The East Carolinian, September 29, 1983






?
�he 3Ea0t Carolinian
-
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.M
Thursday, September 29,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Confusion Cancels SGA Elections
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff WrHar
Because of several administrative foul-ups the Stu-
dent Government Association's Executive Council
has decided to invalidate Wednesday's elections and
tentitively reschedule them for Oct. 13.
The council is made up of SGA President Paul
Naso, Vice President Lindsey Williams, Secretary
Sarah Coburn, Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer, Director of University Unions
Rudolph S. Alexander and Elections Chairman Dan-
ny White. Following a 45-minute meeting Wednes-
day afternoon, the council declared the day's elec-
tions invalid.
Naso said a misinterpretation of elections rules by
the council resulted in 20 candidates for the SGA
Legislature being disqualified from the race. "We
(the executive council) made a mistake Naso said.
"We were wrong and we admit it
The 20 disqualified candidates had failed to file
their campaign expense reports, White said. As a
result White decided to disqualify them from the
race, a penalty not permited under SGA election
rules.
?j !�S
"I basically feel since I had no expenses, I
shouldn't have been required to file an expense
report said disqualified candidate Buddy Conner.
"I listened well to what was going on. I never heard
anybody say that I had to sign a statement if I had no
expenses he said.
Conner has been in the legislature for two years,
but this was the first time he had to run for the posi-
tion. "I was running purely on name recognition
Conner said.
Dennis Kilcoyne, another disqualified candidate,
admitted that he failed to file his expense report, but
said he should have been notified before the election
that he was being disqualified. "I admit that it's
totally my fault, and it should be my responsibility
Kilcoyne said. "But the elections should contact can-
didates who have failed to file before they disqualify
them
White said he was too busy working on other
aspects of the election and was unable to contact the
20 individuals who failed to file their reports.
Coburn defended White saying that he had in-
formed the candidates three times at a pre-election
meeting last week of the need for them to file the
J jg Financial Aid
financial statement. Coburn said she also made the
same point twice during the same meeting. The 20
disqualified candidates meant that 21 people were
running for a total of 25 available legislative vacan-
cies.
Naso said that after a review of the election rules
the council realized there was no rule stating a can-
didates failure to file a financial statement was
grounds for disqualification. "We made a decision;
we thought it was correct, but we interpreted
wrong Naso said.
Neither Naso, Coburn or Williams blamed the
mishap on White. "He did not make an error Naso
said. "We weren't prepared; we were rushed
Naso said he didn't think White organized enough
people to assist in the election effort. "He (White) let
me down in the sense of delegation only Naso said.
"His major fault was that of delegation
Coburn said another major problem was a lack of
student volunteers to work at campus polling places.
White said he had made arrangements through the
Air Force ROTC to cover several polling areas, but
the organization later said it would be unable to work
at the polls.
Williams
Naso
"We had to close five preceints down before 1
p.m Williams said.
Naso said that the SGA usually relys on the sup-
port of campus organizations which receive SGA
funding to volunteer at the polling places throughout
campus, but the late pull-out by the AFROTC left
them disorganized. "I didn't find out about this until
last night (Tuesday) Naso said.
See ECU, Page 3
More Students Apply For Assistance
GARY PATTERSON � Photo Lb
Wednesday morning, in front of Joyner Library, student Army and
Air Force ROTC members raised a flag given to the university by U.S.
Sen. John East (R-N.C). The flag given to ECU was once flown over
the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.
Korean Incident Halts
U.SSoviet Exchanges
(CPS) � The Soviet Union's
shooting down of Korean Air
Lines Flight 007 has scuttled for
the time being a series of scholarly
and athletic exchanges between
American universities and Russia
only weeks after educators from
both superpowers had agreed to
develop new, more open exchange
programs.
Colleges have cancelled events
and staged rallies protesting the
Aug. 28 killing of 269 passengers
on the commercial airliner. It ap-
pears that more substantive
academic contacts between the
countries, worked out slowly and
carefully over three years, may
also be lost as campuses look for
ways to lodge meaningful reac-
tions to the incident.
The losses on two American
campuses were more immediate,
as at least two professors were
killed in the airplane incident.
Several weeks before, Soviet
and U.S. officials had announced
plans to resume academic ex-
changes for the first time since
1979.
Several days before the Rus-
sians shot down the Korean plane,
U.S. State Department officials
announced talks to formalize
academic exchanges between the
two nations could begin by late
September or early October.
But now, "we have no idea
when or if the exchange talks will
begin said a State Department
spokeswoman.
Official academic exchanges
ended in 1979, when a 20-year
agreement expired. The U.S. quit
negotiations to extend the agree-
ment when the Soviet Union in-
vaded Afghanistan in 1980.
The National Academy of
Sciences, which sponsors and
coordinates exchange visits with
the Soviet Academy of Sciences,
also suspended all seminars and
workshops with Russia in 1980 to
record its anger over Afghanistan
and the arrest of Soviet Professor
Andrei D. Sakharov, a pioneer in
nuclear research.
Although the NAS only recent-
ly decided to lift its ban on ex-
changes, "I can't say when or if
anything is going to happen right
now NAS spokeswoman Bar-
bara Jorgenson said.
The NAS will continue to have
"a small but ongoing exchange
program with the Soviet Academy
of Sciences" but will not lift its
restrictions on workshops and
seminars anytime soon.
The Korean airliner incident hit
two campuses closer to home.
Among the 269 people killed
was Chung Soo Yoo, an assistant
chemistry professor at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh. He had been on
his way to Seoul for a one-year
teaching assignment at Korea's
Kangwan National College.
Iowa State visiting professor
Syo-Iti Kobayasi was taking the
plane home after a three-month
stint with the Ames Laboratory.
Vanderbilt University and the
University of Maryland protested
by cancelling their mid-November
games with the touring Soviet na-
tional basketball team.
(CPS) � After three years of
watching aid programs being cut,
threatened and frozen, more
students are applying for aid this
fall, officials across the country
report.
Moreover, the students are hav-
ing a relatively easy time in getting
the aid, they add.
Thanks largely to education's
new status as a hot political issue,
they say, the Reagan administra-
tion and Congress not only have
spared many of the programs that
were on the chopping block as
recently as last Spring, but have
eased some of the confusion �
the seemingly arbitrary changing
of eligibility requirements, the late
processing of aid applications, the
uncertainty over how long certain
programs might last � that con-
vinced many students not to apply
for aid since 1981.
"There's an awful lot of fan-
fare over education right now,
and we are entering a campaign
year said Dallas Martin, direc-
tor of the National Association of
Student Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators in Washington, D.C.
Aid officials warn there's still
potential trouble in the uncertain-
ty over the new draft-aid law,
which requires all male students
born between 1960 and 1965 to
certify they've registered for the
draft in order to get federal aid.
After the U.S. Department of
Education implemented the law
last spring, a Minnesota judge
first temporarily and then per-
manently ordered the government
to stop making military registra-
tion a prerequisite for student aid.
He argued the prerequisite
violated students' First Amend-
ment rights.
But over the summer, a U.S.
Supreme Court justice overturned
the ruling. It said the law should
be implemented at least until the
full Supreme Court gets a chance
to review it.
At present, the requirement is
scheduled to go into full effect on
Oct. 1, 1983, says Education
Department spokesman Duncan
Helmrich.
"Things were going great until
the injunction (against implemen-
ting the law) was lifted said
Robert Misenko, student aid
director at the University of Min-
nesota. "All the different grace
periods and compliance dates �
beginning with July 1. then
August 1, then Sept. 1 and now
Oct. 1 � have really complicated
things
Over 30,000 students returning
to his campus will still need to sign
the compliance form, Misenko
estimated, "unless they up and
change the deadline again
Aid directors elsewhere say
they've had little trouble convinc-
ing students to sign the forms.
"We've also had to make a win-
dow in order to get students'
GSLs (Guaranteed Student
Loans) processed Misenko
adds. "For some reason, the
government has required that the
draft compliance forms must be
signed before we can process
GSLs
"Congress has frozen all
eligibility requirements for federal
financial aid through 1986
NASFAA's Martin said.
The "freeze" effectively ended
the Reagan administration's at-
tempts to make it harder for
financially-independent students
to get federal aid.
The administration wanted to
make students live away from
home for two years, as opposed to
the current one-year requirement,
in order to be eligible to get aid as
an independent.
If the change had occurred,
"there clearly would have been
some students made ineligible"
for aid, Martin said.
Congress' final aid package for
fiscal year 1984, which starts this
October, also increases Pell Grant
room-and-board allowances from
$1000 to $1600, and forbids
secondary loan agencies to
discriminate against students
from schools with high default
rates.
Education Funding Cut
20 Percent Since 1981
WASHINGTON.D.C. (CPS)
� Spending on education and
social service programs has drop-
ped almost 20 percent since the
Reagan administration took of-
fice in 1981, a Congressional
Budget Office report has found.
And in a new American Federa-
tion of Teachers analysis of
federal education spending, AFT
President Albert Shanker charges
President Reagan with "a cover-
up" of administration funding re-
quests for education programs.
The AFT has been friendlier to
the president than other education
groups in the past. It gave Presi-
dent Reagan a respectful welcome
at its June, 1983 convention and
willingly participated in his White
House conference in the wake of
last spring's release of several
reports criticizing the quality of
American education.
But the new AFT "analysis"
noted Reagan had asked Congress
to cut federal public education by
25 percent for 1982 and 48.3 per-
cent for this fiscal year.
STANLEY LEAHY � Pfceto Lab
Coping With Stress
A lecture on handling stress was held in Headrix to strengthen the body include taking positive
Theatre Tuesday night. Guest speaker Dr. Jerry thinking vitamins tad thumping the thymns (a
V. TepUtz gave advice oa increasing strength when gland foaad Bear the base of the Beck). Tephiz
under stress. One way of handling stress, he said, said certain foods, sack as sugar, effect a persoa's
b to apply pressure on certain parts of the head to strength. "Always remember to satfe Teptttz
relieve stress headaches or sinus colds. Other ways said, "positive tkinking win strengthen the body.
Congress eventually granted the
president an 18 percent cut for
1982 and an 18.6 percent cut for
1981.
"Barnstorming around the
country, the president has em-
braced the 'back to basics' theme
of the National Commission on
Excellence in Education with a
fervor for his 'New Federalism'
initiative Shanker writes in a
summary accompanying a
breakdown of how much federal
education money each state lost in
the first Reagan budgets.
The CBO � the office that does
most of the financial budget
analysis for Congress � found
the government is spending aboat
20 percent less on some education
programs than it promised to
back in 1981.
For example, the government
will spend some 27.5 percent less
on Guaranteed Student Loans
between 1982 and 1985 than Con-
gress ordered it to in laws passed
in 1980.
Plans Ready
To Move Day
Of Ceremony
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Hrttcr
Steps are currently being taken
to change next year's commence-
ment date to Saturday, May 5, ac-
cording to James L. Smith of the
Faculty Senate. At the Sept. 20
meeting of the Faculty Senate, the
Calendar Committee recommend-
ed the change of the day for com-
mencement ceremony, which is
currently set for Friday, May 4.
The Senate approved the mo-
tion unanimously. The only ac-
tion necessary for the change is
the approoval by Chancellor
HoweU.
"I have every reason to think
that he will approve it Smith
said.
The Faculty Senate is responsi-
ble for each semester's calendar,
including the commencement
date. Smith, who is chairman of
the Calendar Committee, said
there was pressure last year to
hold the ceremony on Saturday,
and that starting in 1985, com-
mencement will be held on Satur-
day.
Scheduling the ceremony for
Saturday is more convenient for
parents and friends of graduates
who want to attend the ceremony,
according to many students.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SPETEMBER 29, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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would like to have an item
printed m the announcement
column please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care ot
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
ott'ce in the Publications
P. m vg Flyers and handwrit
v- on odd sued paper can
not be rt cepted
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hm.tec! Therefore, we cannot
that your announce
merit will run as long as you
a i � wM suggest that you do not
rei� solely on this column tor
publu ity
f h� deadline for an
"(hi. laments is 3 p rn Monday
Km the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Ai-cinesday for the Thurs
Poer No announcements
r-eceveo after these deadline'
. be pr n�ed
space is available to an
. organizations ana
oeoa'tm, -�s
CALLIGRAPHY
The Department of university
- oni 11 sponsoring a
Calligraphy Mini Course to
hegm Oct 5 Students can be ex
or �o �o come away from this
course with a working
knowledge of the Chancery
Stellc. the most popular style of
writing The class will meet on
fh following dates from 7 9pm
The cost Is 10 00 Register now
a' me Central Ticket Office.
Monday Friday from 10-4 p m
TABLETENNIS
All full time ECU students are
welcome to register for a table
��-m� tournament to be held on
Thursday Oct 4 at 6 p m In the
Mendenhali Student Center
table tennis rooms The Four (4)
�nnen from this tournament
w;il compete with trie winners
f'om the Dorm Student competi
tiom ater in me semester
aegistratlon forms are
� va.iabie m the M S C Billiards
Center and must be completed
by Sunday. Oct 7 For further
Information call The Crafts and
Recreation Office at 757 611
et 260 or me Billiards Center at
tx' 739
FOOTBALL
HIGHLIGHTS
"he Department of University
unions will present an ECU
P rate Football Highlights post
game program on Mondays
following ECU Football games
The program win be held in
Room 231 of me Student Center
from 1J 30-1 30 p m It will
feature Mead Coach Ed Emory
ano members of the Pirate
coacmng staff Persons atten
ding me program are encourafl
ed to bring fhelr lunch or to visit
the Mendenhali Snacx Bar or
Buffet Dining and eat meir meal
during me programs An oppor
tunlty will be afforded to per
sons n sftendance to ask ques
�ions about tfte previous game as
well as ECU'S next opponent it
�III be a gree� opportunity to get
tie nside scoop of Pirate Foot
ball Dates for me programs are
Sept 11.19 Oct 3. I 24. 31. Nov
7. ana M. Tiw. will ba no oro
gram oct it because ot ��
Break
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH
ALLIANCE
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance will sponsor a dance
Friday Sect 30 at me Ledonla
yv-igrf Cultural Center The
price for the affair Is SO cents for
students and 75 cents for non
students
Come on out and party from 10
0 rr till 2 am with DJ and
Company
MODELSWANTED
Models wanted, man and
women, to be in Fall Fashion
Show: NO experience needed
Minimum height 5 6 interested
parsons please meet In Home
Economics Building Room 230,
Wad Oct e at 230 p.m.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
inter varsity would like you to
loin us on Wednesday nights We
meet at 6 30 pm In Jenkins
Auditorium Come join us for a
tun time fellowshlplng. praying
and learning
JEWELRY MAKING
The Department of university
Unions is sponsoring a Jewelry
Making Workshop as part of its
Craft Center courses. The class
s open to all ECU students,
faculty. Staff, and their
dependents (1( years and older)
who purchase a Crafts Center
Membership ($15.00) Enroll
ment Is lilmlted Sign up In the
Crafts Center on the bottom
floor of Mendenhali Student
Center. Monday Friday form
3 10 pm and on Saturday form
12 5pm Classes will be held on
Tuesday Oct 4, 11, 25, Nov 1.
and Nov t from 6 30-9:30 p.m.
The Instructor is Paul Hamilton
For further information call
757 6611. ext 260 (after 5 p.m
call ext 271)
FRISBEECLUB
The ECU irate's are soon to
swing back into classic disc ac-
tion in yet another Natural Light
Flying Disc Tournament Be
sure and come support your
team Oct 9 and 10th at the Allied
Health Feiid.
ORE. LSAT.
MEDCAT
A two-hour workshop, "How to
Do Your Best on Standardized
Tests" is being conducted by me
University Counseling Center
Tnursday, Oct. 6 in 305 Wright
Annex from 3-5 p m No advance
registration Is needed For more
information call 757-6661.
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta, the English
honor society, will hold Its first
meeting of the year on Thurs-
day. Oct 6 at 7 30 p m. In room
221 of Mendenhali Student
Center We'll plan activities for
the year and of course make
plans for the all Important
Halloween party! All members,
faculty, English majors and in
terested persons are invited to
attend
CADP TRAINING
There will be a fra'nlng ses
sion held by the Campus Alcohol
and Drug Program on Monday,
Oct 3 at 4 p m in room 210 Er
win Hall This will be me second
in a series of nine training ses
sions on peer counseling Help
promote responsible decisions
concerning drugs and alcohol
Become a trained student
volunteer CADP Is a student
operated service.
sreAKiMO m
TONGUES
Sounds weird, doesn't l�?What
does me Bible Say'Read Acts,
chapters 2, 10, 19 and I Corln
mlans, chapters 12 14 if you
read mis, and understand what
you have read, you will see that
It Is God's will for all born-agaln
Christians to speak In tongues
Why Because It Is good for you
For answers to these and other
questions about the Bible and
how to read It, come by the booth
on the first floor of Mendenhali
Student Union Friday, Sept. 30,
between 6 11 p.m.
AFTER THE GAME
"COURT PARTY"
Kappa Sigma. Kappa Alpha,
Alpha XI Delta and Alpha Phi.
will be sponsoring a court party
to be held at the KA House after
the game, Saturday Oct. �
against Southwest Louisana.
The party starts at 5,00 and
mare will be a live band to be an-
nounced later. BYOB. Go
Pirates! Saa you mere!
WHY TEACH
THE BIBLE
Because by knowing God, and
the power you have as a son of
God, you can really help people
change their lives. (Luke 4:It,
Acts 16:11) Coma to our
fellowship where wa taach these
truths from God's Word. Mon
day, Oct. 3, room 212 In
Mandanhall Student Center at
5,30 p.m. (Next to the Musk:
Listening Rooms.)
ZBT LITTLE
SISTERS
The ZBT Little Sisters would
like to welcome all new little
sisters and remind everyone of
the meeting. Thursday me 2tth
at 5 p.m. In Mandanhall Cof
teahouse
ECGC
Contused? Fell laft ogt? Want
someone to listen and
understand1? The East Carolina
Gay Community is an educa-
tional and support group for pec.
pie of different sexual
preferences The ECGC will
meet Monday, Oct 3 at 7 p.m.
The ECGC meats at the Catholic
Newman Center. 953 E. 10th St.
(at the bottom of College Hill).
All interested parsons arm In-
vited to attend Coma on out and
be a part.
HETEROSEXUAL
PEOPLES'ALLIANCE
All Interested parsons call
756 1977. Leave name and
number tor Sandy. Club will
sponsor socials to meet future
potential spouses and education
of HPV, Herpes, VD, Birth Con
trol and Abortion
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
Meeting will be held Tuesday.
October 4th, in room 212 at
Mendenhali from 6 to I p.m.
SILENT DINNER
The Sign Language Club Is
having a dinner at Marathon
Restaurant on Monday. October
3rd We hope that you will come
down to join us Everyone Is
welcome Bring your friends
and yourself down to have a nice
quiet meal We are all meeting
there about 6 00 See you there!
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
MEETING
The Accounting Society will
meet Tuesday. Oct 4 at 4 p.m. In
Room 244 Mendenhali. Don
Slagle and Doug Smith,
representatives from Ernst and
Whinrtey, will discuss Intarvlaw-
Ins and n��H� ��� � "���
Eight" ptibllc accounting firm.
All members and prospective
members are urged to attend.
BRIDGE CLUB
Anyone interested in playing
Bridge on a weakly basis should
report to Mandanhall Student
Center Billiards Area for the
Department of University
Union's Bridge Club organiza
Mortal meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 79 at 5 p.m. All ECU
students, faculty, staff, their
guests, and dependents are
welcome.
DANCE
The Baptist Student Union will
be having a dance for all those
Interested In fun and fellowship
on Friday night, September 30,
at f p.m. The SO admission
charge will go towards meeting
our summer missions goal. Saa
you there!
INFORMAL BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Coma as you are to our house,
where wa taach the Bible In a
relaxed atmosphere. (Acts
M:M-3l) Every Tuesday and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. on 112
Rotary St. (4 blocks from cam-
pus) BYOB (Bring your own Bl
ble) Questions Call 752-0434.
PSICHI
Do you have � semester hours
In Psychology? or will have by
the end of the semester?Are you
In the top 35 percent of your
class Then you are eligible for
membership In Psl Chi, the Na
tlonal Honor Society In
Psychology. Pick up your
membership application In the
Psl Chi library during office
hours (Speight 202), and apply
now 111 The deadline for eppllca
tions is Nov. 11.
ALPHA
PHI ALPHA
The brothers of the Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity and the Ladles
of Black and Gold would Ilka to
extend an invitation to all Ladles
Interested In becoming a Lady of
Black and Gold, to attend an In
formal interest meeting Monday
Oct. 3, I9t3 7 p.m. In Mandanhall
Student Center.
CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cross Campus races will
be held Homecoming Day Satur
day October 29, l�t3. A 2.5 mile
race will start at 9:00 a.m. and a
5.0 mile race will start at 9 30
a.m. both races start near the
bleachers at the ECU varsity
track. Bunting Field. The race
course is 95 percent on grass and
traverses in and about the area
surrounding Mingea Coliseum.
Ficklln Stadium, Bunting Field,
Harrington Field and the
women's Softball field. The
races, which are sponsored by
me Department of Intramural
Recreational Services, are open
to participation by all ECU
students, faculty, staff and ECU
alumni. Come on out and loin the
races prior to going to the
Homecoming Game! 11
FRISBEECLUB
Watch for the Natural Light
"Ultlmax Ultimate" Tourna
ment coming October tth and
9th to the ECU campus. Top
North Carolina ultimate teams
will compete. Cash and prizes in
this event arm sponsored by the
ECU Frlsbee Disc Sport Club
The weekend should prove to be
ultimate The I RATES practice
every Tuesday, Thursday and
Sunday on the Collage Hill fields
at 5 p.m. and promise to be one
of the favorites in the tourna
ment All interested disc-duffers
are encouraged to attend the
practices and whip the disc. The
VrtakXM ckufe) W4M m�t TilHiy
Oct atJO p m In Room J47 o�
Mendenhali. Join one of ECU'S
most exciting sport clubs Be
there or be octangular
FACULTYSTAFF
INTRAMURALS
intramural competition tor
ECU FacultyStaff members
will begin Monday, Oct. 10. Flag
Football is the activity and sign-
up days to enter a team ere Mon-
day, Oct. 3 and Tuesday, Oct. 4
from � a.m. to 4 p.m. In Room
105B of Memorial Gym. Teams
play with six (6) players on the
field and a maximum of six (e)
game substitutes. Games are
played on the Intramural fields
lust north of Fickien Stadium.
Teams can consist of members
of e department or of several
different departments. However
the teams are constructed,
loosen up the hands for catching
and the legs for running. Get a
team together and get with the
action.
CAMPUS
MINISTRY
CONVENTION
Attention Catholic students I
The Diocese of Raleigh is spon-
soring a Campus Ministry con-
vention October 7-9 at Emerald
isle for all Catholic students of
the Diocese Enjoy the beach, a
banquet, workshops, and In-
teresting people. For more In-
formation contact The Newman
Center, 953 E. Tenth St
753-4316.
NARCOTICS
ANONYMOUS
There will be a meeting of
Narcotics Anonymous on Fri-
day, September 30 at � p.m. in
room 230 of Mendenhali Student
Center. Narcotics Anonymous Is
a fellowship of men and women
who share their experience,
strength and hope with each
other that they may solve their
common problem and help
others to recover from drug ad
diction or drug abuse, including
alcohol.
FREE MOVIES
Come loin us et the Catholic
Newman Center on October 1 at
9 p m. for the showing of Young
Frankenstein and Biaulng Sad
dies. Bring your favorite
beverages. See ya' there!
Lunch Buffet Lovers. Take Your
PickOf
The Pizzas
At Gatti's.
Your favorite lunch buffet is
still here. Still serving the best
pizza in town. Honest. Take
vour pick from our great daily
selection of pizza and spa-
ghetti. I at to vour
hearts content
Its all vours.
The lunch buffet:
All the ptzza ami y�f��vfi wu �
$2.99
DAILY
11AM TO 2PM
DINNER BUFFET
All the pizza
spaghetti and salad
you caa eat
$3.09
MON.andTUES.
5PMTOSPM
corner of Cotanche aad 10th St.
The best pizza in town. l)irl
Phoae 758-6121
SAM
Interested In business? Come
to the meeting of the Society for
the Advancement of Manage-
ment, Tues , Oct. 11, at 3 p.m. In
Rawl 104 Mr. O. O. Bright will
be giving a presentation on
"Careers In Insurance All In-
terested people and parties ere
Invited to attend.
JEWISH
STUDENTS
ECU Miiiei will be having Its
first general meeting Oct. 3 at
7:30 p.m. In Mendenhali Student
Center. Please ask at Informa
tlon Desk for room number.
Your Input Is greatly ap
predated. Or lust stop by to see
what It's all abouti
SURFING CLUB
There's a surfing club meeting
Thursday Sept. 39 at 7 p.m. In
room 231 at Mendenhali.
Everyone who wants to surf in
this weekend's contest must be
there. We ere Interested in
anyone who wants to surf or who
wants to learn. Come on out I
EPT
EPT will be holding a special
meeting this coming Tuesday at
7 p.m f 104 All members
should attend.
LITTLE SISTER
RUSH
Kappa Sigma will be holding
Little Sister Rush on October 4,
S. and 6 All interested ladies are
invited to come out and meet the
Kappa Sig Brothers and Little
Sisters Hey "Flounder" let's
party I
BUSINESS SCHOOL
SCHOLARSHIPS
AVAILABLE
Thirteen scholarships for ap
proximately (5,700 are available
for School of Business majors
Students interested in making
application should secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
one of the following deparment
offices Finance R343. Manage
ment RI37. Marketing R223
Max R Joyner. tuition and fees
for in state student, scholarship
and citienship
University Book Exchange
WOO, Academic merit
NCNB (4). 12 tuition and fees
for instate student, academic
merit
The Travelers, SI,000,
Academic excellence, citizen
ship, and need Applicant must
express an interest in insurance
as a possible career obiective on
the application form
j Fred Hamblen, S250
Academic excellence 111
business law course and good
citizenship
Credit Women internationl
$200, financial need, scholar
ship, and citizenship Recipient
must have graduated from
public or private high school m
Pitt County
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY
!atney vv Pittard Memorial
mitted to Ruth Jones (Raw:
334) Chairman of School of
Business Scholarship Comm t
tee. by Oct 21, 1��3 A stuoen'
may apply tor one or more
scholarships
Final selection will be maoe
by the ECU Student Scholar
ships. Fellowships ana Finan
cial Aid committee upon recom
mendation of the Dean of the
School of Business The Dean i
recommendation will be made
from candidates selected by the
School of Business Scholarsh p
Committee
ASPA
The American Society tor Per
sonnei Administration will be
holding its next meeting
Wednesday Oct 5 at 3 in Raw
room 20S Throughout the tear
we will rtave guest speakers
from business organizations r.
and around the Greenville area
Wednesday s speaker is Mixe
Lemmons PersonnelSafe' 1
Director from West Point Pec
perelle m Clinton NC Everyone
is welcome Fees will be coi
lee ted from new members Se-
you then'
Student Opinion
Australia
Adams
WRESTLING
The ECU Wrestling Sport Club
Is practicing Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from � p.m.
to 11 p.m. In the Exercise Room
(Room lot) of Memorial Oym.
All students interested In work
Ing out with the Wrestling Club
should attend these work-out
sessions.
The East Carolinian
Srri iri v :he i atnpu- iummuni
wmr W
Poblished every Tuesday
and Thursday durng the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the Suri
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of Ejst
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of Last
Carolina University
Subscription Rate 420 ye- !y
The East Carolinian off es
are located in the Old South '
Building on the campus if
ECU. Greenville. NX
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The Ea�.t
Carolinian, Old South
Building. ECU Greenville
NC 27834
UOt
Telephone 757 4344. 4347,
Brown
By THE!
After 132 y
the sport of d
the United St
dethrowned
America's Cui
decisively Monj
and final mate
asked if they
with the U.S.
Ken Adams �
"I'm not
hundred and
long for any
spor: I've ah
underdogs. I
they kept the
entire time
Angela Gam
"It seems
for the Amene
real patriotic
Joy Brown �
ing, Freshma:
"No I'm
pointed. I
look at the fac
competition 1
game
Deno White
Senior
"I'm disapj
pointed It
was our
We want tc
again s
National Publi
B GLENN
MALGHAN
Staff Writer
Although recent
reports suggested Na-
tional Public Radio
has an improved
financial picture,
future of NPR is 11
in doubt.
According
Valeria Lee. gc
manager of WVS1
public radio statioi
ECU Student Feei
Cheated Due To
Election Mishap
fjjjgggejjjp
CORNER OF 10th AND CHARLES STREET
PIRATE ATTACK SPECIALS
BUCCANEER BISCUIT BREAK
"SERVED ALL DAY"
2 FOR 1 SPECIAL
BUY ANY BISCUIT COMBINATION AND GET
THE NEXT ONE OF SIMILAR VALUE
FREE
SAVINGS UP TO $2.00
PIRATE RIB ATTACK
BUY A RIB SPECIAL AT REGULAR PRICE
AND GET AN EXTRA RIB FOR ONLY
.25'
SAVINGS OF .94'
Cont. From Page 1
Business student
Joe Stroud, a can-
expense form on time,
said he felt "a little bit
cheated" because of
the decision to cancel
the election results.
Stroud said the
issue of the expense
report requirement
was "gone over
specifically" at the
pre-election meeting.
"I feel I'm being
persecuted for
someone else failej
do he said
Williams a
ed in their budg
the SGA wouI
eligible for refun
"We're trying
as fair as we
under the
cumstances Co
said of the new
tion decision. "I i
we can al! learn
this Naso addex
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- "� Jones iRawl
� -nan or Sit-iool of
I sn p Commit
. '81 A student
� . . . KM one or more
rt Hi be made
Student Scholar
ursh pr and Fman
"ee i Don recom
� "e Van of the
less T he Dean s
will be made
� seta 'ed b the
noMrship
ASPA
�. 'or Per
a i be
, � -neetrnq
Ha i
� 'he year
� speakers
� � s in
� . c area
. .�.� s Mike
�el Safety
� �Vesl po rrt Pep
s. r .?' iOre
s tM
a - - ,rer- See
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1983
Student Opinion
Australian Win Debated
Adams
Brown
By THERESA DULSK1
Staff WiMor
After 132 years of dominating
the sport of competitive sailing,
the United States Monday was
dethrowned of the coveted
America's Cup. Austrialia won
decisively Monday in the seventh
and final match. Students were
asked if they were disappointed
with the U.S. loss.
Ken Adams � Finance, Senior
"I'm not disappointed. One
hundred and thirty-two years is to
long for anyone to dominate a
sport. I've always pulled for the
underdogs. I admired the way
they kept their keel a secret for the
entire time
Angela Garris � English, Junior
"It seems a personal tragedy
for the Americans, but I have no
real patriotic concern
Joy Brown � Chemical Engineer-
ing, Freshman
"No I'm not really disap-
pointed. I think that they should
look at the fact that they won the
competition in the past. Its only a
game
Deno White � Drama Speech,
Senior
"I'm disappointed, very disap-
pointed. It was something that
war ours. Its got our name on it.
We want to start the trials up
again so that we win it back
ECU Response To
New Miss America
Varies Considerably
Hot
Garris
White
HOB POOLE - Phofo Lab
Miss America:
beautiful, poised,
talented, competent
and black? For this
first time in history,
the woman chosen to
represent America is
black. Vanessa
Williams, Miss New
York, is a 20-year-old
student at Syracuse
University.
In the university
community, reactions
to the landmark deci-
sion are varied. Hal J.
Daniels, professor in
the speech, language
and auditory
pathology depart-
ment, said beauty
pagents are sexist.
"They present the
woman as an 'object'
and reinforce the
myth that she is
nothing more than a
pieece of meat
Daniels said.
National Organiza-
tion of Women
member Freddy
Jacobson said "the
women's movement
states that women can
do or be whatever
they choose. If the
woman doesn't feel
exploited, then she
isn't
Part of the con-
troversy surrounding
Williams is her light
skin and stright hair;
to some she does not
look black.
"It doesn't matter
whether her skin
looks light or that her
hair is straight; what
does matter is that she
is black the
sweethearts of minori-
ty fraternity Kappa
Alpha Psi said. "We
should all be proud of
that fact (that she is
Miss America) by sup-
porting her rather
than criticizing her
ECU student Debi
Dilts said, "I think
she's beautiful. Just
as long as she's in-
telligent and can
represent the United
States, she deserves
the title
� �
When you open a sturdyperfecting free. 30 minute
Domino's Pizza box. you'lldelivery Across America
always find a hot deliciouswhen people want the
pizzataste of real pizza in the
comfort of their home or
We take special care tooffice they call Domino's
insure your pizza will arrivePizza - for a delicious pizza
hot Whisked from the oven.thaf s hot
your pizza is sliced, boxed
and zipped into anAt ECU call:
insulated carrier for a safe758-6660
trip to your doorIn Greenville call:
752-6996
For over twenty years
Domino s Pizza has been
Limited denvery areas
D"�ers carry under $20
Domino's
Pizza
Delivers.
1983 Domno's Pizza n
National Public Radio Facing Financial Crisis
Bv GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Although recent
reports suggested Na-
tional Public Radio
has an improved
financial picture, the
future of NPR is still
in doubt.
According to
Valeria Lee, general
manager of WVSP, a
public radio station in
ECU Student Feels
Cheated Due To
Election Mishap
I
;et
LS
GET
Cont. From Page 1
Business student
Joe Stroud, a can-
ciidatc who filed his
expense form on time,
said he felt "a little bit
cheated" because of
the decision to cancel
the election results.
Stroud said the
issue of the expense
report requirement
was "gone over
specifically" at the
pre-election meeting.
"I feel I'm being
persecuted for what
someone else failed to
do he said.
Williams said all
Warrenton, N.C
NPR is still facing a
crisis stituation.
"The financial pro-
blems of NPR were so
bad that we were on
the brink of
bankruptcy but
enough people
responded to keep
NPR around she
said. NPR is schedul-
ed to borrow $7.5
million from the Cor-
poration for Public
Broadcasting this year
to operate. This figure
is $1 million less than
earlier projections
and is a result of im-
proved revenues and
budget cutbacks.
Lee considers the
budget reductions a
sore spot for NPR.
"We are a very
small part of the na-
tional budget �
When one considers
military cost over-
runs, we are under-
financed she said.
Lee also complained
that programming
suffers when budgets
are chopped.
"We will not have
the variety of pro-
gramming, nor the ex-
tensive coverage of
news and entertain-
ment programs this
year Lee said.
WVSP should have a
budget of $250,000
but will operate with
$150,000 and reduce
its full time staff to
five people, according
to Lee.
WVSP is currently
raising funds and Lee
said responses were
good but revenues
were down from last
year. "Middle-
management and pro-
fessional people are
not responding as
they should be she
said. Low income
people are con-
tributing like always,
she added.
NPR and WVSP
will probably con-
tinue but listeners
may notice some
changes. "The
system can survive on
what its offered but it
reflects those cuts in
funds Lee said.
Brothers ofKA
would like to
congratulate
1983 Fall
Pledge Class
�anciiciatcs
ho fum-
ed in their budget to
the SGA would be
eligible for refund.
"We're trying to be
as fair as we can
under the cir-
cumstances Coburn
said of the new elec-
tion decision. "I think
we can all learn from
this Naso added.
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Call Pirate Walk
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While Ordering Your
Official ECU Class Ring
DATE: Oct. 4,5,6 TIME: 9:00-4:00p.m
PLACE:
Wright Annex
HERFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company

S: Jt-or 4 -





2Ue iEaat (Earnlittiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller.
Darryl Brown,
WAVERLY MERRITT. arm of 4mm
Hunter Fisher. a��M�
Ali Afrashteh. cm m
Geoff Hudson, ow- ���
Michael Mayo, i suroo.
�iiif Editor
Cindy Pleasants, ��, m.w
Greg Rideout. 0100, p Editor
GORDON I POCK, Fmtenommem Editor
Lizanne Jennings, so Editor
Todd Evans, aw� w���r
raUNR?5BJYWeiCCPS
September 29. 1983
Opinion
Page
SGA Elections
Blame Should Be Placed On White
Elections canceled. No one wins;
no one loses. The statement itself
has sort of an ominous, evil im-
plication. Democratic institutions
� voting, representation � are
serious principles that are to be
handled with care. Wednesday's
Student Government Association
elections gave students a reason to
be wary of those people who were
charged with the duty of oversee-
ing this sacred democratic process.
The SGA elections were declared
invalid, and done so for two main
reasons � not enough people to
man the polls and a misinterpreta-
tion of the election rules which led
to the disqualification of 20 can-
didates. As SGA President Paul
Naso said, "We made a mistake.
We were wrong, and we admit it
But, just admitting a wrong is
not enough. The blame has to be
placed somewhere, even if the
those who erred do apologize. The
trail of administrative foul-ups
lead in only one direction � to
Elections Chairman Danny White.
He should shoulder most of the
blame. When given the respon-
sibility of making sure the elective
process ran smoothly and efficient-
ly, he was, in effect, making a
statement to the students that he
coud be counted on to do the job
� a very tough job. Coordinating
ail the groups to man the polls and
setting up the schedule for people
to be there � and then making
sure they are there is a demanding
task. But, when those groups don't
show up � for whatever reason �
White is the one responsible.
The second mistake made by
White is his failure to adequately
try to notify the 20 candidates who
were disqualified for not turning in
a financial statement. Part "A" of
this mistake was that he didn't
have the authority under existing
guidelines to disqualify them. And
part "B" is the fact that students
who care enough about the univer-
sity and student government to run
for the legislature are owed the
minor courtesy of a phone call to
tell them they've been taken off the
ballot. This was not done by
White.
So, now all the candidates who
had geared up for one election sw-
ing must shift back into low and
wait for the next race in two weeks.
Most of them aren't happy, and
rightly so. Students who had filed
and students who hadn't filed are
both concerned with the way the
election was handled. The decision
made by the the SGA president,
vice president and secretary in con-
sultation with Vice Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer Meyer, Dean
Rudolph Alexander and chairman
White to cancel the elections was
the only thing they could do in
light of the situation. But it doesn't
make up for what happened.
Don't Believe Washington
Campus Forum
How Much Did You Say?
Would you please provide readers of
The East Carolinian with an explana-
tion of how the average salary
($33,273) of professors at ECU
reported in the lead article last Tuesday
was computed. Was the average com-
puted a mean or a median? Are "pro-
fessors" only full professors or instruc-
tors of various ranks? Have the salaries
of administrators been included? Are
the salaries of faculty in the medical
school included? Were the comparison
averages (about $28,000) for "college
faculty members" nationwide com-
puted in the same way as the average
reported for ECU? I suspect that the
figures cited in The East Carolinian are
deceptive in terms of suggesting that
ECU faculty are paid much better than
are faculty at other similar universities.
Karl L. Wuensch
Psychology Department
(Editor's Note: The figures were ob-
tained from institutional research.
They did not include the med school or
administrators.)
I am embarrassed and disgusted thiu
the campus radio station and its station
manager are supporting a stupid, sexist
wet T-shirt contest. I guess I was under
a delusion that it's a university here in
Greenville. To think that our radio sta-
tion promotes, for inane capitalist
reasons, the showing off of distended
nipples in wet T-shirts. I'm appalled. I
know bright women students, and sur-
prisingly, a few bright men students at
real universities that wouldn't tolerate
such a thing. They'd burn your
f � � � g building down. It looks
like there are more folks around with
blood in their genitalia than in their
brains. Real good job you stupid, anti-
intellectual twits.
Hal J.Daniel II
Professor
Speech, Language and Auditory
I never believe government figures
when it comes to how the nation's
economy is doing. I talk to people. In
the past months I discovered, while
orders are up in the building business,
payments are slowing down.
A painter told me, "I can get all the
work I want right now. The only pro-
blem I have is collecting for it after I do
the job
"Why don't you ask for the money up
front?" I asked.
"If I do that I can't get the job. 1 have
this building contractor I work for and
he couldn't sell his condos until they
were painted. So he came to me and
said, 'I'll give you $25,000 to paint my
apartments. I said, 'When will I get
paid?' And he said, 'As soon as you
finish the job Then I said, 'Where do I
get the money now to pay for the paint
and my workers?' And he said, 'The
same place I get mine, from the bank.
Look, just tell me if you don't want the
contract. I can always get somebody
else
"So what did you do?" I asked.
"A job's a job, so I painted his condos.
When I finished I gave him my bill. He
said he'd send me a check in the morn-
ing. A week later I called to find out
where the check was, and his secretary
said the contractor was racing in a
sailboat to Bermuda.
"Three weeks later I bumped into him
coming out of a fancy restaurant with a
bunch of friends, and he introduced me
as the best painter in Washington. He
said it was lucky he ran into me because
he was going to call me in the morning to
ask me if I could paint a second group of
condos he just finished in the same
development.
Art Buchwald
"I said, 'I'd love to do it, but I
haven't been paid for the other condos
yet He said he couldn't pay me for the
first condos until he sold the second
ones. I said, 'Why is that?' And he said
because the bank wouldn't lend him any
money to finish the new condominiums
until he paid back his loan on the ones I
painted. I said, 'It doesn't solve my pro-
blem because the same bank wants me to
pay back the $25,000 plus interest I bor-
rowed to paint the first condos
"He said I should never borrow more
than I can afford to pay back. He
wanted to know if I would do the pain-
ting job on the new development or
not
"I had to say okay. If I didn't paint
the second ones I had no chance of get-
ting my money on the first ones. But I
was tough about it. I demanded a
deposit before I picked up a
paintbrush
"As a down payment for the second
job?"
"No, as partial payment for the first
one. How could I ask him for money for
the second job when he still owed me for
the other?"
"And he agreed to do it?"
"He said it was only fair. The next
morning he sent over a small check with
a nice note saying as soon as I finished
the condos of the second development I
would be paid in full for both jobs
"So you painted the second condos,
and then what happened?"
"I didn't hear from him for three
months. I was about to turn it over to a
lawyer when I got a call from him asking
me if I was interested in painting an old
office building he had just bought in
downtown Washington. I said, 'Where's
my money for the other two paint jobs?'
"He said he used it as a down pay-
ment on the old building he wanted me
to paint. Once it was fixed up he planned
to sell it at a large profit, and he had me
down for a $5,000 bonus.
"I said I wasn't born yesterday, and if
I agreed to do the job, it would cost �-
$90,000 plus a $15,000 bonus
"What did he say to that?"
"He said, 'what choice do I have?
Workmen always have contractors over
a barrel
(c) 193. Lot Kng&B Tuna Syndicate
The Tew And Proud' Isn't An Adventure
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
By GLENN MAUGHAN
They woo you with slogans: "The
few, the proud, the Marines, maybe you
can be one of us They promise you ex-
perience and economic security. They
offer you the chance to travel to far and
exotic lands. Yes, when you see their big
full-page ads in the campus newspaper,
it would appear that by joining the
Marines (or any other branch of the
military) all your problems are over. Not
quite. There is a catch.
The military ads leave out a lot of
facts � facts which paint an entirely dif-
ferent picture of military life and
possibly death.
When you sign on the dotted line, you
become the property of the U.S.
Government. You give up all your rights
of conscience � your right to make up
your own mind. If you are given a com-
mand to kill, you are expected to carry
out that command without question or
any consideration of the morality or
reason behind your actions.
Forget about your religious
background, that doesn't matter. Forget
about freedom, that doesn't matter
either. And if you happen to be one of
the "unlucky" Marines to be sent to El
Salvador or Lebanon you may also have
to give up your life. For what?
That question is still asked by me. It is
probably still asked by the families and
friends of the more than 50,000 U.S. ser-
vicemen who gave up their lives serving
American "interests" in Vietnam. Dur-
ing my military experience in Vietnam
and elsewhere, "for what?" became a
pressing question.
Not once during my recruiter's pitch
on the benefits of serving my country
did he address the facts of life and
death. It was as if Vietnam did not exist
for him just as El Salvador and Lebanon
do not exist for present day recruiters.
Don't believe you are safe even if you
take a "non-combatant" job in the
military. It didn't work for the cooks
and clerks killed during the Tet Offen-
sive in 1968.
If you've studied the issues, it is clear
that the Reagan Administration and the
United States has once again been flex-
ing its interventionist muscles. Beware!
Wars come fast. It won't take long
before you're in the middle of it.
"Want to move up quickly, Go far-
ther faster?" states the headline of
Marine Corps ads. They mean it. Just
talk to the recruiters hanging out in the
lobby of the Student Supply Store this
week. You can move "up" real quickly
� from college student to war in a few
short months. Ask them about blood,
having to kill other human beings or the
horrors of war. They won't tell you.
All you'll see are sharp, well-tailored
uniforms and big smiles on the
recruiters' faces. Lots of exciting
brochures about great opportunities and
high pay. No talk of war and death �
just challenge and adventure.
Don't buy their line � especially all of
you who are 18 or 19 years old. First
check out the real facts.
The Central Committee for Conscien-
tious Objectors is an agency for military
and draft counseling founded in 1948.
According to CCCO staff person
Michael Barba, the Reagan Administra-
tion is gearing up for military interven-
tionism which may lead us into war.
"As if over two million men and
women in arms is not enough, the
government's policies are cornering it in-
to a position requiring more troops
which in turn will make military solu-
tions to political problems more allur-
ing Barba said in a recent CCCO news
release.
Let's face it. If you join the military,
you may or may not get what they pro-
mise you � but what they won't tell you
is that you might have to kill somebody
or be killed. If you're one of them, you
may be one of "the few, the proud and
dead
PIRG Accused Of Being Leftist, Deceitful
By DENNIS ULCOYNE
To compel a man to furnish funds for
the propagation of ideas he disbelieves
and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.
Thomas Jefferson
Last spring The East Carolinian
published an article favorably describing
a new organization that was attempting
to establish itself at ECU. A recent col-
umn on the editorial page gave it a
friendly welcome. This organization is
public Interest Research Group, a.k.a.
PIRG, a brainchild of publicist Ralph
Nader. It says it wants to conduct
student-run research projects devoted to
consumer-oriented and public-interest
issues. In 10 years of existence, it has set
itself up on 160 campuses in 26 states,
including North Carolina.
PIRG if free to establish itself here at
anytime as a private organization seek-
ing vohintiry contribution to support
its activities. However, the rub shows up
with PIRG's proposed way of taking
money from students. To get its highly
controversial funding scheme approved,
it most go before the SGA Legislature to
begin the process which eventually
reaches up to the Board of Governors.
If it should win acceptance by the
SGA, then it will have to submit its
scheme to a campus-wide referendum in
which students will vote on whether or
not to tax themselves $2 per semester to
provide money for PIRG.
It seems like carnival time here, and
our campus police chief has warned us
to be on the alert against conmen and
rip-off artists who flourish at this time
of year. A close inspection of PIRG
shows that it wants our money and has a
sneaky plan for getting it. So hold onto
your wallets and purses.
Despite the innocent-sounding
rhetoric and promises of PIRG, what
causes has it associated with? Try these
for starters: disarmament for the
U.S.A job preference for homosex-
uals, and links with the notorious In-
stitute for Policy Studies, a Marxist and
anti-American agitation and propagan-
da think tank. PIRG's crusades have
consistently shown z politically left-wing
and socialist tilt. No wonder many of its
chapters are secretive. Its partisan con-
cerns are not broad-consensus issues
which a majority of students on this
campus will support. Yet, ECU students
will be fleeced of money to finance such
causes if PIRG has its way.
The organization gets its funds
through the "negative check-off"
scheme, whereby a student is forced to
donate $2 when he pays tuition. If he
seeks to get his money back, PIRG
deliberately makes the refund process
very difficult. For instance, at Duke
University the student legislature asked
PIRG to offer refunds at the most con-
venient place on campus, the lobby of
the student center. PIRG thumbed its
nose at the request. If you hope PIRG
will accept a positive check-off, or a free
contribution by interested students,
forget it. Their strategy manual tells
their organizers to avoid this method.
Students cannot be counted on freely to
support this outfit.
PIRG also shows contempt for us by
running a number of their single-issue
candidates for the SGA. When these
robot-like creatures have done their jobs
by voting in the SGA legislature for
PIRG's check off, they will probably
fade away and in effect leave their voters
without representation on all other
issues.
The main charge against PIRG is that
it is not what it pretends to be and that it
will not do what it says it will. It will
provide few services for students 00
matters they unanimously care about �
by its own rules, 98 percent of the money
it squeezes out of us will be sent
elsewhere. Most of it will not return
because it will stick to the paws of
lawyers, lobbyists, and political ac-
tivists. In a New Jersey court, PIRG was
compelled to admit that it was a
"political ideological" group.
The proposed tax on us will represent
big bucks at ECU (on some campuses
PIRG takes in as much as $200,000).
Once the organizaiton fastens itself on
us it will suck out money like a leech,
and with this great wealth at its disposal
it will be hard to drive out. Moreover, if
such a blatantly political cause can get
money from us, many other groups will
be entitled to try the same thing.
Finally, a statement from The Detroit
News of March 16,1983, tells it all: "Let
PIRG solicit funds the hard way, like
every other interest group. The univer-
sities shouldn't be used as a political
milk cow by the Naderites or anybody
else
Protest Can
A planned protest
by Greenville citizens
and ECU students has
been cancelled after
Pitt County officials
fulfilled their promise
to remove the word
"colored" from a war
monument on
courthouse lawn
ECU student Gi
Maughan origin
complained to Cou
officials last M
when he noticed
word "colorei
U.S. Sen. Jon
Defends Com
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Start MM
U.S. Sen. John P.
East (R-N.C), former
political science pro-
fessor at ECU, this
week defended In-
terior Secretary James
G. Watt's recent con-
troversial statements
in a letter East wrote
to the editors of The
Washington Post and
The Washington
Times.
Last week Watt
characterized
members of an ad-
visory committee he
set up to review his
coal-leasing program
by saying 'We have
every kind of mix you
can have. I have a
black, I have a
woman, two Jews and
a cripple
East is the only
U.S. senator confined
to a wheelchair. In his
letter, which was also
released publicly and
mailed to other
senators Sept. 25,
East said he was not
insulted by the word
because, "It is no a
term of derision
"Much as the term
'negro' now has been
replaced by 'black
so 'cripple' once was
synonymous with
what we now call a
'handicapped' per-
son said East. "At
worst it is a bit old-
fa&Hioned he said.
Handicapped
students' a ECU had
varied opinions about
Watt's comment and
East's letter.
Michael Dixon
he wasn't reaJlv
fended b the st;
mem rie agreed
East's idea that "
pie" was just an
fashioned word
"handicapped "
Bud Walker
said he didn't take
fense at the stateme
"1 thougr � twa
ny, and the let!
shows Sen East hi
good sense of hui
about 1
mistakes
Walker Walker
Dixon are both
fined to a wha
However
students did not ag
with East's defensel
Watt.
Brian Rangle
is also confined td
wheelchair, sail
"Negative connoj
tions go along wj
the word 'crippij
and it was not a wi
statement on Watl
pan Ranglev
said East was soft
ing the issue
much.
Rena Packarl
another student wj
must use
wheelchair, agr j
with Ranglev's
of East's letter,
she too felt offer
by the term
word 'cripple' is w
insulting. I'm n-
'cripple 1 am di�
ed Packard said.
Rebecca Mass
who is not confini
a wheelchair butl
partially paralyzj
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
StPIFMB! K M 19S3
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second
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me for
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on men and
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-ecent CCCO news
Ik military,
hat they pro-
won't tell you
to kill somebody
ne of them, you
l- - proud and
ul
-sll not return
the paws of
and political ac-
sey court, PIRG was
that it was a
group
us will represent
on some campuses
nuch as $200,000).
ton fastens itself on
money like a leech,
wealth at its disposal
five out. Moreover, if
ntical cause can get
iny other groups will
K same thing.
fent from The Detroit
1983, tells it all: "Let
Is the hard way, like
ft group. The univer-
used as a political
Naderites or anybody
Protest Cancelled; Racist Term Removed
A planned protest
b) Greenville citizens
and ECU students has
been cancelled after
Pitt County officials
fulfilled their promise
to remove the word
"colored" from a war
monument on the
courthouse lawn.
ECU student Glenn
Maughan originally
complained to County
officials last March
when he noticed the
word "colored"
engraved twice in tbe
monument
designatory non-
whites from Pitt
County killed during
World War II and the
Korean War.
In a letter to several
U.S. Sen. John East
Defends Comments
B ELIZABETH BIRO
Ht�fT Writer
U.S. Sen. John P.
East (R-N.C.), former
political science pro-
fessor at ECU. this
week defended In-
terior Secretary James
G. Watt's recent con-
troversial statements
in a letter East wrote
to the editors of The
Washington Post and
The Washington
Times.
Last week Watt
characterized
members of an ad-
visory committee he
set up to review his
coal-leasing program
by saving "We hae
every kind of mi you
can have. I have a
black, I have a
woman, two Jews and
a cripple
East is the only
U.S. senator confined
to a wheelchair. In his
letter, which was also
released publicly and
mailed to other
senators Sept. 25,
East said he was not
insulted by the word
because, "It is no a
term of derision
"Much as the term
'negro' now has been
replaced by 'black
so 'cripple' once was
synonymous with
what we now call a
'handicapped' per-
son said East. "At
worst it is a bit old-
fa.shion�sd he said.
tlandicappctJ
students a ECU had
varied opinions about
Watt's comment and
East's letter.
Michael Dixon said
he wasn't really of-
fended by the state-
ment. He agreed with
East's idea that "crip-
ple" was just an old-
fashioned word for
"handicapped
Bud Walker also
said he didn't take of-
fense at the statement.
"I thought it was fun-
ny, and the letter
shows Sen. East has a
good sense of humor
about such
mistakes said
Walker Walker and
Dixon are both con-
fined to a wheelchair.
However other
students did not agree
with East's defense of
Watt.
Brian Rangley, who
is also confined to a
wheelchair, said,
"Negative connota-
tions go along with
the word 'cripple
and it was not a wise
statement on Watt's
part Rangley also
said East was soften-
ing the issue too
much.
Rena Packard,
another student who
must use a
wheelchair, agreed
with Rangley's view
of East's letter, and
she too felt offended
by the term. "The
word 'cripple' is very-
insulting. I'm not a
'cripple I am disabl-
ed Packard said.
Rebecca Massey,
who is not confined to
a wheelchair but is
partially paralyzed,
agreed with East's
argument that the
word "cripple" was
synonmous with
"handicapped but
said an intelligent per-
son would not use the
word today because it
still offended some
people. Packard said
East should have
taken a stronger stand
against Watt's
remark. "It's like pat-
ting the other guy on
the back and saying
it's alright, everyone
will know what you
meanshe said, "but
they won't
county and Greenville
city officials,
Maughan said he ob-
jected to the use of the
segregated listing. "It
would seem that those
who designed, built
and engraved the
monument sought
more to remind those,
who view the piece, of
our segregational at-
titudes than to honor
the dead Maughan
wrote.
Responding to
Maughan, represen-
ting the County Com-
missioners, was
County Manager
H.R. Gray. After br-
inging the matter
before the board,
Gray said they agreed
to change the monu-
ment by hiring a con-
tractor to fill in the
wotds "colored
Gray said in April
that in order to assure
a "professional job"
the monument could
not be amended until
July or August when
weather conditions
were more suitable.
But when
September arrived the
job remained undone,
prompting communi-
ty leaders, including
Pitt County Southern
Christian Leadership
Conference President
Bennie Roundtree to
organize a protest at
the monument sight.
Participants had
planned to "sym-
bolically" remove the
words colored from
the marble slab by us-
ing hammers and
wooden chisels, vow-
ing to return with real
chisels if the job re-
mained undone after
Nov. 1.
According to Gray,
The firm contracted
to amend the monu-
ment had to be called
"four or five times"
but were too busy to
do the job until this
week. The words col-
ored have now been
filled in with a com-
pound which Gray
said will make the
original words undec-
table. A final
polishing process
needs to be done to
complete the job.
"We ordered it
done Gray said
Wednesday, "But
they were the only in
the area that does it
Roundtree said he
was very pleased that
the job was done. He
had contacted county
officials earlier in the
week informing them
of the planned pro-
test. "I think the peo-
ple of this community
did a great job
Roundtree said.
"It was brought to
our attention in early
spring Gray said.
"They (the county
commissioners)
recommended we get
it done and we did
it
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29. 1983
Pa�e6
'Pure Prairie League Mixes Country, Rock
ROBIN AYKRS � Ptwt Lab
These partiers rocked the Greenleaf as 'The Pure Prairie League made their appearance.
Musical 'Superstar' Opens;
Drama, Music Depts. Produce
GREENVILLE � Jesus Christ
Superstar, one of the most
famous and elaborate of ail rock-
operas, will open the 1983-84
season at the East Carolina
Playhouse on October 5, with
subsequent performances October
6, 7, 8, and 10, all at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre.
The production, a cooporative
effort of the ECU Drama Depart-
ment and School of Music, is a
revival of the then controversial
Broadway musical that signaled a
resurrection of contemporary
religious concern in the wake of
the early Sixties when skeptics
declared "God is dead due to lack
of interest, cynicism and
relevance It is a rock music
treatment of Christ's Passion, the
last week of His life, culminating
in His crucifixion and His
followers' searching cries for
meaning in His death.
Even before the show opened in
New York, the now ledgendary
two-record album had been
released in the U.S. and some
religious groups were up-in-arms
about what was called the "ir- tion, Edgar Loessin and Mavis
reverent and blasphemous way in Ray, commented: "In order to get
which Christ's Passion is per- the full rich sound this show
formed Pickets paced day and demands, we've put a very large
night across the theatre entrance cast on stage: about forty people.
We're also using a full orchestra
and some scenic effects that
should make this production as
exhilarating to see as it is to
hear
One of the effects mentioned by
Loessin is a lavish gold gown to be
worn by actor Timothy Parker
who portrays Jesus Christ. In a
dramatic moment of the rock-
opera, the gown is draped over
Christ, the superstar, as he rises
some ten feet in the air. At the top
of the rise, the crowd rips the
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff Writar
Pure Prairie League, one of the country's more
popular countryrock bands, performed Friday
night before a standing room only crowd at the
Greenleaf Restaurant and Entertainment Center. In
a show that lasted about ninety minutes, Pure
Prairie League played a program consisting mostly
of new material from their next album.
Together for thirteen years, the League's current
members are Michael Connor, Keyboards; Bill
Hinds, drums; Tim Goshorn, lead guitar; Al Garth,
alto and tenor sax, fiddle and synthesizer; and
Michael Reilly, bass guitar. Connor, Hinds and
Reilly, the League's original remaining members,
have been playing together about fifteen years. In
the near future, a new singer will be added to the
line-up.
Reilly attributes Pure Prairie League's longevity
to, "liking what we do He said band members
have to be good friends, and there has to be deter-
mination to stay together.
The musicians combine instruments and voices
well into one sound. Harmonies contribute to their
unique sound. There is no overshadowing of one
"star" performer; the band is a group effort.
Although the new material is more rock oriented,
Pure Prairie League's performance came across as
laid-back. The crowd was excited and gave the
League the support a band needs to perform its
best.
Al Garth's sax and Jim Goshorn's guitar com-
plemented the other as well as standing out on their
own. The sax is a nice rhythmic asset to a band and
Goshorn can weave it skillfully in and out of the
melodies.
"This Time I'll Stay" is a new song that was per-
formed in the more "traditional" Pure Prairie
League vein; slow and easy with a country flavor.
"All Through The Night" featured a guitar solo
with well-played drums, but no rush. There is no
need for rushing. The song has a good rock tempo
with percussion playing a dominant part in driving
it home.
Another number that rocks more is "On the Out-
side The upbeat mood of the music makes a nice
contrast to the lyrics:
"I'm on the outside looking in
I'm on the dark side
You won't let me in
A "golden oldie" performed was a rousing ar-
rangement of "Hand Jive Its opening featured a
jaunty bass line by Reilly that sustained the beat of
"doing that crazy hand jive
The highlight of the evening for the audience was
"Amie Accompanied by Bart and Jim of a band
called Bammer (their last names change with
whomever they play, according to Reilly) on vocals,
this was a slower version of the album arrangement,
though no less moving or energetic.
Reilly said Amie is not a real person. The name is
derived from Aimer, French, meaning "to love
Reilly said this song was, "written about a number
of people; the composite dreamgirl He said
"Amie" was originally conceived of as a hard rock
song.
The League came back for two encores, one of
them, "I'm Almost Ready from the Something in
the Night (1981) album.
After the show I had a chance to speak with
bassist Michael Reilly again. The band was packing
to leave and Michael took a few minutes to talk a
little about the League and their next album.
Reilly said the band has gone through a sort of
evolution. Throughout its time together the
League's music has experienced a "natural progres-
sion
"Over the last ten years we've gone from country
rock to a rock and roll stance said Reilly. 75-80
percent of Pure Prairie League's material is written
soley by its members. Reilly said the main writers
are the guitar players but everyone contributes.
Reilly believes an audience can get more of an idea
of the personality of a band when it can perform its
own songs.
No one does solo projects between group albums,
although they may perform in part on someone
else's album. "Between albums we work where we
can Reilly said. "We're going back into rehearsal
Monday. Our next priority is getting the album
out
"We're going to do fewer gigs before the next
album. We have played lots of small clubs, state
fairs, this time of year at least The League is no
See League, p. 7
as advance ticket sales soared,
breaking all existing records on
the famed Great White Way.
"The idea of our whole opera is to
have Christ seen through the eyes
of Judas, with Christ as a man,
not as a God said composer An-
drew Lloyd Webber. The Broad-
way production opened in 1971 to
'standing room only, banner
headlines across the country and
reviews proclaiming it to be
everything from a "modern
miracle to "musical heresy of
the first rank Superstar went on
to a lengthy run on Broadway,
several international tours and
was made into a major motion
picture. Andrew Lloyd Webber is
also known for several other
popular Broadway musicals in-
cluding Joseph and His Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat, Evita
and the current sell-out Cats.
The director and choreographer
of the ECU playhouse produc-
went on to say: "The real
challenge with the gown was
designing it so that it would stay
firmly attached as the actor rises
above the floor and yet release
when the angry crowd rips it
down
To director Loessin, the star of
this production is the music:
"This music is masterfully con-
ceived and overflows with energy
and a rock style that I think
reveals the story in a fresh and
honest way. It is one of the most
important musical theatre works
Ayden Play Takes Off
In 'See How They Run'
gown from the Messiah, revealing of our generation.
Sim crucified. "I hope it will be a
spectacular effect" explains the
designer of the costume, Patrice
Alexander. "In all, the gown has
40 yards of fabric, 75 yards of
highly reflective metalic tape,
weighs about 40 pounds and is
designed to drape from the actor's
shoulders down some 16 feet to
the floor where it spreads out
another five feet Alexander
Reserved seat tickets for Jesus
Christ Superstar and season
tickets for the entire Playhouse
season are on sale at the McGinnis
Theatre Box Office at the corner
of Fifth and Eastern streets in
Greenville.
The Box Office is open each
weekday from 10 a.m. until 4
The Ayden Theatre Workshop's
1983-84 ��am opener is Philip
King's rollicking comedy, See
How They Run, an excellent farce
of the most involved variety.
Galloping in and out of the four
doors of an English Vicarage are
an American actor and actress, a
maid who has seen too many
American movies, an old maid
who "touches alcohol for the first
time in her life four men in
clergyman's suits presenting the
problem of which is which, for
disquised as one is an escaped
prisoner, and a sedate bishop
p.m. Reservations can'be made by 5" at �� thcsc oin�s on d
calling 757-6390 tnc trumped-up stories that are
told to him.
The opening night performance
is Thursday. Oct. 6 mt 8 p.ariU-
Other performances are Saturday,
Oct. 8 at 8 p.m. and Sunday,
Oct.9 at 3 p.m all in the Ayden-
Grifton auditorium on highway
11 south of Greenville. Tickets are
$3 at the door. Season tickets are
still available for $10 for all five
productions by the ATW. For
more information, call 746-6782
or 756-7209.
Open auditions for the Ayden
Theatre Workshop's next pro-
duction, Annie, will be held on
Monday and Tuesday nights, Oct.
10 and 11 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Ayden-Grifton auditorium. Come
join the fun!
Bob And Doug Do It Again I Poetry Corner
Bob and Doug McKenzie, the
two best-known beer drinkers ever
to come from The Great White
North, are back guzzling brew,
eating back bacon and telling each
other to "take off on their new
MercuryPolyGram LP Strange
Brew. The album also doubles as
the soundtrack to the brothers'
debut film project, co-directed by
the two actorcomedians who
first brought us Bob and Doug on
the SCTV show - Rick Moranis
and Dave Thomas. The debut LP
by the two, called The Great
White North soared part gold last
year � a rare feat for a comedy
record.
The origins of Bob and Doug
date back to 1980 and the critical-
ly acclaimed, Emmy award winn-
ing SCTV comedy show, the pro-
gram comes from Canada, and
the Canadian Broadcasting Cor-
poration stipulated that a two
minute segment of the show had
to be filled with "Canadian con-
tent As a joke, Moranis and
Thomas came up with the two
simple-minded siblings who they
felt represented a caricature of a
certain subterranian brand of
Canadian. Luckily the CBC
understood the joke and soon so
did millions of Canadians and
Americans, inspiring a true video
cult with people all over North
America imitating the drinking,
dressing and speech habits of the
two dim-witted brothers. Sudden-
ly "take off you hoser" became a
part of everyday lanugage for
millions and a new brand of nerd-
chic was born.
The McKenzie's first vinyl
outing was a big success and now
their filmic debut should do
equally well. It takes place
inwhere else?a brewery. The
film stars, besides Rick Moranis
and Dave Thomas (who also co-
wrote the film), Max Von Sydow,
Paul Dooly and Lynne Griffith.
Now with two LP's and a new
feature film behind them, these
wasted siblings should spread
their twisted views on life's
"topics" even further.
Late September
Brightly colored lights
Yellow, red and green
Illuminate the nites
Heighten the hopes and widen the eyes
Of small children
For miles around
People talk about names like,
"The Cobra 'The Tempest' and 'The Whip'
Smells like cotton candy, popcorn and candied
apples.
Four wheel drives, campers perched on pick-up trucks
border dimly lit trailers filled with
Ticket takers, mechanics and hot dog makers
Circled up like wagon trains
bracing for another assault.
It's late September again.
Evenings are turning crisp
Sunny warm afternoons
with appointments that we've missed
Amusements of America
with the sun goin down
Momma put your shoes on
the county fair's in town!
William Wladimir Lotowycz
Special Ed. Alumus
82 grad student
Bob and Dong McKeute are ap to (bar crazy antics again on 'Strange Brew
he L
Coot'd from p. 6
stranger to North
Carolina. Previous
engagements have
brought the band to
Boone, Blowing Rock
1 and Charlotte.
� The new album will
be more rock and roll
than the previous
album Something in
the Night (1981).
Recording will begin
ground Christmas
The album's release is
set for spring. Reilly
said there is no centra
theme. "There will be
a lot
roll. It
more p
more
said "
Fleeti
p r o d u cj
Dashut
the ui
Prairie
"Its
wants u
projeci
wood
Re:
A coi
is the
b e c o
stereor
Prairie
penena
'Comate
It's a nagging irony
that so many in-
aovative US bands
Still have to 'ook to
Europe to gain
recognition before
they can become
popular at home
Such was the case
with Comateens, a
New York band
who've enjoyed most
of their success so far
in Europe, particular-
ly in France where
they've completed
several tours. Still, the
band has managed to
inspire plenty of at-
tention from the more
forward-thinking
members of the US
press. In the New
York Daily News Bill
Carlton wrote: "I've
seen them live at The
Ritz, met the musi-
cians in the band and
listened to their full
album. All this has
reinforced my belief
in their great talent
and future
Now that Coma-
teens
their f I
US LP.
Sting
cur Vi
am,
Amenc
fins
to ca
buzz thfl
rot
Europe
paper -
Thai
starec
Comatt
gang on
City c
Sev era-
looking
days. Sil
wrote
Voice:
disting
assured
sense of
rhythm
never h
of then
mien an!
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early
through
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THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1983
Page 6
Rock
performed was a rousing ar-
Jnd Jive Its opening featured a
Reilly that sustained the beat of
(Kind jive "
I' ne evening for the audience was
lined by Bart and Jim of a band
their last names change with
iv according to Reilly) on vocals,
pi sion of the album arrangement,
ing or energetic.
- not a real person. The name is
r, French, meaning "to love
i was, written about a number
ositc dreamgirl " He said
lally conceived of as a hard rock
c back for two encores, one of
Ready from the Something in
b am.
had a chance to speak with
pi) again The band was packing
lei took a few minutes to talk a
Itgue and their next album.
and has gone through a sort of
tt its time together the
-xpenenced a "natural progres-
e've gone from country
stance said Reilly. "5-80
vie I eague's material is written
(9 Reilly said the main writers
but everyone contributes
ludience can get more of an idea
f a band when it can perform its
Detween group albums,
perform in part on someone
teen albums we work where we
x re going back into rehearsal
rit is getting the album
fewer gigs before the next
aed lots of small clubs, state
i at least The League is no
ague. p. 7
akes Off
hey Run'
1 he opening night performance
TYiirsAay, Oct. f a. 8 p.smw
trier performances are Saturday,
8 at 8 p.m. and Sunday,
ft 9 at 3 p.m all in the Ayden-
ifton auditorium on highway
jsouth of Greenville. Tickets are
the door. Season tickets are
available for $10 for ail five
-tions by the ATW. For
re information, call 746-6782
'56-209
)pcn auditions for the Ayden
satre Workshop's next pro-
ttion, Annie, will be held on
pday and Tuesday nights, Oct.
and 11 at 7:30 p.m. in the
den-Grifton auditorium. Come
the fun!
orner
ber
lne eyes
d 'The Whip'
rn and candied
hed on pick-up trucks
ith
u dog makers
UKsed
idimir Lotowycz
1. Alumus
id student
The League s Back
Cont'd from p. 6
stranger to North
Carolina. Previous
engagements have
brought the band to
Boone, Blowing Rock
and Charlotte.
The new album will
I be more rock and roll
than the previous
album Something in
the Night (1981).
Recording will begin
around Christmas.
The album's release is
set for spring. Reilly
said there is no central
I theme "There will be
a lot more rock and
roll. It will be a lot
more punchy, a lot
more edge to it, he
said
Fleetwood Mac's
producer Richard
Dashut will produce
the upcoming Pure
Prairie League album.
"It's flattering he
wants us to be his first
project outside Fleet-
wood mac said
Reilly.
A concern of artists
is the problem of
becoming
stereotyped. Pure
Prairie League has ex-
perienced the dilem-
ma of being categoriz-
ed into one type of
genre without wanting
to. From the start, the
Legue's album covers,
for example, became
a kind of unshakeable
signature. The League
designs the covers and
various artists have
rendered them. The
designs, they feel,
have helped type the
band.
Although good for-
tune has not been
elasive for Pure
Prairie League, Reilly
said, "We'd like to be
more successful we
keep our eye on
what's going on
The League believes
in always looking
ahead and not dwell-
ing on what is past.
"If all we played were
old songs we wouldn't
be here
"You'd be surpris-
ed how people need to
pigeon-hole you.
We're lucky to play
what we want. We try
to thwart people's at-
tempts at categoriz-
inglook at what
Jackson Browne did;
takes balls to do it. If
artists didn't pro-
gress, there wouldn't
be an new music
'Comateens' Release LP
novative
still have
Europe
It's a nagging irony
that so many in-
US bands
to look to
to gain
recognition before
they can become
popular at home.
Such was the case
with Comateens, a
New York band
who've enjoyed most
of their success so far
in Europe, particular-
ly in France where
they've completed
several tours. Still, the
band has managed to
inspire plenty of at-
tention from the more
forward-thinking
members of the US
press. In the New
York Daily News Bill
Carlton wrote: "I've
seen them live at The
Ritz, met the musi-
cians in the band and
listened to their full
album. All this has
reinforced my belief
in their great talent
and future
Now that Coma-
teens are releasing
their first major label
US LP, Pictures On A
Sting, on Mer-
curyVirginPolyGr-
am, the general
American public will
finally get the chance
to catch up to the
buzz that's been sur-
rounding the band in
Europe and in the
papers.
That buzz first
started in 1978 when
Comateens began gig-
ging on the New York
City club scene.
Several years later,
looking back on those
days, Steve Anderson
wrote in The Village
Voice: "They were
distinguished by
assured melodies, a
sense of humor and a
rhythm machine that
never hot in the way
of their kid-next-door
mien and earnest in-
tention to populate
the dance floor The
early band went
through the requisite
personnel changes but
soon settled down to a
solid threesome �
Lyn Byrd,
Manhattan-born, on
synthesizer and
vocals, plus brothers
Nic North (bass and
vocals) and Oliver
North (guitar and
vocals). The band
earned a solid local
reputation with their
early New York gigs
but at the time record
companies weren't
paying much atten-
tion to home-grown
bands (as they had in
the earlier punk �
new wave days). So
the band signed with a
small company and
released their self-
titled debut in late
'81. It immediately
established them with
a major European au-
dience. On this side of
the Atlantic, Boston
Rock worte of the LP:
"Comateens' self-
titled debut album
celebrates teenage
America in the most
innovative manner
since early Talking
Heads
The band's new
Mer-
curyVirginPolyGr-
am LP, Pictures On A
String, presents then-
most incisive and jarr-
ing mix yet. Brian
Chin in Billboard has
already called the LP
"The strongest
blacknew music fu-
sion since The
Thompson Twins last
album, possibly since
Tom Tom Club
There's a strong funk
influence throughout,
along with more
melodic pop tracks
(like "Comateens" or
"The Late Mistake")
plus some dissonant
touches, as in "Ice
Machine Most
unusual is their cover
of "Uptown featur-
ing Lyn Byrd's hyp-
notic vocals and a
semi-psychedelic
musical backup.
'I
l
made their debut album 'Plctvn Ob A String'
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 29. 1983
Page a
Missouri Toughest Team To Date
By CINDY PLEASANTS
S�ortiE4Hor
100,000 pounds of dynamite just "We're gonna go down there
ready to explode for one thing he said, "and
When the East Carolina Pirates Last season, the Pirates scored that's win the football game. I
head for Missouri this weekend, just three field goals against the know we're the underdogs, but
Head Coach Ed Emory believes Tigers and ended up losing, 28-9. we've been that way most of the
his team will be facing their Emory, however, doesn't think time.
toughest opponent to date. this season's match-up should "We want to be successful so
They're the best talent we've prove to be anything like last badly, and there's no one else I'd
rather play this weekend than a
played he said. "They're year's.
� �ii 'in, itm

:
,� H
ti m.
� m fti' J�


��. 0�
Pirate quarterback Kevin Ingram will play a key role In this weekend's game with Missouri, as he did in this
touchdown-scoring run against N.C. State.
Big Eight team like Missouri
Winning against Missouri will
depend on several factors, Emory
said. "We've got to be more ag-
gressive he said. "We can't give
the ball to Missouri for 37 minutes
like we did to Florida State and
N.C. State
The Pirates will concentrate on
moving the ball against Missouri's
sizable squad. "Their players are
just so big Eemory said. "It's
gonna be the biggest challenge in
the world for us to move the foot-
ball against them
Missouri, now 2-1, beat Utah
State 17-10 last week and is now
ranked third in the nation in
rushing and fifth in total offense.
That's why Emory stressed that
the Pirates must be more physical
in this week's practice. ECU had
an open date last weekend, but
Emory said the team came back
from their short vacation ready to
go. "We're pleased with the way
the kids handled the open date
he said. "The intensity, en-
thusiasm and spring in their legs
has been good.
"With our tough schedule in
October, the break came at a good
time for us. That's the way we feel
right now, but we'll know if we're
glad on Saturday
Until then, the ECU coaching
staff will push the Pirates to be
more aggressive. "That doesn't
mean scrimmaging Emory said.
"We need to be more physical
one-on-one and two-on-two.
We've got to be the best tackling
team with the backs Missouri's
got
One of the Tigers most heralded
backs is sophomore fullback Eric
Drain. "He's the toughest
fullback we'll face all season
Emory said. "He's the key to
their running game right now
Drain scored two last-minute
touchdowns against ECU last
year.
Emory doesn't expect many
touchdowns to be made by either
team in this year's contest. "I an-
ticipate a low-scoring game he
said, "and the kicking game
might win it. I can't tell you
enough just how important the
special teams are gonna be in a
game like this. We've got to make
Missouri punt the football
Although the Pirates aren't ex-
pecting the Tigers to be the same
team they were last year, Missouri
is anticipating a few changes in
ECU as well. "East Carolina is a
very explosive football team, the
most explosive team we've faced
so far Tiger Coach Warren
Powers said. "They have great
quickness and speed and excellent
people in the skill positions.
"They are a much better team
than they were a year ago coming
in here
Last week, Emory was concern-
ed about injuries, but most of the
sidelined players have returned.
"We're still concerned about
Terry long's (offensive guard)
bruised shoulder and Norman
Quick (offensive guard, injured
ankle) Emory said, "but the
others are back. Steve Hamilton
(defensive tackle) is about 90 to 95
percent right now. Offensively,
we have a very healthy football
team
Although the Pirates may be
healthy, Emory would like to add
a few players to the 56-man travel-
ing squad. "One of the hardest
jobs I have as head coach is leav-
ing someone behind who deserves
to play he said. "I always wish I
could take a few more
Kickoff returner Henry-
Williams will definitely be making
the trip. Williams, the junior
flanker who transferred from
Northwest Mississippi Junior Col-
lege, is leading the NCAA Divi-
sion I in kickoff returns with a
40.1 yard average return.
Powers Looks For Rush War
Powers Speaks Out: Although
ECU football coach Ed Emory
refers to Missouri's personnel as
"awesome Tiger coach Warren
Powers thinks that may be a slight
overstatement.
"Awesome?" Warren said.
"No, all those words flatter you a
great deal. They impressed Utah
State a great deal too he said
with a chuckle. Missouri just edg-
ed out Utah State, 17-10.
"We're not awesome he said.
"We're a good football team if we
do a tot of things right
Powers believes ECU can also
do quite a few things right,
especially scoring. "I've got a
great deal of respect for ECU
he said. "I believe that football
team is used to scoring a lot of
points. They (ECU) should have
beaten Florida State, and they
beat a good N.C. State team.
They can move the football
Missouri, ranked third in the
nation in rushing, isn't taking the
Bucs too lightly this year. In fact,
Powers is anticipating quite a bat-
tle between the two teams in
running. "They're gonna
challenge our rushing game and
our rushing defense he said.
"That's the way they move the
football (rushing), but they can
also throw the football.
"Kevin Ingram is a great
passer, and Henry Williams is
quite a receiver. They've got a
team that can score
Don't let Powers fool you.
Missouri's got a team that can
also score. The Tigers, however,
have recently had a few problems
with their backs. Missouri does
have Eric Drain, one of the na-
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
tion's leading fullbacks. But just
this week, junior fullback Glenn
Malvern had to quit the team after
finding out that he has only one
functioning kidney. "That was a
great loss for us Powers said,
"He's a heckuva football
player Freshman Eddie Esson
will help fill that gap, and Powers
said tailback Santio Barbosa will
probably help out at fullback.
Another standout, tailback
Cameron Riley has been out with
an injury, but he should be in ac-
tion on Saturday.
Four Keys: Emory believes
there are four keys to beating
Missouri this weekend. "One, we
have to have great play from our
specialty teams he said. "Two,
we must play great defense.
Three, we must maintain good
field position; and four, we must
rush the football
Only The Second Time: The
Pirates play Missouri for only the
second time in school history. The
clubs met last season in Colum-
bia, with the Tigers winning, 28-9.
The final score is somewhat
misleading since the score was
14-9 with nine minutes to play. In
the game last season, current
quarterback Kevin Ingram was
forced into duty when starter
Greg Stewart suddenly fell ill on
Friday night. Since then, Ingram
has developed into the Pirates'
top quarterback, known for both
his running and passing ability.
Father And Son Meet: ECU
Assistant Athletic Director for
Marketing Dave Hart, Jr will get
a chance to visit with his father at
Missouri. Dave Hart, Sr is the
athletic director at Missouri.
Hart, Jr is the color commentary
voice on the Pirate Sports Net-
work.
Williams Making Mark: In ad-
dition to being nationally ranked
in kickoff and punt returns,
Williams is also carrying a rather
high average for yardage gained
each time he touches the football.
In eight kickoff returns, seven
punt returns and one pass recep-
tion, Williams has totaled 426
yards for a 26.6 average per carry.
Ingram moves up: Ingram has
moved to sixth on the career pass
completion list at ECU with a
total of 78. The move puts Ingram
ahead of Mike Weaver (75) and
George Richardson (76).
Vann Listed as Ninth: Tight
end Norwood Vann has become
the ninth leading pass receiver
with 663 career yards to date. This
puts Vann ahead of Bob Grant
(641 yards). An additional 60
yards will move Vann to number
eight, currently held by Vic
Wilfore (721 yards).
Good Start: The 2-1 start for
ECU matches the best start of an
Ed Emory coached team. The
Pirates were 2-1 last year entering
the same game�at Missouri.
Pirates Ranked: In the latest
issue of Football News, ECU is
rated 27th in the nation. Over the
first three weeks of the season,
ECU has moved up each week.
Currently, the Pirates carry a
90.90 power rating in Harry
DeVold's top 100. Missouri, prior
to the Utah State game, was rated
24th at 91.73.
t
� r �
ECU'S Henry Williams, a Junior college transfer, to leading the NCAA
Division I in kickoff returns with a 40.1-yard return average.
Mad Dog A Hacks For ECU
By RANDY MEWS
ECU's Brian Coigan wanna up in preparation for an upcoming game.
Coigau is currently ECU's leading scorer with four goals to bis credit,
but he was unable to help the Pirates la their 4-4) loss to nationally-
rmuked Old Dominion on Tuesday �
ECU transfer-student Brian
Coigan is establishing himself as a
dominant force on this year's soc-
cer team.
In just his first year of playing
division-I soccer, Coigan has
already set the pace. He leads the
Pirates in scoring with four goals.
Coigan had always wanted to
play soccer on the Division-I level,
but explained the road to ECU
was a long one.
After an illustrious high school
career in which his team won a
state championship and was
runner-up for two years, Coigan
accepted a full scholarship to
Virginia Military Institute.
After a successful year of play-
ing soccer at VMI, Coigan decid-
ed he wasn't cut out for military
life. He gave up his scholarship
and headed back home to Bowie,
Md.
With nowhere to turn, Coigan
opted to play his second year of
soccer eligibility at close-to-home
Prince George Junior College.
From there, his soccer career
took off. Coigan was named
Junior College All-America as
Prince George went on to finish
third in the nation. There Coigan
received national tournament
honors.
Once arriving at ECU, Coigan
immediately stepped into a star-
ting role as a striker (forward).
Coach Robbie Church was sur-
prised at how fast he adjusted to
Division-I soccer, but credits Coi-
gan 's immediate success to his
hard-nose style of play.
"Brian is what I would discribe
as a power player Church said.
He'll bull his way through
anything, and whenever there's a
loose ball in the air, Brian will
usually be the one who gets it
Colgan's aggressive style of
play has also earned him the
nickname Mad Dog. "I don't
know why everybody started call-
ing me that Coigan said. "I like
to have fun, and I act crazy at
times, but I think I was called that
because of the way I play soccer
Coach Church likes Colgan's
nickname and believes it's quite
appropriate. "He's such an in-
tense competitor; he'd go through
a brick wall to get at a ball
Coigan doesn't know how he
adopted such a rough style of
play, but realizes it's that style
that has made him the prolific
scorer he is today.
"Brian is a great scorer
Church said, "and he has an un-
canny ability to be in the right
place at the right time
One statistic that speaks for
itself is that since Coigan first
began playing soccer, he has been
the leading scorer on every team
he has ever been associated with.
With everything going so well
for Coigan, his only concern now
is the welfare of the team. ECU is
currently 2-5, but Coigan believes
the Pirates are a lot better than
their record indicates.
"Eight of our 11 starters are
freshmen, so it's just a matter of
everyone getting use to playing
with each other he said. "We
have the talent to be a really good
team, and I still think we can have
more wins than any previous ECU
team
Last year the Pirates finished
the season at 7-10, tying the
record for most wins in school
history.
Coigan feels confident the
Pirates can improve last season's
record. If he continues in his nor-
mal fashion, that year may very
well be 1983.
Ranked Monarchs Beat Bucs
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU soccer team faced the
toughest opponent on their
schedule Tuesday, losing to
nationally- ranked Old Dominion,
4-0.
The number-nine Monarchs
dominated the midfield area,
keeping the ball within striking
distance for almost the entire
game.
ODU had many opportunities
in the first half to turn the game
into a route, but the Pirate
defense was solid. The Monarchs
managed only one goal, coming
from Gordon Eloussun midway
through the half.
"I was extremely pleased with
our play in the first half Coach
Robbie Church said. "The entire
defensive unit did a great job, but
goalie George Podgorney had an
exceptional game
ECU came out in the second
half looking to even the score, but
Eloussun quickly scored his se-
cond goal, breaking the Bucs'
spirit.
At that point, Old Dominion's
dominance of the midfield took
over, as Mike Valinutos made two
consecutive goals to dose out the
scoring.
ODU finished the day with 17
shots on goal, while ECU could
only muster six.
"This was definitely a learning
experience for us Church said.
They're the ninth best team in
the country and have 11 players
on full scholarship.
"Iwsn't disjointed with
our performance; we just need to
eliminate our mental lapses and
play a more balanced game
The Pirates will try to raise their
record to 3-5 when they play
Campbell on Oct. 1. W
P
4
I
The ECU women's tennis team def
7-2 Monday afternoon. The Pirates
son.
Annual R
The annual cross-
xampus races will be
held Homecoming
Dav, Saturdav Oct
29, 1983. A 2.5-mile
race will start at 9:00
a.m. and a 5.0-mile
race will start at 9:30
a.m.
Both races start
near the bleachers at
the ECU varsity
track, Bunting Field.
The race course is 95
percent on grass and
traverses in and about
the area surrounding
Minges Coliseum,
Ficklen, Bunting
Field, Harrington
Field
o rr .
field.
The - - J
are sp j
De- ti
1 n t r a m u
Recrc-
are osx-
studer
staff ar
m.
The
winner
2 -r I
was Willk I
an -mn
teaching
Washing! I
Weekend Of
Savings From
30
ENTIRE
OFBLA
BLOUSES
9Q�
Sale
S19V2490
DRES
I this
SUITS
49
90
Sale TJ SCQ99
alf O S

PANTS
SI I9
19
s 14
C ordure- Gattt Pnc
Be SI Q90
Phone
756-9955
VIIGINIA
LA





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29, 1983 9
'age
I s and speed and excellent
the skill positions,
are a much better team
were a vear ago coming
ek. Emory was concern-
iries, but most of the
p avers have returned.
concerned about
. - (offensive guard)
.ider and Norman
ffensive guard, injured
Emory said, "but the
�.ck Steve Hamilton
is about 90 to 95
now. Offensively,
a erv healthy football
h the Pirates may be
uould like to add
the 56-man travel-
"One of the hardest
: as head coach is leav-
nind who deserves
d "I always wish I
a few more
returner Henry
kfinitely be making
lliams, the junior
1 transferred from
ssippi Junior Col-
Jtading the NCAA Divi-
koff returns with a
average return.
W
.

yh
k. is leading the NCAA
lrHuni average.
U
Id indicates.
�' our 11 starters are
o it's just a matter of
string use to playing
other he said. "We
lent to be a really good
I still think we can have
than any previous ECU
jar the Pirates finished
� at 7-10, tying the
most wins in school
feels confident the
improve last season's
ie continues in his nor-
h, that year may very
Bucs
shed the day with 17
loal, while ECU could
r six.
as definitely a learning
1 for us Church said.
fhe ninth best team in
fy and have 11 players
olarship.
't disappointed with
lance; we just need to
Jur mental lapses and
fe balanced game
Jtes will try to raise their
3-5 when they play
nOct. l. P y
Pirate Netters Ease
Past Rival ACC 7
B
ly Randy
�ix mm
Mews
The ECU women's
tennis team easily
disposed of Atlantic
Christian College
Monday, winning 7-2.
�'I was extremely
pleased with our
team's performance
Coach Pat Sherman
said. "We were very
loose, and I thought
we played more up to
our potential then we
did in our first match
against UNC-
Greensboro
The outstanding
player for the Pirates
was number-two seed,
Janet Russell. Russell
is undefeated in four
matches this season,
and according to
Sherman, she is play-
ing the best of anyone
up to this point.
Russell defeated
LeAnn Summerland
6-1, 6-3 in singles, and
teamed with
Katherine Tolson in
doubles to take Sum-
merland and Mona
Andborn 6-1, 6-2.
In singles: And-
born(ACC) def.
Tolson 6-1, 6-3;
Russcll(ECU) def.
Summerland 6-1, 6-2;
Susan Maxwell (ACC)
def. Miriam Beck 5-7,
7-6, 7-5; Ann
Manderfield (ECU)
def. Susan Dickerson
6-3, 6-0; Cisi Bolton
(ECU) def. Bonnie
Fussell 6-3, 6-0; Lynn
Wallace (ECU) def.
Catherine Williams
6-2, 6-1.
In doubles: Tolson-
Russell (ECU) def.
Andborn-
Summerland 6-1,6-2;
Manderfield-Bolt on
(ECU) def.
Dicker son-Max well
6-2, 7-6; Beck-
Wallace (ECU) def.
Fussell-Williams 6-0,
6-0.
The ECU women's tennis team defeated Atlantic Christian College
7-2 Monday afternoon. The Pirates' next contest is Oct. 1 at David-
Sports Writers Needed
Apply at
The East Carolinian
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
DAILY SPECIALS AT
�subujcw
208E. 5thSt. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR 52.09
TUES.
lit R�AST BEEF BAG OF CHIPS' AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2 09
WED.
NAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SOD,
FOR $159
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMLL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
son.
Annual Races Set
WITH THIS CQUPON
The annual cross-
campus races will be
held Homecoming
Day, Saturday Oct.
29, 1983. A 2.5-mile
race will start at 9:00
a.m. and a 5.0-mile
race will start at 9:30
a.m.
Both races start
near the bleachers at
the ECU varsity
track, Bunting Field.
The race course is 95
percent on grass and
traverses in and about
the area surrounding
Minges Coliseum,
Ficklen, Bunting
Field, Harrington
Field and the
women's softball
Held.
The races, which
are sponsored by the
Department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services,
are open to all ECU
students, faculty,
staff and ECU alum-
ni.
The overall male
winner for the
2.5-mile race in 1982
was William White,
an alumni now
teaching in
Washington, NX.
White's time for the
distance was 13
minutes, 22 seconds.
White also won the
5.0-mile race with a
time of 28 minutes, 59
seconds.
Pat McGuigan, the
1982-83 women's
track coach, was the
overall female winner
of the 2.5-mile race
with a time of 18
minutes, 40 seconds,
while April Ross, an
ECU alumni, was the
5.0-mile winner runn-
ing the race in 39
minutes, 25 seconds.
GIVE US
FILM
WELL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
I
H
I
I
D
I
I
I
I
I
I
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10,8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
Brothers ofKA
would like to
congratulate
1983 Fall
Pledge Class
art � camera hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
�i
GREENVILLE. N.C 27834
752-0688
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84

00000000000000000000000000000000009000000000 tttttfsssi
CountryCooking
512 E. 14th St.
(2 Blocks H. of Boy's Dorms)
Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
take out
752-0476
Coupon
$1.00 off
every two regular plates
(1 meat, 2 vegs, bread, Tea)
Coupon expires Sept. 30
Open
ll:00to8:00
7 days
a week
served 11-2 I
Hot
When you open a sturdy
Domino's Pizza box. you'll
always find a hot delicious
pizza
We take special care to
insure your pizza will arrive
hot Whisked from the oven,
your pizza is sliced, boxed
and zipped into an
insulated earner for a safe
trip to your door
For over twenty years
Domino's Pizza has been
perfecting free. 30 minute
delivery Across America
when people want the
taste of real pizza in the
comfort of their home or
office they call Domino's
Pizza - for a delicious pizza
that's hot
At ECU call:
758-6660
In Greenville call:
752-6996
Limited dexvry areas
Olivers ca" ander $20
Domino's
Pizza
Delivers.
e 1983 Dommo s Pizra, Inc
, . HP. CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills.
Its a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hdlywood, CA 91603.
ARMYBAMDl
BEALLYOUCANBL
�art
I





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29, 1983
Heels Open Conference Play
(UPI) - Fifth-
ranked North
Carolina, the pre-
season favorite to win
the Atlantic Coast
Conference football
championship, and
1 6th-ranked
Maryland, considered
the Tar Heels' biggest
challenger, both begin
conference play this
weekend.
The undefeated Tar
Heels head into seven
straight ACC games
with a trip to struggl-
ing Georgia Tech
where the Yellow
Jackets are looking
for their first victory
of the season and first
ACC win since
becoming eligible for
the league champion-
ship.
Maryland is host to
a surprising Virginia
team that is
undefeated in its in-
itial four games for
the first time in 30
years and leads the
conference standings
with victories over
Duke and North
Carolina State.
The Tar Heels beat
William � Mary 51-20
last week, but the
defense gave up 352
yards along the way.
Coach Dick Crum ex-
pects the Yellow
Jackets to put the ball
in the air after the In-
dians drilled his
secondary for 218
yards.
The Yellow Jackets
have lost starting
quarterback Stu
Rogers for the year,
and Crum says getting
ready is more difficult
when you don't know
who will be calling the
signals.
"Our defense had
some problems last
week and this uncer-
tainty about Tech's
quarterback situation
could cause more
said Crum.
Yellow Jacket
Coach Bill Curry says
he will use either
sophomore John
Dewberry, freshman
Darrell Gast, or
senior Andy Thomas
at quarterback.
Dewberry came off
the bench in last
week's loss to Clem-
son and rushed for
101 yards, while Gast
completed seven of 10
passes in the closing
minutes of the Tiger
game.
Virginia Coach
George Welsh
Classifieds
SALE
PON SALI: Laraadorm ratrlg.
9mt cawd. ll� Call MgjMa.
PERSONAL
N1LLO CARLA. Iff hart) to My
In �rord� how much I lev yew, to
I will ui� My thanks tar being
my bweey and pel. Happy an-
nivorMry. Leva alwayt. Oref.
� UBBA- Happy annlverMryl I
love yew very much I Alwayt,
THIf IS TO CONVEY h fh
wort my heneraM Intentions
at reqvettlna th hand In
matrimony ef Mitt J.C.M.O. en
thtt tttti day et September, ��J
.w.r.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST CAT 1 yean old; white
flvHy, blue eye and 1 green eye
Latt teen on Jarvlt Street. Call
75I-M54. REWAUD OFFERED
LOST DOG Black � tan dober
nam puppy 1 weeks old. Ear
recently cropped. Name Thor.
Reward offered. Call 7Se-e�4)
(hm) 757-2441 (wk).
WANTED
PHARO RESTAURANT
employing daytime help from It
a.m. 'till j p.m. Come after l
p.m. MonPrt. Hi Cotanch No
call accepted.
FEMALE ROOMATE
WANTED: Bryton Hills Apts on
River biuti Rd. Fully turn e�-
cept bdrm S117.S per month �
one half phone end utll. Call
7S1H41.
FART TIME stock perten need-
ed at Kmart. 7 a.m untlll n
a.m. Apply In perten.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED- Georgetown Aptt.
fully turn, except bedroom
7M-440 On block form cam-
Put.
WAITRESS WANTED at The
Carolina Opry House Call dayt
7S-SS7t.
MISC.
LEOAL HASSLES? Call
Howard J. Cummtaeas, attorney
at Law. No charge fer In I Ha I
consultation for ECU Students.
Call m bate
LOWEST TYFINO RATES OS)
campus Include experienced
professional work. Pro
breeding, spelling and gram-
matical corrections J5J 7��
after :�.
PROFESSIONAL TYPINO.
MMgj
GOING TO PIECES ever your
Thesis i Call tike professionals at
word for word. Typing and word
processing Georgetown shop
jRj Hear, call 711 ipoj.
KIX ALBUM COVER signed by
band taken from party special
personal value, please return no
questions, reward 757-3411.
ANYONE HAVING INFORMA-
TION about the accident at the
intersection of Eatt 1tth St. and
Comoro Hill on Wednesday,
Sept. Jiit call 7S1-MS after 1
p-m.
ACADEMIC AHD PROFES-
SIONAL typing Call Julia
Bioodworth at 7SO-7I74.
acknowledges that
Maryland represents a
different level of com-
petition from the
teams his Cavaliers
have seen so far this
season.
"It's premature to
think about the
future said Welsh.
"We play Maryland
and Clemson (a team
Virginia has never
defeated) in the next
two weeks and we still
have some deficien-
cies
"I think it's too
early in the season to
know if you're a real-
ly good football
team Welsh added.
"I think we've made a
lot of progress and
I'm very happy for
these players. I think
we have to take them
one at a time and see
how we end up
Maryland beat Pitt
last week without
starting quarterback
Boomer Esiason who
was sidelined with a
shoulder injury.
Esiason is expected to
return to the lineup
Saturday.
ONE PRICE
NIGHT
THURSDAY
r
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
756-5982 321 E. 10th ST. Greenville 758-5616
H t0 OFF ANV SPAGHETTI
O'NNf. SlttinWi'xUiaO
�JBB) BeStM � CVs�"�g
a teas �. R-�3
J1 00 OFF ON A CHEF S SALAD
W'T� �Oo� CWO-Ct 09 111 iS.�.C
$1 00 OFF A CHEESE MANlCOTTf
3MMf � SIRvIO IrfTM S�. 4
Si 00 OFF A LARGE MEAT BALL SUB
�ait: MaOvOtOM CMCtSfl
1 00 OFF A GHEE. SAAD
Stavt m ��- e�v .��� -t�w
H 00 OFF A L ASAGNA
�.�� ,ia.ic � if vs. ad
ISM All IMA WI1M 1 lOPPINf,
OFYOt RIHOKI (EXTRA CHEESf
IS Al Rr Al)i ON
Pl.rsiPncHrROr BtrKHiH
ON MOMAs A svi )
: MASK mil DINNERS
IsAI Alts
ARII HKr Alts ��t ����-
I PIIC HI KOI HlrKHIK �7 49
Happy Hour 3:00 - Cl. Daily
$2.50 Pitcher $.65 Mug
ON II r-M4i& ihi RSDAYS
: I ASAGNA TOPPED WITH
Mr I I M) MOARM s( HEESE
:s Al)s
2C.ARI l( BKr ADs � ��-�� "
I PITCHER OF BEER FORC7 49
ON FRIDAYS
2sPM.Hr III A Ml l BAI I s
DINNER
:s ADs
: (, KI K BHI AD I IM I c MIR
III RMR
$7.49

(Uplift
A FAIR DEAL!
This Thursday night 16.00
covers main gate admission
at the Pitt Count fair. PI i S
40 GREAT RID Ride as
much as you like all niijht at nr
extra charuc' Remember, we're
celebrating FAIR DAYS I-FAIR
I(.IH PittCountxstvle!
HTTCOUrTirMR
THROUGH OCT. 1
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Receive Cash Fast
Accepting Any Items Of Value For Collateral
All Transactions Confidential
At Mb fern Shaf
We Loan Top Dollars
On All Items
:
����
Why Sll Your Valuables When You Can Brine, Them To
U And We Will Loan You Top Dollar And Give You 90
Day To Reclaim
II Your Want To Sell. We Will Give You Top Dollar
We Have A Large Inventory Ol New & Used Merchan-
dise For Sale
Guns TVs
AM & FM Radios Stereos
Car Radio & Speakers Chain Saw
Heaters M Tools
fWcsf JMuskral Instruments
LargeSelection Of Electronics
�-Jw �.We Real (if Coo4ensS )
We Have Hundreds Of Unique Items
WEBUYGOLD&SILVLR
iy� tan fan Is Committed To Not Being Undersold We
Have Worked Hard To Earn A Reputation For Honesty. �
Fairness And Confidentiality We Cooperate Fully With
Local & Federal Authorities J
Jolly's fawn Shop j
Corner of Greene St. & Pactolus Hwy. �
Greenville, N.C.
752-5759
Hours: 9-6 MonFri. � 8-5 Sat.
items and Prices
Effective wed. Sept. 28
Thru Sat. Oct. 1. 1983
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver
tised items is re
quired to be readily
available for sale in
each Kroger Sav on
except as speclflcai-
ly noted in this ad if
we do run out of an
item we will offer
you your choice of a
comparable Item
when available
reflecting the same
savings or a rain
check which will en
title you to purchase
the advertised item
at the advertised
price within 50 days
Limit one manufac
turers coupon per
item
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
For
CAFFEINE FREE, DIET,
TABOR
Coca Cola
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
KROGER
Orange Juice
KROGER
NATURAL FLAVOR
ice
Cream
$189
i-cai.
KROGER GRADE A
Medium
Eggs
Vz-Gai.
Ctn.
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser Beer
6 $579
16-Oz.
KROGER
2 Lowfat
Milk
DOZ.
Gal.
Jug
$469
ASSORTED VARIETY
THIN & CRISPY FROZEN
Jeno's
SN
RP
.�&.
10-OZ.
BOX
no
jENO�
1.
IP-
IN STORE BAKED DOUGHTIES
Sugar Cookies Roast Beef
DOZ.
Lb.
$399
�J-
Y '
���MMMnMiM
j�1 1.1 � 1. � iniim

1
1





Title
The East Carolinian, September 29, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 29, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.290
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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