,
added 18 points and
seven assists, Danny
Meagher provided
Duke with a fifth
player in double
figures as he scored 10
points and added
seven rebounds.
The win gives Blue
Devil's coach Mike
Krzyzewski his best
start in four seasons
at Duke. The Blue
Devils appearing an
improved team after
last season's 11-17
record, dominated the
last 20 minutes of the
game.
The closest South
Florida came to Duke
in the second half was
15 points when the
Blue Devils lead was
cut to 78-63 with 6:03
remaining in the
game.
Duke surged to a
54-34 halftime lead as
the swift backcout
duo of Dawkins and
Amaker spearheaded
a 25-3 spurt in the
final eight minutes of
the first half.
As Duke ran away
with the lead in that
span, Dawkins scored
10 points and Amaker
7. "Obviously, I am
very happy. This was
our best effort of the
season so far
Krzyzewski said. "I
am suprised at the
point differential bet-
ween the two teams. I
still think that South
Florida has a good
team
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Sanyo Quarti
Karosona Haator. Lare round
modal. Vary now llll.
Motoftocan Nomad II It Spood
wcitaool lock. Excol cond. SIS.
Storoo tyttom: era I aortas saoo
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tapa ok. Oorard OT11 Turn
TaWo Marantx HD444 Spoakan
MM. (All Prtca NoaotiaMa)
Call TM-MOS aftor i.U.
GET IN SNAPE: You f�t 4
visits to oacn at tha a prominont
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aroa. Tbats M visits tor only
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SCMWINN iMpMd Mka. Now
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FOE SALE: Ona aodroam sot:
twin bods, iaroa tabla and
drossor, S7S. Also ono dining
room sot. its Call Millto at
7SM7M.
PERSONAL
�'�MALE
WANTED M
apt at �
BOOMMATE
Call Karon at
nt-rsn.
TAEZAN: hair of
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tor your ropo Hint swings. Jana.
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ths pro-B-dny calibration. On
mara boor MM I would navo
boon tnrw. I'd havo written this
mnar hot I'vo boon Hko a hood
wtlb my tvrkay chippad oM.
Lava ya Ma.
TO O AND D: M Alpha Mfl
thanks tor a traat avanlna. A
and A.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Sat af kays an a
�Jonualam kaychain. Oraat son
Mmantol valuo. Ptaaso Call
7M-07HMI
ROOMMATE WANTEB: to
sharo 2 badroom apt- Mala or
Fomalo. IMS S. Washington St.
fiM.M month ono hall utillttos.
CallTST-llM.
NEED FEMALE: raommato to
sharo i badroom duptoa S7S.M
dopoait ono tMrd utillttos. Call
WMBW botoro StSj p.m.
WANTED: Pasonal attondant
tor handicapped ttudant. Assist
parsonal caro. Fart lima. Block
from campus. Call 751 7.34.
Loavo nama and talaphona
numbor. Na asparlanca
nocoaaary.
FEMALE roommata waadad tor
sprtofl tamastar. S14S.M rant �
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non Court Condominiums.
TSS-aTftt.
BOOM AVAILABLE: in Shorod
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Prator mala, but will taha
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No party hounds or toud music
f londs. No dopors or
roprabatos. Call BJMBJS.
NEEDED: Mala roommata tor
Jan. IS. SSM par mantb plus
utillttos. Call 7$1 MM
MISC.
LOWEST TYPINO BATES an
campus inciuda akpartoncod
profaaslanal wark. Bra-
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aftor S:M.
PROFESSIONAL TYPINO.
sss-am
ACADEMIC AND PBOFBS
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TYPINO, TEEM, TNBSIS,
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USDA Choice Beef Rib
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USDA Choice Beef Loin
New York
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5 Lb. Bag
Fresh Florida Oranges
Eastern Red Or Rome
ApplesFresh Florida
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2 Liter
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14 0i. � Ft. � Cka��aa tail li��r t Bttf
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16 Oz. � SERSBiES
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377
10.75 Oz. - OassftBll't
Chicken
Noodle
Soup
Wbf Pay 275
119 Sheets 2 Ply
So-Dri
Towels
SODRI
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4.5 Oz. � Ltor ft Caltk.a l.�f ft lit.r
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7.2S Oz. - Fm4 List
Macaroni & Cheese
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Cake Mixes
39
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 6, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 06, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.307
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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