The East Carolinian, August 24, 1982






�he iEast (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.
Tuesday, August 24, 1982
Greenville,N.C
30 Pages-3 Sections
Record Student Enrollment Causes
Problems In Finding Quarters
By (.KM. KIIU Ol 1
VM S .IIII
1 . I entered ns seventy-third
academic yeai with a projected
record enrollment ol between
,270 and 13,300 students.
ccording to Actiuc Directoi ol
Missions Di Susan McDaniels,
this numbei surpasses last year's
total numbei ol students, rhese
ures include undergraduate,
luate and post graduate level
I niversitv ol Noi th Carolina
Noi th Cai olina
expei a recoi d
. fiapel Hill ai No: th Carolina
ibei oi
v I remains
h third largest
North Carolina
t projected
nts the university
d 'i 7 new faculty
alls, a research
lemic affairs, said
total amount of
it vacancies
t plained :hai
posilions were
i � were in the
negotiation stage.
I he onslaught of students has
also caused housing problems. Dan
K Wooten, director of housing
operations, said that approximately
50 male students who signed up for
a dorm room were turned away.
1 hey were placed on a waiting list.
Wooten stated that on the first
floor oi Jones there were 57 tem-
poral beds in use.
Wooten said the situation in the
omen's residence halls was better.
The tegular spaces are tilled along
with 50 temporary ones, but there is
a potential tor 50 more beds.
Wooten estimated that those
students who are are now in tem-
porary quarters will have regular
housing within five weeks.
Oorm students found that along
with the shortage of rooms came an
increase in price. According to the
cashiers office the price oi a semi-
private room rose $5 from $378 to
S435.
1 he situation for students who
sought off campus housing this year
was better compared to last year.
"Compared to last year, off-
campus housing is a little less
tight said Lucy Wright, director
of off-campus housing.
Wright explained that the first
place to go when seeking informa-
tion about a place to stay is her of-
fice. She said the advice she had
given was to start to look as early as
possible.
Prices for off-campus housing,
according to Mrs. Wright, stayed at
the same level with the exeption of
room-rentals in Greenville area
homes. She said this was due to in-
creases in utility bills.
Chancellor John M. How ell com-
mented that he was "optimistic"
about this academic year.
The chancellor said the university
was in a desirable position because
oi the increase in students and facul-
ty. He added that a freeze on
salaried goverment employees
enacted by the spring session of the
general assembly could be detrimen-
tal to the university if it continues
for an extended period of time.
SCHOOL OE BUSINESS
1
SCHOOL BUSINESS
BUSINESS EDUUT10N 1 �
DEPARTMENT �
WtUTIVt EDUUTIOM I ?�
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
A ccreditation A warded
Class Drop Procedure Changes
BGORDON IPOCK
Sjl S r i
. flange, being in-
i asi v arolina, concern-
ol dropped
words ol J.
ersit) registrar,
. rd a "true, com-
ai g at adem ic
irses di opped dur-
i A'd were not
id transcript,
is fall ihat pro-
nv course dropped after August
27, the final day oi drop-add for
this tall semester will be recorded on
the student's transcript. The name
of the dropped courses will be
recorded and the date oi the drop
indicated.
Moore stressed that the dropped
course will not affect the student's
quality point average, but it will ap-
pear on the record.
"A student's transcript, by
definition, is a complete record of
all courses in which the student has
enrolled he explained. This
change in procedure was im-
plemented to reflect a complete
record.
Although the recording of drop-
ped courses is m no way meant to
penalize a student, it will have some
subtle ramifications. Moore noted a
present rule that is directly related to
the procedure change.
"If a student drops a course ai
ECU and ihen later completes the
same course at another school, ECU
will not accept transfer credit for
that course.
By FIELDING MILLER
ti'nerul Manayrr
Dr. James H Bear den, dean of
the ECU School oi Business, has an-
nounced that the American
Assembly of Collegiate Schools ol
Business (AACSB) has continued
the accreditations for both the K.
calaureate and masters business pi 11
grams.
The ECU School ol Business is
one of only 182 schools in the nation
accredited in both undergraduate
and graduate levels, placing it in the
top 10 percent of all schools offer-
ing business programs.
To qualify for A AC SB accredita-
tion, schools are judged b their ad-
missions policies, degree re-
quirements, qualifications of the
faculty, financial support, library
facilities and overall physical
facilities.
Thus, the accreditation is one
means for prospective students,
employers oi business graduates,
admissions officers and the general
public to measure the quality and
comprehensiveness of the instruc-
tion offered by the accredited
school.
Dr. Carl Gooding, Chairman ol
the Department ol Marketing and
Management, commented on the
advantages of having an accredited
program.
"Accreditation benel
school of business in two ways: it
enhances our recruiting ability tor
quality students, and it increases the
iob placement opportunities foi
graduates oi the program
Some business firms, especially
the larger companies, concentrate
then recruiting efforts on students
graduating from accredited schools.
According to Dr. Daniel Hines,
chairman oi the Department ol Ac-
counting, "The accreditation of the
ol ol business has an enour-
mous effect on the recruitment of
accounting majors; six of the big
eight accounting firms recruited
1(1 graduates last year
Any collegiate institution offering
baccalaureate and or masters
degrees in business administration
and management may apply for
�A( SB membership.
Currently, the total AACSB
membership includes 706 schools,
only 231 of which are accredited.
Accreditation and membership are,
thus, not analogous
Organized in 1916, the AACSB is
recognized as the sole accrediting
ncy for baccalaureate and
masters degree programs in business
administration by the U.S. Depart-
ment oi Education and by the
Council on Postsecondary Ac-
creditation.
Summer Happenings
News Recapped
By GREG HIDEOUT
XxsManl Nf� r dilor
n M How ell elected chancellor. The Casablanca restaurant
d the SGA tinds discrepancies in their budget. These were
ighlights ol ECU'S summer sessions. For those students who were
tch instead ol in the books, the following is a recap of the
new a aff� ted the campus community this summer.
Ma � - Former SGA Vice-President Marvin Braxton pleaded no
3 nine counts oi common law forgery in Pitt County District
itenced to six months in jail and six months proba-
tion. Both were suspended.
May 14 Dr. John M. Howell was elected the eighth chancellor of
t aslarolina University. Howell had been interim chancellor since
January He referred to his appointment as a challenge and indicated
: a! he plans to stay in Greenville for a while.
May 16 � FC U's baseball team defeated Catholic University 8-4 to
capture the E AC-South championship. The pirates finished the
season with the most wins in the school's history � 33.
May 25 - Eric Henderson was sworn in as SGA president after yet
; another election plagued with controversy. The decision to instate
Henderson was reached by a review board and upheld by the
chancellor and vice-chancellor for student life.
June 2 Broadcaster George G. Beasley presented ECU with a
production music library valued at over $5000. The gift was in support
ol a proposed communication major.
June 2 � The Casablanca restaurant was shut down following a
routine inspection by the building inspector. The owner of the
nightclub, Leroy Cherry, said the closing would cause him to lose
substantial revenue and that he would be forced to go out of business.
June 6 � East Carolina sudent and East Carolinian staff writer
Patrick O'Neill was sentenced to serve three months in jail following
his conviction stemming from a protest he participated in at a military
installation.
June 8 �- Head basketball coach Dave Odom announced that he
had accepted the position of assistant coach at the University of
Virginia. Odom, who's resignation took effect June 30, left ECU with
a 38 4 lifetime record.
June 13 � A break-in at Mendenhall Student Center resulted in a
video game and pinball machine being vandalized.
June 23 � ECU soccer coach Brad Smith resigned effective July 1.
Smith stepped down after a four-year stay to pursue his doctorate at
the University of Tennessee.
June 30 � The SGA found that it would face financial problems in
the fall. Appropriations for the new school year were estimated to be
up to $29,000 over expected revenue. The executive council stated it
would be hard to place the blame on any one person.
Juv 5 � East Carolina's Summer Theatre opened to a packed
house with a rendition of Grease.
julv 5 An ECU student was arrested and charged with assault on
a female. Greenville police records stated that the student allegedly bit
a female patron of the Subway restaurant on the right breast.
Julv 14 � ECU student Glenn Maughan fasted in front of Flanagan
building to promote the views of the ECU peace committee.
july 21 � At the request of senior class president Russell Overman,
the SGA approved $5000 for an interest bearing trust fund. The fund
would be used to award scholarships to rising seniors.
Julv 24 � ECU Athletic Director Ken Karr announced the hiring of
Charlie Harrison as the new head basketball coach. Harrison was
assistant coach at Iowa State before joining the pirates.
Chancellor Howell Opens
82-83 Academic Year
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sliff Wrilrr
ECU Chancellor Dr. John Howell
was greeted with a standing ovation
from a full house of faculty
members in Hendrix Theatre Mon-
day morning as he officially opened
East Carolina's 1982 academic year.
Howell welcomed new faculty
members and praised those return-
ing for their help in maintaining
East Carolina' as an institution of
excellence for 75 years.
Howell promised that his ad-
ministration would function in as
open and informal a way as possi-
ble.
"If you need to confer with me, I
will be accessible he told the au-
dience. "I do not view the
chancellor's office as a bunker he
added.
During his address to the annual
fall convention, Howell urged
ECU's nearly 1000 faculty members
to "constantly keep our teaching,
research, and public service cur-
rent He emphasized the impor-
tance of increasing ECU's "contacts
with the community" and to "be
among the first to evaluate new
trends and devise solutions to new
problems
Howell noted three areas in which
he was directing special attention.
"Research and public service should
be increased he said. He also
spoke of the current status of a
three-phase plan for maintaining
adequate funding of East Carolina's
athletic program. "I'm committed
to a first class athletic program
which is a benefit to the whole
university he said.
During the two-hour program
various faculty members and ad-
ministrators addressed the audience.
Fifty-seven new faculty members
were welcomed by Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs Dr. Robert H.
Maier. "I wish you the best for the
coming year � it will be an in-
teresting year he said.
Maier also announced that Ralph
Nader would be among the list of
guest lecturers coming to East
Carolina this fall.
Maier noted that East Carolina
now had three new academic pro-
grams: a masters in social work, a
BS in accounting, and the maritime
history program.
Dr. William Laupus, dean of the
ECU Medical School gave an up-
date on the relocation of the pro-
gram to the Brody Building and an-
nounced that opening dedication
ceremonies would be held October
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Students Move In
As the summer ends, students begin to move back to Greenville. Traffic
congestion caused problems at the dorms when everyone decided td move in
on Sunday.
Resister Draws Guilty Verdict
By PATRICK O'NF'LL
Stiff Writer
Calling him "an honorable per-
son in the eyes of the court U.S.
District Judge James Turk found
draft registration resister Enten
Eller guilty and sentenced him to
three years' probation and ordered
him to register within 90 days or
face a prison term.
Turk added that in the eyes of the
Selective Service System, Eller may
already be considered registered
since they do know his name, age
and address.
Eller was also ordered to perform
250 hours of community service as
part of his sentence. The final deci-
sion will be made by probation of-
ficials he added.
Eller was found guilty last Tues-
day in a Roanoke, Virginia cour-
troom.
For Eller it was the end of two
years of an emotion filled struggle.
On many occassions he had
repeated his reasons, based on
moral and religious grounds, for his
decision to not comply with the law.
"Registration involves me direct-
ly with the military system, and as
far as being a faithful Christian
goes, I cannot see that military ser-
vice is consistant with being
faithful siad Eller before his trial.
Eller, 20, is a member of the
Church of the Brethren, which is
considered to be one of the three
traditional Protestant peace ch ar-
ches, along with the Quakers and
the Mennonites.
Eller is the first of five men, who
have been indicted for registration
refusal, to be put on trial and
sentenced.
The Justice Department had
chosen Eller from a group of 160
"self reporters" who have been
selected out of a group reported to
be as large as one million who have
failed to register for various
reasons.
"Self-reporters" in most cases are
men who have written letters to the
Selective Service or presidents
Carter and Reagan, giving their
reasons for their refusal.
Eller seemed an unlikely selection
for the precendent setting case. His
gentle demeanor, easy going style,
and strong religious conviction of-
fered no comparison with the more
sterotypical 1960's draft card burn-
ing radicals.
"The reason that I made this deci-
sion and maintain it is simply that
I'm trying to be faithful to God
were Eller's words. He admitted
that he was not comfortable break-
ing the law. "It's something I do
with a great deal of sadness
Eller very carefully explained the
specific conditions which led to his
decision. As a Christian, we're only
given permission to disobey the civil
law when it conflicts directly with
the higher law.
Showing his own insecurity he ad-
ded, "Part of the problem is trying
See ELLER, Pagej
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THE EASTCAROI 1N1AN
Al C.US1 24, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
l� you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcement column
please 'vp� i on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian m care ot the rrodui
' manager
Announcement terms are
available at the East Carolinian
Otrice m the Publications Buildmq
Flyers ana handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be a
cepte'1
There is no charge tor an
nouncemen's but space is often
limited Therefore vo annot
guarantee that your announce
"Yfit will run as long as you want
and sugges' tna you do not rely
-v on this column tor publn t
T "e deadline tor announcements
sSp m Monday tor the 1 scia.
. � irtf 5 o m W � lesflay � I
� �.� paper No an
i enfs i ' '� i' after Tnese
am .� s
ments
, . ,bie to an
i'o depai'
BIOLOGY CLUB
� he B
us' met
i �
B 1 �-
. - �� .
� � �-( ��
KAPPA SIGMA
the Bi rhers .t Kappa Vyma
would like to extend a warm
a . i - r r aii incoming
Freshmen rranste students anct
all retui i "q students we nope
that '��' "� I as a good and pro
. u mester l vmg it up
D a" t as' Wi niber Fall Kush is
ius around the corner Go
I � . KS1 ' '
APPLY NOW
Students who intend to apply to
maior in Social Work or Correc
hons m the Fall ot 1982 should re
quest an application and an ap
p n tor an interview from
me department Ottue 312 Carol
BeiK lAii.ed Health Buildmgi
For mcire information can Mrs
JCyner fSI ft�6l E x1 218
ne tor tall applications
September 7 Students are en
couraged to apoiy during summer
S nool
AMBASSADORS
r first meeting will be held on
� sd �. Sopt I at S 00 Your
, s really important tor
pi i meeting We've g ' �
� . � � al ead I s ana you re
� , pai I of ' Kve'H plan
, g , iu .i" oui I rT Batl � ��
�� . Wendeni all Muitipur
Llf-fcGUARDS
1 he Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is hiring
I i. guards tor the 1982 83 school
year Approximately 20 25 guards
ai. needed tor work at the Mmges
and Memorial Pools Basic hours
available are M F II 30 am to
1 30 p m M F 3 30 p m to 6 30
pm MWF800pmto9 30pm
and Sat and Sun 1 00 p m to 5 00
pm CPR Certification and either
Advanced Lifesaving or WSI is re
quired Interested students should
apply at Memorial Gymnasium.
Room 102 Monday, August 30. at
5 00pm Please bring your Social
Security Card Class Schedules
and CPR WSI and Advanced
Lifesaving Certificate Cards
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
Registration and information on
a variety of outdoor recreation op
portunities are available through
the IRS Outdoor Recreation
Center in 113 Memorial Gym
Recently scheduled events m
elude Horseback Riomg
September 2 9 16. 23. 30 Begmn
ing Canoeing Clinic September 3
and J Ahitewater Ratting Trip
September 10 ana 11 Call 757 6911
or stop By the tenter 1113
Memorial Gym1 tor further mfor
nation
ATTENTION
FRESHMEN
The Biology Club is conducting a
special meeting on Tuesday
August 31. m the Biology Building,
room BN 103 tor all freshmen with
an interest in biology This
meeting will help acquaint the in
coming biology students with the
department ana faculty and the
Bioloby Club The Biology Club
will outline it's plans for the up
coming year and membership
registration will take place
SPORTS EDITOR
WANTED
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is looking
for an Editor for the Intramural
Newspaper. TENNIS SHOE TID
BITS Experience in writing,
layout ana aesign requirea Con
tac' Nance Mize, 204 Memorial
Gym. call 757 6387
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are neeaea from
those interested in becoming Per
sonal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students We are par
Ticularly interested in anyone who
ahs a background of assisting m
dividuals whith their activities ot
daily hvmg For tuther details,
contact Office of Handicapped
Student Services. 212 Wichard
Buildmq. 757 6799
CLASSIFIED ADS j
You may use the form at right or j
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end ot line if word j
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac j
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad
All ads must be prepaid. Inclose
75C per line or fraclion of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to THE EAST CAROLINIAN I
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
Name
Address
CityState
No. lines
.z.p.
Phone.
at 75� per line 5.
, No. insertions.
enclosed
���11 �� i
i�.�i.
��'
J
111,� - 4i i
�1'�h�1�
T4- - �:��
1- -
��'� -L
1i� �,i i . i
Search Committee Chosen
B RONNIE RICE
sijtt W nlrr
An eleven member
search committee has
been ch ose n bv
Chancellor John
M.Howell to till the
post of vice chancellor
for institutional ad-
vancemnt and plann-
ing.
I he job has been va
cant sinee the resigna-
tion ot Donald 1
1 emish last Januar.
The positon has been
filled on an acting basis
b Director ot
Resource Develop-
ment, 1 Douglas
Moore.
According to Di.
Mai Ann Rose, assis-
tant to the chancellor,
members ot the com-
mittee aie as follows:
Caroline Avers (facult
chair). James 1 Smith
(faculty vice-chair),
Stella Daughert
( faculty seci etan .
William shires (news
bureau). Robert Franke
(sponsored programs),
Malcolm Simpson
(regional develop-
ment i. Dm 1 eggeti
(alumni relations)
ngelo A. Volpe (dean.
arts arid sciences). C.G.
Moore (vice-chancelloi
for business affairs),
J o n T i n g e 1 s t a d
(medicine), and .lames
bach applicant will
b e rev i e w e d b
members ot the com-
mittee to assess ilie in-
dividual's qualifica-
tions.
I he office ot ice-
chancellor for institu- Rose said the com-
tional advancement mittee is looking for
and planning includes applicants with ex-
the oversight of alumni perience and
affairs and the handl- knowledge of the
ing of resource positon.
development.
Pet Village
511 S. Evans ST. Phone 756-9222
Across from Taft Furniture
Check our large selection
of tropical fish
and fish supplys.
We also have many small animals
to choose from.
We carry a large selection
of birds and all
pet supplys.
Largest selection
of reptiles in area.
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
"If you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find and
snare an apartment for Fall, con
tact the Off Campus Housing Of
fice. 211 Whicnard Building
757 6881. Defore June 14 Orienta
tion will begm at tnat time ana
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
listing "
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
iom m with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday m the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every A'eOnsday at the
Catholic Newman Center Dinner
and good friendship follows Mass
every Weonsday so come out and
brig a friend
RECREATION
RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
ment rental service has been pro
vided through 'he Depar'en' of
nframural Recreational Ser
. s items available for rent in
elude Backpacks tents canoes,
ana tandem bicrcle The outdoor
recreation center is located in the
eauipment room 115 Memorial
Gym Hours of operation are
2 00 5 00 p m Monday through
Friday Information is available
on State and Federal Cam
pgrounds backpacking Trails.
Day hming Tra is and Canoeing
Rivers
OFFICIALS NEEDED
A new school year .s beginmg
and as usual many students are
looking for ways to earn extra
money The Department of
Intramural Recreational Services
has iobs available for approx
imatei 35 40 students The work
hours range from 3 45 p m to
11 00 p m Mondays through.
Thursday and occasionally on
weekends No experience is
necessary Training clmics are
required and the first clinic is on
Thursday. September 2. in
Memorial Gym Room 102 at 6 00
p m Please bring with you Social
Security cards ana Class
Schedules
EQUIPMENT
CHECK OUT
Tne Department of intramural
Recreation Services provides an
equipment check out service for
students. Faculty and Staff If you
have playful notions but lack the
right equipment stop by 'he equip
ment check ou' room located In
115 Memorial Gym Equipment's
available tor Basketball. Football.
Fnsbee. Horseshoes, soccer.
Volleyball. Softball. Racquerbali.
Tenms and Badminton to mention
a few items This is a free service
(excluding late fees) so fake ad
vantage of a good opportunity
SUPERVISOR WANTED
The Department of I M REC Ser
vices has a position open for a per
son with xnowiedge ana s�
various aspec's of ou'ooor recrea
tion including camping backpa'�
mg. canoeing and b kg Please
contact Pa' Cox a' 757 6387
AEROBIC FITNESS
The ECU Depare"
REC Serv.ces w.H be offer ng
classes in aerobic ttness aga n
this fan The casses are oes:gi-ea
to improve cardiovascular t 'ness,
flexibility and muscie 'one More
information regarding specific
times, dates ana locator- se
forthcoming
MENSGLEE CLUB
ECU w
��
,ng r �-� � -
�? IV
Glee Club will be p
Bee" . � � a '
Ore- - �� � j
make its a
� rt ' ' - 5 ��� �

pear mn c es ' � � ' ' �
Care na ' � �
M W F at 12 Ot
s open to a
- formal
�-a.e a see i- �
� v
757 68
The Kast Carolinian
Sc.ir'i' hectunpuscommun .
since v.1'
Pubiisnpo every Tuesday and
Thursday dur.ng 'he academic
,ear and every Wednesday dur
;pg 'he summer
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operated and published for anc
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Univers'
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The East Carolinian offices
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Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Buildmg ECU Gree"
viile NC 27834
Telephone 757 6364, 6367 630
ITALIAN NITE
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STUDENT UNION
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'� kiiGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
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AT FURTHER EXPENSE
5 OC Pitqnancy Test. Birtt.
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Counseling For further inloi
manon call 832 0535 (Toll Free
Number 800 221 2568 i between o
A M and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Rale.gh N C
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier h the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are available day and
niaht to support and understand you. Com-
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that's what the Fleming Center is all about.
Insurance accepted tree prejinano ieslinK
ll inclusive fees Saluitfal appointments
I p la IK weeks erj earlv pregamc) tests
C all 781-5550 da or night.
1 he Fleming (enter makes the difference.
RESEARCH
PAPERS
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Send $1 00 (refundable) for your up-to-date.
340 page, mail order catalog
We also provide research all fields
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24.182
I
V! I
OPS
HER
fur
us . . .
Ralph
shirts.
Irting with
appeal
libie 100�o
nesh In s
led colors,
re fo want
ke o each
Eller Sentenced
l ontinued From
Page 1
trying to figure out
whether this is where a
coflicl actually exists
But tiler also made it
clear that he would
stick to his original
decision not to register
despite the judge's
threat of a prison
sentence To do so
would make a farce out
oi this. I think I made
that clear to the judge
in the court room.
Right now that's the
wa 1 feel Then he
added "I'm always
open to thinking about
it
lor Eller, the deci-
sion was not an easy
one. Even his parents
disagreed with his deci-
sion not to register.
Eller could have chosen
to register and he pro-
bably would have easily
been able to obtain
conscientious objector
status because of his
religious faith.
"Personaly 1 would
have no difficulty in
registering said Ver-
nard Eller, the resister's
� father, who nimself
was a CO during World
War 11.
"1 do have great
respect for his courage
in following his own
convictions. We fully
support Enten. even
though it's not what we
would do he added.
Despite this, his son felt
he couldn't comply
with even the first step
in a process that he
considered personally
immoral.
Eller, who kept in
constant communica-
tion with Selective Ser-
vice officials to let them
know of his
whereabouts, was
always cordial and
cooperative with them
and the prosecuters.
"I'm trying to respect
what they're doing. I
don't want to cause
them problems he
said.
Eller is corrently a
physics major at
Bridgewater College in
Virginia. He's orginal-
ly from California and
brandishes a straight A
average.
Students Protest Against Draft
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SI�H Writer
More than a dozen
Greenville residents, in-
cluding six East
Carolina students and
an English professor,
took part in a one-hour
demonstration outside
the United States Post
Office on 10th Street
last Tuesday afternoon.
The group, all
members of the Green-
ville Peace Committee,
gathered to offer their
support in absentia of
Enten Ellen (see related
story on page 1) the
Virginia College stu-
dent who was convicted
earlier in the day for
refusing to register for
the draft.
Participants in the
peaceful protest also
cited various other
reasons for their
general opposition to
registration, which
most felt would in-
variably lead to a draft
and then war.
"Draft, war, the.
issue are related, ob-
viously said Diane
Maisel, an East
Carolina senior in art.
ECU social work ma-
jor Micky Skidmore
felt that the mandatory
registration law was a
violation of a person's
"religious rights" and
that "selective prosecu-
tion" was a threat to
freedom and instills
fear in many young
Americans.
The United States
Justice Department, at
the urging of the
Reagan Adminstration,
has chosen 160 men for
indictment, out of the
estimated 700,000 to
one-million who have
not complied thus far.
Reaction to the
demonstration was
described as mixed.
One irate person
said, "You're all
cowards and yellows
bellies while others
cheerfully signed a peti-
tion to President
Reagan asking that he
keep his campaign pro-
mise to abolish peace
time registration.
The group held signs
stating "Don't jail
Enten, and Power to
the Peaceful They
also distributed two
leaflets, One titled, "A
Bad Law. Draft
Registration" gave
various reasons why
registration was not
needed. The other gave
a brief summary of
Eller's situation and
compared him with
other people who have
broken laws or refused
to cooperate for
reasons of conscience,
such as Rosa Parks,
Lech Walesa, Henry
Thoreau and Jesus
Christ.
Asked why so few
students took part in
public demonstrations
for peace, Skidmore
responded, "It's an
issue that is threaten-
ing. It's not easy to
think about. It's much
easier to deny it. Avoid
it. Think of other
things
Both Skidmore and
Maisel hoped that more
students would become
politically active on the
peace issue.
Skidmore said that
there was an air of
apathy spilling over
from the 70's and that
students were more
"interested in their own
little worlds � Greek
week, happy hour, or
whatever
Reserve Cops
CoverCampus
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FIRST STATE CLUB!
Bn GREG R1DEOUT
V�i'in' S, �. I iiluf
"Hey, that cop's in
rm history class
Well, you ma be
right. The policeman
you see could be a
reserve officer. The
program was started in
September of 1980 by
security depart-
nt, and employs
- udents to do certain
aspects o 1 campus
ice work.
1 here are at present
14 student officers. A
. strength of 20 is ex-
pected in the fall. The
aram started with
en members.
"he icers, w ho are
yed through selt-
help or work-study,
m a number o
d n es Among them
ssuing traffic cita-
ons, handling parking
u d securit at atheletic
� and concerts,
d helping w ith
trveillance at problem
:nn e areas on campus.
The program to date
has worked well. Ac-
cording to It. Detective
Gene McAbee, the
ipervisor of the pro-
im, the success is
mainly because of the
lality of the students
olved.
McAbee said that the
� yeai the reserve of-
ers were employed
e saved the universi-
�. over $800 in private
security fees.
McAbee said most of
the students involved
plan to enter the law
enforcement field.
Ihev represent a
number of majors;
biology, business, art
and social work.
McAbee explained
thai most o the train-
ing is done on the job.
1 he are taught how to
use radio codes and
how to properly write
citations.
The reserves are not
allowed to carry guns
bat can defend
themselves when
necessary. They are
responsible to McAbee
or the squad super-
visor, and all incidents
must reported to them
before any action is
taken.
The students are
allowed to work up to
ten hours each week,
but often work more on
their own.
McAbee's impres-
sion is that they do
TTiOa volunteer than
paid work. He said they
often use their own cars
when on patrol.
bach student reser-
vist must have a 2.5
grade point average
and no criminal record
other than minor traf-
fic violations. He also
expained they must not
have a record of trou-
ble with the university.
McAbee said the pro-
gram has never been
advertised, but has at-
tracted quality people.
Two officers have been
awarded commenda-
tions for assisting heart
attack victims. Five of
the mx reservists who
graduated last year now
have jobs in law en-
forcement.
McAbee believes that
everbody at the security
department is suppor-
tive of the program.
N.C. State has a pro-
gram similar to ECU's
called student patrol.
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UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
211 JARVISST.
2 BLOCKS FROM ECU
ADJACENT TO OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
O 'Neill Released
Bv JAY STONE
Patrick O'Neill was
recently released from
the Federal Prison at
Eglin Air Force Base
where he was serving
the remainder of a
three-month prison
sentence.
He went to jail
because he was charged
with blocking traffic at
Fort Bragg. An action
he took protest the fact
that the United States
government was train-
ing El Salvadoran
troops there.
"1 got arrested at
Fort Bragg protesting a
U.S. policy that I con-
sider immoral
This is how O'Neill
sums up his convictions
about taking a stand in
violation of the law. He
goes on to add that he
feels U.S. military aid
and training of El
Salvadoran troops has
been responsible for
37,000 deaths in El
Salvador since 1979.
O'Neill also asserts
that American policy in
El Salvador is actually
encouraging com-
munism because it
takes the side of a
government which has
no desire to deal fun-
damentally with the
problems faced by the
poor.
I support civil
disobedience because
all else has failed ex-
plained O'Neill. "It's
important to illustrate
that the status quo is
not acceptable. I don't
have to belive that it's
effective for me to go
sit down in the road
and block traffic at
Fort Bragg. I do that
because I believe it's
right
O'Neill believes that
this viewpoint is ap-
plicable, not only to
United States foreign
policy in El Salvador,
but to the nuclear arms
race as well.
O'Neill concluded,
"the justification for
an insane arms race and
the justification for a
crippling defense
budget is the preserva-
tion of freedom. But,
no one is free in a
nuclear age. We are all
hostages. Therefore,
it's important for peo-
ple of conscience to sit
in the road, to blockade
the bombmakers, and
to say preparation for
nuclear annihilation is
not business as usual
I
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'

(Eire iEaflt (Uarulinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mu ler, smmi �����'
Mike Hughes, ������
WAVERI Y MfRRITT, Dvcte MwM� ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Ednor
Robert Ricks. ju�fU ���� Ernest Conner, �. mm
Phil LIP MANESS. cm ifjujjrr STEVE BACHNER. BiikiI iimii Ctftor
Chris Lichok, c�n��iMMw Mike Davis, rwm��wp
August 24. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Welcome
i
Keeping You Informed
in the past it has been typical, if
not downright customary, for The
East Carolinian to welcome the stu-
dent body back to Greenville in the
first issue of the fall. Unfortunately,
yet realistically, a vast majority of
the student body will never even see
this newspaper � not just today,
but all semester.
Nevertheless, to those select
students who faithfully read The
East Carolinian through thick and
thin, we bid a hardy "welcome
Furthermore, we thank you for
your support � past, present and
future � and we pledge once again
to do the best job possible of bring-
ing you concise, accurate and in-
teresting news of campus-related
events.
Despite the common misconcep-
tion about The East Carolinian's
not being a totally serious news
medium, I can state categorically
that our entire staff is dedicated to
and serious about their commit-
ment.
Anyone familiar with last year's
hierarchal breakdown will notice
that the newspaper has experienced
a major turnover from last year's
staff. Therefore, changes will be ap-
parent throughout the paper itself.
However, we do intend to improve
on the paper as a whole, to
familiarize students with as much of
"what's going on" as possible.
And there is certainly a lot going
on � sporting events, SGA actions,
student union activities, just to
name a few. We are working here
because you have the right to know.
If the newspaper helps any of you
make a more informed decision
regarding some topic of concern,
then we have done our job.
But our job doesn't stop there.
We have an obligation to entertain
as well as inform, an obligation,
again, which we take seriously.
We hope you will continue to
read your student newspaper, and in
return, we hope you find the
1982-83 East Carolinian a better
paper than ever before � more in-
formative, more provocative, more
interesting.
If, at any time during the course
of the year, you have some question
about our policy or practice here,
please feel free to call, write or come
by our office.
And, once again, welcome back
to school.
j-Campus Forum
Guidelines For Forum Use
From the editor:
Are you one of those students who
likes to complain about the status quo
but who doesn't like to "get involved
Perhaps you'd like to say something,
but, rhen again, who'd listen?
The Campus Forum, otherwise
known as letters to the editor, provides
for a virtual marketplace for your ideas,
helping students voice their opinions on
the vital issues of concern on campus.
Space is provided for all letters, provid-
ed the following guillines are observed:
� All letters must be typed or neatly
handwritten and double-spaced on clean
white paper;
� Letters mut not exceed two pages;
� Letters must focus on a pertinent
issue of concern � no personal attacks
will be permitted;
� All letters must be signed by the
author;
� Author's address, phone number,
major and class ranking must be includ-
ed so that letters may be verified;
� Students are limited to one letter
every three weeks;
� All letters are subject to editing for
style, grammar, libel and clarity, and
� Deadline for turning in letters is
noon on Mondays for the Tuesday issue
and noon Wednesday for Thursday's
paper.
Remember, The East Carolinian's
Campus Forum is the best campuswide
vehicle for dispensing your own
thoughts on the issues that affect
students. The newspaper is here to serve
yuu, so don't neglect the opportunity to
voice an opinion.
Please adhere to the above guidelines
for the Campus Forum and bring your
letters to our office on the second floor
of the Old South Building across from
Joyner Library. Your cooperation and
input are greatly appreciated.
So, don't just sit back and complain;
take action. Granted, a letter won't
move mountains. But, then again, it just
might be the first step towards getting
something done.
OKI
College Press Service
3
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College Press Service
AiMr&
iMttof)
Coping With Special Difficulties
A Tip For Transfers
There's no denying the fact that
our administration makes a
meritorious effort at orienting all
the university's new students each
year. Obviously, it is a formidable
task. But despite their painstaking
weekend sessions and outgoing let-
ters by the ton, some students arrive
on campus with very littie
understanding of the ECU
"routine
It's not so difficult for freshmen,
who have never really been exposed
to university life. Their adjustment
� although it may be traumatic �
is, nonetheless, a part of the yearly
college calendar.
For the transfer student,
however, the transition is somewhat
different. Having come from a com-
munity college two years ago, I am
aware of the problems transfer
students can experience upon arrival
in Greenville.
1 suppose the first thing a person
notices about ECU is the perpetual
line. You have to wait to register for
classes. Then you wait to pay your
tuition and fees. And if you want to
drop or add a class, there's another
short line to conquer. But that's not
all; you also stand in line to bus-
books, return books, cash checks,
approve checks, buy lunch, buy din-
ner, etc etc.
Unfortunately, there isn't a whole
lot we can do about lines aside from
just waiting them out. One word of
advice, however: before you spend
half the day waiting in a line for
some reason or another, be sure you
completely understand the purpose
of that line. This, of course, may
sound like a ridiculous hint, but
nothing is more frustrating than get-
ting to the front of a mile-long line
only to find out that you've
neglected to have something signed,
certified, stamped, okayed, initial-
ed, checked, verified, passed, etc.
So, if you don't know, ask.
Unless you're transferring as a
freshman or sophomore, you'll
want to get a faculty adviser in your
department as soon as possible.
Otherwise, you'll be assigned a
general college adviser. Naturally,
these faculty members are more
than competent to help you with
your scheduling problems. But each
general college adviser has scores of
advisees, with various majors and
educational needs. An adviser in
your prospective program is a
tremendous asset.
But apart from getting
scholastically situated, the relative
success or failure of your college
transfer depends upon your own
personal adaptation. Decisions
regarding extracurricular activities
and the like are up to you.
However, when deciding whether or
not to involve yourself in a certain
activity, take into consideration any
and all necessary restrictions �
economic, temporal or otherwise.
Spreading yourself out too thin in
the first few weeks of school is a
sure-fire way to jeopardize your
academic standing for the rest of the
semester.
And, above all, don't be overly
concerned with fitting in. In a
relatively large (by N.C. standards)
school like this one, no one knows
who's old and who's new anvway.
The President Frequently Stumbles,
But His Image Has Yet To Fall
By MIKE HUGHES
Is Ronald Reagan getting a bit senile? A
lot of Washington big wigs � even a large
number of the president's own people �
might just think so.
Since his inauguration, Reagan has been
the frequent victim of a dreadful disease,
the misstatement. Time and time again, the
president has fumbled and bungled facts
FIRST OF ALL,
IREODNVteHOOLD
GET THESE HERE FOOD
STAMPS DlSTWBUTtD
T&mERSTOFFlCES
" � i- ft �
and occurrences, much to the apparent
chagrin of his White House staff.
Most everyone will remember the time in
1980, during the New Hampshire cam-
paign, when Reagan was quoted as telling
an ethnic joke. Reminded of the inherent
damage such humor could pose to his run
for the presidency, Reagan claimed that he
had indeed told the joke but that he intend-
ed the remark be used as "an example" of
what he doesn't like.
Pretty fast thinking, huh? Oh yes, most
would agree Mr. Reagan has a wonderful
way with words.
Then, of course, there was the time at a
White House press conference when the
president proudly boasted of his firm
belief in the practice of tithing (the dona-
tion of one-tenth to charity). He reminded
the press corps that a majority of his
unselfish donations were, in fact, not tax
deductible.
Honorable, indeed. That is, it was
honorable until the next day when White
House press secretary Larry Speakes had
the unhappy task of explaining to reporters
that the president's charitable donations
don't even come near 10 percent of his in-
come.
The examples go on and on. A slip-up
here, a foot in the mouth there. But the
funny thing is, Reagan seems to emerge
from these incriminating statments prac-
tically unscarred.
Even members of the Reagan ad-
ministration admit that if Ford or Carter
were to have made the same blunders, the
result would have been impending disaster.
They readily admit that their job as ex-
plainers and expost-facto interpreters is
quite difficult. One White House aide, ob-
viously frustrated by the amount of ex-
planation his job entails, once admitted to
a group of inquisitive reporters, "I'm not
sure 1 can make any more sense of it than
you can
Aw. don't you feel sorry for the poor
man?
Most observers agree that Reagan's fre-
quent mistakes do not represent a
deliberate intention on his part to mislead
the public. One official who worked close-
ly with Reagan for a number of years said
that the president is merely "uneducable
that he forms opinions or beliefs before he
is completely informed on a certain subject
and that he shrugs off any contrary infor-
mation.
White House administration members
state emphatically that Reagan is most
popular when he discusses philosophical
issues, rather than those of immediate, fac-
tual concern. It is therefore somewhat
ironic that those same administration
members claim that he is particularly sen-
sitive about accuracy. He takes pride in
precision, his aides say.
They admit he tells frequent
misstatements, but they maintain that,
unlike Nixon, Reagan's foul-ups are
unintentional. "With Reagan an aide
says, "the stories are more like parables. If
you call him on it, he'll probably say.
'Yeah, you're right "
However, it would be difficult, if not
impossible, to condemn Reagan on his un-
fortunate past statements. As yet, none has
really been extremely deviant. And of
course, his mistakes could be just that �
simple, unintended mistakes. After all, he
is 71 years old.
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THE EAST CAROL 1N1AN
Opinion
AUGUST 24, 1982
Page 5
ECU Sports
Victim Of 'Fair-Weather Fans'
RS�, Tfe MARXISTS WN� k SOUKKK TO ALL THIS 6L
With the beginning of another
schoolyear comes another year in
ECU intercollegiate sports. And
with the beginning of each new
sports calendar come the hopes of
victory, the realities of defeat and
the hard-fought battles that "make
it all worthwhile
To those of us armchair quarter-
backs and self-proclaimed coaches
who sit back and criticize every
misfortune of our sports teams, the
season unquestionably holds in
store many, many ups and downs,
sometimes more of one than the
other. But undoubtedly, we will
have all the answers � afterwards.
The same holds true every year.
We'll all jump on the bandwagon of
a winner, but just let that team lose
a game or two, and how quickly we
are to condemn the entire program.
Granted, we all like to see the
Pirates win � and there's nothing
wrong with that � but as fans, we
have to learn to take the good with
the bad. Just as surely as there will
be victories, there will be defeats.
Nonetheless, our athletes � male
and female � have earned our
respect. They've worked hard for it,
and they deserve more than the sup-
port of fair-weather fans.
Probably one of the worst spec-
tacles of the lack of support occurs
fairly regularly at the home football
games. When the Pirates are winn-
ing, the play-by-play announcer can
barely be heard over the cheers. But
just let the Bucs get a touchdown
behind, and the only noise to be
heard is the sound of shuffling,
disgruntled feet leaving the stadium.
It is unfortunate that we students
become so preoccupied with winn-
ing that we fail to appreciate the
fine effort put forth by ECU
athletes. And for those of us who
find it so easy to criticize, it might
be beneficial to take in a practice or
two.
So, get out and cheer on the
Pirates come rain or shine. Don't be
a fair-weather fan.
Behold The Lowly Frosh
B MIKE HUGHES
Ah August in Greenville � when the
ragweed is in full bloom. When the warm
summer air is filled with the putrid scent of
perspiration. A time of "such sweet sor-
row A time when 13,000 caravans
journey from the four corners of the earth
� okay, maybe not the earth, but at least
the tour corners of the state � bringing
possessions great and small (not to men-
tion unnecessary) to houses, apartments,
dorm rooms and various rat holes around
the thriving metropolis. Most have been
here before, but for some, this week marks
the first real time away from home.
� � �
Ah. behold the lowly freshman. See how
he clutches the new course catalogue. Why
does he cling to it so? Does he really find it
interesting reading? Is he struggling to
choose a major? It he afraid his book will
run away? Does he still believe it has
valuable pizza coupons inside? No one
really knows.
Observe the humble newcomer. He
thinks independence is LUC greatest. At
last, he's realty on his own. But he can't
wait for his allowance to arrive so he can
pay for all those calls to mom and dad.
Oh, behold the poor freshman. He has
so much to learn: how to cook his supper
without burning the salad, how to dry his
laundry when someone has doused the
pilot light in the dryer, how to wrestle stub-
born roaches off his bed at night And
the list goes on and on.
See the "suave" freshman with his new-
mustache. See the spitfy new sports car he
got for his high school graduation. See him
show off.
Uh oh, see the sat. e freshman. Boy is he
mad. See the steam come out o his ears.
He just found out where he gets to park his
spiffy new sports car that he got for his
high school graduation.
Behold the naive-yet-chipper freshman.
He went to class 20 minutes early to make
a good impression on the teacher. The
teacher was 15 minutes late.
Behold the angry freshman. Win is he
so angrv? Does he have to go through
drop add? Did the alligator fall off his ex-
pensive underwear? Did a roach crawl into
his box of raisins and die? Oh no! Dread of
dreads! Someone has stolen his beloved
course catalogue.
New SGA President
Charges Not Totally Cleared
Threat Of Aggression 'Eradicated'
Peace In The Middle
By MIKE HI GHES
Contrary to what Americans have been led to believe all
along Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin admitted recently
�hat his country's invasion of Lebanon was not totally
necessar In the same statement, Begin ranted on and on about
the tremendous job Israeli troops have done in the Middle East
fighting, killing 3,000 Palestinian guerillas and taking some
9,000 prisoners. . .
He continued to sav that peace in the region is now a reality,
since his nation's forces have "eradicated" the threat of aggres-
sion in the Arab states.
After his country's demonstration of its "military superiori-
ty" in the Middle East, the chief Israeli official feels confident
that no other nation in the region poses a threat to the vast peace
he has fought so hard for.
The double-standard policy Begin seems to adhere to is simply
incredible. Sure, the groups like the PLO need to be done away
with; they pose a serious threat to lasting peace in the Middle
East'and everywhere. But for a man so overly concerned with in-
fluencing peace in his corner of the earth. Begin certainly has
killed a lot of innocent people.
Perhaps he epitomizes what the world leader is destined to
become in the near future � a trigger-happy, morally-deranged
paranoid.
The recent war in Lebanon � which he preferred called a
"show" of military strength � cost countless lives � soldiers,
women and children. But it seems that in Begin's mind a few
thousand lives is a small price to pay for a fabulous military
display.
Fortunately, now his beloved country can rest in peace,
because, as he says, "There is no other country around us that is
capable of attacking us Now if that's not security, then I don't
know what security is.
A new fall semester has arrived, and
since the beginning of the first summer ses-
sion we have had a new executive branch
of the SGA.
Unfortunately for East Carolina and its
president, Eric Henderson, the chief ex-
ecutive officer was elected admid an array
of charges of campaign impropriety.
Some of these charges were serious and
involved allegedly falsifying records to
hide overspending violations on the part of
Henderson. Others simply involved things
that an experienced school politician, such
as Henderson, should have known better
� charges which included illegal cam-
paigning near polling places and illegal
placement of campaign posters.
The entire race for presidential office
here at ECU was smeared with controver-
sy. And this controversy could not help but
reflect on the entire SGA and the school.
Though. Henderson was not the only
one to run for the office of president and
was probably not the only one in the cam-
paign to run slightly afoul of the SGA-
established rules for conducting a cam-
paign, he was the person who won the run-
off election and was judged by the honor
committee and chancellor as eligible for
the office of president.
This in turn calls on Henderson to live
down the charges he incurred in his cam-
paign and live up to the position bestowed
upon him by the students and adminstra-
tion of ECU.
Henderson can best do this by keeping
everything above board. He owes it to the
students of ECU to address the issue of the
charges raised about the way he conducted
his campaign, including the affidavit-
backed allegation that he overshot his cam-
paign spending limit and falsified records
to conceal the fact.
To an East Carolinian reporter, Hender-
son claimed that further discussion of the
matter would only hurt the school and
would not specifically answer questions
dealing with the subject. This is reminis-
cent of Richard Nixon saying that con-
tinued focusing on Watergate would hurt
the country and that Congress shouldn't
impeach him because his foreign policy
was so important to the country. It does
not hold water.
Henderson also owes it to the students to
be as open as possible about the actions of
the student government legislative and ex-
ecutive branches. In the past, a lot of ex-
ecutive and legislative actions were con-
ducted without the majority of students
knowning what was going on.
Members of the SGA sometimes seemed
more intent on playing "petty politics"
than on serving the students they were
elected to serve. This is not true of all SGA
members. Most of them are highly
honorable and do serve in the interest of
the students.
Henderson, however, is in an excellent
position to encourage or reduce the
amount of petty politics engaged in by the
entire SGA. He should discard all other
considerations and do everything in his
power to best serve the student body of
ECU.
By doing this, Henderson would go a
long way toward increasing his prestige
with the student body and could leave a
legacy for other student body presidents to
follow.
In all fairness. Henderson has expressed
an intent on keeping the students informed
of what the SGA is doing through the
media and other channels. He has even
taken some action toward this goal.
However, the intent must always be more
the expressed, and the action must be
tangible and continuous throughout his
tenure.
Coping With The Threat
Of Ail-Out 'Nucular' War
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau

u
ANPIME FEEL WE'VE BEEN
MORE THAN FLEXIBLE PURNG
THE- HBGOTfflONS. M CROP-
PING OF OUR PEMANPFOR
A LIST OF RID. BVACUEES
IS A GOOD'EXAMPLE�
By MIKE HIGHES
You know, I don't think there's
anything that bugs me worse than nuclear
weapons.
There was a time, about 30 or so years
ago, when bomb shelters were popping up
iust about everywhere in America. People
were petrified about the impending
"nuclear age which had begun a few
vears before.
And still today, concern over the direct
and indirect effects of nuclear advances in
science is widespread. Anti-nuclear
movements are today as popular as the
shelters of the 1950s.
This degree of common awareness is a
definite asset nowadays, especially since
nuclear weapons and power plants have
become a virtual part of everyday life.
That's not what bugs me.
What bugs me is when a supposed
nuclear weapons expert � an Air Force
Lieutenant General - gets on TV and
starts talking about "nucular weapons
Now that really makes a person stop and
I mean, isn't it just a bit frightening that
this guy is probably in charge of a lot of
nuclear fire power, and yet, he can't even
pronounce the word?
Put it this way; how would you feel it
you walked into an English class, and the
professor started lecturing on "William
Sharkspeare?" Well, around here, no one
would really know the difference anyway.
Ignore the analogy.
But seriously isn't it eye-opening when
the topic of nuclear weapons � the
ultimate killing instruments of our age �
have become such a routine part of our
lives that they can be treated in this non-
chalant manner?
Not only does this reflect a lazy society
but, in my opinion, a sick one.
I mean, here this guy is bragging about
the warhead capabilities of the United
States. On and on he rants about the coun-
try's "nucular" weapons arsenal, which,
he claims, must be increased to keep up
with the bloodthirsty Russians. God forbid
we should get behind the Russians in the
nucular arms race.
And do you know what else is
disgusting? Unconfirmed rumors have it
that newer Americanized English dic-
tionaries will include "nucular" as an op-
tional spelling and pronunciation to
nuclear.
Oh well, that fits in with the American
way of doing things anyway, doesn't it? A
handful of mental pygmies can't do
something the correct way, so they just
change the rules. Makes sense to me.
3
BUTUHY
pip you
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I
THE EAST CAROL 1NJAN
AUGUST 24, 1982
Greenville Banks Geared Towards Students
By MIKE DAVIS
Production Mtnatef
One of the more important things that an in-
coming student can do while in Greenville, waiting
to stand in a drop-add line, is to shop around and
open up either a saving or checking account.
A bank account is an important item to have
and almost anyone can open one up. However, it
should be noted that it is not a person's right to
have a banking account. Rather, it is a privilege
and should not be taken lightly. Opening and
maintaining a bank account requires responsibili-
ty-
Greenville has numerous banking institutions
with a variety of regular banking services offered.
Many of these banks are just branches of entire
state-wide network of banks. Other are more local
with several Greenvillle area locations under the
same name.
Bank of North Carolina: The Bank of North
Carolina has two locations in Greenville � at the
corner of Forth and Cotanche streets and at 2820
E. Tenth Street.
Gloria Hathaway, the customer service
representive for the Bank of North Carolina, says
the bank is a regular full service banking institu-
tion which offers regular savings accounts that
earn the maximum interest allowed by law.
The bank offers two types of checking accounts
tor East Carolina students to choose from. One is
a regular checking account which is charged two-
dollar per month for maintainance and $.20 per
check written. The other is a banking plan thai
allow free checking if a savings account with a
balance of $300 is maintained. However, if the
sauries" balance falls below $300 the two-dollar
monthly tee and 20 cents per check fee will levied.
The Bank of North Carolina also has the Now
Account, an interest bearing checking account.
This account requires a minimum balance of $500
and earns 5.25 percent interest, compounded dai-
lv.
Hathaway says that it is easier for ECU student
to have an account in Greenville. She also sug-
gested that students, who open up accounts from
out of state, bring a cashier's check to open up
their accounts faster. It usually takes about 10
working days for an out of state check to clear.
Another point that Hathaway made was that
students should try to keep up with their check
book balance at all times. It can be frustrating for
a bad check to be returned according to
Hathaway. Your account is also charged $12 to
cover the cost of handling a check that shows in-
sufficient funds.
There are about 48 other Bank of North
Carolina branches in the state.
Branch Banking and Trust Company: BB T is a
lull service bank which has three locations in the
Greenville area � Green St Arlington Blvd. and
at Medical Village. BB T is a bank that is oriented
toward the ECL' student. They offer free checking
to full-time ECU students. They also have the
Now Account which earns 5.25 percent interest on
a minimum balance of $500.
To start a checking account, students only need
to open with SI00. They can also apply for the Til-
ly the Teller Card which is free to BB T customers.
BB T is the oldest banking institution in the
state.
The bank has approximately 120 locations in
about 64 North Carolina cities.
First State Bank: First State Bank has four loca-
tions in the area � Greenville branch, downtown
branch. Northwest branch and a Winterville
branch.
Marty Jones says of the First State Bank says
the bank has a variety of checking plans for the
ECU student to choose from. The first checking
plan is called the Club. Club checking requires no
minimum balance and is charged $4.75 per month.
This includes a $10,000 accidental death insurance
policy, traveler's checks, travel discount coupons
and discount movies tickets to three area movie
theatres.
Regular checking can be obtained with an open-
ing of $100 minimum. The Now Account requires
that the student open a checking account with a
$500 minimum balance. It also earns 5.25 percent.
However, if the balance falls below $500 a two-
dollar monthly fee and a 15 cent fee per check will
be charged.
First State also offers a checking account which
is a combination of the Club and Now accounts.
Here a $800 minimum balance is required and in-
terest in earned of the funds that are not used.
Jones said that students should reconcile their
banking statement every time they receive one in
the mail. First State charges seven-dollars for each
check that is returned for insufficent funds.
First States has 24 hour banking machine
located in North and South Carolina under the
name of BankAround.
North Carolina National Bank: NCNB has
several location in Greenville � East End Branch,
Greenville Blvd West End Shopping Center and
201 W. First Street.
NCNB is another full-service banking institu-
tion which offers a variety of services for ECU
students. They offer regular savings and checking
accounts. If a customer maintains a savings ac-
count with a balance of $300 free checking is pro-
vided.
Students are also eligible to apply for Visa
Cards. Students who qualify are given an open
line of credit that is determined by Visa.
Martha Brinson of NCNB suggests that
students open up with Bonus Checking. Here,
with a minimum balance of $500 in regular savings
or checking, the customer gets free checking and
earns 5.25 percent interest.
There are approximately 180 branches in 65
North Carolina cities and towns. NCNB also has a
24 hour banking machine.
Peoples Bank and Trust Company: Peoples is
located at Carolina East Mall and offers students
various services from which to choose from. Their
regular checking requires no minimum balance
and is charged three-dollars per month plus 20
cents per check.
For a five-dollars charge each month, Peoples
offers the Bank Club. With this account, a
customer receives free checks, discount movies
tickets, life insurance, discount coupons and
more.
Peoples also offers free checking with either a
minimum $300 balance in checking of savings.
They offer the Now Account, which requires a
$500 balance and earns 5.25 percent interest.
Peoples is located in the central and eastern part
of North Carolina.
Planters National Bank: Planters has offices in
Greenville at the following locations � on the cor-
ner of Washington and Third streets, Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Plaza.
Planters is also a full-service bank. Their check-
ing plans include regular checking where the
customer is charged one-dollar per month and
$.20 for each check.
To get free checking a balance of $300 must be
maintained in savings. Planters also provides
regular savings which earns 5.25 percent interest,
but if the savings balance falls below $50 the ac-
count is charged one-dollar per month.
Planters also offers a service to help cover those
unexpected checks marked "insufficent funds
This plan would automatically, when needed,
deposit $100 into an account that was overdrawn.
This deposit would be paid back by the customer
at an annual interest rate of 18 percent This $100
would be deposited even if the overdraft was five-
dollars.
Returned checks not covered by the service are
not charged anything for the first one, but after
that, the account will be charged $11 for each
returned check.
Wachovia Bank and Trust Company:
Wachovia's banks in Greenville are located at the
corner of Forth and Washington streets, N. Green
St Pitt Plaza, 10th St. and the Medical Center.
Again, Wachovia is a full-service bank and of-
fers regular savings and checking accounts. To get
free checking a $300 balance must be maintained
in savings or a $400 balance must be kept in check-
ing.
If the balance in either account tails below the
limit, then the checking account is charged two-
dollars per month and 15 cents per check.
With a minimum balance of $500 Wachovia of-
fers an interest bearing checking account, which
earns an interest rate of 5.25 percent.
On campus the ECU Student Bank is located on
the first floor of Mendenhall Student Center. The
student bank cashes checks for students upon
presentation of a valid ECU ID. card, or driver
license.
The policy of the student bank and changed
some in the recent months. The bank now charges
a $10 fee for returned checks. Students can't cash
a check written to them by another student.
However, the bank will still cash a check a student
received from home.
The student bank will cash checks up to $125
over a seven working day period. The bank will
also cash all student payroll checks written by the
university.
The student bank will also take payments for
students who need to pay telephone bills.
Each and every student should be responsible
for their checking account and a few special notes
of consideration should be noted.
Deposits made after 2 p.m. will be posted the
the next business day at 2 p.m. Deposits made on
Friday afternoons after 2 p.m. will be posted on
Monday at 2 p.m.
11
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
LOLST24. 1982
SEAFOOD SPECIALS FOR OUR TENTH ANNIVERSARY!
L
Cycling Is Fun For Club
B PATRICK O'NEILL
MiflHmt.
"North Carolina is
for bicycling" is the
1982 theme developed
by the North Carolina
Department of
Transportation's Bicy-
cle Committee.
According to the
committee, "Bicycle
riding is steadily in-
creasing in North
Carolina and Green-
ville is no exception,
savs Tom Marsh, a
member of the Board
ol Directors of the Tar
Rner Bicycle Club.
"Greenville is a good
placed to ride he
adds.
The year-old bicycle
club was started by a
local group of bicycle
enthusiasts to en-
courage the use of this
healthy, non-polluting
�transportation alter-
native.
"Our basic purpose
is trying to get bicyclists
together with other
people who want to
nde says Marsh who
rides his own bicycle
�een miles to and from
his teaching job at Pitt
County Community
College everyday.
More than half (over
3 million) of the state's
population use bicycles
for "short-distance
trips, to go to work, for
health and exercise,
and and for fun ac-
cording to the North
Carolina Bicycle Com-
mittee. And thousands
of vacation visitors are
also choosing North
Carolina for their bik-
ing pleasures.
The Tar River Bicy-
cle Club is a "very in-
formal" group and has
no membership re-
quirments or dues, says
Marsh, "everyone is
welcome
The club gets
together every Saturday
morning at 8 for a
group ride. They
gather at the Elm Street
Gym (1 block south of
Tenth Street) and
usually ride for an hour
on routes in the Green-
ville area.
"We're non-
competitive notes
Marsh, "we are more
interested in recrea-
tional biking and tour-
ing Individual club
menders have been
known i take longer
trips and they also offer
to share their expert
knowledge of bicycling
with other participants.
North Carolina's
good climate and
beautiful roads and
sceanry make year-
round bicycling a
popular activity. Ac-
cording to the North
Carolina Bicycle Com-
mittee the state's
climate is "lacking ex-
tensive periods of
weather extremes" and
it also has well main-
tained streets and
highway which they
claim "are among the
best in the nation with
thousands of miles of
low volume country
roads which are ideal
for bicycling
The committee also
points out that North
Carolina offers " a
diversity in points of in-
terest" from the Blue
Ridge Mountains to
300 miles of coast line.
It'l very very
cheap adds Marsh to
the advantages of cycl-
ing. Besides saving
money, riding a bike
helps a person stay in
good physical condi-
tion.
It's a very non-
stressful activity. It's
better than running as
far as stress goes says
Marsh. He claims that
riding a bike doesn't
endanger the knees,
ankles or other joints.
"When you run,
you're pretty much
limited to five or 10
miles says Marsh.
It's much more exciting
than running
Marsh also points
out that biking is a
pollution-free mode of
travel. "Forty percent
of air pollution is caus-
ed by automobiles he
says. "The automobile
is the greatest polluter
there is � more than
factories
On the safety side,
Marsh suggests that all
cyclists wear a helmet
and ride with the traf-
fic. Along with the re-
cent increase in bicycle
riders has come a large
increase in bicycle ac-
cidents, says the N.C.
Bicycle committee
All new (and not so
new) ECU students,
faculty and staff are
welcome to join in the
Tar River Bicycle
Club's fun. "A lot of
people don't realize
how easy it (bicycling)
is to do concludes
Marsh.
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Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner
Yarbrough A warded
A book about human
rights and federal judge
Frank Johnson of
Alabama by professor
Tinsley E. Yarbrough
of ECU has been given
the prestigious Silver
Gavel award by the
American Bar Associa-
tion.
Presentation of the
award was made
August 9 at the annual
convention of the ABA
to Malcolm M. Mac-
Donald, director of the
University of Alabama
Press which published
the book. Yarbrough,
the author, will recieve
a plaque.
Fifteen Silver Gavel
awards were presented
to newspapers, book
publishers, magazines,
and radio and televi-
sion stations during the
25th annual presention
of ABA's highest
award for
"outstanding public
service in increasing
public understanding
of the American legal
system
Yarbrough, pro-
fessor and chairman of
the Political Science
department at ECU, is
a native of Alabama
and a graduate of the
University of Alabama.
His book, published
in 1981, examines the
impact of Judge
Johnson's decisions
upon racial discrimina-
tion in transportation,
voter registration,
education and other
public programs and
institutons in Alabama
from the 1950s until
Johnson's appointment
to the Fifth Circuit
Court of Appeals in
1979.
The book is entitled.
Judge Frank Johnson
and Human Rights in
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No. 1 Iron PGAWas $44.00 NOW$12.95
Pittsburgh Porsimmon-Taylor Metal Woods ceo QC
Normally $95.00 NOW5V.VD
12 Prirp
All Golf Hats, Caps & Visors for Summer ���- r,n

Gordon
Fulp
Golf,
Ski&
Tennis
Shop
Located at
Greenville
Country Club
off Memorial Dr.
ATTIC
Souths No. 6 Rock Nightclub
TUES. - BRICE STREET
C
A
DINNER SPECIALS
Yw FVFDY DAY 5
I j" wmm � (REDUCED FOR ECU.)
A WED. - SIDEWINDER
(ONLY $1.00 ADM. FOR E.C.U.)
THURS. - SIDEWINDER
(LADIES' UGHT NIGHT)
(UGHT AT DOOR, BAR & GIFT SHOP)
FRI. - HAPPY HOUR 4-7 25 ADM.
WSECRET AGENTS 50 & 60 BEV.
FRI. & SAT. -THE STATES
SUN. - SPONGETONES(IFCFREE)
5 o'clock'til 10 o'clock
EVERY DAY
Monday � Happy Hour � 9:00 until
$1.00 Specials closing
Tuesday � Pizza Buffet � $2.49
Ladies' Night
Wednesday � Salad Bar Special
All You Can Eat �$2.15
Spaghetti Special �All You Can Eat �$2.49
Champagne Jam Nine until One
Friday � Happy Hours 4 until 7 $1.00 Specials
Saturday � Happy Hours 7 until 10 $1.00 Specials
Sunday � Lasagna Special All You Can Eat �$2.99
Thursday
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4 p.m7 p.m.
758-0080 FOR TAKE OUT
FRIDAY, AUGUST 27th
HARRY & SCRAPPY
VIDEO, PINBALL, FOOSBALL, BILLIARDS
513CotancheSt. Greenville, N. C.
Across from U.B.E.
EAST CAROLINA'S
PARTY CENTER
The excitement is here
six nights a week!
Tuesday � Crazy Tuesday
(Check club for different events each week)
Wednesday � Pony Nite
Thursday � College Nite
Friday - End of Week Party 3-7, 9-11
(Check dur for bar specials)
Sunday � Ladier Nite
Opening soon on the
' corner of 5th & Cotanche.
For the best of
beverages & atmosphere.
Find out how your
L' favorite beverage should
really taste � come try
our frosted mug.
Panama Jack's happy hours prices
from 4.00 p.m. to 8:00 - 25C mugs, $1.25 pitchers
the upper level
SUB STATION II HAS A
VARIETY OF OVER 23
SANDWICHES TO CHOOSE FROM.
One Block East
of the Attic
215 E. 8th
752-2183
Fast delivery
7 days a week.
Video Games
We welcome returning
Pirates & Freshmen
Open Monday thru Wednesday �
10:30a.m11:00p.m.
Thursday thru Saturday �
10:30a.ml :30a.m.
Sunday 12:00 noon-11:00 p.m.
Fri. afternoon H.H. �surprise bond ?
Fri. Nite - The Throbs
Sot. � Evans Johns & the H-bombs
(Formerly jj's Music Hall)
BEER COMING SOON
GOOD TIMES
Moti. (3-4 p.m.) FREE Pinball
(8 p.m.) Dart Tournament
HAPPY HOUR from 4-7
every day with the
coldest beverage in town.
Daily
Happy Hour
5:30-8:00
Not open to the general public.
119 EAST 5th STREET
752-8711
r THEY OFFER A "COMPLETE
MEAL ON A BUN AND
ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE.
C'96? Sub�tai
Coupon
25
off any half sub
50C
off any whole sub
Expires Aug. SI, 1982
-�� -
I

?
t





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1982
Spilman Scholarship Created
ECU NEWS BUREAU
A memorial endow-
ment tund in honor of
the late Jonetta Webb
Spilman, a long-time
state political leader, is
being established at
1 CU by the Pitt Coun-
ty Democratic Women.
Spilman. a former
vice chairman of the
state's Democratic Ex-
ecutive Committee,
died July 20 at the age
ol 93. She had been ac-
tive in state political
circles for more than 50
ears and in 1936 was
smie campaign director
for Oovernor Clyde R.
Hoey.
Officials of the Pitt
Count) Democratic
Women presented a
check to ECU to
establish the Mrs. J. B.
Spilman Memorial En-
dowment which will
provide a scholarship
to be awarded to a
political science major,
preferably a "female,
senit r democrat
"Spilman was not
only a good Democrat
but an outstanding
citizen whose interests
spanned a wide range
of human concerns
said Ann D. Evans,
president of the Pitt
County Democratic
Women. "She gave
unstintingly of her
energy, intellect, caring
and talent to her fellow
citizens
"We hope her many
friends and admirers
will view this
(endowment) as a way
to honor her memory
and join with us by
contributing generously
to this memorial en-
dowment established in
her name Evans add-
ed.
The executive board
of the Pitt County
Democratic Women
acted to establish the
memorial and named a
committee chaired by
Gladvs Howell of
Greenville to funnel
contributions to the en-
dowment through the
ECU Foundation Inc
which will administer
it.
"This came about
because so many people
mentioned such a
memorial as a very fit-
ting way to honor the
memory of this great
lady who was so well
known said Grace
Carroway, vice presi-
dent of the Pitt County
Democratic Women.
In paying tribute to
Mrs. Spilman at the
time of her death, Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. said
she was a "ereat North
Carolinian Janice H.
Hardison, executive
director of the N.C.
Democratic Executive
Committee, said she
was "a tremendous in
spiration to everyone
Spilman was the wife
of the first treasurer
and business manager
of the school which is
now Fast Carolina
University and ECU's
administration building
bears the Spilman
name.
Classifieds
ROOMMATE
ROOMMATE Needed tor nicely
furnished apartment, call '58 3894
for more into
ROOMMATE wanted for
partially furnished apt at Strat
ford Arms Call 765 6906
WANTED
WANTED Bass player with
vocals for working part time rock
band 754 4973
FOR SALE
1975 VEGA Hatchback, good con
dition, excellent mileage, S800
754 7899 or 754 7171, ext 374
SMALL REFRIGERATOR for
sale exc cond 545. call 758 5903
FOR SALE VW Rabbit 1974
4 speed 4 door am fm stereo
8 track, 756 6009
"SEE WHAT Mary Kay
Cosmetics can do lor you For a CALCULATOR for sale Texas
free skin care demonstration, call ms Business Analyst II 535.
Terry Harrison at 756 7386 757 1664
Test Schedule Announced
B GREG HIDEOUT
I Cl has released its
testing calendar for the
82-83 academic year.
All Tests will be ad-
ministered at the testing
center, room 105 of the
Speight building.
The American Col-
lege Testing (ACT) will
be eiven Dec. 11, 1982
and" Apr. 16. 1983.
Allied Health Profes-
sions Test (AH PAT)
will be given Nov. 13,
1982 and Jan. 15. 1983.
College Level Ex-
amination Program
a l HP) will be offered
the third week of each
month with the exep-
m of December and
1 ebuan . Prospective
candidates must con-
tact the testing center at
least one month before
they plan to take the
test.
Dental
Testing
(DAT) is
offered Oct.
and Apr. 16
Admission
Program
going to be
9. 1982
1983.
The Graduate
Management Admis-
sion Test (GMAT) will
be given Oct. 23, 1982,
Jan. 29, 1983. Mar. 19.
1983 and June 18.
1983.
The Graduate
Record Examination
(GRF) will be offered
Oct. 16, 1982, Dec. 11.
1982, Feb. 5, 1983,
Apr. 23. 1983 and June
11. 1983.
law School Admis-
sions Test (I SAD will
be given Oct. 2, 1982,
Dec. 4, 1982 and Feb.
19, 1983.
The Medical College
Admission (MCAT)
will be offered Sept. 1 1
and 12. 19S2. and Apr.
9, 1983.
Miller Analog)
testing, ihe MA I. will
be gien mo st
Wednesdays at 2:30
throughout the school
year.
The National
Teacher Examinations
(NTE) area exams will
be given on Oct. 30.
1982 and Apr. 30,
1983. The core exams
will be given No. 13.
1982, and Feb. 5. 1983.
The North Carolina
Real I state I icensing
Exam (REI E) will be
given -ug. 28, Sept.
25, Oct. 23. Nov. 20
and Dec. 18. I he dates
tor 198 3 were
unav ailable.
I he Pharmacv Co
lege Admission I es
(PC AT) will be ad
minis!ered on Feb. 5
1983.
I he Scholastic Ap
titude resi (SAT) wi
be ottered on Oct. 16.
1982. Nov. 6. 1982.
Dec. 4. 1982. Jan. 22.
1983, Mar. 19. 1983
and May 7, 1983.
Other tests will be
given if requested and
are administered on a
special basis.
STUDfNT UNION
ir a�xwt ujvi�vt
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks. Camping Equip
ment Steel Toed Shoes.
Dishvi and Over ?00 Different
Ne and Used Items Cowboy
Boo's. 536 95
ARMY-NAVY
1501 S Evans
Street
STORE
RESEARCH PAPERS
5'aa� n.is $� 00 'or the
jrrenl Koao� '���rc�catalog 11 27B
D� � ' a a acaflec �.b��ct
HneHrrh ft�ialaiii ' I i2 ioao a
� ���� LO A-gees 'A 90025 (213)
y
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
MALPASS MUFFLER SHOP
758 7676
2616 E. 10th St.
Greenville
Seafood � Bar-B-Que
710 N. Greene St.
"Across the Bridge'
5 minutes from Campus
Sunday-Thursday 11 a.m9 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m10 p.m.
7520090
BACK TO SCHOOL
STUDENT SPECIAL
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
More Power where
it counts
!
Trout
Flounder
Crab Cakes
Shrimp
Clam Strips
Special Good hriSat. 4-0p.m.
REAGANOM1CS LUNCH SPECIAI
$-i ft YOUR CHOICE OF ONE MEA1
�f
Don't just replace your old
muffler, improve your car's
performance. Add Thrush
Turboffcwer Mufflers to ��
your exhaust system. You'll feel the �S'
extra power the minute you step on the
gas. So pick up some performance C 0
J
The Performing Parts.
your choice of
one or all
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS COUPON
Off Complete
Eye Glasses With
This Coupon
Offer
Good
til
83182
A
A
o�
�ii
e'e.

Oo
2$c
e
�,
9.
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Pizza Transit Authority, inc.
When it comes to pizza, PTA comes to you
Now at ECU


CV
lo
a
o
oAP
.a
�oo
.o
o.
o
FREE DELIVERY
anywhere in our
service zone.
Collect
the cut slice
in the PTA logo
from the top of any
12 PTA boxes and we'll deliver
your favorite 12-inch one
topping pizza, fast and free! Or,
collect the 12 slices and save S5
on any pizza of your choice.
Start collecting today!
This special offer will continue through May 15, 1983.
7
Q
TT

P

n
ku
O
ZBahsSL
0
o
o
x
In the winter, you can
be certain about two
things�cold weather
and hot PTA pizza. And
you can forget the cold.
PTA pizza arrives
steaming hot, every
time.
6
N
When it comes to pizza,
PTA comes to yo j.
757-1955
NSn
IT
Pizza
Transit
Authority
rNO
o
r-c,
c
�o i o
m

V�J Pizza Transit Authority, inc
off Any Pino
57
j

OR
off any Large Two or More Topping Pixza
Otter expires 91582
Good only with this coupon
One discount per ptzza
757-1955
FREE DELIVERY
ANYWHERE IN OUR SERVICE ZONE
j






10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24. 1982
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Fall Semester Rush Hours:
Thurs. & Fri. Aug. 26, 27: 8:30 a.m6:00 p.m.
Sat Aug. 28: 8:45 a.ml:00 p.m.
MonWed Aug. 30, 31 & Sept. 1: 8:30 a.m6:00 p.m.
P
READ
DA
SHOIT
&1
1
V
Where you'll find:
New & Used Textbooks
Art Supplies
Room Accessories
Calculators
Study Guides
Rental Typewriters
Brief Cases
Knapsacks
ft
Jewelry
Photofinishing
Magazine Subscriptions
Official ECU Class Ring
Imprinted wearing apparel
Complete line of school supplies
Mm
mm
I,
Witt til
mv

HI
'

AWi
p
Jill
lilWI
ill
liil
i
ill I
lu .� t
I
r.

STOP BY ON THOISDAY, AUG. 26, POICHASE YOUSE
SUPPLIES AND TEXTBOOKS, AND GET A FREE 8-OUNCE
SOFT DRINK. NOT ONLY DO YOU GET A FREE DRINK,
PAL, BUT YOU GET A CHANCE TO SAVE REALLY BIG
BUCKS, WHEN YOU BUY USED BOOKS. AH GOT THE
BIGGEST INVENTORY OF USED TEXTS EVER AND
YOU ARE THE BENEFICIARY, IF YOU KNOW WHAT
I MEAN. TO REALLY LIVEN THINGS UP, AH'M GONNA
GIVE YA A CHANCE TO WIN EITHER A $50.00, $30.00
OR $15.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE ON THE DAY
WHAT'S MENTIONED ABOVE.
SEE YA THEN, OR ELSE
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina University


?
I
I





THL EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
At (.1 SI 24, 1982
Page I
Best Picture
Highlights
Campus Series
lan (harleson and Ben Cross in 1981 Best Picture winner Chariots of hire. The film is scheduled for campus showings this fall.
The ECU Student Union Films
Committee kicks off another school
year in a tradition that is carried on
by few schools in the state system,
that of free films for the card carry-
ing campus population.
Thirty-two movies will be shown
fall semester at Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre, including
1981 's Academy Award winner for
Best Picture, Chariots of Fire and
space epic Star Wars, For students,
admission to them is free with valid
ID and Activity Card. As ever,
faculty and staff on campus will be
admitted by current MSC Member-
ship.
Films have been selected to fit five
specific categories: Popular Films
(shown Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day nights with a few exceptions).
Special Films (of an international
variety; shown on Wednesday
nights), Double Features (usually ol
an international variety; also shown
on Wednesday nights). Film
Festivals (beginning on Sunday
afternoons), and 1 ate Shows
(shown weekends).
The first film of the semester,
Neighbors, starring the late John
Belushi and his old .SAY cohort Dan
Aykroyd, will be shown this Friday
and Saturday night only at 5, 7 and
9 p.m.
Trie rest of the weekend pop
lineup is as follows: Chariots of hire
(Sept. 234), Atlantic City (Sept.
9 10 1 1 ), Ragtime (Sept.
161718), On Golden Pond (Sept
23 2425), Star M ars (Sept. 30Oct.
1 2), Taps (Oct. 789), Pennies
From Heaven (Oct. 2223), (at
People (Oct. 2829 30), Sharkey's
Machine (Nov. 456), Missing
(Nov. 12 13), Time Bandits (Nov.
18 19 20), Shoot the Moon (Dec.
2 3 4), and Southern Comfort
(Dec. 9 10 11).
The Special Film lineup has Man
of Iron (Sept. 1), Don Giovanni
(Sept. 15),ria (Oct. 6), dates of
Heaven (Oct. 13), Onihaha (Nov.
3). Vn. 10), and My Dinner
With Andre (Dec. 1).
Double Features are The Chant of
Jimmie BlacksmithGallipoti (Sept.
8), Stroszek I Hi Marieen (Sept. 29),
and Dracula freaks (Oct. 27).
A James Bond Film Festival is
slated tor November 21 which
features Dr. Vo, You Only Iive
Twice, and For Your Eyes Only.
Late Shows include Pink Flam-
ingos (Sept. 24 25). The Decline of
Western Civilization (Nov. 19 20),
and Harold and Maude (Dec. 3 4).
Knoxville's '82 World Is More Than Just Fair
By MIKE HUGHES
rrave ing to a World's lair is an opportunity which
mes ib a a few times during most of our lives.
iated in Greenville, N.C there may never
� rec enient setting than Knoxville, Tenn site
1982 VN rld's Fair, which runs through Oct. 31. If
et : ide it to the Knoxville Fair, "you owe
� ' i yourc If" to take it in.
ikt maj �r production, the Fair has drawn mixed
si negative remarks stemming from the
d the like. But if you enjoy learning
ultures, eating good food, drinking lots
b ng around people in general, you're
e festivities at the Fair.
; irns the World" is the lair's theme.
tel a ' opic for 19S2. Numerous energy ex-
: site, exploring the benefits and uses ot
vpes oi energy known to man � natural
nuclear, solar, hydro. wind, etc. In addi-
i exhibits from the majority o countries
ranging from Panama to Saudi Arabia
� ilk. us energy sources of each country.
Travel
But unlike a classroom lecture on the unexplored
realm of solar energy, the lair provides an interesting
background as the basis for education, many o' the
energy exhibits even being participatory.
Still, most oi us don't go to something like a World's
Fair fust to learn something. We go to gorge ourselves
with food and drink, to take in a few shows � in short,
to be entertained.
Well, there again, you're in luck. Apart from the
scores of roving entertainers � mimes, magicians, pup-
peteers, etc. � the Fair offers a full slate of daily per-
formances by virtually all types of musical groups �
folk, country, pop, contemporary, bluegrass, nostalgic
and international. In addition, big-name entertainers
A Movable Feast
Song & Dance At Mendenhall
appear from time to time for major concerts and perfor-
mances. Cheap Trick. James Taylor and Joan Jett, just
to name a few .
The daily World's Fair parade features several guest
bands as well as the 1982 World's Fair Marching Band.
The same bands perform on stage throughout the dav
with choirs, jazz bands, clogging groups and other
musical ensembles.
And if you're into video games, you'll enjoy the two
well-equipped arcades on either end of the Fair grounds.
And Pac Man fanatics won't want to miss the entire ex-
hibit dedicated to their financial burden.
The day's entertainment culminates each evening with
a terrific fireworks display over the scenic Tennessee
River. But even after the Fair site shuts down for the
night, the fine entertainment continues. International
symphonies, opera, ballet, theatre, celebrity perfor-
mances and sporting events are all nightly occurrences
at locations near the Fair. And the city of Knoxville
boasts nightclubs galore to satisfy and late-night taste.
While in Knoxville, you can eat like a king or a college
student, with meals and snacks ranging from chili in a
bag to bierwurst to fine seafood. The L&N Station, a
renovated railway stop on the Fair site, epitomizes the
range of foods to be tasted at the Fair, offering
everything from sandwiches to gourmet French meals.
And what would such an extravaganza be without
beer? Now, at a dollar and a half a go, you may not
want to indulge too heavily, but a visit to the Strohaus in
an absolute must. There a tired traveler can take in a
Bavarian band or two and enjoy a mug or three of
Oktoberfest. Or. it you prefer the old American stand-
by, plastic cups arc available.
Think o it! Where else can you try New York lox and
bagels one minute. New Orleans seafood the next.
Belgian wattles the next and French pastries for dessert?
Certainly nowhere in Greenville.
I odging is virtually no problem, with accommoda-
tions available to suit practically any budget. The city of
Knoxv Ule and its outlying areas are more than adequate-
ly stocked with all types ol motels, converted dorm
rooms and various other lodging arrangements. Reser-
vations are highly recomn ended but are not an absolute
necessity.
Perhaps some comment is probably necessary about
the length ot lines. Simply by virtue of there being
thousands ol poeple ling the Fair everv day. there
are long iiries. (Already, more than -even million have
attended.) But unlike a college drop add lesson in
stagnancy, the exhibit lines at the Fair move quite rapid-
ly.
I urthermore. one common-sensical generalization
seems to hold true about which exhibits are the best �
the longer the line, the better the exhibit.
And finally, a couple o suggestions tor anyone plan-
ning a trip to the Fair: take in the U.S. and China ex-
hibits, especiallv the U.S. movie; both are fabulous.
The 1982 World's Fair is an event you don't want to
miss, and bemg only seven or eight hours away, it's an
event vou shouldn't miss.
1 he ECl Artists Series Committee has announced its
1982-1983 series, which is comprised of six of the
world's acclaimed artists and ensembles. The series is
designed to offer top-quality, highly professional musi-
cians at a low cost.
The season begins Oct. 4, with the award-winning
master ensemble, the Tokyo String Quartet. This group
has been touring to great acclaim world-wide for the
past 12 years.
The next performance of the season, Oct. 21, will be a
75th anniversary and homecoming spectacular. The
dvnamic husband-and-wife duo of William Bolcom and
Joan Morris will entertain with songs from the parlor
piano days ot a hundred years ago and the pop songs of
the early 1900s, to the exciting wit and elegance of the
great Gershwin and Porter, to Charles Ives and Lieber,
and to Stroller's cabaret songs.
The principal flutist with the New York Philhar-
monic, Julius Baker, will be the next guest on Nov. 15.
This world-class artist of the premier rank has perform-
ed with such orchestras as those in Cleveland, Pitt-
sburgh and Chicago.
The season continues with the return engagement
Jan. 17 of the Gregg Smith Singers. This mixed-voice
chorale has "captivated audiences around the world"
with their distinguished trademark of positioning the
group in smaller sections around the music hall.
On Feb. 7, the chamber orchestra Orpheus will ap-
pear. This ensemble is unique, as they are totally
responsible for programming, repertoire and perform-
ing without a conductor.
Climaxing the season on March 24, pianist Peter
Serkin will perform. The son of legendary Rudolf
Serkin, Peter has performed with most of the world's
major symphony orchestras.
To be assured of your seats, the Artists Series Com-
mittee recommends purchasing season tickets. This plan
offers substantial savings: 50 percent for students, 66
percent for faculty and staff and 56 percent for the
general public.
To order tickets, call (757-6611, ext.266) or drop by
the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center.
In addition, the MSC Theatre Arts Committee an-
nounces its upcoming season: four performances,
featuring the American Ballet Theatre, North Carolina
MSC
Dance Theatre and two shows by the Acting Company.
The committee promises "one of the best seasons of-
fered with some of the finest repertories in the state,
in the country and in the world.
The first two performances (Nov. 18 and Jan. 19) will
feature classical and romantic ballet as well as modern
dance.
The Acting Company will follow with a performance
of Shakespeare's Twelfth Sight on March 25 and
Moliere's classic comedy Tartuffe on March 26.
Season tickets for the 1982-83 Theatre Arts series can
also be purchased for $12, a four-dollar savings.
The Mendenhall Student Center also sponsors
another season of travel adventure Films, featuring five
works.
On Oct. 20, John Roberts kicks off the season with
The Pleasures of Denmark, a country which prides itself
on its art and design.
Jens Bjerre is next on the slate. His film, Fabulous
Tibet, explores the hidden valleys in the Himalayas and
shows on Nov. 9.
On Nov. 17, Doug Jones, of the National Parks Ser-
vice, will present Portraits of America � The National
Parks, a film which exhibits the beauty to be found "in
our own backyards
Greece, the cradle of ancient civilization, is next on
tap. Kenneth Richter's film Greece, which will be seen
on Jan. 27, juxtaposes that famous cradle with the
Greece of today.
And finally, Matthew and Sherilyn Mentes present
Poland � The Enduring Dream on March 15. This film
colorfully depicts a stalwart nation and its people's
belief in the future of their land.
Individual season tickets are available for the Travel
Adventure Films Series as well, at a cost of $12. All
films will begin at 8 p.m.
A scene from American Ballet Theatre II production of Romeo and Juliet. The company is slated for November.
T
i
"� v





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
AUGUST 24, 1982


Norma Jean
A Future Behind Her'
By HARRY HAl'N
Nr� ork lilt N�
NEW YORK � You probably know exactly
where you were that sunny Sunday 20 years ago
when you heard the news that Marilyn Monroe
was dead. I remember it was, otherwise, a heart-
breakingly beautiful day. So incongruous, I
thought at the time. Aug. 5, 1962, it was � one
of those indelible dates that tragically litter the
'60s and '70s. Marilyn was the first to go and, it
seems 20 years later, the last to leave.
In a very real sense, she has never been away.
She was the most exploited of stars in life, and
death did not change that. Rarely does a year go
by that some book doesn't come out advancing
The Marilyn 1 Knew; all sorts of unexpected peo-
ple � from her maid to Norman Mailer � have
had a nice commercial ride on that bandwagon.
She has been perpetuated in plays, movies, TV
movies, TV documentaries, songs. And the long
line of comedy counterfeits stretches from Jayne
Mansfield and Mamie Van Doren to Suzanne
Somers and Loni Anderson. As an everpopular
public commodity, Marilyn Monroe never really
died.
And there are reasons the name still retains its
old box office magic. "Marilyn says historian
David Shipman. "fascinated the world while she
lived more than any other star since Garbo, to
whom she was sometimes compared. The camera
found incandescent qualities in them both, and in
return thev surrendered themselves completely to
it
But something more than physical beauty was
at play here. Incorporated into Marilyn's screen
persona was an orphan undercurrent that came
from real life � a trusting vulnerability potent
enough to reach out and touch every man in the
audience. Considering her private life (a train
wreck from start to finish), it's not surprising
that the vulnerability came easily, but it is amaz-
ing that she could still rise to risk it. And this is
what humanized The Love Goddess.
Mostly, the myth lives on in her movies. She
made 30 in all, and they're locked into perpetual
replay in revival houses and on television. Not
one of her starring vehicles is time-capsule
caliber, but there are moments of Marilyn in each
that you want to hold onto. She was a star simply
by being, conforming as she did to the same
classic curvy-broad outlines of the adolescent
daydreams that were served up in comic strips.
"The cut of the face is Betty Boop, but the col-
oring and expression are Daisy Mae Time
magazine said. "Monroe is for the millions a
figure of fantasy rather than flesh. She offers the
tease without the squeeze, attraction without
satisfaction, frisk without risk Essentially, that
was Marilyn's gift to us � she answered to Sen-
sual Fantasy � and, because the fantasy had
been on film, it has survived.
There is every indication that Marilyn bought
the fantasy, too, and labored mightily to preserve
it. As the most visible Venus of her time, she had
her pick of men and married two of the most
famous � Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller �
but her longest and most lasting affair was with
the camera. That was the one consistency in her
career, and it is the thing that remains, advancing
See MARILYN, Page 8
Hank Jr. Gets A
Northern 'Okay
B JACK HI RSI
( higago I nhunt-
The last time Hank Williams Jr. was in New
York City, he had to have a secuntv guard.
Media representatives peppered him with in-
quiries as to how he could possibly dislike the Big
Apple, accusing him of suiting "anti-city" Dixie
songs just to rouse rabble west of the Hudson
and south of the Mason-Dixon.
Williams, however, held his ground. And
when somebody at a major New York country.
radio station, undoubtedlv considering the
marketing potential of the New York area, said
he would like to talk to Williams about
demographics, Williams' longtime sidekick
Merle Kilgore stepped in and succinctly stated
Williams case.
"Let me tell you what Hank Jr. thinks about
Kilgore offered. "He thinks about writing songs,
singing them, making records, doing shows, go-
ing fishing, going hunting and that's it. You
know what demographics mean to him? They
mean something like the nomenclature of Brown-
ing's new B80 shotgun. He'll talk demographics
about that with you, if you want him to
Amid the media flurry, the people of New
York seemed altogether unoffended by him, as
far as Wiliams could tell. The ones who didn't
like country music paid him about as much atten-
tion as he pays them, and the ones who did like it
seemed eager to welcome a friend from down
home � whither they hailed from down home or
not.
One fan sent a note to the stage echoing the
sentiments ot his sectionally chauvinistic song
"Dixie on My Mind The note said something
like "I'm stuck in New York City, too, with Dix-
ie on my mind
On a call-in radio show, Williams recalled that
See HANK, Page 9
301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building
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, ,





I
Hi-Tech Times
THE FAST CAROl INI AN
AUGUST 24. 1982
Cinema's Brave New World
B JOHNCULHANI
M iORk When Star liars, with its
futuristic setting, androids and computerized
space warfare, became the first film in histor to
ke SUV million in 1977 (it has no grossed
loin nines that). Hollywood decided that what
the public wanted was more and bettet special el
- In the next five years, aimed with huge
dge t s and increasingly sop h i s t i c a t ed
nnology, filmmakers rewrote the book on
ci eating illusions ol reality.
Wirework combined with optical effects made
Superman tl more realisticalh than man had
evei flown'1 bet ore The animation of models
in The Empire Strikes Hack gave such devices as
- friendh space beast, the launtaun. a fluiditN
ol movement (il not a personality) to top Willis
O'Brien's original King Kong. hand puppet ol
rubber, spewing gore as it burst through a take
human chest in Alien, made old-time monsters
such as Frankenstein seem tame. And the top-
issing film ot last year, Raiders � the I st
rk. orchestrated its stunt work and its
mechanical effects with an attention to expensive
detail unknown in the adventure pictures ol
irhei eras
Without a doubt, technical wizardn is chang
i the face ot films we see. nd the flood is uist
beginning Spec -t. effects pictures now dominate
, screens 1' e firs! month ot summei
essed I i sasc n
Poltergeist, Star 1 rek II: Tht '
Blade Runner and The Thing
1.1. but
.� Khan.
In then pre
5 of s
movi
an V a res .
ion wnh exi
,
turns
V
N
H rt
arl stinting the narra
sl e pi aised I he spec ��� �
i- Blade Runner and Tht
le damning the quality of the storytell-
o often, il seems, special effects are
he end as ell as th means ol making
nd ol filn I he results can range from
iehumamzmj
. Meyei d
Khai � I '
well as ts el tects
d b h f fi ce h i 11
Star I rek movie
d the were
meretv
. a movie said
: Star Trek II: The
as been praised for its
and is one ol the sum-
case in point was
a hich was all special
spectacular, thev w 11 e
there was no storv .
"On the other hand, television has eroded the
audience's patience with exposition and the
groundwork that narrative requires, so that now
ou have movies and television shows where
there's no plot at all, just stunts or star turns. It's
a new form ol pornography. Who's doing it or
win they're doing it is no longer important, but
it you want to see a guy jump through ten hun-
dred hoops ol fire and maybe get burned to
death, tune in never mind making it a part ol
the stoi Forget the story
Meyei sees a very real problem tor today's
filmmakers. "The question is he asked, "can
you make a good story now about two people
tailing in love ot out of love that is not laced with
stunts and special el tects and get the big audience
tor it
c reating characters that people will identif)
with and toot tot has always been one ot the
most difficult parts of storytelling. Carlo Ram-
bald who fashioned the mechanical creatures in
the 1976 remake ot King Kong and the unearthly
visitors in Close Encounters oj the third Kind,
created an extra terrestrial tor Steven Spielberg's
successful . T. out of steel and rubber and
hydraulic and electronic controls.
Rambaldi believes that � . proves a special
effect can perform an artistic function as effec-
tively as an actor. "The success of I.I. means
that it no longei is important that you have
Marlon Brando oi John Traolta he said. "It
special effect is created very well, people
don'l think whether it's mechanical or not �
y're thinking about the story. In . we have
children and one electronic creature. When
I finally saw the tunshed movie, even I cried a ht-
:le
gainsi that background, two new features �
both with elaborate special effects � are making
then debuts, in Walt Disney Productions'
futuristic adventure IROS. the hero, played b
Jeff Budges, is sucked into a micro-civilization
inside a computer. This is accomplished b a
state-of-the ait combination of live action with
compute! generated imagery.
The Secret oj MMH. the First animated
feature from Don Bluth Productions, a new
studio founded bv former Disney animators,
builds us storv around a pack of rats who have
developed high intelligence in experiments con-
ducted on them at the National Institute of Men-
See DISNFN: . Page 6
PHOTOFINISHING
As a fall semester special, we are offering $1.00 off the regular price of
$3.1 5 for developing and printing one 1 2 exposure roll of film and $2.00 off
the regular prices of $5.69 and $8.09 on 24 and 36 exposure rolls.
It's as easy as clipping the coupon below and bringing it in with your film.
Try us for your film developing needs. Your satisfaction is guaranteed.
VALUABLE COUPON
Film
Developing
color print
film developing
� Kodacolor, Fuji or 3M
color print film
� 110,126 or 135 film sizes
$10FF
12 EXPOSURE ROLLS
$2 OFF
24 & 36 EXPOSURE
ROLLS
Otter expires 9
ThU coupon mutt mccompwf Old
Student Sopyl Store
Wright Building
STUDENT
SUPPLY
STORE
Wright Building
Owned & Operated
by
East Carolina
University

Clothing
niversity clothing was selected to meet the needs of a college man. The cloth-
ing and accessories featured here can be the foundation for building a ward-
robe, 'his elothing is so elassical and unchanging that it can carry a man through all of
his college years. This gives you the opportunity to purchase an outfit for around
8300.00. Hut it is not discount clothing. It was chosen with a college-aged man's
budget in mind. It meets the same strict standards that all of our merchandise does.
m
nisei sitlotbing s Wool
Herringbone Sportooat.
Named fr its i lassii ij. enect
resembling tin- backbone t a hci
ring Goes well with khaki oi wool
trousers or jeans Available in
brown as shown or blue-gre
Si. - h gulai t11- l'1 I ong
v � (HI
iirt Bucks. Niamrd foi
thru br �s 11i � Folm and
tint- nan buck suede With good-
looking classic, creje soles tin
u i etremel comiortabh 1 f k
tn also be worn as a casual shoe
With leans Ss 7 1 i Sot I no
0
'in Oxford-cloth Button
dowii Shirt. Originated
in the l'Hti Centur in Scotland a
baskerweave fabru t softly-spun
(irns We offei vou ni huest in
bine as shown oi white Must
sirs available When purchased
m ltb one ol the I 'niversit lloth
mu a( kages x22 'H)
m
niversirv Clothing's Naw
'Blazer. A sport jacket
credited to the Captain of the
H.l S Blazer who equipped his
inotle crew with the metal-but-
toned blueserge jackets Blazers
are still distinguished b metal
buttons Our blazer is distin-
guished b its comfortable blend
of wool and polyester which ena-
bles year-round wear In naw as
shown Most sizes available
$125.00
haki received its name
when the British origi-
nated the color III ISIS to equip
then troops to light in the desert
against the Vfghans khaki trous-
ers are now a staple in most men s
wardrolx's because ol then ver-
satile and eas care Our kh.iki s
an (Hi cotton s-1111 plain trout,
two real jxx'kets and straight legs.
Sizes 2() S S2� (H)
ilk Regimental Stripe
Neckties. Knglish regi-
ments first began to use distinctive
colors on then ties and so lal clubs
and schools followed suit I he tust
to do so was the Zingeririeket
(!lub m ISt3. It was red gold, and
black Om L'niversit) Clothing
Neckwear is handmade ol (M)
silk and available in a variet) ol
combinations ol stripes SIS ()
ihetland Wool Crewneck
Sweater. In KM) wool
soli light, tweed-like, ven
nappv t.tbric made onb Ironi the
Inn undercoat oi sheep Received
its name Ironi sheep raised on the
Shetland Islands oi Scotland
vailable in charcoal grey, natural
as show u naw, tartan green, and
wine Sizes S, M L & XL
S40.00
UftK - Whip Worsted
Trousers. 100 wcmI
with plain front on-seam pockets,
two oar pockets and straight legs
vailable in ure as shown Sizes
29-iS S4"i 00
W lassu al Wool Aberdeen
'Surcingle Belt. With
leather tab and brass buckle
Available in navywine stripe as
shown, naw white stripe naw
khaki stripe solid naw solid
khaki Sizes 2S-40 $13.50
UNIVERSITY Clothing
Created because there was a need for an affordable line of duality elothing for college men.
oflfimans
MENS WEAF
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE � CAROLINA EAST MALL
STUDENT LA YAW AYS WELCOME
f

!





4 THt- I fcSTCAROI IN1AN
l i,l SI 24. IS2
Welcomes
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
r a
BlCoke
TAB OR
FRESH
SAUSAGE OR
Pepperoni
Pizzas
Coca-Cola
For
FRESH
Pizza
Bread
Register Now
for FREE his & her
Scwhinn 10 speed
Bicycles. Drawing
to be held
Sept. 10th.
No purchase
required.
You do not
have to be
present to win.
For
LIMIT 3 BTLS.
i�
41 -W rtV C
"

Nf
rM
ttfc 3
IX

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U.S. NO. 1
ALL PURPOSE
White
Potatoes
FRESH, CRISP
Head
Lettuce
Hds
A
zvstfW
�7 f )
x-l
(
TVHH
PA,
Goebel
A,
P"F
.
xjr w
k
-V
k
'

COUNTRY OVEN
Potato Chips
-to

LW
'�t
V
t
BIANCO, ROSATO OR
Riunite
Lambrusco.
99
hA

�tfj
,
��������- �1-JIliT
wt'tlllltf �
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l
NONE SOLD
.ERS
OPEN 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON.
THRU
SAT.
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031
i
i





rHE EAST CAROLINIAN M CH ST 24. 1982 5
7
Items and Prices
Effective Tues Aug. 24,
thru Sat. Aug. 28, 1982.
m
-? A
JD( II J
:
�v'

p
a?
.4"
V i r- ��- ft
� . J �
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KROGER FROZEN
Orange
StV v
4
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WL
3
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1
I

Ijtfx
s
tvi
ft
M
Tty i
s-
r
�J&m
t.
3
U.S.D.A. GOVT.
NSPECTED GENUINE
Ground Beef 3
rf 12-Oz.
, Cans
Lb.
Juice
ORANGE JUICE
v25?fo
ORANGE JUICE
fiffi?
jiinr"
4?;
200 SH
NOTEBOOK
Filler Paper
SHARP EL-220
BASIC POCKET
Calculator
ORANGE JUICE

SHARP
Only

EL-5085
31 FUNCTION
U

i

,r2i
SAVE
200
Ct
Scientific
Calculator
WHILE QUANITIES LAST
w
?
1
2
K
G.E. FINE FMAM
SOUND, PORTABLE
Mini Radio
MFP FLOURIDE
TOOTHPASTE
Colgate
v
7-2500
�-
wm.
f i
nrf
U
s

.Ji
in n
r
G.E 7-2582
2V2" SPEAKER
�J!�J'��I
2?'9at5
SNlrWt
Portable Radio5! O"
ADVERTISED ITEM POl ICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
available ,rr sale in eac Kroger Savon except as
specif'caliy noted m this ad if we do run out of an item
we will otter you your choice of a comparable item when
available, reflecting the same savings or a ratncheck
which will entitle you 10 purcnase the advertised item at
the advertised price within 30 days
7-2582
Let's go Krogering for the best of everything
t





IHI I M XKOI IMW
M GUS1 24, 182
Signs of the limes: Ahoe left, right � "light cycles" from Disne's TRON; below right � ad slick for Spielberg's Poltergeist.
Disney Zaps Japs With TRON
Continued From Page 3
t.tl Health (NIMH) While Tron
represents a dramatic leap forward
into ih e e r a oI compu t ei
tech nolog v . Mil t akes a
calculated step backward into the
era ol classical animation pioneered
b Walt Disne in classics such a
Batnhi
IRi). a $20 million cinematic
journe through the mind ol a com-
puter, frequenth looks like the
ultimate video game, played by �
and with human beings on a
screen 70 feet wide and 30 feel high.
I he film has more than 800 shots in
which such actors as Jeff Bridges,
David Warner and Cindy Morgan
are put into computer-generated en-
ironments.
Disney is the first to tell a stoi
with the computer-generated im-
agery that Hollywood is looking at
as the herald of a major change in
its way of making movies.
! homas I xv ilhite, Disney s
2lJ year-old head of production,
� I the studio decided to produce
o not only because it called for
a new technology but because it us-
ed that technology to tell a story
thai would call forth "a new
my thology " of characters.
"We in ested $20 million in oui
e! thai the characters in this
lputei world, invented b man in
- own image, would appeal to peo-
ple, aid.
I he significance ol the computer-
rated en ironments in w Inch
�� . �: !h') takes place is thai
the first stop toward using
tiers t "h lild" nun ie sets
Iri leed Steven Spielberg, maker
� . i d Poltergeist, predicts in a
recent issue ol merican film
hat "there w ill be a da
when it will be possible to create
an entire civilization at the cost of
two days' shooting
Perhaps Hollywood's increasing-
ly frantic love affair with special ef-
fects merely reflects its fear that the
audience for fantasy (mainly people
under 30) is being devoured by video
games.
Those games currently gross bet-
ween $8 billion and $9 billion a year,
compared with about S3 billion a
year for all the movies shown in
theatres. 1 as! year the most popular
video game, Pac-Man, grossed
about SI.2 billion � three times as
much as Star liars, history's most
popular movie, has earned in the
five years since its initial release.
Even Disney is hedging its fantasy
bets. The company has licensed
Bally -Midway Man u fact ur mg
(distributors ol Pac-Man) to install
$50 million worth of a new
"�IRON video game in arcades
across the country.
TR( had its genesis when story
man met computer man. In 196,
the film's wn'er. director and co-
producer, Steven Lisberger, then an
animator of drawings with his own
studio, looked at a sample reel from
a computer firm called MAGI
(Mathematical Applications Group
Inc.).
" I hat reel ot computer-generated
ii. gery impressed me terrifically
with the computer's capabilities
I isberger recalled. "Shortly aftei
that. Atari came out with the tirs!
video game, called 'PONG and I
put the two ideas together
1 isberger is among those who
believe that computer-generated im-
agery will eventually replace all
ms ot optical effects but he
concedes that "it's still verv expen-
sive to lav all the information
describing a setting into the com-
puter
Put once its done, the possibilities
are awe-inspiring. "The most amaz-
ing thing about TR) I isberger
said, "is thai its back lot is sitting on
somebody's desk I here's a com
puter tile with a couple ol floppy
disks that have all the information
on them necessary to generate those
images again Foi ll'(. we've
designed the beginnings ot a video
game landscape. It we wanted to
make a IRO II. we could call up
that world, and simulate more
�i the same tune. Disney is taking
the next step in computer
technology. I wo young animators,
John 1 asseter and Glen Keane, are
planning a 30-second scene from
Maurice Sendak's modern
children's classic ii here the Wild
Things Ire, in which the little boy
called Max chases his dog out of his
room and through the upstairs hall
and dow n the stairs.
Max and his dog are being
animated conventionally, like iht
characters m all the other cartoons
made by Disney. Hut Max is being
colored, eliminating the need for
those who now paint each individual
animation cell. Even more revolu-
tionary, Max's room, the hallway
and the stairway are being planned
to be executed bv MAGI as
computer-generated enironments.
If the experiment works for
M here the H id Things ire. it could
conceivably work tor a host of other
fantasc environments. Disney is cur-
rently planning Return to (): as the
first live action (') movie since the
classic Hizaed of (): in 1939. "It
computer-generated imagery im-
proves fast enough Disney's
Wilhite observed, "()z this time
could be a digitalized domain
In the final analysis, however, it
isn't the special-effects techniques
that make an � . endure. 1 he
creature made ot rubber and steal,
the deer made ot pencil marks on
paper, all participate in narratives
that compel belief. As Walt Disney
never tired of saying, "first get the
stoiv neht
BOYD'S
BARBER &
HAIR
STYLIST
Melvin H. Boyd
Mel H. Boyd, Jr.
Danm R. Boyd
Call for appointment.
Located 1008 S. Evans St.
OPEN
HOUSE
Baptist Student Union
Thurs Au�. 26, 5:30 p.m.
( (truer oj 10th cV awrence Sts.
Hamburger
Cookout
No Charge 1 ots ol t un
Square Dance
Follow ing the Cookout
Nelson Jan is. Caller
(Makes even the beginner
feel like a professional)
i
�SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS'SSSST'SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS'SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
FAMOIS
PIMA
321 E. 10th St. Across from ECU
featuring
Pizza, Subs, Spagetti, Lasagna, &
Cold Beverages.
Fast Delivery within city limits.
FREE DRINKS with delivery. A ticket with
each pizza is given. Students bringing in 5
tickets in each month by the 25th get $2.50 re-
fund and will be eligible for monthly drawing
1st prize � $75
2nd prize � $50
3rd prize � $25
of
DINE INOR TAKEOUTS
PHONE 758-5982 758-5616
m
mj
back get
�wwwwwwwww
A
VERANDA ROOM
Tues-Sat.
Appearing "SOUND EXPRESS"
Happy Hour
Fri. - 1.30-7.00
Free Beef Ribs & Tacos
ARBOR ROOM SPECIAL
Only
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Sat. Night - 5:30'til closing
All the Prime Rib & All
he burgundy wine you can drink
Wed. � Shrimp & Chablis
AH you can eat & drink 3.V5
td
fe Ramada Inn 264 By Pqss M
to welcome you
90 oSs weekend
this
70 off
rhe finest
suiRSTOOC
ln todies'Fashions
pnooe
756 9955
Hours.
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1
THF FAS! CAROl IMAN
-l .1 SI 24. 1982
!
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The Saving Place
SM
Store Hours
Monday-Saturday
9:30'til 9:00
K mart- ADVERTISED
MERCHANDISE POUC f
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t'vefl ite" ' v- - - v' � ��� ,�
�ceS-Ki iiefTi ,s no' a.aar ky pv
chase due 'c ar, unforeseen eason
k mar mi1 ssj- a Wa� Cef or request
lo' n me'fav3�se ione lte� o -easo
at 'at . . ' � MOd a' Via
sate p'wre te e.?� d-d-af - rMl
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Thurs. Sat
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m
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PAPER
3.97
Wall
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Shampoo
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rug cleaner
Our Reg 22 87
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Portfolio Pocks
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Pillowcases
4.97
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Full FlatFitted
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Kmart Brand White
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��� ii.lL�l1 .f.i.tiLiJ





8
1VII l AS I CAROl INi N
l GUST24, l�M2



Marilyn Combined Sex With Screen Naturally
Continued From Page 2
the best of all possible Monroes for generations to
came.
Marilyn and the camera hit it off immediately. Back
in 1945, she was singled out of a line of paint-sprayers at
a defense plant in Van Nuys by a young Army
photographer named Daid Conover. (His book came
out last year.) He was on orders from Capt. Ronald
Reagan to get shots o women in war work, and Marilvn
filled the role admirabK .
When she shucked her workclothes and put on a
sweater, he got her picture into Yank and Stars &.
Stripes. Response was immediate: Marilyn was named
Miss Flamethrower. The Girl Most I ikeU to Thaw Out
Alaska and the person the Seventh Division Medical
C orps would most like to examine.
Modeling and the movies could not be far behind �
and weren't. One month in 1947 she was on five
magazine covers simultaneously; the next month she
was on the Mother Wore Tights set. at 20th Ceniury-
1 ox. getting a siknt color test from the great
cmematographer Icon Shamrov. "Fvery frame of the
test radiated sex Shamrov said. Norma Jean
Doughertv was signed on the spot at SI25 a week,
rechristened Marilyn Monroe and put to work.
If there was anything more auspicious than her movie
debut in Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay!(mules had the titles
roles), it was being trimmed from that film. Her one-
word bit � "Hello" to June Haver in a crowd scene �
wound up on the cutting-room floor, and Fox followed
thai with a fast goodbye.
The star was stillborn, but unbowed: after fiddling
around in B movies, Marilyn soon graduated to the A
team � A as in The Asphalt Jungle and All About Eve.
Angela, her role in John Huston's The Asphalt Jungle.
was the most conspicuous star-making part since 1 ana
1 urner donned a sweater and took her famous walk into
I he Big Time. Marilvn pouted and purred on the
periphery of that crime melodrama as the house pet of
shvster lawyer Louis C'alhern. The script tried to pass
her off as his quote neice unquote, but her performance
left no doubt about the nature of the relationship: Her
eyes were smoky with hot innocence.
Joseph L. Mankiewicz caught those eyes and quickly
cast her as Miss Caswell in All About Eve. She was �
another euphemism � a "protege" of drama critic
George Sanders, who blithely introduced her to Bette
Davis in a party scene as "a graduate of the
Copacabana School of Dramatic Arts
A kinder career could have followed that double blast
of flesh impact in 1950, but it didn't. Darryl F. Zanuck
yanked her back to the Fox fold and memoed his troops
to write her into any picture that could use a sexy
blonde. The results were conventional slink-ons in such
Huff as Love Nest, We're Not Married, let's Make It
I egal and (. Henry's Full House. During the filming of
�l.v Young As You Feel, co-star Constance Bennett was
heard to quip, "I here's a broad with a future behind
her
That remark proved, soon enough, to be much more
than nisi a catchy wisecrack: In 1952 came the picture
that put Marilyn on the map � and, indeed, all over the
globe. Her career was just getting into gear at Fox when
a blackmailer came forth threatening to make public the
fact that she had once posed nude for a calendar. Such a
revelation in those hypocritically high-collared times
was sure to send any rising young starlet into a fast
nosedive, so her studio suggested she lie like hell.
Instead, Marilyn called a news conference and 'fessed
up. "Did you really have nothing on?" one newsman
tentatively ventured. "Oh yes Marilyn replied, "1 had
the radio on She said she did the picture back in 1949
simply because she needed money. That excuse went
down well with the people, most of whom quickly
queued up to get their copies of the calendar.
That shot of Marilyn, sprawled majestically on red
satin, became the very first Playboy centerfold � and
the most famous calendar-art in the world. All Marilyn
ever got out of it was $50 and a bad cold, but the public
bv now had her number. By the end of 1953, the trade
press reported that she had made more money for her
studio than any other actress in Hollywood. In the 10
years she had left on the screen, her movies made $200
million.
Marilyn never forgot who her real friends were. "The
people made me a star � no studio, no person, but the
people did she said in her last interview with life
(which was on the stands at the time of her death). "1
like people. The 'public' scares me, but people 1 trust
As well she should have: If Zanuck had had his way
� and he usually did at Fox � he would have kept
Marilyn spinning her wheels in dumb-blonde bits. But
the people had spoken � very loud and very clear �
and he had no other recourse than to turn up the white
heat of stardom.
The last of her secondary leads was the pick of that
lackluster litter: She played a voluptious office-
decoration with no visible secretarial skills in a Howard
Hawks comedy called Monkey Business. Charles
Coburn more or less sealed her screen image-to-come
when he handed her a sheaf of copy and said, "Find so-
meone to type this Then, as Marilyn hip-waved her
way out of the room, Coburn turned to Cary Grant and
said, by way of explanation, "Well, any stenographer
can spell
Primarily, Fox kept Marilyn confined to comedies
and musicals. In How To Marry A Millionaire, she pro-
ved delightfully daft as the myopic mantrap who kept
taking off her glasses and running into walls. Her
reward: winning the I.orelei Fee role in Gentlemen
Prefer Blondes over the queen of the lot (Betty Grable),
the Broadway original (Carol Channing) and the
definitive dumb-blonde (Judy Holliday).
By this time, the name of Marilyn Monroe (MM in
lip-smacking shorthand) had become synonymous with
sex. And the sort of sex she projected on the screen was
non-threatening, life-affirming, rather joyful for a
generation conditioned to keeping it under the covers.
But she objected � long before women's lib � to being
labeled a sex symbol.
"I never quite understood it, this sex symbol she
once said. "1 always thought symbols were things you
clash together? That's the trouble, a sex symbol
becomes a thing. I just hate to be a thing. But, it I'm go-
ing to be a svmbol of something, I'd rather have it
sex We are all born sexual creatures, thank God. and
it's a pity so many people despise and crush this natural
gift. Art, real art, comes from it � everything
Even a solid-gold career. But a girl can giggle and ng
gle and wiggle just so long. Marilyn wanted more. She
wanted to be taken seriously as an actress What she had
in mind, she said, was Grushenka in The Brothers
Karamazov. That news quickly became the joke ol the
industry, and Marilvn soon tound herself plavmg a
variation on the joke a hat-check girl who longed to
play Chekhov � in There's No Business like Show
Business.
Marilyn opted for No Business � and studio suspen-
sion over the role she was being offered � and struck
out for the Actor's Studio in New York to study deep-
dish Stanislavsky with Fee Strasberg. A year of stud.
worked wonders for her confidence, and she returned to
the screen in a performance that should have won her an
Oscar nomination � that of Chene, the somewhat soil
ed "chantoosie" in Bus Stop, who is browbeaten into
marriage by a young virginal, hot-to-trot cow poke
Most critics, overlooking the slight fact that it wa
virtually an inflection-for-infleetion imitation of Kim
Stanley's Broadway original, consider this her finest ac-
ting job. First to sound the general alarm was Bo-dev
Crowther: "Hold onto your chairseverybody. and
set for a rattling surprise. Marilyn Monroe has finally
proved herself an actress in Bus Stop. She and the pic-
ture are swell
"It might be kind of a relief to be finished -he told
Life. "It's sort of like you don't know what kind - i
yard dash you're running, but then you're at the finish
line and you sort of sigh � you've made it! But you
never have � you have to start all over again. I now live
in my work and in a few relationships with the few peo
pie I can really count on. Fame will go by and. so long,
I've had you, fame. If it goes by, I've always known it
was fickle
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�t�-
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
At East Carolina University
752-7240 Meeting in the Methodist Student Center
758 0145 501 East Fifth Street
St DAYS from 5:30 -
IRh I MOVIE, SANDWICHBLFFFT,
and DISC I SSIO about movie:
Stewart LaNeave
Campus Minister
September 5 �u Ordf ! ive Twice
September 12 � Brian's Song
September 19 � And Justice tor ill
September 26 � Ordinary People
October 10 � orha. The I,reek
October 24 � Kramer i Kramer
October 31 � Who's -it raid of t irginta Hoo
November" � The Creek Tycoon
November 14 � Batchassid) and
� � Sundance Kid
November 21 � American Gigolo
November 2 � the Rules o) Sf.irriage
December 5� The I arthlmg
Local and
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s 1- t A( VLTYLUSt Hat Ml Ml 1 I HI FFt !
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PROGRAM and St PPERfor STL DENTS 2.0� for meat
tall Study on American Religiousults: Off and Onampm
October 26 � Sfargaui
August 31 � Margaux's
September 7 � Stechuan Carden
September 14 � Marathon
September 21 � Sneetarolme
September 28 � riendl
October 5 � Pizza ttut
(Ktober 12 � hour Seasons
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November � Marathon
November 16 � Seet aroltnes
November 23 � hrtendh
November 30 � tour season
December 7 � I'izza Hut
WEDNESDAYS from 12 20-l:30p.in
(,RAl). STl DENT LI N It at MlMX HALl SNACKBAR
We'll gather at one of the round tables.
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HOT DOC, It SCHmtheGROt DI.EVFJ of the
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FEl L O H SHIP FOOD
DISCUSSION
Attend weeklv worship services a First Presbyterian.
14th & Eim Street, or an of the other area churches.
Plan earl to be a part of the fall retreat to
Washington. D. C, on November 4 to look into
how religion influences the American Political Pro-
cess. We will be staying at the Pilgrimage next to the
Church of the Pilgrims. 2201 P Street. N. W
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Free Small Salad
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264 By Pass
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V

OUT I






THE EAST CAROI INI AN
AUGUST 24, 1982
Hank Jr. 'Whiskey Bent9
C ontinued From Page 2
no callei seemed angt during the time he was
there In fact, one � a woman � paid him one
ot his finest compliments
oui tather hooked me on country music
she said, "and you keep me there "
Before a recent Chicago-area show, Williams,
ining barefooted on a couch in a posh subur-
! hotel and looking shghtK uncomfortable
and embairassed amid the luur - recalled e-
ning to a New York media representative that
wasn't just New York he disliked. He said he
In't like cities per se: "Any city � Miami.
Houston, Nashville, you name it Perhaps sur-
prised thai Williams included Nashulle in the
the man asked him where he lived.
"Vinemont, la Williams responded, "and
Buchanan, lenn
W tlliams abrubtK laughed.
"I get mone out of the big banks and put it in
little banks he added "1 get it out of
Citibank and take it back to First Alabama
urban songs aren't the only ones
Williams writes and oi sings; he also writes and
sual country ones about dunking and
b and loving In addition, he writes and
some not-so usual ones about his impas
t I loe of guns and rural freedom and his
. tradition" ot tame, folly, ecstas and
the legac ot a tather who entered
Hi. - Heaven at age 2 after mixing alcohol
narital misery
W ill ams' songs often aren't as pretty as his
- classic ballads ot heartbreak The son is
known tor tierce country-rock with under-
� a steely intention to live lite as he
S me ot these undertones bespeak a
diness, and others can sometimes be
icted as empathetic with drug use.
Hi- Dixie songs dispia an almost-rabid sec-
tonalism that can make a listener wonder it
salizes that there arc some beautiful
ts north of the Mason-Dixon 1 me �
f his Northern tans don't think it
his national appeal to ocasionally
- mething about one ot those places.
w lliams remains one of the most power-
majoi anists on today's country
1 lie reason is that he is a more than
talented titan who devoutly believes
e things he writes and sings about.
� is :al ardom is made much more
by 5 an b the expression of true feel-
� today's most popular country
. ds neutral and bland, as it made tot
: e purpose ot" not turning anbod off,
ve one oi turning somebody
ns to have little respect for such
l ies
V 1
"I've had controversy with my stuff forever
he said with a shrug. "That's the whole thing. If
I can get excited about something, it's easier to
get you excited about it. Instead of just saying,
Here's my next song, friends. 'Plang, plang,
plang! . . I'm not gonna mention names, but I
don't go home and put on the records of this and
that artist and listen to an acre of strings and all
this wholesomeness and happiness.
"Now that doesn't mean I have to hear radical
songs. 1 can sure listen to Joe Ely or Con Hunley
oi I ee Greenwood
At 33, Williams himself appears less "radical"
behind the scenes than on the surface.
Reared in the shadow � forced in youth, in
fact, to become virtually a musical replica � of
his tragic father, Williams has survived a spec-
tacularly unhappy first marriage, alcohol and dr-
rug abuse, a suicide attempt and a fall in the
Rockies that necessitated an interminable succes-
sion of operations to rebuild his face. More
surgery is scheduled next month to repair the tear
duct of his right eye.
But today's tears, unlike so many earlier ones,
result from a physical malfunction instead of a
heavy heart. Williams is emphatic and convinc-
ing when he describes himself as happy today.
Having severed eight years ago the disadvan-
tageous business ties of his Nashvile youth, he
has found in rural Alabama a new career direc-
tion that is his own rather than a duplication of
his father's.
He has also gathered like Kilgore around to
help him run his burgeoning business, and he
lives happily with second wife Becky, to whom he
gives credit for turning his life around.
"1 voice all these opinions and get upset about
things, but 1 couldn't be any happier than I am
todav he said.
"1 sometimes think about Daddy, and how
some of us make it across that line and some of
us don't.
"M line wasn't nearly dying (in the fall) in
Montana; it was all drugs and whiskey and going
through that stuff vvith Ciwen (his first wife),
listening to Daddy's records and saying to
myself, 'Why do we have to through this hell?'
"Some make it. some don't. Johnny Cash
could have died just as easily as Jimi Hendrix. So
could I
"But if you can just get across that damn crazy-
stage, and it you've got that good-hearted
woman at home and friends around you in the
business, you're gonna be all right
With this new lease on life, Williams is deter-
mined to live out his time in his own way. He
seems to do what he wants instead of what is
assumed to be professionally smart.
When interviewed, he was considering doing a
commercial for the National Rifle Association.
According to Williams, he was told, "You're one
of the few who don't have a bunch of agents who
say, 'Oh, God! We can't give him that image "
He was also planning to help in the upcoming
Alabama gubernatorial campaign of controver-
sial ex-governor and ex-presidential candidate
George Wallace � because Wallace "did too
many things for grandmother and grandfather.
I've seen him at too many funerals
Williams didn't go to the recent huge New
York anti-nuclear arms rally, which some of his
advisers suggested might be politic, because he
saw no sense in exerting popular pressure on
Washington to ban bombs when no such popular
pressure could be exerted on Moscow.
And he continues to voice his dislike for the ur-
ban centers where most of the nation's record
buyers live.
At first glance, Williams' outspoken views
would seem to make him disliked everywhere ex-
cept in places like Vinemont (pop.480), Ala and
Buchanan (pop. "about 200"), Tenn.
But they don't. Although there is a probable
downside to all his controversy � Williams has
yet to be even nominated for, let alone presented,
any of the awards dispensed each autumn by
Nashville's powerful and conservative Country
Music Association � he is hardly unpopular.
His current E iektra Records album, High
Notes, is one of tne best sellers among the top 75
listed on the country hit charts, which also con-
tain three other Williams IPs, including one
(Whiskey Bent and Hell Bound) that has been on
for 140 weeks.
And for several weeks earlier this year, he had
a total of eight LPs among the top 75, the highest
number in the history of the rankings.
Later this month, around the time of his eye
operation, actor Richard Thomas will come to
Alabama to begin portraying him in a TV movie
biography.
One reason for Williams' popularity is ob-
viously that a significant number of urban record
buyers share his views about a lot of things Thev
possibly sense that his anti-urban stance has been
oversimplified into something negative when it
actually represents something positive.
In his music, the nation's cities are really sym-
bols of urban pressure, while the South sym-
bolizes pastoral peace. As Williams himself ex
plained to a record company executive in New
York: "What 1 mean in this whole anti-city thing
is just that I'd rather have grass under my feel
and be walking beside a stream than be walking
on sidewalk with pollution over my head
Perhaps because of the strong masculine tone
in much of his music, he seems to have attracted
a male as well as a female following.
Onto the stages on which performs, he said,
people toss both "Beechnut tobacco pouches and
panties � which is kinda the best of both
worlds
Winkler Stars In Opie's 'Night Shift'
Sexy Shelley Long co-stars with Henry Winkler in the sleeper summer
comedy Night Shift, directed by TV's Ron Howard, now showing at
Greenville's Buccaneer Theatre. Also at the Buccaneer are An Officer
and a Gentleman and The BeastMaster. The Plaza Cinema has The
Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Star Wars and Zapped The Park
Theatre is showing The Challenge. At the Plitt Entertainment Center
are F. T Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Ytung Doctors in me and
Friday the 13th Part 3. Firefox is at the Tice Drive-In. The 264
Playhouse has X-rated 1 Thousand and One Frolic Sights.
BE A
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isaazrE
The Revlon Flex Rampage-Rally
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Now Flex the fabulous Instant
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Flex-Rampage Rally Sweepstakes! Irs
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Sport Dodges personal sire pickup
The raHy is a Sports Car Club of America
Solo II SkiB Raly If you win youll be at
the wheel of your own Rampage Or
win one of hundreds of other pnzes.
Go to your partrcipattng Flex retailer
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If your name is drawn youH get $50
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I
8
8
9

GOTCHA COVERED
WESTERN WEAR
1st ANNIVERSARYSALE
August 23-September 4th
Boots - $25 & up
Selected styles by Justin, Dan Post,
Acme, Dingo, Texas and More.
Just received a new selection
of Tony Lamas
Jeans by Lee, Chic & Sedgefield.
Everyday low price $18 to $21
Hats � all straw & felt by Stetson,
Bailey, Bee, More � $5 & up
Present student I.D. & receive free o
BRASS JEANS KEY RING
Located 6 miles from Carolina East Mall
SouthonHwy.il Mon. Sat. 9: 30 am. 600 p.m. 746-2402
i
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OVERTONE SKIS
211 JarvisSt. Greenville
758-7600
The Timberland� boat shoe is the perfect addition to
any wardrobe It has waterproof brown leather uppers that
stay soft and supple, solid brass eyelets that won't rust, and
a permanently bonded soft, white ibram sole lor longer
wear.
It's the classic boat shoe with one big difference:
Timberland quality
Located 3rd & Jarvis
Only 2 Blocks
from Campus
Overton's 'Polo' Styled
Skiers Shirt
Timberland
2 Eyelet
3 Eyelet
Retail
59.95
69.95
OVERTON'S
43.95
47.95
Reg. $29.95
'19.95
SAVE 30 ON SELECTED SHOES
T-Shirts
Long Sleeve wSleeve Imprint
$9 95
Reg.$15.95 SALE �
Short Sleeve Reg $8.95 SALE 5.95
OVERTON'S SWEAT PANTS
OVERTON'S SWEAT SHIRT
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1





THfc FAS I e ARCH IN1AN
Sports
-l (,l si 24 ivh2
Pagi
Emory Anxious To Get '82 Season Underway
B CINDY PLEASANTS
spore tdilor
Dressed tn the usual coaching at-
tire, head football coach Ed Emory
sat behind his large, paper-clattered
desk.
The phone beside him rung
almost constantly, and his secretary
wandered in occasionally to relay a
message or two.
Coach Emory is a busy man these
days, but that should come as no
surprise. Emory, along with hun-
dreds of coaches throughout the
country, are preparing their teams
for battle. And this year. ECU will
be fighting with a new strategy. One
of the Pirates' main weapons will be
the all-new -formation.
During the month of August,
Emory and his staff begai training
the incoming freshman recuits, put-
ting them through strength, condi-
tioning and sprint tests. And Emory
liked what he saw.
"They reported in excellent shape
he said. "We'll have some outstan-
ding players, but we'll also have to
wait and see when we get pads on so
we can measure their talents
Along with the varsity's arrival on
August 17, the coaches began
holding four practices per day. star-
ting at 6:30 a.m. and winding up
after an 8 p.m. practice.
Frequent work-outs, however, are
needed to prepare for a grueling
schedule. And Emory made no
qualms about the difficulty of the
eleven games that lie ahead.
"We probably hae the most
challenging road schedule in the
country he said. "When you pla
on somebody else's field, with
somebody else's ball and referees,
that can be a plus for them
�'But that won't be no excuse for
losing
Emorv grew accustomed to road
trips during his high school years at
Camden Military Academy in
Camden, S. C. The outstanding
tackle played in 48 away games and
only three home contests, a set-up
that he and his teammates didn't
mind too much. "We sure did like
getting out of school he said, with
a smile.
Emory believes that playing at
another school enables the team to
concentrate entirely on the game
without any distractions. Traveling,
though, does cause one major
stipulation.
"We can only take 55 players
Emory said, "so we can't take along
too many specialists He added
that not having ECU fans and sup-
porters along was another minus.
But the team will have the support
of its many followers at the first
away game of the season. The
Pirates will play N. C. State in
Raleigh on September 11. The
meeting should definitely prove to
be an exciting one, especially since
both players and coaches will be
eager to start the season off with a
win.
State Coach Monte Kiffin and
Emory have each encountered
disappointing seasons, personal
criticism and the pressure of proving
to others just how effective they can
be. But Emory said he doesn't try
to put a great deal of emphasis on
one game.
"We could blow smoke all the
time, he said, "but if you lose, you
might feel the season is over
Emory compared the situation to
that of a student. "If a student con-
centrates on only one exam he
said, "he'll probably end up flunk-
ing the other five
Emory said he is trying to prepare
for an 11-game schedule rather than
ECU's season opener.
"We hope the students and fans
won't base their opinions of the
team on the N. C. State game he
said. "We're just gonna try to be
the best we can be
The head coach is mainly con-
cerned with those elements that he
and the team can control. "If their
quarterback connects 28 out of 30
passes, we have no control over
that he said. "But we can control
our own destiny
And Emory will be counting on a
stable quarterback to help control
that destiny � a position that is
presently filled by one big question
mark.
Two upperclassmen, Kevin In-
gram and Greg Stewart, are vying
for the role, and Emory is anxious
to find a number-one quarterback.
"I've always said that quarter-
backing is like being married to two
women at the same time he said.
"You just can't split quarterback
time. At least it's never worked for
me anyway
In other positions, Emory would
be more than satisfied to have
players splitting time. Emory's
ultimate goal is to build depth and
to have reliable replacements on
hand when needed.
With a schedule that includes
such powerhouses as Central
Michigan, West Virginia and
Missouri, any coach would be wor-
ried about injuries. "We need to
ECU Head Football Coach Fd Emory
stay healthy he said, "but we're
playing so many individuals
Emory further added that because
of injuries, building quality and
depth in the second and third teams
is vital.
In the kicking department, ECU
lost punter Tom Barnhardt, and
Emory described this year's kicking
team as being "very young with a
lot of potential Sophomore Kurt
Larkins became the starting
placekicker after spring drills and
played in one varsity game during
the 1981 season. Incoming freshman
Jeff Heath, who is from Virginia
Beach, Va will also have some
playing time, according to Emory.
The all-state kicker has a 38-yard
punting average, and kicked a
record 58-yard field goal in high
school.
Sophomore punter Jeff Bolch
made one punt in 1981 for 27 yards.
The Hickory native was named as
the second punter after spring drills.
Defensively, All-America can-
didate Jody Schulz will lead an
outstanding line-up. The 6-4,
235-pound defensive end had 125
tackles for the Pirates last season,
including 56 solo stops. Labeled as
ECU's best pass rusher and open-
field tackier, Schulz led the team
with nine quarterback sacks and had
over 10 tackles in seven games in
1982.
Jody Schul? is one of the finest
football players I've ever had the
pleasure to coach Emory said.
Joining Schul will be defensive
tackles Hal Stephens and Steve
Hamilton. Stephens, a 220-pound
junior, has accumulated 105 tackles
m the last two years. In 1981, he
had tour tackles in back field tor a
22-yard loss
Hamilton, a junior from
Williamsvilk, N.V started in the
right tackle position during spring
drills. -V a part-time starter last
season. Hamilton racked up 19
tackles in 1981.
In offense, Emory described the
team as "good depth-wise
"Our offensive line has a chance
to be a good one he said,
"especially our tight ends Nor
wood Vann, a junior tight end.
caught 20 passes last season for
yards, including two touchdowns.
The Warsaw native caught six
passes tor 110 yards in the purple-
gold game and averages 15.1 varJs
per game.
laiibak Jimmy Walden rushed
40 times during the '81 season for a
net 152 yards. The 5-10. l"5-pound
sophomore had a -vard punt
return against Southwest Louisiana
and returned 25 kickoffs for 540
yards During pre-season practice.
Walden was clocked a: 4.4s in the
40-yard dash, the lowest time
�corded.
Offensive guard Terry Long -
stt EMORY, Pae 2
AD Ken Karr Speaks On Coaches, Fans, Money
B CINDY PLEASANTS
sports r (1 Iff if
Athletic director Kenneth Karr
spent most of the summer interview-
ing applicants for coaching posi-
tions.
Overall, Karr replaced four
coaches in the strength, basketball,
soccer and tennis programs. But
Karr said he expects frequent per-
sonnel changes.
"In virtually any program, you'll
have personnel changes every year
he said. "But the athletic depart-
ment is the most unstable of all
department situations
Karr explained that because many
coaches range from ages 25 to 35,
plans to continue an education or
the acceptance of other job offers
are two reasons why resignations are
so common every few years.
How does Karr rate the present
athletic staff? "1 think we're for-
tunate to have so many hard- work-
ing and dedicated people who are
also trying to stretch our budget
dollars Karr said many of the
athletic programs have not been
funded. "These are hard times he
said.
I ast year, three sports were drop-
ped because of lacking funds; gym-
nastics, wrestling and field hockey.
But Karr does not anticipate that
any other programs will be discon-
tinued in the future. "We may,
however, have to reduce our spen-
ding to continue on a very tight
budget he said.
Karr is also aware of the need to
improve athletic facilities in order to
comr ete with other Division-I
schools. "We are behind schedule
he said, "but enhancing our ability
to compete is, of course, one ol our
objectives
"Through the next five to ten
years, we shall concern ourselves
with upgrading our facilities at
every opportunity
But upgrading facilities takes
money. And with a half-million-
dollar deficit, the athletic depart-
ment's funds are too sparce to
finance renovations and building
costs.
According to Karr. promoting
revenue support effectively is the
answer. "I think we have many
resources in the private sector that
may have not opted to assist us in
our pursuit of athletic excellence
Karr pointed out that monetary
funds are not the only source needed
to assure success in ECU's athletic
programs. "We need student sup-
port he said. "We need to
motivate our teams to pi
exciting
and to give 110 percent, knowing
that winning will be the end result
fans can often make or break the
the success of a team, and Karr
would like to see EC I students and
supporters making even more noise.
"We must have the students to fill
the stands and ticket-buying fans
Karr said winning teams
demonstrate the importance of sup-
port b) the large ;urn-outs at games.
"Their stadiums are full of
hometown tans he said, "making
it difficult to even move on the foot-
ball field
Karr said he believes the fans will
help determine whether or not the
football team is a complete success
in an tough, new division.
�'We want teams to play hard
enough so both opponents and fans
will respect us he said. "Defeat is
oniv temporary
Pirates Looking For Pre- Season Answers
t4 -
Pirate Defensive Coordinator Larry Beckish
INJURIES: Tailback standout
Jimmy Walden may be out of com-
mission for six weeks. The
Greensboro native is scheduled for
X-rays on Monday. Walden was in-
jured last Friday and was diagnosed
as having a strained liga-
ment Defensive tackle Barry
Smith, a junior college transfer
from San Francisco City College,
underwent surgery on his thumb last
week to repair ligament and muscle
damage. Coach Emory reported on
Sunday that he expected Smith to be
running by Monday Senior
linebacker Mike Grant, who under-
went knee surgery in May. will not
be ready for ECU's first game
against N. C. State. Emory said he
is hopeful that Mike Grant will be
back, however, in the very near
future. Grant was the Pirates'
leading tackier during the 1981 year
with 132 tacklesA total of 15
players suffered some type of injury
during last week's preseason prac-
tices.
TWO QUARTERBACKS?
Emory might just change his mind
about having one starting quarter-
back this season. "It's awful close
the head coach said, referring to
juniors Greg Stewart and Kevin In-
gram. "We haven't been able to
separate them in practice
Offensive coordinator Larry
Beckish said he would start Stewart
in the N. C. State if he had to make
a choice right now, but things could
change in the next few weeks. "The
big reason Stewart is the number-
one quarterback right now is
because he makes a higher percen-
tage of corrective judgments
Beckish said. The first-year coach
said Stewart is an excellent throwing
back, and Ingram has been running
the ball well. "Both talents fit right
in with what we're trying to do
Stewart said he won't be surprised
if he ends up splitting time with n-
gram. "I expect it he said. "It's
gonna take two, one to pass and one
to run
RECOVERED? Terry Long, who
was involved in a car collision last
week, said he is still having a few
side effects. "When 1 run into peo-
ple with a helmet, I still get a little
dizzy
Long is one player that doesn't
mind playing seven away games. "I
like to play in front of big crowds
he said.
The offensive guard, now bench
pressing 500 pounds, has high hopes
for the '82 season. "I'd like to
make All-America if 1 could he
said, "and I'd like to be the
strongest player in the country if
possible Some people already
think so, Terry.
Cindy Pleasants
B� A Look Inside
KILLER INSTINCT! After being
a bouncer at a restaurant-bar in
Virginia Beach all summer, Clint
Harris is ready to play football.
And the free safety is definitely
looking forward to trie first game of
the season. "I don't like red and
white Harris said, "and I don't
like the Wolfpack
BEST EVER. Emory said this
year's team is conditioned more
mentally than any team he's been
around in a long time. "This team
has more character than any team
I've seen Emory said they have
not had one bad preseason practice,
and the players have been very in-
tense and enthusiastic.
CHANGES. Former quarter-
backs Larry Brobst and Carlton
Nelson are now receivers. Brobst
will be working at the flankerback
position, with Nelson performing as
a wide receiverLarry Roark will
be joining the Pirate squad once
again as a split end.
CONFIDENCE! Emory said he
will be very surprised if this team
isn't competitive in every game this
season. And Beckish definitelv
agrees. A former offensive coor-
dinator at Wichita State, Beckish
said he accepted the job here at
ECU with his eves wide open. Why
would a coach accept a position at a
school that seemed to have a troubl-
ed program? "Because I'm helping
them get out of trouble. " he said.
"I was very aware of the problems
and it really didn't bother me,
because we're gonna get it done
Beckish explained his 1-formation
concept, which will include a split-
back veer and two extra divebacks.
The concept is different from other
I-formations. but Beckish believes it
will work.
"There's only one way to do it
he said, "And that's my way
Beckish said he gives his players a
little advice, and his words of
wisdom to the quarterbacks were,
"Don't get us beat
"If they won't get us beat he
said, "I think we'll have a helluva
chance
DEFENSE. Defensive coor-
dinator Norm Parker said this year
will be a real challenge, and is pleas-
ed with the strength and speed of the
defensive line. In reference to the
N. C. State game, Parker said that
because of changes in the
Wolfpack's offensive game, nobody
really knows what to expect. But
the team will be able to scout State's
film after the W olfpack's first game
on September 4.
PRFSEASON PRACTICE-
Tightend Norwood Vann is looking
sharp in the new 1-formation, along
with Carlton "Snake" Nelson and
Milton Corsey. Stewart's passes
were not too soft or too hard, but
just right. He also took advantage
of openings down the middle
whenever he had a chance.
Defensive end Jody Schulz is still
the player to watch and will be all
season.
t





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24, 1982
s���KaSi
Emory Praises Commitment
To Pirate Football Program
& w
Pirates In Last Year's Clash with Duke
Continued From Page 1
considered ECU's
strongest player. The
6-0, 279-pound junior
bench presses over 500
pounds and was named
as the team's most im-
proved offensive player
in 1981.
Presently, Emory has
150 players on the
Pirate squad and can
only give 30 scholar-
ships per year.
Emory said he usual-
ly redshirts 15 to 18
players each season.
And because of a new
rule, Emory can now
redshirt any freshman
that he may choose.
The final decision,
however, is left up to
the student and his
parents. "We would
never make a players
do something he
doesn't want to do he
said.
In the past few mon-
ths, Emory has seen a
greater commitment to
upgrade the ECU foot-
ball program �
something he is thrilled
about. "1 believe our
new chancellor is com-
mitted to excellence
he said. "More has
been done in the last
three months than in
the last three years
Emory is referring to
the present fund-raising
drive to raise one-
million dollars and the
plans for renovating
Scales Field House.
I know it takes time
to build a program
Emory said, "but the
time is limited, on a
coach's contract
After last year's 5-6
record, does the
pressure to have a win-
ning season bother
Emory? "I've never
been bothered by
pressure he said, "1
strive on adversity
"It's the frustrations
that bother me
Emory said that not
having the same advan-
tages as other
Division-1 schools have
is frustrating. "But
frustrations can also be
a key to better
somebody else he
said.
Emory feels that
making somebody else
better is right down his
line of work.
The husky, sandy-
haired coach believes in
putting his student-
athletes first.
"My job is to make
others successful he
said he said, "then I
will be success!ul
"1 ask no plaver to
do something I
wouldn't ask mv own
son to do "
Emorv said he would
like football to be
fourth in their lives,
following religion.
family, and academic,
respectively
Although all plavers
must be handled in-
dividual I v , E m o r v
believes that one should
always treat others in
the same manner that
they would like to be
treated.
But respect
something an athlete
must earn. Emory gives
every plaver the same
words of advice, "II
you act like a man, then
you'll be treated like a
man
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1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1982
"
J
Schulz Tackles Publicity,Opponents
tter recording 125
tackles in his first
season of major college
football, Jody Schulz
suddenly finds his
name mentioned on
All-America checklists,
not to mention televi-
sion, radio and posters.
On the field. Schulz
is aggressive and tough;
off the field, he is shy
and quiet. He says he
uist wants to ignore all
of the publicity and
plav like he did last
ear.
"Jod had a great,
great junior year
ECl head coach Ed
1 mory said. "He's got
the size, speed and
strength to be the best
in the country. We ex-
pect great things from
him this year
Emory's optimism is
well-founded. After
transferring from near-
b Chow an College as a
junior, he led the
Pirates with 56 solo
tackles, nine quarter-
back sacks for "8 yards
in losses, and six
tackles in the backfield
for 16 yards in losses.
After making the
All-South Independent
team and the AP All-
America honorable
mention list last fall,
Schulz returns as the
Pirate's best bet for
All-America honors.
As far as personal
goals, Jody would like
for the Pirates to ha e a
winning season and
possibly go to a bowl
game.
His most spectacular
game last season was
against Richmond.
Schulz had 16 tackles
and was all over the
field as East Carolina
approached the final
period trailing the
Spiders 7-3. He picked
off a Steve krainoek
pass and returned it 24
yards to set up the go-
ahead touchdown.
Minutes later, he
scooped up a blocked
field goal and rambled
26 vards to the Rich-
mond 32 to set up the
winning touchdown in
the 17-13 Pirate vic-
tory.
Schulz continued to
work out and stay in
shape during the sum-
mer. "He's come back
dedicated and eager
said defensive coor-
dinator Norm Parker.
"He's got the attitude
that he's ready to do
some hard work to
have a good year he
said. "He knows that
he's got to provide
some leadership this
season
"He's working to
live up to his role on the
team
Pirate Defensive End Jody Schulz
FOR THOSE WHO BELIEVE IN MIRACLES
SUPER VALUES
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Monday-Saturday 5 tokens for $1.00
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The high score of the week for every machine
receives a prize from a sponsor
We also cater to parties of all kinds � Call 752-0241
Tuesday Night - Ladies' Night - 6 takens $1.00
Bring the following coupon to receive 8 tokens for BflgjaM DOLLAR! The coupon also regists for
the chance to win $50.00 in tokens. Drawing to be held September 27. See you there!
Heaiai riamaa � rvigr.
J.D. DAWSONCO.
Catalog Showroom
YOUR CATALOG GIFT STOREAND A WHOLE LOT MORE
218 E. 10th St
Greenville
102 E. Main St.
Belhaven
Bring $1.00 with coupon for 8 tokens � Register for $50.00 in tokens.
Name-�
Phone
Address

PeiOKG CUPPER
Hair Salon Unisex
With a large number of
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forward
to catering to your every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that the
PEKING CLIPPER is accustomed to
doing. We stay open Tues. & Thurs.
nights till 9:30 p.m.
Call for appointment at 758-1505
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Located 1 2 mile from ECU at 1005-A Hamilton St.
Free Checking
for Students
24 hr. Banking Services
3 LOCatiOnS Arlington Blvd.
H CO �QQQ Corner of 3rd & Green
J Z0O O y Stantonsburg Rd.
Welcome Back Students:
?
Nobody works border for your money.
B6&T
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
FCOCM. m��oaT muraxz lwjtk��
n





THfc EASTCAROl IN1AN
AUGUST 24. 1982
Fall Intramural Schedule
ACTIVITY
Bicycle Race
Flag Football
Putt-Putt (team)
3 on 3 Basketball
Tennis Singles Tourney
Punt, Pass, and Kick
Track Meet
Cross Campus Run
Soccer
Bowling
Raquetball Singles
Team Handball
Free Throw Contest
Pre Season Basketball
FacStaff Raquetball
ENTRY DATES PLAY BEGINS
8-30 to 9-6
9-6 to 9-8
9-13 to 9-15
9-20 to 9-22
9-20 to 9-23
9-20 to 9-29
10-4 to 10-11
10-11 to 10-23
to
10-11
10-11
10-11
10-13
to 10-13
to 10-20
10-25 to 10-27
11-22 to 11-30
11-29 to 12-1
11-29 to 12-2
September 8
September 13
September 20
September 27
September 27
September 29
October 13
October 23
October 25
October 25
October 25
November 1
November 30
December 3-5
December 6
CAPTAIN'S MEETING
9-7 8 p.m. Memorial 102
9-9 7 p.m. Biology 103
9-16 4 p.m. Brewster B-102
9-23 4 p.m. Memorial 102
10-12 7 p.m. Brewster C-103
10-20 7 p.m. Brewster C-103
10-21 4 p.m. Mendenhall 221
10-28 6 p.m. Brewster C-103
12-2 7 p.m. Brewster C-103
ACTIVITY
Student Life Celebrates
Slow Pitch Softball
Almost Anything Goes
Flag Football
Volleyball (Recreational)
Soap Opera Trivia Contest
ENTRY DATES PLAY BEGINS CAPTAIN'S MEETING
9-13 to 9-15
9-27 to 9-30
10-4 to 10-6
10-25 to 10-27
11-1 to 11-3
August 25
September 20
October 6
October 11
November 1
November 8
9-16 7 p.m
10-5 7 p.m.
10-7 7 p m
10-28 8 p.m
11-4 7 p.m
Brewster C-103
Brewster C-103
Brewster (103
Brewster C-103
Mendenhall 221
ACTIVITY
Flag Football
Soccer
Team Handball
Pre-Season Raquetball Tourney
Co-Rec Flag Football
Volleyball
DATE
9-2
10-11
10-25
11-29
10-4
10-27
TIME
6-8 p.m.
6-8 p.m
6-8 p.m.
6-8 p.m.
6-8 p.m.
8-10 p.m.
PLACE
Memorial 102
Memorial 102
Memorial 102
Memorial 102
Memorial 102
Memorial 102
Intramurals: Something For All
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
B KEN BOI.TON
Whether you're into
flag-football, putt-
putt, or soap opera
triia, there is
something for everyone
in the upcoming ECU
intramurals program.
Indcr the guidance of
Dr. Wayne Edwards,
there will be a total of
fifty-one activities this
year, an all-time high.
During the 1481-1982
ear, a total of 4,851
students look part, in-
cluding 65.2 percent of
the full-time male
enrollment. This was
the highest percentage
of male participants in
1 Cl history. Accor-
ding to Edwards, "We
were really pleased with
the program last year
and vc anticipate even
more participation thU
sear
side from the ac-
t iv i11cs themselves,
there are other services
ottered to students by
the Department of In-
tramural Recreational
Services. There is an ex-
tensive outdoor recrea-
tion program that was
started :ast year. Some
of the expeditions that
are scheduled for this
year are a white-water
rafting trip down the
Nantahala River on �
September 11, and a
backpacking trip in the
Appalachian Moun-
tains during fall break.
Another service is the
Sports Medicine
Department. It is
available to all students
and there will be a
training room located
downstairs in Memorial
Gym that will open
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and 1:30 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. Heading the
department will be
Jamie Maul, a certified
athletic trainer with a
Master's degree from
the University of
Virginia. ECU will be
the only school in the
state with an In-
tramural Sports also be a fitness pro- classes offered will b((
Medicine Department. gram offered. There aerobic fitness, jaz ex
were twenty-seven ercise, persona
Along with outdoor fitness classes last year
recreation and sports with 755 students par- defense, and belly
medicine, there will ticipating. Some of the dancing.
Athletic Department
Plans Renovations
fTar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
�ilJ
�-� l ,
79
t-J at

� �
A?
i
Crosi Green �re�t Bridge
Take leH a 11 Ugh'
By KEN BOLTON
Auhiiai Saxxts i�f
With the growing
popularity of ECU
sports, the athletic
department has decided
to renovate and make
additions to Scales
Field House. The field
house currently houses
locker rooms and of-
fices for the football
and baseball teams.
The construction.
which is planned to get
under way immediate-
ly, will be done on the
south side of the
building. In the future.
Scales will house the
Sports Information Of-
fices, a central equip-
ment room and a laun-
dry facility. The equip-
ment room and laundry
facility will be available
to the entire athletic
department.
There are also plan
for renovation of th
locker rooms, but n
interior work will r
done until November
According to Directo
of Operations Bol1
Helmick, the construe
tion will not affect th�
football season in an;
way. The planned com
pletion date is February
1, 1983.
Located one block down on
0
lett
1
Phcne
758
0327
jrtt:
Airport Road
iiia
All You
Can Eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
$499
Special 11-3
Saturday's Only
ALL THE
POPCORN SHRIMP
YOU CAN EAT
August & September
tZOIJ
Selected Shirts 1200 & 15
Plus Ta
ECU Pirate Shirts15'
And 25 off
all other shirts in stock
iAYDEN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
Open 7 days � 744-3389
- ECU STUDENTS GREEN FEES $6.00 DURING WEEK -
WELCOMI
BACK TO
We accept checks for up
to $5.00 over amount
of purchase
Coke
2 Litre
SI 09
Bud & Bud Light
$259
s
INTRODUCING . . .
ONE DAY EYEGLASS
SERVICE
Now, on most single vision plastic lenses
we can provide you with the finished pro-
duct in 24 hours. Affordable fees, quick,
accurate service. Seeing is Believing.
DR. PETER W. HOLLIS
�Y�CAKC�KT�R
OF GR��NVILl� PA
TIPTON ANNEX. 228 GREENVILLE BLVD
756-9404
i
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i
i
i
i
i
k
$
20
00
OFF
Any Prescription
Eyeglasses
Must Be Presented At Time Of Order
Other Discounts Do Not Apply
Six Pack
Carolina
Dairies
12 Gal. Milk
$25
with coupon only
$200
Discount on any
case of Beverage
western union
Telegraphic money
orders
3 Packs
Cigarettes
Cella
S319
Free tea with
purchase of
Western Burger
Double Western
Telegrams
Soft-Serve
ICE CREAM
WELCOME BACK TO
Hamburger Platter
t
�t





fHE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24,1982 5
1982 EAST UAROl IN A V ARSl
IN FOOTBA1 I SCHEDUI
September II at C State
Septembei Us EAST rENNESSEE S
Septembei 25CENTRA1 MICH
at Missouri
RICHMOND
at Florida State
II I INOIS STATI
at Wesi Virginia
at Texas -ilineion
October 9
Octobei t
Octobei 23
Octobei 30
No ember 6
I XII
CiAN
ilki
1
November H at William & iar
November 20 a: 1 emple
Raleigh, Nc
GREENV II 1 I
GREENVII I I
Columbia, MO
GREENVILI I
1 allahassee, HI
GREENVII 1 1
Morgantow n, W V
ilington, TX
W illiamsburg, A
Philadelphia. PA
NC
NC"
NC
NC
(X)
00
00
30
(X)
00
oo
30
30
30
30
T Formation Will Bring
A Stronger Aerial Attack
Cl offense's
new aq "I" foi
matton will I . lb
one majoi change on
. strongei
aeria at ack.
ccording to offen-
sive coordinator 1 arr
Beckish, "Fan- can ex
uhere from I I
teen to torn parses a
ne this year
"In order to win a
an attack based on
passing, you have to
have a lion a a
passing team such a
Brig ha in Young or
Florida State The ke
tor u- will b. . tive
balance he said
u a totij
schedule thai include
sC
four hon - - . th
Pirates � eed a
ot offensive prod
order to comrj
ith perenn a vers
V � ii and
- at s far as
much passing -
lake place, the game
plan will change each
came according to the
�n and the type ol
defensive alignment
the emplov
This will be Beckish's
firsi vear a I c I aftei
spending 199-19S1 as
the offensive coor-
dinator at Wichita
State Universit), W ith
Beckish's guidance,
ichita state was ninth
in the nation in offen-
sive production last
year, averaging more
424 ards per
game
In the past. ECl
m-na Ied t h e
Southern Conference
because the Pirates
recruited all ol the
quick. speed players
that were in abundance
around this area. Then
other teams started
suiting players with
-peed and started
changing then defense
count e t I he
wishbone attack
ccording
Beckish, "Since the
passing game wasn't a
majoi threat out ol the
wishbone, the "1" for-
mation will enable us to
have a better balance
between the running
and passing game "
One major dif-
ference between the
two types ol offensive
formation is the posi-
tion ot the receivers.
With the wishbone,
there is onl one wide
receiver. With the "1"
formation, there will be
a wide receiver lined up
on one side as well as a
flanker on the other
Side
As Beckish puts it,
the formation will help
the Pirate passing at-
tack. "This will help us
utilize out talent better.
We have some real fine
athletes in the quartei -
back and receiver posi-
tion?
Th e quar t e r b ac k
situation is still unsettl-
ed with juniors dreg
Stewan and Kevin In-
gram leading the way.
Also showing excellent
potential a i e
sophomore 1 arr
Brobsl and transfer
John V illiams. Axcor
ding to Beckish. "II I
had to pla a game to
.1a . I'd -tart Stewart,
but we're still going on
a weekly basis. t this
time, we still have not
decided on a starting
quarterback tor the
NC State game
�tter practicing up
to tour times a dav dui
ing the past couple ol
weeks, the players and
coaches are looking
forward to the start of
the season. According
to Beckish. "The kid-
have been very enflin-
ed during practice, and
have responded bettei
to the workouts bettei
than I anticipated. V e
are very excited about
the season, and I think
we are very capable ot
being a good, solid,
physically tough foot
ball team
ABORTIONS
I !� tr9 t�rmtaati�ai
App'ts Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-IO0 321 0575
oflMflAiAioooooooQOOoooocoooooooooooooooa
c "
r?M0Y
ADVERTISING
PAYS
FOR MORE INFO CALL
757-6366
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS


SAAD'S
SHOF REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
7s� m�
o
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ARCADE
VARIETY SHOP
& GRILL
Q
OP
o
o
Hamburgers & Hotdogs
Video Game Room
Corner of 5th & Reade
)OOOOQOOOQQOOQQOQOOOOQOQOQOQQPQQQQQQO�fl
HAPPY
HOUR
DAILY
4p.m7 p.m.
)
Ol PON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON
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y 12 HERO
EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 30, 1982 j
COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON COUPON
DELI SANDWICHES, HEROES, SOUPS, SALADS,
VEGETARIAN SANDWICHES, FRESHLY BAKED
BREADS � LIVE ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
DIAL FOR
TAKEOUT
7580080
VIDEO, PINBALL, BILLIARDS
513 COTANCHE ST. ACROSS FROM U.B.E.
Y WELCOMES BACK
ALL ECU STUDENTS
204 E. 5th St.
DOWNTOWN
� :�
sveemts
ALBUMS and TAPES
-MEN AT WORK-
PATRICE RUSHEN-
REO SPEEDWAGON
BILLY SQUIER-
JOHN COUGAR-
LARRY GRAHAM-
ALSO FEATURING:
ASHFORD AND SIMPSON
-38 SPECIAL-
PAUL MCCARTNEY
GEORGE THOROGOOD
-BAD COMPANY-
JEFFEREY OSBOURNE
We &yy Used Albums and We Selj Used Albums
Nice Selection of Cuts-Outs (100 guaranteed product)
New 'Nice Price' Section (all LPs 4.99 or less)
Complete Line of Blank Tapes and Accessories
Toj
't foe&ET
.( HECK OlTOl R POSTER AI CTIOM
(1st Monday of each month)
t f





FHl EASTCAROI INIAN
Al GUST 24. I�M2
Coach Sets High Goals
For ECU Soccer Squad
New head soccer
coach Robbie Church
wants the ECU soccer
team to plav an ex-
citing, explosive tvpe of
game in 1982
"Our goals are to
provide exciting and
entertaining soccer this
season he said. "We
also hope to draw a
larger number of spec-
tators
With most of las;
yeai 's stai ters returning
and a schedule loaded
with nationally-ranked
teams, there will be an
abundance of action-
tilled soccet this year
W nh Church at the
helm, the Pirates will
have excellent creden-
tials at the coaching
spot He attended high
school in Atlanta,
Georgia at the Wood-
ward Academy While
there, he was an all-
state soccer player dur
ing his iunior and
senior vears, and led
the state in scoring his
senior sear.
After high school.
Church attended Pfeif-
fer College in
Misenheimer, N.C
where he played three
vears of varsit soccer.
After all three ears of
college pla. he was
named all-conference
as well as all-district.
He was named team
captain his junior and
senior years, and was
selected MVP his senior
year.
Church also worked
recently as a graduate
assistant at the Univer-
sity of South Carolina
Spartanburg. White at
ECU. he will be atten-
ding graduate school.
Church's biggest
problem this season
will be having to
replace goalie Steve
Brown who graduated.
But there will not be
too many positions to
fill on this year's squad
with all of the defensive
backfield-returnees.
"We will have a lot of
experienced players,
especially on defense.
We will have to find the
right combination up
front Church said.
Practice began Mon-
day morning and the
first game is scheduled
for September 12.
Anyone interested in
trying out as a walk-on
should contact coach
Church.
In September, the
Pirates will play
Christopher Newport
College on September
12; Pfeifter College on
September 17; William
and Mary on
September 19; N.C.
State on September 22;
El on College on
September 25; and
Virginia W'esleyan on
September 29.
No 'Better Man For The Job'
Coach Jerry Lee
"We couldn't have
picked a better man tor
;he job Those were
the words used b Bob
Helmick to describe
new ECU golf coach
Jerrv 1 ee Helmick.
who is the Assistant
Athletic Director In
Charge Of Operations,
helped select Lee for
'he iob
I ee, who has played
on the ECU golf team
tor the last four ears,
graduated in 1981, and
plans to return in the
tall to work on his
Master's degree. He
will be serving an ap-
preniiceship to the Pro-
fessional Golf Associa-
tion in hopes of earning
a cub card. Lee plans
on making a career as a
ib pi Sessional or as
a college coach. "Jerrv
- vei dedicated to the
game of golf. He was
acting team captain,
and he is verv familiar
with the area tour-
naments and coaches
Helmick said.
1 ast vear's team had
a successful season
while competing with
some of the best teams
in this part of the coun-
try. The high point of
the year came in April
at the Old Dominion
Invitational in irgmia.
Don Sweeting, an ECU
business major from
Carrboro. N.C, won
the tournament over a
strong field at the
Seascope Golf and
Country Club. While
winning the tourna-
ment. Sweeting set a
course and tournament
record with a 64 in the
first round. The Pirates
finished third in a field
that included such na-
tional powers as Wake
Forest, Honda State.
North Carolina State,
and the University of
North Carolina
W ith it's talent. ECU
has the potential to
lump right into the
thick of things in every
tournament this year.
There will be six return-
ing lettermen on this
year's squad, with
Sweeting holding down
the number one posi-
tion Along with
Sweeting, returning let-
termen are: Chris Cza-
ja, John Riddle, David
Waggoner and Rick
Woodard.
As I ee puts it, the in-
coming class could
have as much potential
as the returning golfers.
"We could have more
talent this year than
we've had in the four
years that I've been
here. We have possiblv
the finest group of
golfers coming in that
we have ever had The
recruits expected to
hae the biggest impact
are: Robert Wilson
from Fayetteville,
lames Watterson from
Pittsburgh, Penn-
sylvania. Roger
New some trom Port-
smouth. Virginia and
W ill Dubose from Fort
I auderdale, Florida.
This vear's schedule
will begin at North
Carolina State on
September 16 There
will be a total of four-
teen tournaments this
year, with six in the fall
and eight in the spring.
ECU has always played
a very competitive
schedule, and will con-
tinue to do so this year
According to Helmick.
"We play as tough a
schedule as anyone, in-
cluding top teams from
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference and Southern
Conference. We should
make an impression
this year
The Third Annual
last Carolina Invita-
tional will be held this
vear at the Brook
Valley Country Club
from March' 8-10.
Among the schools par-
ticipating in the tourna-
ment will be defending
champion Georgia
Southern.
There will be a
meeting on Wednes-
day, August 25 at 7:30
p.m. in Minges Col-
iseum for all golfers -
returning, incoming
and potential.
� WASH
HOUS
Modern Laundramats Close to Campus
lOthSt.
Across from Krispy Kreme (752-6117)
14th St.
1 Block from the "Hill" (752-9636)
�Large capacity washers
� Lots Dryer
�Color TV's with cable
�Video Games
� FluffFold Service
� lOthSt. � Open24hrs.
�Attendants
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Introductory Offer
FREE WASH wthis coupon
Limit 1 coupon per visit.
Offer expires Aug. 29,1982
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
HOLLOWELL'S
DRUG STORES
Old Fashioned
S Orangeades and I. em onades
$( 9 oz38C
16 oz 53C
2 litre Pepsi, Mtn. Dew & Diet Pepsi
98C
We feature
Fountain Coke and Pepsi
Banana Splits
Sundaes
Float
smalL42C
large62C
Milkshakes62C
Hot Dogs2or$1.00
We are open every day of the year to serve you.
We have been in Greenville for over 50 years.
This fountain special is offered only at
Hollowell's � 911 Dickinson Avenue
Hollo well's �1700 West Sixth Street
We have 3 stores to serve you in Greenville
911 Dickinson Avenue 752-7105
1700 West Sixth Street 758-4104
315 Stantonsburg Road 757-1076
Specials Good for 2 days only
L
T
Al
Dei
mJi.
Located across from the girl's highrise dorms � Downtown
Welcome Back
ECU Students
we missed you!
We appreciate your business.
To show our appreciation we're having
� SPECIAL HAPPY HOURS - �
wTues Aug. 24th & Wed Aug. 25tht
3 p.m. until closing.
All 12 oz. draughts - 25C
We specialize in the finest sandwiches and
a 31 item salad bar. Also serving ice cream.
Hours: 11 a.m11 p.m. MonSat.
Sunday 11 a.m9 p.m.
Ml
For take out call 752-4761
521 Cotanche St. Georgetown Shoppe
V
I
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I
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v
h r
!
A -
is)
I
Sa
ano D
men:
Boston
Faveit
vuli a:
rhei
road
nion.
Caroiil
Georcj
Thcf
State i





THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
Al C.LSI 24. lvx:
P1RA TES
in the pros
FOOD TOWN
'illHW,ilaWllfraf
USPA Ckeiee Family Pack
Fast Carolina's pro d. aft choices are doing well
in training camp. Nev England has George
Crump listed as second ti defensive end
behind Julius Adams. St. Louis rookie Tootie
Robbins started for St. Louis early in the
preseason. Both have good shots at making the
roster NFI veterans are doing well also. Runn-
ingback Sam Harrell is Minnesota's leading
rusher after two games with 60 yards on just five
carries He also has five receptions for 29 yards
and a touchdown The Patriots' Tony Collins is
his team leading rusher after one game. He
picked up 40 yards on six carries against Pitt-
sburgh, averaging 6 yards a total. He broke a
22-vard run in the game. Across from Colbns in
fhe preseason game was linebacker Zack Valen-
tine, who figures to see more plasing time as a
Steeler reserve this season.
Lady Pirates A
Team Of Youth
And Experience
There is a lot oi excitement surrounding the
1982-1983 Lady Pirates Basketball team.
Three starters and three experienced letterwin-
ners join the best recruiting crop in ECU history.
as Cathy Andruzzi begins her fifth season here.
Musing from last season will be ECU starters
Sam Jones and Lillion Barnes, who have been
named as Andruzzi's student assistants this year.
Both played key roles last season as the young
Lad Pirates rallied from a shaky 4-7 start to
make the NCAA playoff field. The Pirates finish-
ed with a P-10 record for the 1982 season.
Senior starters Mary Denkler, Fran Hooks and
Loletha Harrison, however, return to bolster
hopes for a third straight playoff appearance for
the Lady Pirates.
QenktW led ttije stafe i scoring4asi season with
a 20.1 average, which boosted her to fourth place
on the career scoring list with 1,203 points. Twice
she hit for 29 points in a game, and she was in
double figures in every outing. Her 8.6 reboun-
ding average was tops for ECU. Her strong suit is
getting points in the clutch, and she will be
counted on for leadership in her senior season.
Harrison, a 5-8 jumping jack, was honored as
the best defender on last season's team. She
blocked five shots in the 68-60 win over N.C.
State and drew tough defensive jobs every game.
Her 6.9 scoring and 6.7 rebounding averages
show her strength.
Hooks converted from forward to point guard
last season and was the steadying force down the
stretch for the Lady Pirates. Not the quickest
point guard, she employed good court sense and
solid defense to grow into a vital starter.
Sophomore Loraine Foster (9.3 ppg) and
Darlene Chaney (6.9 ppg and 5.3 rpg) have future
stardom written all over them. The lightening-
quick Foster became instant offense off the bench
late last season. Chaney also blossomed late and
carried her exceptional play into the summer to
make the East squad for the National Sports
Festival. Senior point guard Caren Truske has
collected two letters and averaged better than an
assist each seven minutes of playing time last
season.
Freshmen will make their mark on the
1982-1983 team. Three high school All-Americas
� Bridget Jenkins, Sylvia Bragg and Lisa
Squirewell � head the list. Jenkins was the
Associated Press player-of-the-year in North
Carolina last season after her Southwest
Edgecombe team took its second consecutive
state 3-A title with its second straight undefeated
record. The 5-7 guard
was considered the top prep player in the state last
season.
Bragg, a 5-8 wing player, joins old high school
teammate Chaney at ECU- She was a Converse
All-America and played in the McDonald's All-
Star Classic in Washington, D.C last spring.
Squirewell is a powerful inside player who
averaged 24 points a game as a senior at Wake
Forest-Rolesville. She joined Jenkins on the AP
all-state first team.
Add to that trio powerful center Rita Simmons
of Miami (Fla.) Central High School and Eunice
Hargett. an honor student from West Craven
High School. Simmons poured in 22.6 points and
tore down 18 rebounds a game as a senior.
Hargett was an "A" student and a class leader
while making all-conference in basketball four
times.
A prestigious field for the second annual Con-
verse Lady Pirate classic highlights the 1982-1983
East Carolina University women's basketball
schedule.
National title runnerup Cheney State, Clemson
and Detroit join the Lady Pirates for the tourna-
ment in Minges on Feb. 12-13. Old Dominion,
Boston U Appalachian State, UNC-Charlotte,
Fayettcville State, St. Peter's and Morehead State
will also visit Minges.
The Lady Pirates will play a rugged 18-game
road schedule which include trips to Old Domi-
nion, N.C. State, Notre Dame and the South
Carolina Invitational, featuring East Carolina,
Georgia, Mercer and South Carolina.
The home opener will be against Fayetteville
State on Nov. 22.
LFPINCSCVAGA
Thaia prices good thru
Saturday, August 21, 1982
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Towels
Why Pay 17 ?
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3109
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Light IT Lively
399
16 Oz. � Pbillift'e
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4 100
7.1S Oz. � Fooa" Ten
Macaroni & Cheese
389

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14 Oz. - ioof ft EatBoof ft Ckeeea fteef
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Prices good at 6reeville Feed Team Stare only
f
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24,M2
Basketball Brings 'Bigs' To Minges
ECU SPORTS INFORMATION
The 1982-83 East Carolina
University men's basketball
schedule will be highlighted with
home-and-home games against all
opponents of the ECAC-South, and
a visit by the University of South
Carolina Gamecocks to Minges Col-
iseum.
The 27-game schedule will feature
12 contests at home and a very
strong lineup of opponents on the
road, including three NCAA and
one NIT playoff teams from last
season. From the NCAA field, Easl
Carolina faces N. C. State in
Raleigh, December 8; Southwestern
I ouisiana in the opening game of
the Bavou Classic, December 17-18
and James Madison University,
both home and away.
From last season's NIT field, the
Pirates face the University of Rich-
mond at home and away.
New head coach Charlie Harrison
wili find his club on the road for
seven of the first nine garrcs. in-
cluding the opener on Nov. 27 at
Duke University.
"Our schedule is very difficult
Harrison said. "It is not only dif-
ficult from the standpoint of who
we play, but the sequence in which
we play them
First Big-Eight Opponent In '82
Moving Forward
East Carolina
University Director of
Athletics Dr. Kenneth
Karr has announced
that the Pirates will
play at the University
of Illinois in 1987 in
football.
This will mark the
first time a Pirate foot-
ball team has played
against a Big Ten con-
ference opponent. The
two will meet in Cham-
paign on October 3,
1987.
In October of this
year. East Carolina will
venture into the Big
Eight for the first time,
playing the University
of Missouri in Colum-
bia. "Our schedul-
ing of games with Big
Ten and Big Eight op-
ponents continues our
move torward as an
NCAA Division l-A
football school Karr
said. "Over the last
two years, we have add
ed football powers
Florida State. West
Virginia, Missouri, and
m.w. Illinois to oui
schedule, in addition to
renewing a scries with
the I iiiciMi ot
Southern Mississippi
Tickets On Sale Now
For Bucs'Opening Game
Minges Coliseum
Home Of The Pirates
Tickets are now on sale for East
Carolina's opening football game
against N. C. State on September
11.
Student tickets are SI 1.00 each
and can be bought on August 24, 25
and 26 from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. On
Wednesday, August 25, the ECU
Ticket Office will re-open at 7 p.m.
and will remain open until all lines
are gone.
Students may pick up tickets
��
eer Tuesday, Wednesda
Thursday during the week ol
home game. I he first home ticket
tree with each student's ID and -i
tivity card.
A guest ticket is priced al W
each and am additional tickets �
cost S9.0O.
The ticket office, which is U
in Minges C oliseum, will a
open from a.m. to 12 p.m eer
Saturdav.
Building A 'First-Class Athletic Program'
Million
Chancellor Dr. John M.
Howell has announced that a one-
million dollar fund-raising drive will
be held in order to improve the
university's athletic program.
Howell indicated that because of
ECU's placement in the Division
l-A level, funds for needed to enable
each team to compete successfully.
"All of us cheered last Eebruary
when we heard the news that ECU
remained in the Division l-A of the
NCAA Howell said.
"In the months since February,
the additional costs of maintaining
Division-1 programs has become
more and more apparent to us
"We at the University are deter-
mined not only to stay in the top
category, but to compete successful-
ly there.
The project, under the guidance
of a select committee, will be con-
ducted over a five-year period.
Howell said the money will not be
used to pay back the large deficit
within the athletic department, but
will be used to properly fund the
current operating budget to assure
ECU of the ability to compete in tIk-
NCAA Division-I status.
Dr. Ray Minges. a retired physi-
cian and a long-time fund-raiser for
ECU, has agreed to serve as
chariman on the committee. Other
members are: Bob Abbott, a local
public accountant; Jack Edwards,
owner of UBE and several other
businesses; Max Joyner of Jefferson
Standard Insurance; Tommie Little,
a local building contractor; Larry
Mallard, vice-president of NCNB
and a city executive in Greenville;
Cliff Moore, vice-chancellor of
business affairs; Leo Jenkins,
tormer ECU chancellor; Tom Ben-
nett, eastern vice-president of
Wachovia Bank; les C.arner, board
chairman for Garner Wholesale
Merchandisers; and Jerrv Powell, a
newly-appointed city executive ot
Bianch Banking and Trust.
Howell said he has full confidence
in this committee and their abilities
to make the fund-raiser a success.
The chancellor also stated that
ECU should always strive to be in
the top ranks of an program.
��It is a matter ot demonstrating
to the state and nation that this is a
university of great use to the com-
munity it serves he said. "A fine
athletic program, like a fine drama,
art. music or business program
serves that purpose
Howell said he has supervised the
admissions of students long enough
to know that an outstanding athletic
program attracts exceptional
students from all parts of the coun-
try .
"1 et me close by emphasizing
again mv commitment to a first-
class athletic program�in all of our
sports Howell said.

DELI KITCHEN j
Home Cooked Food
Meat & 2 Veg Bread, Be
$"100 Free refills on
coffee & tea.
Breakfast Served 6:30 a.m10:30 a.m.
Sausage & Ham Biscuits � 50
Lunch Served from 11:00-7:30
Homemade Biscuits & Desserts
Eat In or Take Out
103 Raleigh & Dickinson Ave.
752-5339
Why eat anywhere else when you can
eat at the Deli Kitchen
(
629 Dickinson Ave.
Phone 752 2042
Closed
Wednesdays 12 30
Lube, Oil & Filter Change
Includes up to 5 quarts
any Western Auto single
or multi-weight oil, oil
filter (74-5901 ser.).
chassis lube and all
labor. Most U.S. cars.
$
I
10
Putt-Putt Golf and Games
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
OPEN 12 PM DAILY. PHONE 758 1820
Come on out the puttings fine!
49
with this coupon
v ON ECU 10th Streetin i ea GQ� Putt-� Putt .�

Forthefunofit!
i M ! � ! ! W.I
( )
COLE
BUY A KEY
AT REG. PRICE
GET A SPARE KEY
FOR A PENNY
CSkT TT Offers expire Sept. 4, 1982
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
-I
I IN
i iNi
Y
PASS VOID AfTER
8-26-82
it I per pi'isnn per
�M'�'T .1
Welcome Back!
Come See What's On
SALE!
All Swimsuits50 off
All Shorts20 Off
Sundresses50 off
New fall merchandise arriving.
Marsh's
fef-7i Surf
- n -
Sea
Are you HUNG UP about
ways to meet new friends, a
place to enjoy stimulating pro-
grams, or some ways in which
to order your life so that the
stress of school is not over-
whelming? Why not try using
the programming at the
Methodist Student Center �
open house on August 31 from
7 to 9 p.m 501 East Fifth
Street across from Garrett
Dorm. Telephone: 758-2030.
The Wesley Foundation is the represen-
tative of the Methodist church in
ministry to the campus.
PRE-GRAND
OPENING
LADIES SHOE SALE
European Trained Hairstylists
PAIR
TO
PAIR
VALUHSUP TOS42PAIK
Pitt Plaza
Shopping
Center
(Across
from
Radio
Shack)
?
Wi
10-6
Daily
Greenville
756-6088
We have the latest European hairstyles on
videotape. Call ahead or come by today to
select the new fall hairstyle for you.
MonSat.9-6 756 6200
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
B
c
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ser
ai
caneej
the
W H
I
J
fail
A'
Nai
e
diar.
Sai
��-
LS
A
w a;
'
Tea
Fcde
pp
I
v
'
t
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1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1982
d

ne
t
8
Icrts
Buccaneer Babes To
Continue Hard Work
In their third ear oi
ser ue at Eas!
Carolina, the Buc
caneer Babes will lend
their time and service to
the Pirate football
cause this ear
I he mam function of
the Babes is to help
with possible incoming
recruits
W hile lsitme the
t CU campus, a recruit
will be assisted b a
Buccaneer Babe. These
women tr to make the
piaers feel at home in
what is actual!) a
strange land.
The girls conduct
tours of the campus for
the recruits and their
families, showing them
around Mendenhall
Student Center, Ficklen
Stadium, the press box
and field house, the
strength complex and
various other points of
interest.
While in Greenville,
the recruits are helped
b the Buccaneer Babes
with some of the more
informal introductions
around campus. Aftet
all. there are just cer-
tain thines a tootball
coach isn't going to be
able to tell a young
football player about a
college campus.
One o( the main pro-
blems the Babes have is
that their contributions
and efforts often go un-
noticed. According to
eteran member Diane
Dais, "We hope to
have more participa-
tion this eai We hope
tti be able to get a float
in the homecoming
parade as well as a
representative for
homecoming queen
Applications for the
Buccaneer Babes are
handled by Garry Fast,
administrative assistant
for athletics. Last year,
there were approx-
imately 25 Babes, and
each one was assigned
up to five recruits.
It takes a special type
of dedicated person to
be a Buccaneer Babe.
She has to be willing to
work hard with little
recognition. According
to Davis, "It takes so-
meone who really cares
about the football pro-
gram and is willing to
give their own time for
the team
Jones Hopeful For '84 Olympics
bU KEN BOITON
For someone who
In'i even know what
sport was in Mav.
Sam Jones is quickK
becomimg one of the
finesi .cam handball
avers in the United
States
Jones, an a 11 -
America performer on
. Ill I ad Pirate
- . b til team last
has used her
or athletic talent
. ei come her lack oi
familiarity with the
sport
Ver playing in the
National Sports
Festival in In-
dianapolis. Ind Jones
is selected to be a
member oi the US.
National team. If she is
still on the team in
)g4, she be on the
hile plamg in the
National Sports
Festival from July 13 to
31, Jones helped the
South team win the
gold medal. She scored
a goal in eer game,
including three in a row
in the championship
game In the gold
medal game, she played
an important role for
the South as they
deteated the East team
20-IS.
At the end of the
festival, the Women's
Olympic Committee in-
vited three girls to play
for the U.S. National
team. Every six mon,
ths, the committee
evaluates the team and
decides who to keep.
They are called the
U.S. National team un-
til 1984, when they
become the U.S. Olym-
pic team.
I
�s ()l
Accoi
a n e
member
� D i
mpic team.
to Dr.
Edwards, a
oi the Board
ors oi the US.
Handball
nes has a
good
the
aM
in s � Noi
pi ple have the
:v that Sam
he aid. "I'm
exc ted about her
i being in the
,mpics in Los
Sam Jones
I tit
PEPSI Welcomes Back
E.C.U. Students
OUP'S
GSWe
aD
PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY OF GREENVILLE, INC.
1807 Dickinson Avenue � (919) 758-2113
reduces prices
ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES
RegularM39
JuniorJW5
KingX9
SuperXJ&9
Beef n CheddarXttt
DELIcious SANDWICHES
French Dip1.69
Turkey DeluxeU
Roast Beef DeluxejU-W
Ham & Cheese1?9
SublOT
ALL-NEW CHILD'S MEAL (12 & Under) 1.59
Child-size roast beef sandwich,
fries, drink & Arby's cookie
SALAD BAR (Lowest Price in Town!)
All-You-Can-Eat$1 95
Bowl with sandwich purchase1 25
Pre-Made Salad-To-Go1 65
SUPPLEMENTS
French FriesJ&titt .4964
Potato CakesJA 55
DESSERTS
Apple or Cherry Turnover59
Arby's Chocolate Chip Cookie25
DRINKS
Coffee, Hot Tea, Milk40
Soft Drinks455565
Milkshakes69
Greenville Square Shopping Center
708 E.Greenville Blvd.
Student Special
Regular Roast Beef Sandwich, regular French
fries and medium soft drink for
s
$
2.10
with this coupon
Not valid with other coupon or discount Expires Sept 11 1982
MONTUES. � Available
for private parties � Papa
Katz will cater any party or
function. We also have a
mobile D.J. for public use.
WED. � "ORIGINAL
LADIES' LOCKOUT" �
8:30-10:00 � Ladies' only �
Gents in after 10:00.
Touch
Class"
River Bluff Rd.
Behind Putt Putt
758-7912
THLRS.
Appearing �
"Clifford Curry & Hot
Smokin' Brass Happy hour
� 4:00 p.m8:30 p.m.
FRI. � Rock & Roll with
Alan Handleman. Happy
hour �8:30-10:00.
SAT. � Beach nite with John
Moore. Happy hour �
8:30-9:30.
SUN. � "KOPY KAT" �
Ladies' Lockout till 10:00 �
gents in at 11:00 with no
cover all night long.
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will be entitled to 3 guests per
evening. Neat dress and proper identification
will be required of all members and guests,
�bring application & dues to the door and
receive your membership card that night.
Introductory
Membership - $1.00
tor month of S�pt.
Norn
Address
Tolophono No.
�irthoor.
Occupation
Moootos
Musk proff wco
DATI
SIGNATURE
T
i
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24, 1982
FREE I
ALL ECU STUDENTS
INCLUDING FANTASTIC
DISCOUNT COUPONS FROM
OVER 30 OF GREENVILLE'S
FINEST MERCHANTS:
U.B.E.
COUPON
BOOKLET
FREE
Mc DONALDS
OVERTONS
CHEBER FORBES
TREE HOUSE
MALPASS MUFFLER
TODD'S STEREO CENTER
ART & CAMERA
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
BLUE MOON CAFE
MARSH'S SURF & SEA
BOOK BARN
H.L. HODGES
CROW'S NEST
SNOOTY FOX
WOOW RADIO
NEW DELI
KRISPY KREME
ROBINSON'S JEWELERS
SAMMY'S COUNTRY COOKING
BACK STAGE HAIR STUDIO
STADIUM CLEANERS
THE BIKE POST
APPLE RECORDS
ACCUCOPY
STOP-N-GO
TAPSCOTT DESIGNS
bissette's
brody's
GAMA
FOR HEADS ONLY
ART & CAMERA FRAME SHOP
Kcflusutefij
AVAILABLE eMCTOtlJJ FROM THE
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE
DOWNTOWN IN GREENVILLE
COME BY FOR YOURS TODAY!
(NO PURCHASE NECESSARY)
BONUS! ALSO FREE!
OFFICIAL PIRATE'S TREASURE MAP OF ECU!

t
T
.





Title
The East Carolinian, August 24, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 24, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.208
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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