The East Carolinian, September 7, 1982






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(ilnrnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.5
Tuesday, September 7, 1982
Greenville, NX
14 Pages
Circulation 10.(KM)
Student Injured In Accident
Bv I' IKK KO'MII I
SUM Wrllrr
n 1 CU student was seriously in-
jured early Friday morning when
the vehicle she was operating was
struck at high speed bv a truck that
was being pursued bv the campus
police.
reresa Karen Whitley, 24, sus-
tained multiple face injuries and was
admitted to Pitt Couty Memorial
Hospital in guarded condition.
According to ECU Assistant
Directoi of Security, 1 rancis Fd-
dings. a pick-up truck was observed
by ECl police officer 1 t. Ernest
Suggs at approximately 1:25 a.m.
driving the wrong way on a one-way
street in the vicinity oi Fletcher
dorm. When Suggs attempted to
being driven by
David Earl Jackson,
would not v icld.
�nsued when Jackson
his lights" and drove
viossed fifth street
ECU studen
21. the drivei
� chase
"turned ofl
ofl campus
over.to Summit Street and again
wen; the wrong way on a one-way
stree
Fddings reported that Jackson's
vehicle made "several turns on
several streets" in an attempt to
elude the patrol car.
At the intersection of Willow
Street and Stancil Drive, Jackson's
vehicle struck a third car, driven by
Whitley.
Whitley, Jackson, and a third
ECU student, Stevenson
Cherry,who was in the Jackson
vehicle, were all taken to Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital. Jackson and
Cherry were not seriously injured.
Jackson was arrested and charged
with "driving under the influence,
operating a motor vehicle without
due caution and circumspection,
operating a vehicle in excess of 55
miles per hour and at least 15 miles
per hour over the posted speed limit
to elude arrest or apprehension by a
ilaw enforcement officer with the
authority to enforce motor vehicle
laws.
As of Monday evening Whitley's
condition was listed as stable. "I
don't feel that she has sustained any
significant brain injury the
neurosurgeon attending toWhitley
said. "She knows pretty much
where she is - she's awake and
responsive
Whitley had to undergo a lengthy
operation to reconstruct her facial
bones. Her attending plastic
surgeon reported that the operation
went well. She will remain in inten-
sive care until the swelling goes
down, and further diagnosis can be
made.
Jackson was released without
bond in the custody of a third party,
believed to be his parents, Eddings
said. Cherry was not charged.
Eddings reported that the chase
was "not really a high-speed chase"
because the roads involved were not
conducive to fast driving.
When asked if he felt that Suggs
had used good judgement during the
incident, Eddings said "Yes, 1 think
so. He was using every precaution
that he could Eddings told The
East Carolinian that Suggs had his
blue lights on and was using his
siren while pursuing Jackson.
"You can't just let people go.
When people do things like this,
you've got to make an effort to stop
them he added.
East Carolina nursing student
Fauren Crist, who resides near
Whitley, felt that the police were us-
ing poor judgement. "1 think that
was uncalled for Crist said.
"They should think twice before
they decide to chase someone. Now
it's too late she continued,
"because someone's already been
injured
According to a spokesmen with
the Greenville Police Department,
all officers are told to "use good
common sense' and not to put any
lives in danger during a chase. The
jurisdiction tor this case has been
turned over to them, since the acci-
dent occured ofl university proper-
ty.
The spokesman added that a per-
son who tails to yield to a blue light
has "nine times out of 10 done
something bad' and an officer
should keep in pursuit because "you
can never be sure what that guy's
done
Survey Polls Women's Opportunities
Job Advancement Unequal
Bv P ! K K FI! 1
Women now ace int tor 42 per-
cent ot "v. a ' rce in the United
States, a recent Gallup Poll ta-
iled One halt oi all adult
women are now working and 54 per-
cent 01 those surveyed believe that
the d ' iv equal emplovment
ppoi tunities w ith men.
e recent poll asked a series oi
questions ling women in the
labo ' rce and their opinions on
tnd equality. The
vv.hu n surveved 766 adult
women and 65 adult men. had a
margin oi error oi plus or minus 5
ints.
Forty-one percent ot the women
surveved said they believed they did
: ave equal employment oppor-
tunity with men, while five percent
offered no opinion. These results
showed a marked change from the
these same questions in
In 19"5, when only 39 percent of
the labor force were women, 46 per-
cent felt they did not "have equal
employment opportunities Forty-
,nine percent oi the 1975 respondents
said they did have equal employ-
ment opportunities and five percent
had no opinion.
"I-think there's a real interest in
hiring women right now said Ms.
Inez S. Fridley, ECU area coor-
dinator for residence life. "More
than there has been
Fridlev is a member oi the ECU
1
Committee on the Status of
Women, which was formed in 1972
to give impetus to women's issues
on campus and to advise the
chancellor on such issues.
Fridley believed that many more
women were joining the labor force
for economic reasons. "It is nothing
in the world but an economic
issue she said. "Men and women
have to work
According to the conclusions of
the Gallup Poll, the new findings do
not necessarily indicate that job bias
has actually grown during the seven
year interval between polls
"Instead, the figures probably
reflect, at least in part, heightened
awareness of sex discrimination in
employment the poll concluded.
Working women; by almost a
two-to-one ratio, were less likely to
believe that they have "equal job
opportunities with men" than
women who were never formally
employed.
The poll also pointed out that
women with higher than a high
school education also felt a greater
degree of inequality in employment
opportunities.
Sixty-eight percent of the college
educated women in the Gallup
survey said "their sex does not have
equal job opportunities (with
men) Only 49 percent of the
women whose education had stop-
ped at high school agreed.
Another member of the ECU
Committee on the Status of
Women, assistant professor of
humanities in the ECU Medical
School John Moskop, pointed out
that ot the 13 seats available on the
ECU Board of Trustees only one
was tilled bv a women.
"Its hard for me to imagine that
there just are no women qualified
tor these posts tie said.
Fridley said she is still aware of
the stereotyping that can lake place
in regard to women. "There are
stereotypical images of women
she said. "You will hear people give
putdown comments
Fridley added that these putdown
comments "are often made in
reference to the women's liberation
movement She teels that society
has a hard time overcoming some of
these stereotypes.
The Gallup Poll asked the ques-
tion: "If a women has the same
abihtv as a man, does she have as
Donovan Fields Questions On Inquiry
NLW YORK (I PI) � Labor
Secretary Rav Donovan said Mon-
day he has never had a thought of
resigning in the face of criminal
allegations and believes he will be a
"political asset" tor Republicans in
the fall election campaign.
In Labor Dav appearances on two
network television shows, Donovan
found himself mainly fielding ques-
tion- about a special prosecutor's
prolonged investigation into the
dealings ot his New Jersey construc-
tion company.
I he investigation by special pro-
secutor I eon Silverman was clouded
turther on Aug. 25 with the slaying
of Nathan Masselli, a witness in the
case.
Donovan said he is "extremely
confident" of being cleared soon,
and suggested some reporter might
win a Pulitzer Prize by tracing the
source of the charges.
"When Mr. Silverman is through,
and files his final report, that is not
the final chapter of what has hap-
pened to Ray Donovan he said on
CBS' "Morning" show. "Ray
Donovan is really incidental in the
scheme of things. But America,
justice, fair play, fair treatment in
the media, aren't
Donovan said he plans to cam-
paign on behalf of Republicans this
fall, and does not consider himself a
political liability. "I, Ray Donovan,
believe I'm a political asset he
said.
Asked on ABC's "Good Morning
America" to respond to a morning
New York Daily News editorial call-
ing for his resignation, Donovan
said: "My response for that is I am
happy I work for President Reagan
and not for the Daily News
Donovan said his family and part-
ners have been "injured" by the
"screaming headlines in the press
and he once wondered, "Did I have
the right to put them through it0"
But he said he has never had "a
thought oi resignation
Reminded on ABC that Silver-
man questioned how Donovan can
be so certain he will be exonerated,
the secretary said: "I have the basis
for being extremely confident
because I know I am guilty of none
of these charges
Only minutes later on CBS,
Donovan agreed that the protracted
investigation has taken a toll on his
ability to do his job.
But, he said, "I learned as a
young man that self pity is
something that saps your energy and
does vou no good
On The Inside
Protestors Greet Senator Helms
Christine McVie and Lindsey
Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac
performed before a full house at
the Greensboro Coliseum
Wednesday night. For the com-
plete story, see Features, page 7.
(Photo by Gary Patterson)
Inside Index
Announcements
Classifieds
Opinion
Campus Forum
Features
Sports
2
13
4
4
7
11
AUSTIN, Texas (UPI) � About
100 pro-abortionists, carrying signs
saying "Our Bodies, Our Choice"
and "Helms' Bill Means Women
Die Monday protested an ap-
pearance by Sen. Jesse Helms,
R-N.C, at a Republican fundraiser.
But Helms made scant mention of
the abortion issue during his speech
to about 500 people at a $25-a-plate
luncheon to honor Texas Senate Pro
Tern Walter Mengden during
Mengden's "Governor for a Day"
program.
The North Carolina conservative
chose instead to attack the nation's
press, criticize welfare cheaters,
ridicule homosexuals and call for a
halt to communist intervention in
Central America.
Helms said "wrongwingers" are
leading a Senate filibuster against a
proposed constitutional amendment
to ban abortions. The amendment,
he said, is aimed at "putting the
brakes on the slaughter of innocent
unborn children
To say that he is imposing his
religious beliefs on others through
the abortion issue is "hogwash
said Helms.
Outside the hotel, members of the
National Organization for Women,
Students for Choice, the Women's
Political Caucus and the Texas
Abortion Rights Action League
peacefully walked a picket line.
Jan Friese, TARAL director, said
the subject of Helms' speech did not
matter because he is trying to
"redefine the Constitution to suit
his philosophy
"Whether he speaks about abor-
tion or school prayer, he's talking
about an erosion of the Constitu-
tion she said. "We don't need to
hear what Jesse Helms has to say
Friese predicted the anti-abortion
amendment will fail, adding, "I'm
pretty confident they're going to
lose that vote
Helms blasted the nation's big
newspapers and television networks,
saying, "Much of the distress of this
country can be laid at the steps of
the major news media of this coun-
ty.
?5B5
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' 1,
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fi
.VJ
ffi
.5
PlKIObv SCOTT LACSON
No Sax Before The Big Game
This musician toots his horn despite the coach's warning. He was also lold
not to go the "bar" unless he ordered a Sour note Ohiousl. he's play-
ing the ECU fight song. Right?
good a chance to become the ex-
ecutive of a company?"
Seventy-one percent said "they
did not" have as good a chance,
w hsle 50 percent of the less educated
women said "yes" they did have as
good a chance as a man.
Overall 56 percent of the women
surveyed said thev did not have
equal access to executive positions.
Fort) percept said "yes witn four
percent offering no opinion.
Men felt that women were not as
discriminated agaisnt as thev
try.
"I don't really worry about what
they say he said. "1 know they
regard the truth as precious. Other-
wise, they wouldn't use it so spar-
ingly.
"I'm proudly an unreconstructed
rightwinger Helms added. "1 con-
fess to it because I know who the
wrongwingers are. You've got one
who is editor of the Austin paper if I
read it right this morning
Sharing the podium with noted
Texas evangelists James Robison
and Lester Roloff, Helms said the
idea that communists in Central
America should be appeased is
"baloney
Helms said Central America
could become another Vietnam for
the United States "if we don't let
them (anti-communists) preserve
and restore freedom He predicted
some 10 million Central Americans
could migrate to the U.S. if they are
displaced by communist forces.
"If we abandon them now, we'll
pay for it he added.
thought
Only 49 percent ot the men I
that women had equal acci
top jobs. Forty-five pen
believed that women
equal access, and - 1 .�� :eni I ad no
opinion.
Moskop - ��' " 'hat �
that show om
represented in high m t
tions "have - gnii cartcc
"De facto 11 looks like there -til!
a problem iwith women's equah-
tv i said Moskop
Reagan Vetoes A id
By UARRY1 BROWN
Miff Unln
President Reagan last week
vetoed a supplemental appropria-
tions bill that contained funding for
student loans, a move that should
further delay financial aid to univer-
sities.
As of last week, the ECU finan-
cial aid office still had not received
its federal funding for 1981-82, for-
cing the office to issue emergency
loans and deferments of tuition so
students could enter school.
Reagan vetoed the bill, which
contains money for both domestic
and defense programs, because he
objected to the distribution oi the
funding.
The president had asked for more
of the money to be set aside for
defense and less for student loans,
senior citizens and other domestic
programs
The spending plan wa- actually
below the amount the administra-
tion had requested, but wa- 1
directed to the programs the wa
thev had outlined.
The bill passed both houses c
Congress bv a large margin. m
mg that the Congress could feasibl
override the presidential veto.
Democrats had hoped to p the
plan containing funding fer social
programs. The administration had
wanted the legislation for its ap-
propriations to Reagan's Caribbean
Basin Initiative aid prog-am and
military salaries
Vice Chancellor for Student 1
Flmer Meyer voiced the university's
concern, "let's hope congress
overrides it he said, referring
the president's veto.
A
lngrid Bergman and Humphrey Bogart in a scene from Casablanca.

f
1������� i�i�. 1� tit m
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 7, 1982
Announcements
GEOLOGY CLUB
The geology club would like to
invite all interested persons to
their tirV club meeting It will be
Tuesday. Sept 7 at 7 00 in Graham
301 Plans will be made tor this
semester's activities Everyone is
welcome
SNOW SKI SNOWSHOE
There will be a meeting tor all
persons interested in snowsknng
on Thursday. September IS at 4 00
in Memorial Gym 10a Christmas
ana spring break trips will be
made on Snowshoe. West Virginia
tor PHYE credit or nort credit A
slide presentation will be shown
and information on ski packages
including prices and accomoda
tions will be distributed Space is
limited tor each trip Reservations
will be accepted at this meeting
For additional information con
tact jo Saunders at 7$7 6000
Memorial Gym ?05
ATTENTION
On Mondav September 27. 9 00
p m in Mendrix theatre Pi Kappa
Phi and CADP will sponsor well
known Dr Kenneth Mills from
UNC The topic of discussion will
be Alcohol Prevention' Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
NATIONAL LABOR
RELATIONS BOARD
A representative from NLRB.
Winston Salem. NIC will be on
campus Thursday September 23
to mtervew undergraduate
students who expect to graduate
with at least 34 semester hours in
one or a combination of subjects
such as Labor Relations In
austriai Relations Labor Law
Labor Economics. Political
Science Economics. Business Ad
m,nistration Personnel Manage
ment Accounting or Law
Students must have a 3 0 grade
pomt average or better Deadline
to appl� s September t7 1982
COOP
Cooperative Education is a pro-
gram which �-eips students gam
valuable experience related to
their career goals through alter
nating periods of academic stuidy
with periods of off campus
employment The Co op Office
located in 313 Rawl, currently has
iob openings for Spring '83. In
terested students should stop by
today tc get more information, to
complete the necessary forms,
and to sign up for interviews
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship is
betgmning their second year of
reorganization Thursday Sept 9
m Room 748 at 8 p m in MSC
Come loin our study of the Bible
and how if relates to your lite
Elections will be held
SKYDIVE
East Carolina Sport
Parachuting Club Skydive mis
weekend For more information
call 758 7072 or 754 90U. after 5
p m
LACROSSE
am people who are interested in
reorganizing the Lacrosse Club,
please meet on the field at me bot
ton of college hill drive. Ml
Wedresda September 8. at 3 30
p m
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
There wilt oe a general
organizational meeting of 'he
Philosophy Club Thursday
September 9 at 4 00 o m in BO
313 We will be planning topics for
fall semester All who art in
terested in philosophical topics
please attend this meeting
INCREASED
LEARNING EFFICIEN-
CY
A program for increasing Lear
nmg fctficiency will be ottered by
the Counseling Center this Fall
Dr George Weigand will teach the
class on Monday and Wednesday
at I 00 PM beginning September
13 and Or Phyllis McAllister will
teach the class on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 00 PM beginning
September 14 Both groups will
mmet in 305 Wright Annex The
classes are available to all
students Attendance is voluntary
No formal registration is re
quired
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service m the Bloxton House
is ottering these one hour sessions
to aid you m developing better m
terviewing skills for use m your
iob search You may select a time
from those listed below
September 15, 1982 Wednesday
2 00 p m September 23 1982
Thursday 3 00pm
September 28, 1982 Tuesday
4 00 p m.
October 4, 1982 Monday 3 00
p m
A film and discussion of mter
viewing through the Career Plann
mg and Placement Service will be
shared.
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloc ton House
is offering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume September 14, 1987
Tuesday 7 00 p m , September
22 1982 Wednesday 3 00 p m .
September 29 1982 Wednesday
4 00 p m , October 5, 1982 Tues
day 3 00pm
Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
urged to attend You may come to
the Bloxtgon House at any of the
above times
PHYE MAJORS
AH students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
ing change of maior week for the
Fan Semester, should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday September 29
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfac'ory performance on
this test is requ-red as a prere
quisite tor official admittance to
the physical education mator pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the test is available by
calling 757 64' or 6442
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Welcome back APO! Alpha Phi
Omega will have their first
meeting on Thursday. September
9 at 6.00 p ft! . m the Erwm
building It isespecialiy important
for officers to attend See you
there
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications ae being received
tor the North Carolina Sheriffs'
Association Criminal Justice
Scholarship Applicants must be
tun time students enrolled as ma.
iors m the Department of Social
Work Corectional Services who
meet the financial need and
academic criteria established by
the Sheriffs' Association
Preference will be given to
1) Sons or daughters of any
law enforcement officer killed in
the line of duty
2) Sons or daughters of any
Sheriff or Deputy who is deceased,
retired or currently active in law
enforcement
3) North Carolina residents
Awards will be made without
regard to race, creed, religion,
color, national orgm age or sex
Applications are available in the
Department of Social Work Cor
rectional Services. Room 314,
Carol Belk Building (Allied Health
� Social Professions) and must be
submitted by September 15, 182 to
the Department Chair
PHI ETA SIGMA
The Ph. Eta Sigma Freshman
Honor Society will hold the first
meeting of the fall semester on
Tuesday September 7 at 5 p.m. in
Room 221 of the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center All new and old
members are urged to attend
WOMEN'S RUGBY
There will be an organizational
meeting for all women interested
in playing rugby this year in room
102 m the basement of Memorial
Gym on Wednesday. Sept 8 at
5 00 No experience necessary
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The International Language
Organizaton will hold its first
meeting on Wednesday.
September 8 at 3 00 The meeting
will be held in BC 304. All in-
terested people are welcome to at
tend You do not have to be a
language maior to attend the
meeting
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
This Monday, September 13 will
be the second meeting ot the East
Carolina Sharing Group We will
be meeting the second and forth
Mondays of every month Leader
ship of the meetings will rotate
Kathleen Colbert is the leader of
discussion for the September 13
meeting The group is basically a
sharing session and group sup
port a time tor prayer and discus
Sion Everyone is invited to come
NATIONAL
INSTITUTES OF
HEALTH
A representative from NIH.
Bethesda MD will be on campus
October 4 and 5 to interview
students who would like to work In
a clinical setting as Norma'
Volunteers Students will be paid
daily stipends All interested
students must attend a general
meeting at 7 30 p m on Monday.
October 4 before having inter
views Students maioring in Allied
Health and related fields are en
couraged to apply
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Bask NAUI or PADI SCUBA
Certification Sept 14 Oct 7
Basic Sailing Sept la Oct 2.
Beginning Ballroom and In
termediate Ballroom Sept
17 Nov r� Texas Country Dance
Sept 1 Nov 20
Darkroom Photography I Sept
IS Nov 13 Yoga Sept 29 Oct 13
Conversational German Sept. 21
Nov 23 Camera l Sept 21
Oct 19 Jazz Exercise Sept 21
Oct 21
Guitar Sept 21 Nov 9 Banjo
Sept 21 Nov. 9 Algebra Review
Sept 12 Oct 10 Clogging l Sept
22 Oct 27 Retirement Planning
Sept 23 Oct 14.
For more information call
757 6143
SPEAKING IN
TOUNGUES
GOD wants you to speak m
tongues, and it is good for you and
others if it is done in love ace or
ding to God's Word (read l Corin
thlans Chapters 12 14) Come to our
fellowship where we teach the
truth of God's Word about speak
ing in tongues and other attitudes
and principles laid out in Bible
You wilt have an enjoyable and
abundant life IF you undeistand
God's Word, which is His will,
AND do God's will Monday, Sept
13 and Thursday. Sept 8, at
Mendenhall Student Center in Rm
242 at 7 30 p m
AED
The ECU Chapter ot Alpha Ep
silon Delta will hold its first
meeting on September 7, 1982 at
7 30 PM in Flanagan 307 The
guest speaker for the evening will
be Dr Wayne Ayers on the topic ot
the Medical School Application
Process He will also give some
helpful hints on the new MCAT All
interested are welcome to attend
TIBETAN BUDDHIST
GROUP
All interested persons are m
vited to Oin the group tor discus
sion ot Buddha Dharma and prac
tice of meditation The group
meets Wednesdays at 5 PM at IU3
Evans Street Cail 758 4255 even
ings or k7$; 6894 days for mforma
lion
TUTORS WANTED
THe Center for Student Oppor
tunities is accepting applications
for tutoring positions in allied
hea'th ana nursing courses Ap
plication forms may be obtained
from Room 302 Beik Building
Room 152. Nursing Building or
Room 1508 Brody Budding
Salary .s based on qualifications
and assignments Can 757 2S00 f
more information is des-red
BETA KAPPA ALPHA
Beta Kappa Aipra Hte banking
and Finance Fraternity m hold
its first meeting Wednesday
September 8 in Rawl 130 at 4 to
p m Lawten Nisbet manager of
interstate Securities will speak or
the recent happenings HI hip t r,dr
Cial world An old members ana
interested business aiurs are
urged to attena
NCSL
The Norm Carolina Stjden-
Legislature wii hold a "��
ship meeting Tuesoa, ' I at
7 30 p m .n Room 712 at m
Menoenhai' StuOent Center AH
members anc .me'ested pe-sos
are encouraged tc attend anc
prepare tor the upcoming ac
tivitWS
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I
Buck's Gulf
2704 E. 10th St. 758-1033
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
i

mm cupper
Hair Saion Unisex
With a large number of
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forward
to catering to your every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that the
PEKING CLIPPER is accustomed to
doing. We stay open Tues & Thurs.
nights till 9:30 p.m.
XN.X.VXVNV
XXXXXXXXXX
I he East Carolinian
Puoiised every Tuesda ana
��r3�' curing �he acaoen-c
��� �i every Wecinesdar dur
g �-�� summer
Tre Gas' Carolinian is trie of
� i r5Daoer cf Easi
i ' �� versify, owned.
� ' : 2 puoiisea for ana
�'� j'ur:e-i's of East Carolina
Subscription Rate 20 yearly
The East Carolinian Offices
are located in the OKI Sooth
Building on the campus ol ECU.
Gree"ivihe N C
RUSH
Gamma Sigma Sigma
National Service Sorority
WHEN: Sept. 7, 8, 9 6:30 p.m. each night
W HERE: Coffeehouse (located in Mendenhall, bottom floor)
WHAT: Ice Cream Party, Service Project, Cookout (respectively)
WE MA KE THE DIFFERENCE BECA USE
H E A RE THE DIFFERENCE!
Pizza
Transit
Authority, inc
We're Comin' to Ya!
Fast,
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757-1955
405 E. 14th St.
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i








I HI I AS! R) IN1AN
si-PII-MBt-R 7.1W2
Klan Concern Voiced
B I'VIRKKONHI
According to figures
� pi b the anu
amation league of
B'nai B'rith, North
v arolina has about "50
core" members
the Ku Kiu klan
� om about MXi
n 10 eaiv ago
I he ant defamation
and a numbei oi
oth� anizations u
nomtor the activities
and growth of the klan
other right wing
.nips such as
he nais and National
States' Rights Party
w o groups
dged to have
250 members
, fi 3

. ong the
- ites foi klan
� . the
11,000
11 I v.

ise. bu
aisagiccs
doesn't exist that
these groups are promi-
nent and influential
said Olshansky.
Olskansky, who has,
in the past, lsited last
Carolina to speak,
made his comments in
an interview that ap
peared in the News dnd
Observer.
Greenville and ECU
hae both experienced
evidence oi minimal
klan activity in the past
couple years 1 ast ear,
some black students at
Kl had reported that
racist stickers making
derogatory comments
such as Hitler Was
Right" and Who
Needs Niggers" were
stuck on then cars.
some racist literature
has also be e n
discovered at various
t - on campus Dur-
ing this past summer
session East Carolinian
sia 11 w r i t e i John
eylei wrote a three-
part feature story on
the activities oi an last
v arolina graduate who
i -lied membership in
National Socialist
Party oi America.
Despite these tacts,
osl students seem to
dismiss these incidents
as isolated cases "1
haven't iieard about
too many incidents (oi
klan activity) around
here said
rI NAACP Presi-
dent Jackie Rowe, "but
1 know thev're active
Stephen S. Miller, a
member of the
Carolina Knights,
believes that the hard
economic times are
aiding their member-
ship "The media can
only say the economy is
getting better for so
long; eventually people
are going to start look-
ing elsewhere for
answers Miller also
told the News and
Observer.
Many of the klan
watch groups report
that these groups fre-
quently have many
organizational pro-
blems and are not
always unified.
North Carolina has
been the focus of much
media attention on the
klan nai issue since
1979 when a gun battle
erupted in Greensboro
between a group of
nai klan members and
a group of Communist
Workers Party(CWP)
members. Five CWP
members were killed in
that battle, and subse-
quently all of the klan
and nazi members in-
volved were acquitted
of the charges. The case
has been re-opened and
it is before a federal
grand jury now.
The largest concen-
tration of Klan
members in the state is
centered around the
Goldsboro area where
approximately 400
members of the
Carolina Knights are
located.
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�he iEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
W V 1 K L V. Ml RR1TT, Dmcioroj AOtnamg
ROBI Rl Rl l KS, Business VanoKf
Phil 1 IP MANESS, Crtdtt Manage
Stephanie Groon, emulation van
FlEl DINt. MlL LER, General Manage,
MlKE HUGHES, imoa.u,g�duoi
Cindy Pleasants, $pom���
Ernest Conner, ,�� ��
Steve Bachner, &���������w
Miki- Davis. r,Ku��� uanager
Septemb� 7, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Transcripts
Change Adds To Challenge
Just as with every other facet of
university life, ECU'S new pro-
cedure foi the recording of dropped
courses has its ups and downs. Un-
fortunately, the negative effects of
this year's change may far exceed its
benefits.
The theory behind the procedural
change, according to J. Gilbert
Moore, ECU registrar, is to record a
"true, complete and accurate
academic record" of all Last
Carolina students. In fact, however,
a student's transcript ma now (in
some cases) disproportionate
reflect a lack of interest or effort.
For most of us, our college
transcripts will � in greater or
lesser part � determine our success
as job hunters in the near future.
For some, the record will be the
highlight of a successful college
career. Others may choose to
downplay the transcript (for one
reason or another).
But regardless, the 1982
schoolyear change could make a big
difference in the academic perfor-
mance of many students; and for
some, the difference may just be the
fine line between "success and
failure
For example, the new method
fails to take into consideration the
various reasons students drop
courses. Sure a lot of us may decide
to axe a class because o simple
laziness or panic. That's just
another part of college life. But in
other cases, a student might
discover he or she needs to lessen
the academic load to accommodate
a part-time job or to devote more
time and effort to other courses.
Still, as in other cases, the negative
ramifications will play a dominant
role.
Potential employers don't have
the time to carefully review every
letter of every transcript. They scan
applicants with terrific speed � by
necessity. And this is direly unfor-
tunate for students now, should
they have to drop a course for
whatever reason, because,
realistically speaking, a transcript
indicating two or three dropped
courses (regardless of which
courses) is looked upon with much
less favor than one without those
markings, despite the fact that the
completed grades may be identical.
Perhaps ;he new system will more
accurately reflect a student's
academic record. Admittedly, there
are instances when the "drop
marks" could indicate a propensity
toward laziness on some student's
part. But the adverse effects of the
change � regardless of whether or
not it affects the grade-point
average � may be the source of
much distress. After all, we have the
dubious privilege of living during an
age in which first impressions are
ever so important.
At times, it seems our administra-
tion is so intent on change that it is
doubtful whether or not they con-
sider the adverse results of such ac-
tions. Certainly, those parties in-
volved did take these ramifications
into consideration, but perhaps they
felt the "benefits" of such a change
outweighed its drawbacks.
So, before you go to the trouble
of dropping that Philosophy of
Medieval Spanish Music class (the
one you need for your general col-
lege humanities credit), you might
want to remember that the big red
"W" stays with you even after
you're gone.
Business As Usual On Campus?
Labor Day
If you were one of the unlucky
students who had to come back to
campus for classes Monday,
chances are you've asked yourself,
at least once "Why?"
Good question. Why does one
small institution in eastern North
Carolina conduct itself as if it never
heard of Labor Day, when the rest
of the entire country takes the day
off? It somehow doesn't seem right.
Sure, this year we get a "fall
break (consisting of two days in
mid-October, when the beach is too
cold and the mountains too warm),
so a day had to be taken up
somewhere else. But not on a tradi-
tional three-day weekend like Labor
Day.
Everyone and his brother makes
plans for the Labor Day weekend �
that is, if his brother doesn't attend
ECU.
But at ECU, it's business as
usual, right? Wrong. Sure, we have
classes like any other day. But we
can't cash checks; we can't buy sup-
plies at the book store. Secretaries
are nowhere to be found; offices are
closed, etc etc.
This is not to say that these peo-
ple don't deserve a day off. Of
course they do, especially after the
first week and a half of the
semester, when everything is closing
in rapidly. But by the same token, a
campus operating in half-swing is
senseless.
It's hard to believe that Monday
was the only day that could be used
to satisfy the semester requirement.
There are other possibilities.
Carolina, for example, got Labor
Day off in addition to their fall
break. Sure, they may have to go a
day longer or start a day earlier, but
the beginnings and ends of
semesters are staggered anyway,
and no one really notices an extra
day there.
Or why not have two three-day
weekends, one on Labor Day and
one in October. The administration
could still call it a "fall break" if
they wanted to.
But, Labor Day is behind us now,
and a four-day weekend awaits us in
October. Let's not gripe about what
can't be changed. Well, then again,
why not?
Campus Forum
Baha'is Teaching Unity And Peace
Consider This
Last year, the video-game in-
dustry, the world's latest wallet
burner and producer of ulcers,
made a whopping $9 billion in
revenue � more than the combined
incomes of President Reagan, Gabe
Kaplan and Benji the Wonderdog.
Nine billion dollarinis! Thirty-six
billion quarters wasted on the likes
of Pac-Man, TRON and Defender
(only 2,000 of which were invested
by East Carolinian staff members).
On March 30, 1982, I he East Caroli-
nian published a story outlining the
systematic persecutions against the
Baha'is in Iran. This harassment, sanc-
tioned by the Khomeini government, has
continued, and the local Baha'i com-
munity recently received news that Ah
Naimiyan of Urumiyyih, in nor
thwestern Iran, was executed on Aug.
11, after one vear's imprisonment. To
date, almost 130 Baha'is are known to
have been executed or kidnapped since
revolutionary authorities took power.
Iran is pursuing a program of violent
harassment and pressure designed to
force Baha'is to convert to Islam. Other
actions against the Baha'is hae includ-
ed the widespread burning and looting
of homes, destruction of Baha's holy
places and cemeteries, thousands of
dismissals of Baha'is from their jobs and
schools and hundreds of summary ar-
rests of Baha'i leaders.
The United States Congress, the
United Nations Human Rights Commis-
sion, the European Parliament and the
governments of Canada, West Ger-
many, Australia and Great Britain, as
well as other national and international
governing bodies who have spoken out
against what U.S. Baha'i officials, are
calling it "the intended genocide of the
300,000 Baha'i of Iran
The Baha'i faith, an independent
world religion, teaches the need for
world unity and peace, the equality ol
men and women and the elimination of
all forms of prejudice. These and other
Baha'i beliefs have aroused the an-
tagonism and prejudice of the dominant
Muslim clergy in Iran since the religion
began in that country almost 140 vears
ago it is only in the last few years,
though, that the persecution has been so
gruesome and systematic.
The Baha'i Club on campus can pro-
vide interested individuals and organiza-
tions with additional information on the
taith and the persecutions in Iran. Please
call 758-9530 oi 752-4483.
Karen Farlo
Graduate, Nursing
Registration
Registration: It looks like the campus
is taking a step backwaids to the 1960s
When a paper prints an editorial stating
"if you give a military general a bunch
oi bodies, he'll find some wa to use
them that is a totally uneducated point
oi view. The military today, in order to
do anything mihtarilv, must have either
Presidential or Congressional approval.
The generals don't call the shots Thev
usually carry out the plans That's all.
It Idler and Sasvsav were prosecuted,
it was tor one reason: They broke the
law Who says that being a Christian
means that vou are against war1 Who
savs that all that a career in the mihtarv
means is being out in the foxholes,
shooting people'1 Filer and Sasway could
have registered, and if the draft ever
came up, and thev w
could appiv for a nor. comba
(for example: niedu. .
civil defense, cook; the
on).
Switzerland has
vice tor all people above a c ta
male or female. They've I a
for years dc you an men
Swiss being in a wai f Thev ha
been neutral, bev
realize that it thev were
Switzerland, the whole .
rise up in arms against them
Don't forget: the m
�"bring on the deaths of our sns
possibb us all" unless t
that order the mihtarv to
David R Pa
! eshmaj D
Forum Rules
The East Cat weU ma i
expressing all i h m
drop them by ourofjicx � th � . s
Building, across ji �� 1o er ibra
For purposes oj verijica i en
must mchuic the name, ma
classification, address, phom numb
and signature oj the authorfs) letters
are limited to typewrit let pages
double-spaced ot neatly p I t
ters are subject to editing for I
obscenity and libel, and no ;vvrjj at
tacks will be permitted

'





I tit I ASM K) INI V
M it . Mill K
I
i
Band Sets Up Fund
Buz Iedford's
Super Grit Cowboy
Band and two other
music-making groups
have set aside Oct. 17
on then fall schedule
foi a chants show that
has a special meaning
I edtord and his
friends
I he show will raise
money � an estimated
$3,000 to $5,000 - to
build up a memorial
fund Led ford has
established in the name
of his late wite, Becky,
who helped the group
cet started toward suc-
cess in the music
business.
Beckv died in an
automobile accident in
June, 1981. just as Super
Grit Cowbov Band
began taking off in the
countrv music charts
Last fall, Super Grit
Cowboy Band and four
other groups staged a
benefit that raised
$3,000 in Becky's
memory
With this initial
amount. 1 edtord
established The Beck)
L e d f o r d Memorial
Fellowship in Reading
Education at her alma
mater, hast Carolina
University, last fall.
His wife, the former
Becky Keith of
Kinston, N.C received
the BS degree in 1976
and her MA in 1979,
both in intermediate
education with a con-
centration in language
arts. She was an honor
student.
She had been named
the recipient o a
graduate fellowship for
reading education in
ECU's School of
Education for the 1981-
1982 school year. Led-
ford specified that a sti-
pend from the endowed
fund be used for a
graduate fellowship in
reading education.
Plans are for Bu
1 ed ford's friends, most
ot whom knew Becky,
to put on benefits once
or twice a year, or as
often as possible, to in-
crease the memorial
fellowship fund.
On Oct. 17 The Bill
Lyerly Band of Raleigh
and Coulters of
Durham will join Super
Grit Cowboy Band at
the Carolina Oprv
House in Greenville
where $5 tickets will be
available at the door.
V N V V X V V
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Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
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$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35c extra
i
:mumu-K���ipic�x
I
THE
PADDOCK
CLUB
Welcomes Back
ECU Students
Sun Sept. 12
at 5:00 with
FREE Hamburgers
and your
favorite beverages.
ATiTIC
TUESDAY
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WEDNESDAY
CONTROL GROUP
(1 ltti ANNIVERSARY PARTY
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H.H $1 00 specials - 25 Droft
FRIDAY - H H 4-7 free hors d
SATURDAY - H.H. 4-7
SUNDAY - LASAGNA SPEC $2 99
TUESDAY CRAZY TUESDAY
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PONY NIGHT - 30C ponies
Free adm. tor ECU students
THURSDAY $1 00 Adm.
COLLEGE NITE - 70 cans
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The Paddock Club is a
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Not Open to the Gen. Public
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Each of these advertised items is re-
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For






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 7, 1982
'


Nuclear War Theory Disputed By Professors
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Before he resigned,
former Secretary of
State Alexander Haig
caused lots of anxiety
as a result of statement
he made claiming the
United States could win
a limited nuclear.
Controversy is still
being generated by the
Reagan adminstration
in regards to statements
concerning nuclear
war. The Los Angeles
Times recently ran a
story saying the Reagan
adminstration ordered
the Pentagon to com-
plete a strategic master
plan that would give
the United States the
capability of winning a
"protracted nuclear
war" with the Soviet
Union.
According to the
story, the final docu-
ment of the plan has
already been delivered
to the National Security-
Council and is awaiting
the final approval of
Reagan.
"The directive is part
of a top secert national
security decision docu-
ment that was drawn
up in the Fall of 1981 to
supercede presidential
f
directive 59, which was
approved in the last six
months of the Carter
Adminstration said
the L.A. Times' story.
Directive 59 was also
a controversial docu-
ment which described a
major change in U.S.
nuclear strategy from
that of targeting cities
to, instead, targeting
military bases in the
Soviet Union. The
change in targets led
many observers to
believe that the U.S.
was trying to develop a
first strike nuclear
capability because this
strategy could be used
to knock out Soviet
missiles while they were
still in their silos.
"It's bizarresaid
ECU political science
professor Lon
FelkerI don't agree
with that position
Associciate history
professor John
Atkeson added that
there are certian
unrealities
associated with this
kind of "long war
thesis" policy.
Atkeson has served
30 years as a U.S. Ar-
my officer, and he is
currently active in the
reserves. "Nuclear war
scares the hell out of
me he added.
This new document
differs from any of its
predecessors in that it
specifies the U.S. goal
to win a protracted
nuclear war. "The plan
would contemplate
nuclear warfare that
went on for as long as
six months, "reported
the Times' story.
"It's absurd to con-
sider fighting a nuclear
war over a series of
months said Felker.
"I think a protracted
nuclear war would be
an impossibility
Atkeson also doubts
that a nuclear war
could be limited or pro-
tracted. "The escala-
tion possibilities
(during a nuclear war)
are enormous he ad-
ded.
This new policy is ex-
pected to cost U.S. tax-
payers an additional
$18 billion. The addi-
tional money would be
needed to construct the
special communica-
tions systems that will
be required to endure
this type of protracted
nuclear warfare.
Former chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, Air Force general
David C. Jones, has
warned that prepara-
tion for fighting a
limited or protracted
nuclear war would be
like"throwing money
into a bottomless pit
During his retirement
address Jones said that
he didn't "see much of
a chance of nuclear war
being limited or pro-
tracted. 1 see great dif-
ficulty in keeping any
kind of nuclear ex-
change between the
Soviet Union and the
United States from
escalating
The defense guidence
statement issued an-
nually by the Depart-
ment of Defense to pro-
ject the next five years
needs of the U.S.
military claimed last
year that protracted
nuclear war is possible.
Colin Gray is a
leading advocate off ttiis
new protracted nuclear
warfare policy. He is a
Reagan apDOintee to
the Arms Control and
Disarmament Agenc
and state department
advisor.
Gray believes nuclear
war is a "suriable
event and the United
States should plan to
"defeat the Soviet
I nion and do SO at a
cosl that would not
prohibit I s
recover) "
Gra added that he
hoped a postwar world
order could emerge that
would be "compatible
with western valuer"
It wa- specified that 2
million U.S. fatalities
would represent a
"capatible level
A
i�p m m m m
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SHOP
Bring this ad for
10 off
on the purchase of
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prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
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T'Ht t ST( A KOI IN1AN
Entertainment
Sl F 11 MBt R 7, IVK2
Ha
Australia's
Best Here
Wednesday
Gere And inger Titillating Audiences In Steamy Romantic Drama
Xmerican Gigolo's Richard (.ere romances sexy Debra Winger in the
runaway hit An Officer and a Gentleman, now showing at Greenville's
Buccaneer Theatre along with John Carpenter's slimy horror-thriller
The Thing and camp Kung Fu Zombie. The Plaza Cinema has the
long-awaited it orld According to Garp plus Zapped and Porkv's. At
the Plitt r ntertainment (enter, located in the Carolina East Conve-
nience Complex, are F. T Raiders of the Lost Ark, Young Doctors in
I ove and Friday the 13th Part 3 in 3-D. Downtown Greenville's Park
Theatre is showing the science fiction-horror film Forbidden H ordand
has a weekend late show of karate film Super Power. The lice Drive-
In, Highway 11, has Friday, Saturday, Sunday shows of The Thing.
Eastern N.Cs only showcase theatre for erotica and porn, the 264
Playhouse, Farmville Highway, is running twice nightlies of triple
X-rated Night Dreams. On campus this week, the Student I nion Films
Committee has an Australian double feature slated for Wednesday with
The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith and Gallipoli (see story at right) plus
Thursday, Friday, Saturday movie Atlantic City. All three films will be
shown in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Iheatre.
By MICHAELS. BLTZGY
suff Unirt
This Wednesday evening, Sept. 8,
in Mendenhall Student (enter's
Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present two
films from Australia,hunt oj Jim-
mie Blacksmith, and Gallipoli
(ham of Jimmie Blacksmith will
begin at 7 p.m and Gallipoli will
start at 9 p.m admission is by ID
and activity card for students and
MSC Membership for faculty and
staff.
(hunt of Jimmie Blacksmith.
written and directed by Fred
Schepisi, is about the problems that
faced Aborigines (and still do) in
turn-of-the-centurv Australia. Half-
white halt-Aboi lgine Jimmie
Blacksmith grows up with prejudice
and hate and is pulled in two b his
heritage. He grows up in a
minister's family and learns to "be
good
And Jimmie tries. He marries a
white woman who has his child and
settles down to work as a sharecrop-
per. But they live in abject povertv,
and Jimmie tries his best to keep his
family alive. I hen the farmer who
Jimmie works for refuses to give
Jimmie credit, in an attempt to keep
Jimmie's relatives of! ol his farm.
Something inside Jimmie snaps,
and he kills the farmer with an axe.
setting him off down a road ol mass
murder. The film does not revel in
this violence, though. It depends
more on the fine acting ol lommv
lewis, who portravs Jimmie His
range ol emotions run trom dancing
at the birth ol his child to total
hatred of everything.
The film is based on tact, tor an
incident like this happened around
the turn of the century The beautv
in this film is that one an imagine
this happening in America The
plight ol the Aborigines is not all
that different trom that of the
American black or Indian I his film
mav remind one ol William
Faulkner's The Light in August, tor
Jimmie is very similai to Joe
Christmas, the protaganist in that
story.
Australian films (at least in mv
viewing experience) hardlv ever have
anything to do with what one might
consider a normal subject. But this
is what makes them so !asanating.
A lot of this probably lies in that
Australia is a harsh land, and one
develops a different philosophv in
such a place.
1 have never seen an Australian
film I would consider boring, vet
onlv recently have thev been getting
anv where near the praise thev
deserve. But. then again, hearing
how wonderful a film is in Sneak
Previews doesn't do you am good it
it doesn't plav anywhere near you.
But luckily, thev are playing near us
this time, and I strongly recommend
see '(.A! 1 IPOI I. Pag 9
Screening lngrid's Films And Notorious Past
By NDK1-W SARRIS
an, 1915-1982, final!) lost her long bat-
cancel early las! week. Ingmar Bergman's
�'��� Sonata, " hich she plays a remorsefully
Liv I llman's emotionally deprived
. I her On Golden Pond In recent
. � : - ! have encountered firsthand much of the genetic
f her youthful beauty in the striking features of
1 ndstrom and Isabella Rossellini. lngrid Bergman
a : remarkably accomplished actress in all media, but
� u ol us growing up in the '40s she was much
as 1 indicated in a heartfelt tribute I wrote a few
igo, when she could still read it.
d Bergman was the guest o honor at a reception
Museum ol Modern Art on October 15. The occa-
as the publication ol lngrid Bergman: My Story
lngrid Bergman and Alan Burgess (Delacorte Press).
It is a thoroughly fascinating book, neither as lurid nor
as morbid as the events it describes, but as honest and as
due as the .dc with which lngrid Bergman transfixes
even a perfect stranger privileged to encounter her in
person This perfect stranger, unable to think of
anything adequate to say, humbly asked her to
autograph his copy of her book. A protective agent-type
lady frowninglv informed the perfect pest that Miss
Bergman was not giving out autographs. Miss Bergman
gentlv took the book out of the pest's hand and quickly
scrawled her signature. No fuss, no bother, no break in
the direct gaze. The pest fled with his prize into the
crowded room.
A screening of Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious follow-
ed the reception, and the auditorium was not quite com-
pletely full. Bergman introduced the film with some
anecdotes from her book. Unsure of the year in which
the film was released, she shouted out questioningly to
her biographer, and an elderly Englishman shouted
back, rather smugly under the circumstances, that he
didn't have the foggiest idea. The pest, also a movie
buff and hard-core Hitchcockian, intruded loudly with
the information that the year was 1946. The pest was 18
vears old when he watched 30-year-old lngrid Bergman
kiss 41-year-old Cary Grant on the gigantic screen of the
Radio City Music Hall back in 1946. Little did the pest
know back then that Notorious would mark the end of
lngrid Bergman's surprisingly brief reign as the Swedish
Empress ol America's movie screens, and that when her
fall came it would rival Marie Antoinette's in brutal
abruptness. What was done to lngrid Bergman in the
press, the pulpit, and even on the floor of the United
Slates Senate during the Rossellini affair amounted to
ritual murder. Driven bv neither greed nor lust, she
stumbled into one o this century's biggest scandals
while seeking only a broader and more realistic canvas
for het artistry as an actress. If the cruel catcalls oi the
yahoos and the philistines were not so everlastingly
disgusting, one could discern in her bizarre misadven-
tures a comic irony of which even she is not complete!)
aware. What is marvelous about her book is that its
sirategv of presenting the divided perspectives ol the
subject, her biographer, and other concerned witnesses
to her life and career enables the reader to confront the
ironic distance between lngrid Bergman as she sees
herself and lngrid Bergman as others see her. Conse-
quently, I began rethinking many of the tired paradoxes
that had been swirling about lngrid Bergman for so
many vears.
First o all, no one can begin to understand lngrid
Bergman's preeminence as a movie star unless one fully
understands the emotional climate o the first hall ol
the '40s Her kev movies are Intermezzo 11939),
Casablanca (ls42). For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943),
Gaslight (ls44), Saratoga Trunk. Spellbound, and The
Bells oj St. Mary's (1945). and Notorious (I94M. In the
mid-40s. when her career was peak, three minor 1941
vehicles � Adam Had Four Sons. A Rage in Heaxen.
and Dr. Jeykell and Mr. Hyde � were re-released to
satisfy the insatiabale cravings of her fans. Vehicles"
is perhaps not the right word tor movies with male co-
stars such as I eslie Howard Intermezzo). Spencer
I racv (Dr. Jekyell and Mr. Hyde). Robert Montgomery
Huge in Heaven). Humphrev Bogart (C asablanca).
Garv Cooper For Whom the Bell Tolls. Saratoga
Trunk), Gregorv Peck (Spellbound). Bing CrosbyThe
Bells of St. Mary's), and Cary Grant Notorious).
W oodv Allen and other ostentatious admirers of
Casablanca tend to think ol it exclusively in terms ol
Bogart's myth, though at the time it seemed to many of
See BE AI I'll'I E. Page 8
Fleetwood Mac
Gala Affair In Greensboro
3F.J
Bv GR PATTERSON
fleetwood Mac. after a two-year vacation from the
road to rest and persue solo projects, returned to North
America last Wednesday, night to the cheers of more
than 18.000 fans in the Greensboro Coliseum. Starting
as a verv low key British blues band in 1967, the group
has metamorphosed several times with different
members, including Bob Welch. The latest members
have become one of today's most consistent musical
groups.
Since 1975, the band has been composed of orignal
members Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. along with
Christie McVie, Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.
The latest North American Mac Attack" began on
Friday morning, July 30th. Bob Deerborn, a local triad
record store manager arrived at the Greensboro ticket
office anticipating a big crowd tor Monday morning's
ticket sale. Bv Saturday night, some 50 people had join-
ed Bob tor the weekend vigil. They resembled a beach
partv complete with coolers, lounge chairs, sleeping
bags' and ghetto blasters I hev must have been a strange
sighl to the R.E.O. Speedwagon fans who walked past
them Saturdav night.
I he long wait paid off as some 600 people were lined
up bv 9:30 Monday morning when tickets officially
went on sale. Thirt'v tans camped outside Resnick's
Records in Winston-Salem to take their chances on what
tickets were there B Monday afternoon, only the
$12.50 seats in the back were available, telescope op-
tional. .
Tickets to this concert would be very special as
Greensboro was chosen as the first stop on their North
American tour that started last Wednesday night. To
the 18,500 fans there it had been two years too long for
Fleetwood Mac. Rumors mounted early that this tour
would promote the new Mirage album. However, the
two-hour show proved to be a non-stop blast from the
past with onlv three songs from their current album:
�I ove in Store "Hold Me" (ranked fourth on last
week's Billboard chart), and a vibrant duet with Lindsey
Buckingham and Stevie Nicks singing "Eyes of the
World
As the fans in the S.R.O. Greensboro Coliseum settl-
ed into their seats Wednesday night, a Detroit-based
group known as the Rockets tried to impress the crowd
with a mixture of new-generation and hard line
rock'n'roll. The crowd tolerated the Rockets for their
forty-minute set but refrained from bringing them back
for an encore. As the lights went out a second time, five
super-talents emerged for the first time on a U.S. stage
since touring for the Tusk album in 1980. Exubrant fans
were seen running from the bathroom, with zippers in
hand to catch their first glimpse of singer Stevie Nicks,
as the crowd joined in the chorus of "Won't you lay me
down in the tall grass and let me do my stuff
For the next two hours, everyone remained on their
feet except for a very special moment when a single
spotlight illuminated keyboardvocalist Christie McVie
to warm the crowd with "Songbird Though
Greensboro served as the North American sound check,
the band experienced few problems on stage.
"Rhinanon the third song into the show seemed to
challenge and perplex Stevie Nicks. She made several
waves and gestures to the sound personnel when her
lyrics just couldn't dominate the popular song. Lindsey
Buckingham, sensing the trouble, executed some in-
credibly slick lead guitar licks that balanced Stevie's
voice and brought cheers from the crowd. If her windy
voice was ever compromised during the whole show, it
was to Buckingham's guitar.
After "Rhinanon Stevie retired to a small tent at
the back of the stage. She went there frequently, singing
no more than three songs in a row without a break.
Christe McVie and Lindsey Buckingham also left
several times, giving the stage a different flavor for each
song.
Buckingham continuously brought applause
See MAC, Page 9
StjM Photo By GARV PATTERSON
( lock wise from top left: Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham in hot Greensboro Coliseum.

f
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i M . Koi IM W
M til MB1 K ls82
Ingrid Bergman and Humphrey Bogart in a scene from Casablanca.
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An Ineffably Beautiful Actress
M
In
Continued From Page 7
us that Bergman did more tor Bogart than
Bogart did for Bergman.
No one even now seems to want to remember
how breathtakingly big Bergman was in her
Hollywood heyday. Bergman herself tends to
discourage the idolatry of nostalogia, or the wor-
ship of what she once projected at the expense of
what she now is. Her remarks about Notorious
seemed casually affectionate, but not unduly ad-
miring. Apparently she cannot bring herself to
believe that the man who once pulled her out of a
crying jag with the consolation "it's only a
movie, Ingrid" might indeed have been the
transcendent artist his cultish champions describe
in their lengthy disquisitions. After she spoke, I
could feel around me all through the screening
the impatient stirrings of the social butterfly
brand of philistine for whom Hitchcock's stirr-
ingly ambiguous masterpiece of love and betrayal
and suspicion is merely a trivial entertainment.
Ingrid Bergman has indicated in other inter-
views that she is genuinely puzzled by the high
regard of film enthusiasts for her Rosselhni
flops. Yet she is remarkably perceptive about the
great appeal of Rossellini's artistic aspirations in
the challengingly visionary period after World
War II. And she is remarkably generous to af-
firm as she does that their relationship did more
lasting damage to his career than to hers. Unfor-
tunately, whatever one thinks of the cinematic
virtues of the Rossellini-Beigman collaborations
� Stromboli, Europe 51, .loan at the Slake.
Journey to Italy, and ear � and I have
celebrated these virtues in print on many occa-
sions, it is clear that Rossellini was less effective
in enhancing Bergman when he was in enhancing
Anna Magnani, his previous love, in Open City,
and The Miracle. Nor was the late .lean Renoir
any more effective with Bergman or with au-
diences in Elena et lei honunes. despite Ingrid
Bergman's gallant defense of the great French
director. It remained for the comparatively tar-
nished Anatole I ltvak to rescue her from com-
mercial and professional oblivion with
Anastasia, a competent but uninspired romance
that brought her back in triumph to America to
receive her second New York Irilm critic Award
(the first was loi hei three 1945 films, Spell
bound. Saratoga Trunk, and "he Bells ol St
Mary's), and her second Oscar (the first was foi
(iasliehr in 1944). Except for a few sequences in
Stanley Donen's Indiscreet with her verv loyal
champion C'ary Grant, and a few sequences in In-
gmar Bergman's Autumn Sonata with 1 i
L'llman and her old acting classmate, Gunnai
Bjornstrand, she has never really set the screen
on fire as she did in her younger days. For one
thing, she has spent much ot her time and emo-
tional energy in the theater, on television, and in
the very real life she had been seeking to escape
from her early childhood through acting
It strikes me that we have never really done
right by Ingrid Bergman on any level. It seems
unconscionable to me as a film historian that I
have been unable to see the 10 films she made in
Sweden (and the one in Germany) between 1934
and 1940. Can it be that Garbo's verv inac-
cessibility has made us more eager to devour
every scrap of footage she ever graced with her
presence, whereas Bergman's accessibility has
made us singularly uncurious about the blossom-
ing years of her ineffable beauty?
Curiously, 1 had never thought of Bergman as
Garbo's successor on the screen, vet that is how
it must have seemed to both Garbo and the late
IB. Mayer when he borrowed Bergman from
David (). Selznick for A Rage in Heaven and Dr.
Jekyell and Mr. Hyde at a time Garbo was hin-
ting at her retirement. When Garbo came along
in the '20s, she was immediately typed as the con-
tinental siren who lived only tor love. As with
Pola Negri and Marlene Dietrich. GG was
granted erotk options denied American ac
tresses. By the time Bergman came along in the
ate '30s and earlv '40s. the censors and the
puritans were in complete control ol Hollywood
and a great deal ot eroticism had to be
sublimated in the increasing!) neurotic nice girl.
Ingrid Bergman was not onlv more "moral"
than her European predecessors, she was also
more "natural" than her Hollywood sisters of
American origin. Much has been made ol the
fact that the saintly image she projected in I eo
McC arey's The Hells of St. Mary's was the chiel
source of her later problems with the public. An
endless parade of dreary theologians have
dismissed The Hells of St. Mary's as only super-
ficially religious McCarey's genius, however,
was not religious at all. but tundamentallv emo-
tional Hence, what was overwhelming about
Bergman in I he Hells oj St. Mary's was not her
spiritual purity and dedication, but her over
whelmingly physical beauty in close up at the
altar. Her nun's habit only intensified the erotic
frisson ol her officially forbidden sexuality. We
could all lie to ourselves about the nature of the
attraction she exerted until that tateful moment
when she lumped ofi her pedestal into a Sicilian
volcano
Ingmai Bergman is quoted in Ingrid
Set BERGMAN, Page in
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THb EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 7, 1982
lever,
t mo-
ibout
bt her
L ver
It the
otic
We
i! the
kinent
Icihan
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D
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Mac Slays 'Em
In Greensboro
Continued From Page 7
throughout the evening for his lead guitar,
especially during a duet with drummer Mick
fleet wood called "Not That Funny About
halfway through the show, when Stevie Nicks
returned to the stage for the third time, she
charged the microphone and the fans with a
powerful delivery on "landslide Equally mi-
pressive was hei singing on the next song,
�� flunk About Me Either some soul searching
oi consultation with the sound personnel had
tughl her back to the impact she produces in
the studio For the rest of the evening, her raspv
voice remained tight and aggressive.
rhroughout the show, the quiet backbone of
the group, otherwise known as drummer Mick
leetwood and bassist John ie played their
rich style ol rhythm and blues, while Nicks,
Buckingham and Christie McVie added the flash.
John McVie and Fleetwood formed I leetwood
Mac along with two now defunct members in the
1960s. Before that, John had played with
John Mayall in the legendary "Blues Breakers"
band thai once featured Eric Clapton.
: the encore ol "Sisters of the Moon the
d exited, except foi John McVie and his wife
c hristie in a heavy English street voice saving:
"Oui hearts are with you
With the ice broken and Greensboro warmed
fleetwood Mac left tor the six-hour drive to
Mlanta's Omni hotel. The band will be in Nor-
k foi a sold-out show at the Scope on Sept. 10.
'Gallipoli'
Continued From Page 7
films. Which brings me to the next one.
Gallipoli is much different than Jimmie in
at it does and attempts to do. Directed by
Petei Weir, best known for The last Wave and
Picnic at Hanging Rock, this film is a lot dit-
. renl from his previous work. Where Weir striv-
ed for rich symbolism in his last films, Gallipoli
bleak, stark look at the idiocv of war.
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v





10
1 til l-ASl CAROl INIAN
SEPThMBfcR7, 1982
Bergman Had
Lasting Effect
Continued Kiom Page 8
Bergman's book to very useful and illumniating
effect:
"1 saw all the pictures that Ingrid made in
America. The only one 1 didn't see was the
remake of Intermezzo with Leslie Howard. 1 was
a oung director in those days and we were all ab-
sorbed and fascinated by the American film and
its techniques. We liked also the dark style of the
French films, but we knew we had an immense
amount to learn from the American way of mak-
ing pictures. Of course, some of Ingrid's pictures
in those early American years were not master-
pieces, but 1 remember very clearly that whatever
she did 1 was always fascinated by her face. In
her face � the skin, the eyes, the mouth �
especially the mouth � there was this very strong
radiance and an enormous erotic attraction.
"It had nothing to do with her body, but in the
relationship between her mouth, her skin, and
her eves. So 1 was always ery attracted by her as
an actress. One of the very first times I saw her in
person she was already married to Lars Schmidt.
She had been shopping in Stockholm, and we
were sitting in the hotel suite when she came back
it was in the winter � and she came in loaded
with packages and with a high coloring, and I
had exactly the same feeling from the first mo-
ment: a very strong erotic attraction and she was
very beautiful
Ultimately, Ingrid Bergman may have been
punished b her public more for her prescience
than for her presumption. She abandoned the
comforable cocoon of Hollywood's artifices just
a few years before the film colony's confidence in
these artifices began to crumble. She shattered
the hypocracy of American puritanism almost
two decades before the children's revolt would
shatter the complacency of American family life.
She was prematurely mature, and naturally she
had to be her avenger or vindicator. To their eter-
nal credit, her more civilized friends and ac-
quaintances, including the much maligned
Howard Hughes, did so from the first through
the last stages of her interminable ordeal. All I
would like to do is to confess the deep love I felt
for hei back in the '40s in the Music Hall, and
even more to confess that I realize only now that
what I thought was a purely spiritual love turns
out to have been deliciously profane.
ABORTIONbUPTO
12th WEEK Of-
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM I) H
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
$8S 00 Prpqnancv Test B-
Confn 0 p otD' m Pregr
i. v Coun ,t iq Fm urther in'
mat.on rail 63. 3S (Toll F.
Number 800 2? :�8I betwet"
A M and s P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
1)7 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
VVf-Jttfi

eVVV-
7
&'
.CP C .? ;X 2 fP N
43
M
XN.SVNNVXN.XXXNS'NVNXNNVN'N.NNNVXXS.NXN.VVNVXVXXXXXXNVN.X
DELI KITCHEN
Home Cooked Food
Meat & 2 Veg Bread, Be.
S'lOO Free refills on
103 Raleigh & Dickinson Ave.
752-5339
Why eat anywhere else when you can
eat at the Deli Kitchen
coffee & tea.
Breakfast Served 6:30 a. m10:30 a. m.
Sausage & Ham Biscuits � 50
Lunch Served from 11:00-7:30
Homemade Biscuits & Desserts 5
Eat In or Take Out
!
I
NS.VVXS.SV
X V N. N N X
i
IaTiTICII�ATiTIC
ANNIVERSARY PARTY
WITH
canTRDL
CROUP:
RftC ADM. (ALL NIGHT) j
JWt4nd DOOR PRIZES
301 Evans St. AAall In the Minges Building 752 5476
INTRODUCING OUR All You Can tat
BUFFET from 5-9 p.m.
Mon. Thru Sat. � for only $5.95
Buffet will include
�Chicken
�Lasagna
�Seafood
�Ham
�Vegetables
�Meatballs
� Roast Beef
�Salad
�Dessert
�Iced tea or coffee
THE
Vf SHOE
ROOM
402 S. Evans Street
On the Downtown Mall
752-1268
AH Brand Name Shoes
Buy 1 Pair of Shoes
at regular price & get a
second pair for Vi price
NEW Shipment of Handbags
now in stock-10 OFF
In the bargain section:
3 PAIRS of ladies' shoes,
clogs or sandals for only $15
SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
Thursday - Sat Oct. 23-25
Hours: 10:00-5:30 MonSat.
MasterCharge Visa
Lavaway Plan Available
� Beverages
60C
(WHILE IT LASTS)
Also offering our full lunch menu
from 11:30-2:30
our full dinner menu
from 5:00-10:00 Mon. Sat.
CLOSEDSUNDAY
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
$1.00 off Buffet
One coupon per person only.
Good between 5 7 pm Expires Sept 26 1982
I
I
I
I
I
I
mm
JE
Now you can go to the bank
without going to the bank.
We're adding another
Teller II in town - but you
won't find it at the bank
like the others. This new
Teller II stands alone in its
very own building. And like
Teller II, this special build
ing is also open 24 hours
a day, seven days a week.
So now you have a choice,
Come directly to the bank
or go to the Teller II away
from the bank - either way
were making it easier and
more convenient for you
to do all your owbu
banking with Get ft All
Wachovia. At Wachovia.
Our New Teller II opens September 7 at the
Carolina East Convenience Center �� ,0 g�� &s m
H
E
Bv



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IIN
Sports
I i' i I MBI r
Emory Ready To Face Wolfpack Challenge
U i Nl� PI sNs
-
Sta i ing
V oil pack squad practices, but playing in a "leal
i irman. finishing S n game" i� quite different "Kiffin
he I formation against State, was pleased with his kicking game
mory hopes to be moi too he aid I i -a- relerring
han I urman with the to statt I � I MikeCofer,
ites' newly acquired off i �hi a bit ol trouble while
"l-urmai I mat m ol 41. MM)
malion

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� ith
i utie
II � .
njuries, State Concern Emory
�hi
1 Ilk ll)slllt
lit i In
. : � RO
- � B
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v -
Pirates. Wolfpack in lasl year's action
eks
Blazing Speed. H i
� N '
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I
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JV's Win
10-yard dasl lei ie i 41 seco
� illiam a a
4.32; Dec Dee H 4.37; settled I Saturday
Dwavne V 1.4 fcru East Ca i : ��
Pirate head coach I-d r mor
Baseball Season To
End With Drama
H KIN Kill ION

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Bosl �: Rt o
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. kansa
i x Roy Call I

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Royals a; -
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-
Bro
See KM Kl 1 Page 12
elson Relieved To Be Rid Of Quarterbacking Pressures
lormer (Barllon Nelson
II sPORIs IMORM IION
I he piessures he
ol qua: terback are cone foi the
first time since his junioi v
high s hool foi East C ai olina sen
( ai lion NeKon.
1 he regulai quarterback since 1 d
1 mi � k over the Pirates in
1980, Nelson was shifted to spin end
in the spring to lake advantage ol
his speed in the new Pirate 1 attack.
It didn't lake new offensive cooi
Lam Beekish and reteivei
coach Rickey Bustle lone to sec that
sw itv h was a mastei 1 he 6 1.
172 pound ex quarterback is a
i: itural Soft, large hands blend
with dazzling open field moes to
make Nelson a constant threat at
split end I he moves which used to
move the Pirate wishbone attack on
the ground will help Beckish's new
attai k move through the aii
"I hope it will help me stay away
from injuries the business major
said
In the seventh came ol 1980 at
North Carolina, Nelson's football
careei appealed to have come to an
abrupt hall vicious hit caused a
neck injury which put him out foi
tin season and there was some
doubt it he would nsk playing
again He missed spring drills
before his innioi veai
I ast
game at qua
handful ol plays a- � I
Nelson has rolled
tool tl
ed tot 1 1 touchdow ns
But against N. t Sta
neck give aga "1 hui t my
i. ain, but it as e same
spot he said li tut nt
a must, k pull
hold it n a
Nelson cics much
foi ins switch to Bev � rwo
w eek s bet oi c pi ing pi a
Beckish approached Nelson
"When coach Beckish r came.
1 talked to him about thi
"My aims was hurt, but Greg
(S ewart) and 1 kept throwing passes
to cash othei he said " oach
Beckish asked me again about mm
ing right before spring practice U
aims kept hurting, so I changed
Spring practice ended and Nelson
proved his potential by pulling in his
first two passes foi 21 yards in the
purple and cold came W ith consis
tent performance and improvement.
Nelson ahs earned the right to share
staitmg time with returning spin end
Ruk Nichols
1 he hesitation Nelson fell when
he lust changed to spin end turned
into reliel " lot ol pressure is ofl
Nt
! '
I
-
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l
Neb
B
ob with the re� "tit
a lot
king w � . . .
me
Ne I son k he o f f�
s
con1.
n

notes will t"
because ol mor pass
didn't respect th pass
wishbone because they knew
we'd be running more
Nelson was nickna
Snake by E I Pii ate tun
New 1 ngland Patnol nthony
lins Collins said that when N $
then a freshman, ran on the field I
ooked like a snake ' 1 he Si �
with his 4 5 speed in the 4o
dash, is going to demand opponent
respect as he slinks through the
ondai





12
I HI l AS l i AKOl INI AN
SEPTEMBER 7, 1982
Baseball Season Will
End On Climactic Note
Continued from page 11
r e c o r d , m a n y o f
Hendei son's attributes
have been overlooked.
In addition to being
one ol the tmest defen-
sive left fielders in the
game, he also leads the
maun leagues in runs
scored. It Oakland
u ej e a contending
team. Henderson
would be the leading
candidate for MVP.
It it weren't for the
pla of first baseman
I ddie Mm i ay, the
Baltimore Orioles
wouldn't be as much in
v ontention as they are.
In addition to Murray's
U8 batting average
and 2b home runs, he
also leads the American
I eague in the numbei
� game-vA inning hits
VA ith a lineup packed
with potential MVPs,
the Milwaukee Brewers
have a strong candidate
at the shortstop posi-
tion. Robin Yount,
who at only 27 years
old is already in his
in hits and doubles; is
second in batting
average and third in
runs scored and triples.
Yount's offensive pro-
duction as well as his
underrated defensive
play have led the
Brewers to the best
record in the major
leagues.
The vote here is for
Yount, with very
honorable mention go-
ing to Henderson, Mur-
tav. California's Reg-
gie Jackson and Kansas
City's Hal McRae.
In the National
I eague. the MVP situa-
tion is far from decid-
ed. One month ago, it
would have undoubted-
lv been Atlanta's Dale
Murphy. But Murphy
had a hitting slump that
not coincidentally was
proportional to the
Braves' early-August
skid.
While playing for his
sixth career major
league team, Mon-
treal's Al Oliver has
had a superb year. He
has led the National
League in batting for
much of the year, and
is currently batting
.333. He is also in the
top three in RBls, hits
and doubles.
When picking the
National League MVP,
one name that has
always come up is
Philadelphia's Mike
Schmidt. He is current
ly third in the league
with 29 home runs.
If the season were to
end tomorrow, the nod
would go to Dale Mur-
phy.
Now has a COLOR T.V.
and will be showing all sporting
events. Happy Hour prices will be
in effect during these events.
WHEN THET.V. SON,
SO IS HAPPY HOUR
H hilt there enjoy our fine food
and pleasant atmosphere.
Room
Wednesday Night
PONY NIGHT
All Ponies - 30 All Night
Free Admission for ECU Students
Best in Rock N Roll
& Dance All Night
�i�lll�iBm�i�tl�IIB�l�l�BII���lll�rf
REMINDER
PI KAPPA PHI
FALL RUSH
TONIGHT THRU
THURSDAY NIGHT
PARTY'S BEGIN
ALL NIGHTS AT8:30
COME OUT AND FEEL
THE EXCITEMEN TMtt
�!��� ��!��� Ml
�I
i
TUESDAY I
NIGHT
I
IS
COLLEGE j
NIGHT
AT
SPORTSWORLD i

I
YOU GET
HAPPY FEET! yl
wheh vou come to sportsworld. CVL I ,
WE'RE HEAVEN ON WHEELS! $tQQ I
i SPOBTSWOBUTi
t
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
Open Under
New
Management
for Men & Women
WITH ECU I.I)
104 E. Red Banks Rd.
Located adjacent to Ramoda Inn and
756-6000 6:30-10:00
���WMniiMiiii�iiwiiimimniiwMH�iimiwl

RECENTlREMODELED It's that time again
get back into shape. Nautilus is located on Ivans
Street, within walking distance from campus. Featur-
ing a full line oi Nautilus equipment. Olymp
weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker room.
C all and ask about our prn-rutcJ iiuien: rau s
8mur rau Call and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION
MonThurs � 10a.m9 p.m. Fndav � !0a m 8p m
Saturday � 10am 5 p.m Sunday � l p.m -5pm
Pizza Inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
iov Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price �
IM INN has changed all that!
We sell our deliverv
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
CLEAR VUEOPTICIANS COUPON
'This coupon must
atcompdn, el
Off Complete
Eye Glasses With
This Coupon
Offt?r
Good
til
83182
Greenville Store Oni,
25 OFF
for ECU students on
prescription glasses.
Bring in ad & student ID
30
DISCOUNT ON
B&LRAYBAN
SUNGLASSES
(WITH G 15 LENSES)
CALL US FOR AN EYE EXAMINATION WITH THE DOCTOR OF YOUR CHOICE
fcl�AR
VUE
pticians
315 PARK VIEW COMMONS
ACROSS FROM DOCTORS PARK
752 1446
OPEN 9 AM TIL 5 30 P M
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY J
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
PLAZA SHELL
610 Greenville Blvd.
24 hour
756-3023
24HOURS
TOWINC
SERVICE
OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
ALL YOU CAN EAT �
CHICKEN $2.99
(dark meat)
This meal includes Chicken,
Fries, Biscuits &
l Small Tea (no refills)
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
Forty years ago, khaki was synonymous with muddy
foxholes, C rations, and other horrors ot war. The stuff
wore like iron, but it you were to be seen on the street
with khaki's on, you were probably A.W.O.L. Now
manufacturers have re established a khaki beachhead
the clothes durability and low cost make it a winner
Khaki is a staple in any wardrobe. Cotton, inexpensive
and long lasting Duck Head is the khaki tor you at a
price you can afford. For her $22.00. For him $20.00.
F,
S
Dt
anru
the
the at
i
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1982
13
t
���,
I

.
Km
Fund-Raising Drive
Surpasses $250,000
last Carolina
Lniversity chancellor
Dr. John M. Howell
announced Friday that
the new $1 million
tund-raising drive for
ihe athletic department
leaded by ureenville
businessmen Dr. Ray
Mmges and Ray Clark
has surpassed the
$250,000 mark
"We have had ex-
cellent response by the
business leaders and
others in Greenville and
Pitt County Howell
said, "and we are also
starting to expand the
campaign toward other
communities
throughout North
Carolina
The campaign, laun-
ched Aug. 6, has a goal
of raising $1 million
over a five year period
to ensure that ECU's
athletic department is
given the support it
needs to succeed in
NCAA Division 1 com-
petition.
"We have been very
successful in 1 avet-
teville, for example,
where friends have rais-
ed over 50,000
dollars Howell
noted. "We will con-
tinue the effort in Pitt
County and the state of
North Carolina
.��� �.�;� �.�.v�.� .� �h " � ���.�� - � �
Classifieds
�� � �� �V �� �� x'� -�� � �� yt r � ��� t V
WANTED
PART�TIME position available
as a phone collector MUST HAVE
experience in collections. Call
Phillip, at 7S7 1330 alter 1 00.
NEEDED: CERTIFIED scuba
diver tor volunteer work. Begin
within one to two weeks Flexible
hours depending on schedule. Con
tact Dr David Porretta. Minges
Coliseum IS7 M4I, after 5 p.m.
call 75H)4lt
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: JVC JAS 22 Stereo
Amp. 4J wartsc tlSO or best offer
742 049
FOR SALE: Stereo with � track
and radio. Turntable doesn't work.
25 tapes S0 7S3 3334
FOR SALE S cu ft refrlf Very
good cond call 757 3104
FREE KITTENS: NEED A good
home call 7SI 4402 ask for Chris.
IAST CAIOUNA UNWISITY
1907 19S2
ROOMMATE SERVICES
SPORTS WRITERS NEEDED
Applx in person at Ihe East Carolinian office. Old
South Building, across from Joyner Library. Experience
preferred but not necessary. Musi be dependable and
willing to learn.
WANTED
2 ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house, 2 blocks from
campus S7S per month. Call Buti
Chadwick 752-4941. 309 E. 13th St
l OR 2 female roommates needed
Langston Park Apt Call 752 002
or come by Hearts Delight.
Available now
CARLA: I love you Greg LLTX
MAL COM I used to love you, but
now I love Greg
MYRNA Mafcom used to hate
you, but now he hates Greg,
because Carla stole him from her,
when he was rebounding from
Gladys So, you're in luck he still
hates you. but not as much.
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates;
754 3440
PROFESSI jNAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
751 5301 or Gail Joiner 7U 1041.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc Call 752 4733.
LOST AND
FOUND
Lost in FOUR SEASONS
restaurant: Lady's yellow gold
Bulova watch engraved on back
Great sentimental value Reward
Call 75 7903 �nd ask for Slier ri
WINNER TO RECEIVE $1500 IN CASH; COMPETE ON CBS-TV
I
i


Miss
North Carolina US
1983 MISS NORTH
CAROLINA-USA PAGEANT
The official preliminary to the
MISS USA and MISS UNIVERSE
TACEANT
NO rtRFORMING
TAUNT RiQUIRtD
I -� i � ie as Mo'lh Ca'O
. na s represents! vem ihe -iaitonaii KHovtaed
SAPAGEAN1 The search is on to find
Mis: if . S lor '9S3 Entrants
� :� �- beauty potse and personal
ry The Miss N � A Pagfa
oeipf. sod � ��-Rf oios Auc ojr-
5 en v -t oe Z7r v�iir ihe
� - - �' - Ci. o.emtfc?i ?6tf" To
- ' . � � stOf erween 18 & ?� -i-
� i .r � . � � � � beeri ar" ed '
TO OBTAIN FHEfc ENTRY INFORMATION . ame address iq
andtetet Ma '� B -�� "�� 'interests inc
- NE - ilree Mien �-�-�- 105)944-3;
r!5KfyK0iZ5K2254SZ�55!K28
Sick to Death
of Fast Food?
Try home cooked
meals at
The Carolina Grill
From the Student Center take
Breakfast anytime 9th st west � just a quarter mile.
CORNER of 9th & DICKINSON
MONSAT. 6 a.m3 p.m. Phone 752-1188
Appearing
Wednesday Night
at
RECORDING ARTISTS
NICKY
rIAIvlxIS
BAND
Ladies' Night
Ladies' Admitted Free
Nickel Draft 'til 10

A
i
r
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale at o�
I below the advertised price m each A4P Store eicepi as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT. 11, AT AftP IN GREENVILLE
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Now in Progress GRAND
REMODELING SALE!
� P�Meat Specials � y
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fresh Fryer -
Leg Quarters
39
BONELESS FULLY COOKED
Armour Ham
99
35
0 can m
A&PFRESHLY
Ground Chuck
i
58
lb
(3 lbs. or
more)
TAB, SPRITE, MELLO YELLO
Coca Cola
2 liter
plastic
bottle
79C
A&P CHILLED
Orange Juice
64 OZ.
carton
88 $
KING OF BEERS
Budweiser Beer
612oz. O
cans �
19
GRADE "A
Loose Eggs
Extra Large
PICK
YOUR doz.
OWN! for
59C
CALIFORNIA
CRISP ICEBERG
rE FARV
large
heads
BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE!
12 GALLON CARTON
Sealtest Ice Cream
BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE!
RIPLETS, REG. OR SOUR CREAM 7 oz.
Gordon's Potato Chips
BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE!
16 oz. LOAF
Less Wheat Bread
CP3
SUPER SAVER COUPON
?
A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES, REGULAR
Al
Eight 0'Clock
Bean Coffee
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON.
GOOD THRU SAT SEPT. 11. AT AP IM GREENVILLE
1 lb.
bag
674
SUPER SAVER COUPON

AP
GOLDEN QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER pkg.
�GOOD THRU SAT SEPT. 11. AT AftP IN GREENVILLE
29�
673
�1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
v
SUPER SAVER COUPON ?
J
15� OFF LABEL�YOU PAY ONLY
Tide
Detergent
AV
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT SEPT. 11, AT AftP IN GREENVILLE
49 OZ
box

I





INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY . GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 27384
RUSH
KAPPA
SIGMA
Pledge ai-J 1 uilr Sislers of ihc
KAPPA SIGMA Fnuei
I all Rusli 1982 TOO
icaied beside D�rr s I9CP
.i ern ���� . �� proem
.i the lulun rn ,ij:c you
mak vourselt . Ikmim
- .i ife. .1 . jmp.is
� I 'ic make
ihe ilcgiaie
c intormatioi ana a idc cal!
M?
- the kAPPA SU Al 1 taiern.
:u Puruiil Ol Excellence! "
A r
j KAPPA . � SIGMA f 1� s
y
THE MOST TINTED MAN IN THE COUNTRY
Tuesday, Sept. 7
Blue Hawaiian Luau Party
Wednesday, Sept. 8
The Original las Vegas
Playboy Bunny Night
Rush Parties Begin at 8:30 � Please feel free to drop in anytime!
tfie men of
invirezou to
aTTend
Dear Fnend,
Congratulations on your decision to attend East Carolina
University. Your choice has been a wise one. E.C.U. is a rapidly
growing institution that is becoming known nationwide for its
high standards and excellent curriculum. Along with the school,
the fraternity system here at E.C.U. is also growing. On behalf of
the Interfraternity Council, I would like to welcome you to
Greenville, and take this opportunity to discuss the fraternity
system with you.
The popularity of fraternities among college students has varied
considerably over a period of more than two hundred years. It is
interesting to note, however, that the number of students joining
fraternities during the last five years has been the greatest in their
history. The fraternity system has survived wars, depressions, and
periods of great social upheaval. Only worthwhile concepts and
organizations can stand this test of time.
The new members of the East Carolina University Interfraternity
Council would like to give you every opportunity to learn about
their fraternal experience. We see this experience as an extremely
important part of our total education. It is through the fraternity
that we learn about ourselves, about other human beings and
about how to be effective leaders.
Fraternities at E.C.U. provide a unique living and learning
experience where one can participate in leadership development,
decision making, social concern, and most important, honest
friendships. I hope you will take the time to come and meet the
members of the many fraternities here on our great campus and
that you will call on me if I may ever be of assistance.
Once again. Welcome.
Sincerely yours.
Tap Johnson
President. East Carolina
Interfraternity Council
FOR IT!
rush phi kaPRTttujI
TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY
409 rliabethsi.
1501 titmck St. 7fS-mO
PI KAPPA PHI NATIONAI ORGANIZATION AWARDS TO
PI KAPPA PHI
CHAMPION
MASTER CHAPTER
FOR EXCELLENCE IN RECRUITMENT, SCHOLAR-
SHIP. AND MANAGEMENT; CURRENTLY RANKED
3rd OUT OF 107 CHAPTERS OF PI KAPPA PHI IN THE
UNITED STATES IN OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN
OPERATIONS.
DEFENDING ECU INTRAMURAL
CHAMPIONS FRATERNITY
DIVISION
WHERE DO YOU GO WHEN
YOU'RE IN A RUSH?
eaders in:
A cademic s i hie tic s
Campus Organizations
Social Enjoy men l
"Come See What
Makes Us Best"
Call 752-4379 for a ride
on the"0)KT RUSH BUS"
Party starts at
9:00 each night
505E.5fhSt. 752-2941 752-6502
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Fraternity
Sigma Phi Epsilon is a national tratermn with
undergraduate chapters across the U.S. The Sig Eps here
at East Carolina exist for the same reason 'hat all other
Sig Ep chapters do . . . building close friendships, promo-
tion, academic excellence, and enriching your college ex-
perience. Please come by and isit.
the
BETA THETA PI
celebrate
their new charter as
EPSILON ALPHA
chapter
party's tuesday- thursday
900 until
�behind joyner library-
Lambda Chi Alpha Rush
Tuesday Nite � 9:00 Revolving Rooms
Wednesday Nite - 9:00 'Washed Ashore'
Thursday Nite - 9:00 Purple and Gold Rush
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity would like to ex-
tend an invitation to you to come by and meet the
brothers. As ECU's oldest fraternity, Lambda Chi is
rich in tradition and the "Choppers" take pride in be-
ing leaders on campus and in the community.
ALPHA
SIGMA
PHI
Fraternity
FALL RUSH
1982
September 7,8,9
422 W. Fifth
752-1073
Sigma Tau Gamma
The dream was conceived at the beginning of the fall semester
1977. A group of 34 hCL students joined together to form a
brotherhood. The Delta Alpha chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma is
composed of men and little sisters who believe that an individual's
uniqueness should not be restricted by an organization. Our
members are encouraged to have their own lifestyles and not to tit in-
to any stereotype. We are a social fraternity that enjoys an at-
mosphere unique from the others. Please visit Sigma Tau Gamma
Give us a call at 758-4140 for directions to our house. Sigma Tau
Gamma CARES!
TKE
LAMBDA PS I
CHAPTER
Tuesday 7
Raw Tones Band
Wednesday 8
Special LIVE
Entertainment !
Thursday 9
Green GDand
Pitt Beat
UNC PARTY
951 E. 10th St
Bottom of College Hill
9 P.M. till ???
Plenty of beverages & music
SEPT. 7-9
L
'

I
C"

!





Title
The East Carolinian, September 7, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 07, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.212
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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