The East Carolinian, July 7, 1982






r

She �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.68
Wednesday, July 7, 1982
Campus Crime Rate
For $1-82 Reported
B CHARLES ROADMAN
Due to an increase in robbery and
larceny, the campus crime rate rose
bv 5.8 percent during the 1981-82
school year. Over $100,000 worth of
cash and merchandise was reported
stolen.
This was an increase of $23,000
over the 80-81 school year.
However, during the same time
period, the ratio of reported crimes-
to-arrests was up by six percent and
the percentage of recovered proper-
ty was also up by more than 17 per-
cent.
Joseph Calder, director of cam-
pus security credits the increase in
arrest and recovered property to an
elevated student awareness.
According to local security ex-
perts, the students are the first line
of criminal defense and can help
reduce the crime rate by reporting
crimes as they are happening or as
soon as possible afterwards.
The blue light system that is cur-
rently going into operation
throughout campus is designed to
Group Keeps Watch
make the reporting of suspected
crime as easy as picking up a phone,
for as soon as any of the phones are
picked up, a campus security agent
is dispatched to the area.
To aid in recovering stolen pro-
perty and help reduce the chances of
property being stolen, students can
have their personal items engraved
and the number recorded at the
security office at no charge.
Another way students can help
reduce the campus crime rate is to
participate in the student reserve.
This is an organization sponsored
bv the campus police and designed
to aid in crime prevention. Duties in
the organization include campus
patrol, handling parking violations
and stadium parking.
According to Calder, over 46 per-
cent oi campus crimes are commit-
ted by non-students. Of the 54 per-
cent committed by students, the vast
majority are committed by one-
semester freshmen who never return
for the second term. Next in line are
the sophmores, juniors, seniors and
a very low percentage being commit-
ted from the graduate level students.
How Did You Spend Your Fourth ?
These students find two different ways. One relaxing under a shad tree; the others bask-
ing in the sun at the beach.
Photo By JOHN LYNCH
Anti-Defamation League Denounces Far-Right's Effectiveness
� un.ovc Uv von'rea storm troopers out. �
B JOHN WEYLER
Null Wnlrr
Editor's note: This article is the
third installment of a series concern-
ing the philosophy of fascism and its
supporters. The first article describ-
ed the basic beliefs oj fascism, and
its most significant outbreak.
Hitler's National Socialist or Nazi
regime. Lije under the Nazis 'm
described by Dr. Bramy Resnik oj
ECU'S foreign Language Depart-
ment, a survivor of the Holocaust.
The second article focused on
Richard F. Becker, an ECL
graduate student and former
member of the Sational Socialist
Party of America (NSPA). This ar-
ticle will examine the history and ac-
tivities oj the NSPA and similar far
right-wing groups.
Norman Olshansky of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith,
an organization which keeps watch
on the radical right, says that these
groups are small and inefficient, all
out of proportion to the publicity
they often receive. He characterizes
them as a "rag tag, outside the
mainstream, hunch of sickles. On
the other hand, what they stand for,
the explosive atmosphere they can
generate with just one or two people
makes them a force which should he
of concern to all . .
Because then doings are shrouded
in secrecy, the exact activities and
origins ol these organizations are
often difficult to ascertain. Certain-
ly, the oldest and most well-known
of them is the Ku Klux Klan, which
dates back to the end of the Civil
War. The Klan once had tens of
thousands of members, but has now
dwindled into dozens of small
splinter groups.
Olshansky calls the Carolina
Knights of the KKK the most
"visible" ol the many Klan associa-
tions in North Carolina, led by a
former Green Beret, they reputedly
run a military-style training camp
near Angier in Johnson County.
North Carolina is also home to a
branch of the so-called United Klans
of America.
White the KKK is quite infamous
a less well-known organization with
members in North Carolina is the
National States Rights Party
(NSRP). Becker, who was once
associated with the NSPA (who says
he no longer shares some of these
groups' beliefs, describes the NSRP
position as being: 'for the expul-
sion o all Jews, and including black
people in a separate country. The.
favor sending some of them back to
Africa "In fact Becker adds.
"one of them told me, he said, 'we
ought to send them half way back to
Africa and let them swim the rest ot
the way
While exact membership figures
for these groups are impossible to
determine, the NSRP appears to be
one of the largest such outfits in
America. Says Becker. "There's
more National States Righters than
there are any other group, and they
can be successful in that was
Primary
RALEIGH, N.C. (UP1) -
Democratic candidates for two Ap-
peals Court seats and the 2nd
District congressional nomination
requested runoffs Tuesday, but the
2nd District Republican nomination
was decided without a fight.
F. Douglas Biddy of Durham
conceded the GOP nomination to
John W. "Jack" Marin following a
Monday night meeting.
In unofficial returns from the
June 29 primary, Marin had 3,076
votes or 48.8 percent of the total to
1,810 votes for Biddy and 1,421 for
Barry L. Gardner of Rocky Mount.
Biddy, who is from Durham, will
face Libertarian Yvonda Sue Lamm
and either H.M. "Mickey"
Michaux Jr. or IT. "Tim" Valen-
tine in November.
Michaux, seeking to become the
first black congressman from North
Carolina in 80 years, led the
Democratic primary with 45,119
votes or 44.2 percent of the total
compared to 34,048 votes for Valen-
tine and 22,983 for former House
Speaker James 1 . Ramsey of Ro-
boro.
Valentine said Tuesday he had
called for a runoff.
Noon Tuesday was the deadline
for calling for a runoff. Second-
place candidates in races where no
candidate received a majority of the
June 29 vote could call for a runoff.
There will be two statewide
runoffs, with Sidney S. Lagles Jr. of
Raleigh requesting a runoff against
Paul Wright of Goldsboro for the
Appeals Court seat being vacated by
Judge Robert Martin and H. Hor-
ton Rountree of Greenville calling
for a runoff against Eugene H.
Phillips ot W inston-Salem for the
seat being vacated by Judge Naomi
Morris.
Larry Edwards, a spokesman for
Biddy, said the decision whether to
request a runoff was put off until
Monday night's meeting with
ECU Student Arrested
In Restaurant Assault
ECU student Kenneth Thomas
Ray, Jr. was arrested early Monday
morning and charged with assault
on a female.
According to Greenville Police
Captain John Briley, Ray allegedly
bit a female patron of the Subway
Restaurant on the right breast. The
police reported that Ray's action is
alledged to have occurred as a result
of a bet between him and his two
companions.
The victim, an employee at
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base,
told the police that Ray got up from
the table where he was seated, came
to her table and bit her on the
breast.
After the incident, which occur-
red early Sunday morning, Ray ran
from the restaurant.
Briley stated that Ray was releas-
ed after posting a $300 bond. The
amount of the bet was reported by
Briley io be ten dollars.
Marin.
"Mann and Biddy found they
were close on many issues he said.
"We decided to get together and
support one candidate and go ahead
with the Republican plan for the
economy
Valentine, a former member oi
the state House and legal adviser
and legislative counsel to former
Gov. Dan K. Moore, said he
believes people who voted for
Ramsey in the first primary will
switch to him July 27.
"I believe my political philosophy
represents the political attitude and
thinking of a great majority of peo-
ple in the 2nd District and I think
that this majority of voters is oppos-
ed to Mr. Michaux' political
stance he said.
Eagles had 187,412 votes in the
June 29 primary to 195,354 votes
for Wright.
Announcing his runott bid.
Eagles criticized a state judicial code
that prohibits candidates tor
judicial offices from commenting
on issues that might come before
their courts.
Eagles said the restriction detracts
from "a partisan election process in
which the people expect to know
and are entitled to know where can-
didates stand on issues of legal
philosophy and any other questions
except specific cases coming before
the courts to which the candidates
aspire
Rountree trailed Phillips in the
primary bv more than 100,000
votes. Phillips got 194,573 or 39.9
percent of the vote in the five-way
race, while Rountree got 91,858
votes.
because nobody says, 'Hey, you're a
Nazi1 or 'you're a Klansman You
don't wear a swastika or a robe with
a hood on it in the States Rights
Party. It's more socially acceptable
to the system to be a member of the
States Rights Party
Lhe American Nazis have a long,
twisted history. Their story begins
with George 1 incotn Rockwell,
whose National Socialist White Peo-
ple Party (NSWPP) attracted a
good deal of attention in the early
sixties. Rockwell was assassinated
bv one of his own followers in 1967,
and the NSWPP was taken over by
former NSRP member Matt Koehl,
who still heads the Nazi group to-
day. A tew years after Rockwell's
death. NSW PP member Frank Col-
lin split with the group (reportedly
he was kicked out because they
discovered his father was Jewish).
Collin moved to Chicago and
founded the National Socialist Par-
tv o America (NSPA), a mimscule
organization which nevertheless
managed to become quite
notorious.
Becker claims that he "met Frank
Collin on two occasions. One was at
the NSPA rally in St. Louis in April
of 1978. That was the one that was
attended by our friend Mr. Hinckley
(President Reagan's would-be
assassin). "1 saw John Hinckley
there, didn't know who he was . . .
He was just another storm trooper,
and at those rallys we don't ask
many questions about our fellow
storm troopers
In 1977, Collin attracted national
attention when he announced the
NSPA would hold a march through
Skokie, Illinois, a small town in
which many survivors of the Nazi
concentration camps lived. After a
storm of controversy and court
legislation, Collin never did march
on Skokie, but won the right to
demonstrate at the Federal Plaza m
Chicago on June 24, 1978. Becker
says he participated: "About all
that march really consisted of was,
we rode in a truck up to the post of-
fice in the Federal Building there.
The police station is down in the
basement there, and the police
escorted us up through the building,
outside onto the Federal Plaza
where (Harold) Covington, Frank
Collin and several others made
speeches to the crowd. They were
drowned out by all the veiling and
hollering and throwing . . . We were
hit bv bottles, brickbats, eggs
especially, lots of eggs, tomatoes,
and various other missies that were
thrown by the crowd
In 1979, the NSPA, which was a
splinter group from the NSW'PP,
splintered again. Collin was ousted
from the organization he founded,
and Covington became leader of a
new NSPA, headquartered in
Raleigh, N.C. Covington formed an
alliance with local Klansmen, and
became involved in the single most
dramatic event involving far-right
wing groups: the Greensboro shoot-
On November 3, 1979. five
members of the Communist
Workers Party were killed and seven
more wounded at a "Death to the
Klan" rally in Greensboro. Six
Klan Nazi members were charged
with murder and rioting, and ac-
quitted by a jury on November 17.
Becker says he, "attended a
gat her ins in franklin County about
two weeks prior to that incident (on
Nov. 3) at which several of the
Klansmen, Nazi party members and
assorted right wingers appeared
there, well-armed with all kinds ol
weapons 1 spoke at that gather-
ing just briefly, for about five
minutes. I didn't make any com-
ment about the proposed sojourn to
Greensboro. All 1 know is that
several people got up and spoke
about the fact that there would be-
an anti-Klan demonstration in
Greensboro on November 3, and
wanted everybody to get up there
that possiblv could, and that they
were having some storm troopers go
up there who were well-prepared for
anv emergency . . "
Becker believes that the group
didn't plan any violence, but
retaliated after being fired on. "As
far as the jury was concerned up
there in Greensboro Becker says,
"they probably agreed with me that
the Communists who were killed
needed killing. And as far as I'm
See FASCISTS, Page 3
Communication Major
Status Still Uncertain
I
Bv CHRIS HARRINGTON
siifl Wnlrr
During the first few days of East
Carolina University's second sum-
mer session for 1982, students and
some faculty members are still
wondering about the status of a pro-
posed communication major for the
ECU campus.
While the University ol North
Carolina's Board of Governors did
meet last month with an agenda that
included discussion and authoriza-
tion of two new programs for ECU,
the communication major was not
one of them.
The programs approved by the
board of governors in their June
meeting were, a bachelor of science
program in accounting and a master
of social work degree.
The accounting major upped the
School of Business's concentration
in accounting from a minor.
The master degree in social work
marked the first graduate level
degree program offered by the
Department of Social Work and
Corrective Services here at ECU.
Presently there is only one other
such graduate program in North
Carolina and that is offered at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
The new program should begin in
fall of 1984, and applications for
admission will be taken during the
1983-84 school year.
The new graduate level course will
focus on the needs of rural areas
and small communities.
As for the proposed communica-
tion major. Dr. Donald J. Stedman,
University of North Carolina
associate vice-president for
academic affairs, said, "At the
earliest the board of governors will
discuss the proposed major at the
July meeting
However, Stedman was certain
that at this month's meeting,
members will be more concerned
with the budget allocations, so that
it is likely that the proposed major
will not be discussed until the
September board meeting.
"My opinion is that the board
meetings are far and few between,
and that for a proposal to be passed
from the planning committee to the
board, means that someone (student
and faculty) has to be determined to
make the committee see that this
proposed major is something to be
reckoned with explained Sted-
man.
Darlene Chaney is one of four
ECU athletes who will be com-
peting in the National Sports
Festival at Indianapolis, Ind. The
event, sponsored by the U.S
Olympic Committee, will run Ju-
ly 24-31. For complete details, see
Sports, page 7.
Inside Index
Announcements2
Classifieds 2
Opinion 4
Compos Forum
Features
Sports






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THE EAST CAROLlNlNJlJLY7,J982 . 3
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Local Nun Returns From CentralAmerica
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Staff U rilrr
"We lack the
sophistication to see
through the propagan-
da the (United States)
state department puts
out. From my ex-
perience, it's a lie
said former East
Carolina campus
minister. Sister Jane
Paris.
Paris just returned to
Greenville after spen-
ding the last two years
doing missionary work
in Central America.
Paris receivied a
graduate degree in
classics from the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill
in 1974. She came to
Greenville in 1976 to
work as a pastoral
associate with the local
Catholic community
and to do cai.ipus
ministry with the ECU
Catholic Newman
Center.
She also worked in
ministry for migrant
Farm workers for two
summers in Sampson
county.
During her stay in
Central America, Paris
worked in a rural
village in Honduras as
well as spending some
time working in El
Salvadoran refugee
boarder camps.
From her experience
she gained insight into
many of the problems
m Central America and
how the United States'
involvement can
sometimes be the
decisive factor in the
outcome of many of
these events.
"Eighty-five percent
of foreign investment
in Honduras is from
the United States
claimed Paris, "but 75
percent of the profit
goes outside the coun-
try
She added that most
of the Honduran
agricultural production
is in cash crops such as
bananas, pineapples,
cotton, sugar cane and
coffee, which are used
for export, most often
to the United States.
"In Honduras, four
percent of the wealthy
people own 55 percent
of the land so the other
96 percent don't have
enough to just basically
live said Paris.
The land per person
ratio is worst in El
Salvador, according to
Paris, where two per-
cent of the people own
60 percent of the land.
What this means is
that the people have no
self-determination
because someone else
owns their land she
explained.
Paris claims that
"land is the key thing"
for the people of Cen-
tral America. Adding
that "our (United
States) military aid to
El Salvador is helping
to keep the people
and
lm
landless
poverished
The refugee camps
Paris visited are located
along the Salvadoran-
Honduran boarder.
They are filled with
thousands of
Salvadoran peasants
who fled the violence in
their homeland.
Paris worked in a
series of six camps over
a two mile area that
housed seven
thousands people.
"The people arrived
extremely malnourish-
ed and ill plus
traumatized and fear-
ful she said. Because
life and death situation
and (this) makes our
concerns (in the U.S.)
look rather petty
Many religious
leaders have been
murdered in Central
America, including a
group of American
nuns. Local people are
tortured or killed
because of their in-
volvement with the
work of the mis-
sionaries.
Paris is against the
U.S. military aid to El
Salvador and praised a
statement from the
United States Con-
ference of Catholic
work in the refugee
camps as her most
memorable experience.
"That's what sticks out
in my mind � the
month I spent in the
refugee camps with the
Salvadoran people
Paris said that upon
returningI had more
questions than what I
went with
Will she return to
this strife torn part of
the world to once again
be a missionary? Her
answer was uncertain.
"But if I go back she
concluded, "it will be
to the refugee camps.
The need is tremen-
dous. There are not
enough people serving
there
For now, Paris is
staying at the Newman
center helping out
Sister Helen Shondell
and Kathleen Jackson
in pastoral and campus
ministry and renewing
old Triendships
throughout North
Carolina.
Fascists Still Thrive
Continued From Page 1
concerned it's a damn shame they
didn't kill them all
Despite all the attention they at-
tracted in Skokie, Greensboro and
elsewhere, the neo-Nazi groups are
shrinking rapidly. Collin is currently
m prison, convicted of sexually
abusing children. Covington has
disappeared from the scene, his
whereabouts unknown except for a
rumor that he ws seen recently in
Charleston, S.C.
The American Nazis have been
plagued with a loss of trust in their
leaders, dwindling membership
authorities, court entanglements,
and lack of funds. "All of this con-
tributes to the demise of what was
already an impotent operation"
says Olshansky. "For all intents and
purposes the neo-Nazis are a thing
of the past
Meanwhile, the Klan, the NSRP,
and other fascist associations con-
tinue to operate in N.C. and nation-
wide. The fourth and final segment
of this series, to be presented next
week, will discuss the questions that
arise about American fascism, and
will examine what influence, il any,
figures, harassment by legal these groups have had in Greenville.
of the high influx of 'Bishops calling for a
people, the camps were
often ill equiped to
meet the demands
made by the people.
The camps often had
"very little food" and
poor health care, Paris
explained.
Paris noted that her
return to the U.S. was
jarring. "You expect
an adjustment when
you go, but when you
come home you don't
expect a difference �
but I'm different
"I'm bombarded by
the amount of things
we have and the
availability of material
goods explained
Paris.
Paris also spoke of
the struggles and
dangers of doing mis-
sionary work in Central
America. "The church
1 come from in Central
America is in a daily
hal to the military aid.
"For once we are
speaking out on the
right side Paris said.
She addedthat the
average person doesn't
know the facts and
doesn't make a point to
get them, and that's
embarrassing. There is
no excuse for this
"We're terribly ig-
norant about what is
going on said Paris,
speaking in regard to
the U.S. government
and corporate activities
in Central America.
Her solution is to
read and study.
"Education is our first
step according to
Paris. She advises all
Americans to expand
their political
knowledge of these
events if justice is to be
realized.
Paris recalls her
Students Return Home
From 'ECU In Morocco'
Nine East Carolina
students have returned
home from the North
African kingdom of
Morocco after six and a
half weeks of study and
travel sponsored by
ECU and the Experi-
ment for International
Living.
Their stay in Moroc-
co began May II when
they flew from New
York to Casablanca.
After an orientation
program and a sightsee-
ing tour of Casablanca,
they traveled to Rabat,
the capital o Morocco,
which was home base
for the ECU-Morocco
program, and took
w
ith
local
lodgings
families.
According to Dr.
Robert C. Cramer, pro-
fessor of geography at
ECU and director of
the program, students
earned full summer ses-
sion credits in
geography, political
science and indepen-
dent studies. Several
students also studied
conversational French.
The students took
field trips to the im-
perial cities of Fez,
Meknes. Marrakech
and the ancient Roman
ruins of Volubilis.
"The students saw
herds of camels, sheep
and goats, climbed
sand dunes, tramped
on the deserts and ex-
plored modern cities as
well as rural villages
with adobe buildings
Cramer said. He added
that they also shopped
in modern store where
the price of an item is
determined onlv after
negotiations.
Cramer also express-
ed hope that the pro-
gram can be continued
next summer, especially
in view of the recent
ctiltiir. I agreement bet-
ween the governments
of Morocco and the
United States.
Peace Committee Protests
Performers Hold Concert
For Public Radio Station j
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
1185 00 Pregnancv Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fur
'her information call 13? OSJi
Toll Free Number
00 131 358) between 9 AM
md 5 P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C
B MIKK HAMER
si�lf Wriier
On July 1, nine
members of the Green-
ville Peace Committee
demonstrated at the
Greenville Post Office
in support of Ben
Sas w a) o t Vista,
California tor his
resistance to draft
registration.
The group also ex-
pressed support for
Patrick O'Neill, a staff
writer for the East
Carolinian, who is serv-
ing a three-month
sentence for civil
disobedience at Fort
Bragg.
The committee has
been involved in other
activities also and, on
July 3, met with other
peace advocates from
around the state to
demonstrate outside
the main gale of
Seymour Johnson Air
Force Base in
Goldsboro.
According to Ms.
Edith Webber of the
East Carolina faculty,
protesters this past
Saturday discussed
ways to involve the
people of Goldsboro
more actively in the
future.
Webber also said
that the group chose
the occasion of the
Fourth of July weekend
to bring to mind the
preservation of the
American values of
liberty and justice.
The protestors nor-
mally meet some
hostility when pro-
testing at Seymour
Johnson; however,
Webber stated that
passers-by seemed
friendlier toward the
demonstrators this
time.
ZHXK:XttH:?t- ��� -�����.��-���
HELP WANTED ADS
fill the
job!
B MIKKHAMK.K
Mall Hnlrr
On the evening of Ju-
ly 13, several Fast
Carolina students and
local Greenville musi-
cians will perform in
the Phoenix room at
the Attic to raise money
for public service radio
�Uatio. WVSP located
in Warrenton, N.C .
This will be the
fourth consecutive year
that Greenville musi-
cians have donated
their time and talents
for the radio station.
Performers for this
year's benefit will in-
clude; "Something
Else a ja group
made up primarily of
music students from
ECU; Lonely and the
Juke Jive Bombers, a
local R and B group;
its listeners to bring
issues to the surface so
and the 1 ighting Wells
Blues Band ol Green-
ville.
Ihe concert will
begin at 9:30 p.m. and
will be recorded lot
possible airing on the
station.
WVSP. whose call
numbers stand for
"voices serving peo-
ple got started in
August 1976 with the
purpose of providing
information and enter-
tainment for the rural,
poor and predominate
black population of
Warren and neighbor-
ing counties in eastern
N.C. and Virginia.
The station's
primary locus, accor-
ding 10 Walter
Nor fleet, the station
director, is on being
responsive to the needs
of its listeners.
Ihe station relics on
that the) mav be
discussed on the air.
Ihe station's stated
goal is "making life a
little better for all per-
sons m the communi-
ty
The station is located
at 9).9 on the FM dial
and broadcasts at
100,000 watts with
Greem tile being on the
eastern perimeter of an
reception area which
extends to the triangle
area on the South and
to Petersburg, Virginia
to the North.
WASP is funded bv
private and public
foundations and also
bv listeners' contribu-
tions.
204 E. 5th St.
Downtown
758-1427
SAVE$THISWEEKON
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LUNCH & SUPPER
ll:00a.m8p.m. Mon-Sat
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PLUSTAX,TEA
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512 E. 14th St.
(2Dlocksdown from Belk dorm)
J.A. UNIFORMS j
SHOP
I
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prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
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off Memorial Drive.
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all? iEaat (Earoimtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, atmmmtmm'
Mike Hughes, mmmmemf
Waverly Mlrritr, dm. �, mtmim Cindy Pleasants, v�m,��
Roblrr Rucks, �,��, mm�i. Ernest Conner, mihw
Phii i ip Manlss, , ��� MhM, Steve Bachner, awataw &
Chris I ichok, r,� ,j,�,� mm, Mike Davis, �intimv
JuK 7. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Used, A bused A nd Taken A way
With the recent federal budget cuts
in financial aid for students and
those still to come, college tuition in
the U.S. has become a sore topic.
The cost of an education skyrockets
while the availability of government
funding plummets.
Students in the 1980s will soon
have to face the grim reality that
Uncle Sam is steadily whittling his
way out of higher education. And
the transition has left and will leave
many students searching frantically
for ways to stay in school. Some will
survive; some others will have to
drop out. And some will never even
make it to their first class. Unfor-
tunately, many capable minds will
never know the challenge of a col-
lege education. They will never live
the "college experience Indeed,
the future of the American college
student is endangered.
But just who is to blame?
Spokesmen for the federal govern-
ment contend that the aid cuts are
actually realignments in the budget
and that the Reagan administration
will expend even greater amounts of
money "to assist American youth to
attend colleges, universities and
other institutions of higher learn-
ing Anyone who believes that gar-
bage may be interested to learn that
I'm looking to sell some beautiful
oceanfront swampland in Florida.
On the contrary, these financial aid
cuts are for real.
However, laying the entire blame
on the federal government is equally
unjust. Although they do control
the ultimate purse strings, at least
some of the fault lies on the
shoulders of students, students who
continually insist on misusing the
federally-supported programs.
Their abuse is not only irrevocably
unfair; it's illegal.
Take student loans (NDSL and
GSL programs) for example.
Although student default may not
be "epidemic as some officials
have claimed, the misuse of these
funds is not as rare an occurrence as
one might believe. With the interest
rates on these loans comparatively
low, many "bargain-conscious"
students have made handsome four-
year investments, collecting an undo
allowance on Uncle Sam's tab. Pret-
ty sly? Sure, it's sly, but unfor-
tunately, their sly bargain ends up
forcing some other, more deserving,
students out of school.
Of course, abuse of student
financial aid monies is but a minor
reason for the current federal
education budget problems. And
perhaps there is some validity to
arguing that our government has its
priorities somewhat askew � i.e
rising defense spending v. financial
aid cuts � but if the recipients of
federal aid continually misuse those
funds, then the principle behind
monetary assistance is lost, and the
incentive to continue the programs
dwindles.
Therefore, students must accept
the fact that they are, at least in
part, responsible for the demise of
financial aid programs in the U.S.
On the other hand, the federal
governments cuts in student
assistance constitute an act of un-
disputed hypocrisy. Where has the
government gone in the past for
research and innovation? To col-
leges and universities. Where have
the major advances in technology
(medical, engineering, military,
etc.) become realities? In colleges
and universities. Where have a vast
majority of this nation's leaders
been cultivated? Certainly not in a
multi-million-dollar warplane.
It is, indeed, unfortunate that our
government cannot see the impen-
ding harm of cutting financial aid
programs. Without federal
assistance, many institutions
around the nation will suffer exten-
sive drops in student enrollment,
despite the contentions of some that
the 1983 cuts are minimal. No mat-
ter what the "experts" say, campus
populations will decline.
But it is equally unfortunate that
a certain young entrepreneurs feel
they have the right to deprive others
of much-needed assistance. This in-
creasing misuse of student loans has
cost American taxpayers a pretty
penny, not to mention the damper
those abusers have put on the
educational goals of others. The
dilemma, which is in itself, a
microcosm of American economics,
is truly a tragedy.
And like a tragedy, there are
those who must suffer, those whose
worthiness will be determined on
the basis of money rather than of
mind. But eventually, the tragedy
winds its course back to the source.
The government will inevitably suf-
fer, as thousands of willing, apt
minds are turned away from the
country's colleges and universities.
Perhaps this dilemma illustrates
that it is time our government
reassessed its priorities. Granted,
others are also at fault, but because
our leaders in Washington have
chosen to balance their precious
budget at the expense of higher
education (and other wothry pro-
grams), they must get the brunt of
the blame.
Regardless of who's at fault,
however, the problem of decreasing
financial aid is at hand, and it's not
simply going to go away. So, those
students fortunate enough to con-
tinue receiving assistance should use
the money with prudence and con-
sideration. After all, you could just
as easily be on the other side of the
educational fence.
tfW
�,& IMfSL �& Co�g. r.� Svc.
jwran-
qBNBWf
HWElFtXJEyKNEEDD
TAUcteUHuL
m
The College Experience
Was I Expecting Too Much ?
I don't know about anyone else, but for
me, the first week of college didn't turn
out exactly as I'd planned. Something � I
don't know what � just didn't click. It
sometimes makes me wonder what went
wrong.
To look at all the brochures and
bulletins � the ones they send by the
dozen the summer before your first year �
you'd think ECU stands for Euphoric
Community Utopia, a place where people
live in proverbial harmony: teachers, ad-
ministrators, janitorsoh yes, and even
students, all working together to make the
"learning experience" more beneficial for
everyone. Tralala.
But it's funny how quickly experience
can shatter expectation. Indeed, how
quickly the truth emerges. For me, the
"learning experience" began shortly �
very shortly � after I arrived.
� � �
Pulling in to the parking lot behind Belk
dorm, my parents and 1 were immediately
presented with a dubious thrill. We were
treated to an exhihition of that great con-
test of wit and skill which has become so
popular among campus intellects � target
spitting. Yes, three of ECU's finest
hawkers were steadfastly engaged in a bat-
tle from the third-floor balcony.
Their victim was an unexpecting
aluminum can, carefully chosen so that ex-
pert shots would ring out for all to hear.
The tension mounted; the atmosphere
thickened; all eyes were on the trio. The
vast crowd grew uneasy awaiting the
emergence of their dorm's champion spit-
ter
Just about that time, Mom suggested we
go inside and register. 1 must admit I was
pained to leave such a close match, but
eventually I gave in.
Inside the lobby, I got my introduction
to the linear concept of college life, the
perpetual line. I thought it funny that the
brochures had made no mention of lines.
When I finally made it to the front, the
adviser proudly presented me with a box. I
excitedly looked inside, only to find that it
�was all the same stuff Mom had bought me
a week earlier. There were tiny containers
with shampoo, powder, mouthwash
Now that 1 think of it, that box was pro-
bably just the RA's convenient way of
dropping some sort of hint. Well, never-
theless, I was overjoyed to learn that all
this "Qood Stuff" was absolutely free
"That's amazing I mumbled in awe. "I
didn't think anything at college was free
With that, the adviser just laughed.
'There's a lot you don't know about col-
lege he explained. "We're not really out
to get anybody. We're just here to make
your stay at ECU as enjoyable as possible.
Oh, by the way, your key deposit is six
bucks
Mike Hughes
Just The Way
It Is
With my impression of college life
dwindling fast, I made my way upstairs to
my new room. I tried to picture how it
would look after I'd arranged the furniture
my way. "It'll be great I thought to
myself. Almost like my own little place.
Well, I was certainly right about the
"little" part. Why, even the cockroaches
had to carry their food out into the hall so
they could sit down to eat. And as if that
wasn't enough, I nearly got a hernia trying
to move my bed.
I soon found out that dorms were ob-
viously not made for sleeping. Very little,
if any, actual sleeping takes place there.
But like the rest of the college campus, the
dorm is an integral part of the total
"learning experience Why, in my first
night alone, I learned at least seven varia-
tions on the ancient backwoods art of
mooing. I suppose some parks and recrea-
tion majors were busy practicing for their
promising careers.
I remember the brochures promising
hours of informative discussion and in-
triguing lecture. I couldn't wait to get in on
that! Little did 1 know then that that mean!
I'd spend eight hours in a drop-add line
listening to three girls gossiping about their
friend Beulah and her weight problem
How intriguing.
Classes, too, were somewhat of a disap-
pointment. Being an idealist � indeed, a
naive idealist � I was up two hours early
and marched to my first class on that
hum.d Thursday in August full of great
hope and expectation. After all, this was
my first real day of college, my first en-
counter with real learning. Well, I must ad-
mit, I did learn something. I didn't unders-
tand too much of the objective explana-
tions, but I sure learned which teachers I
never wanted again.
After a rough day of classes, I was cer-
tainly ready for a good, hardy lunch at the
cafeteria. Boy, was I hungry. I paid no
heed to the silly warning I'd read on a
bathroom wall. "That's what thev say
everywhere I reasoned. "Besides, the
food can't be all that bad Take my ad-
vice, pay heed to those silly warnings on
the bathroom walls.
Speaking of which, I was amazed to find
that bathroom jargon, or porcelain
literature (as it is known in some circles), is
one of the most booming non-credit
courses on campus. I'm sure that the
English faculty would agree that some of
the best freshman compositions are done
with coins.
At first, I was appalled at the language.
(The brochures, again, had forgotten to
mention it.) But not unlike the smell of my
roommate's feet, I eventuallv got used to
it.
Yes, I got used to a lot of things: the
dorm, the teachers, my first name being
changed to a six-digit number. I even got
used to the environmental sounds from
downstairs.
And looking back on the experiences I
had during my first week of college, I
wondered if, in fact, this wasn't what I'd
expected after all.
It sure as hell wasn't.
Campus Forum
Little Denies Henderson's Blame
It is amazing at how easy it is for Eric
Henderson to criticize me now that I
have graduated and no longer reside in
Greenville. If he is looking for a
scapegoat with regard to this year's
financial woes, he should turn to
somebody other than Kirk Little. The
SGA treasurer's job is primarily an ad-
ministrative one. I did not appropriate
the monies; the SGA legislature did. (It
is interesting to note that Mr. Henderson
belonged to the legislature for the past
three years.) I merely accurately record-
ed the appropriations following accep-
table, ethical and sound accounting
principles. During the whole funding
process, the SGA legislature fully knew
how much money was being ap-
propriated and to which organizations it
was being appropriated. So how was it
my fault?
As for Mr. Henderson's attempt to
place the blame on me, I say nice try.
But remember, people will still consider
the source.
Kirk Little
SGA Treasurer, 1980-81-82
Forum Use
From The Editor:
In the past. The East Carolinian's
Campus Forum has been probably the
most reliable vehicle for disseminating
opinion at East Carolina. Where else can
students voice their feelings on issues of
concern with the promise of being
heard? The Jact is, there really aren V
any other viable methods on campus.
Alt hough we may all be proud oj our
school and what it means to us, it is im-
possible for an institution the size of
ours to be without problems.
Sometimes, these problems are trivial
(though frustrating). But there are other
times when these difficulties just won 7
go away.
In this latter case, the Campus Forum
is ideal. Not only can a letter to the
editor voice your own opinion, but by
writing, you can injluence the opinions
of others. So, if you have some topic
that interests you, offends you, enrages
you, or just causes you to iunk, your
tetters are not only welcome; they're
highly encouraged.
So, don't just sit back and watch
things happen; make things happen.
Remember, if no one knows (hat a pro-
blem exists, nothing will ever gel done
about it.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our ojfice in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
4

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9
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mv
'om
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 7, 1982
Page 5
Grease' Gets
Able Support;
Uneven Solos
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
The cast of EClTs Summer Theatre Production of Crease takes a bow. James Dean, Elvis Presley and others look on.
By KATHY WEYLER
Matf W nlrr
East Carolina's Summer Theatre
opened Monday night to an almost-
packed house at McGinnis Theatre
with the ever-popular musical.
Crease. This reviewer must confess
the disappointment she felt upon
learning that done-to-death Crease
was to be the Summer Theatre's
first production. Expecting a bor-
ing, unoriginal presentation of this
fifties tribute such as those 1 have
seen in other community andor
college theatres, 1 was pleasantly
surprised by the all-around good
show the ECU cast, directors and
technicians assembled.
Altogether, Crease is simply en-
joyable with its foot-tapping,
tinger-snapping fifties-style musical
score and a host of rousing dance
numbers choreographed bv Dale
Muchmore, who also directed this
production. Gregory Buch's set
designs and Patrice Alexander's
nostalgic costumes contribute a
great deal to this production as well,
conveying with a few symbols the
mood and atmosphere ol the world
as seen bv 1950s high schoolers
Frame blow-ups of photographs
depicting everyday kids and teen
idols frame the set � an unusual
and effective touch reminding us of
the real fifties. The set is also
designed on two levels, allowing foi
greater creativity in staging
As a whole, the cast sings, dances
and acts well. However, when solo
performances are called tor, the
musical element in this production
frequentlv weakens. Neithei Sandv
nor Dannv (the leads, played by Sal-
ly Nell and Robert Bennett) haw
particularly outstanding voices, al
least not tor this tpc ot music. San-
dy sounds a bit strained most of the
time and Danny lacks consistency in
tone and volume on several occa-
See GREASE Pa�e 6
Films Of All Time
By ROGER EBER1
hit at" Sun-1 iiiu-n
CHICAGO � Once everv 10 years, the British film
magazine Sigln and Sound conducts a poll of the
world's film critics, who are asked to name their choices
tor the 10 best films ol all time. The result is the longest-
running parlor game in movie criticism.
Hie critics (86 of them, the last time around in 1972)
vend in their lists, the editors tabulate them, and the
result is a "top 10" that stands for a decade as a
barometer of current tastes in film criticism.
The magazine's latest decade has just ended, and at
this sear's Cannes film Festival, duing a dinner maik
ing the 50th antmersarv ot Sight and Sound, editor
Penelope Houston distributed letters uniting critics to
ake iheii 1982 nominations.
The deadline was June 30, the ground rules were
wonderfully simple ("Ten titles only, please, in
alphabetical order or order of preference, of films made
anywhere, at any time"), and this autumn the new "top
10" will be published.
Such lists are necessarily unsatisfactory and unfair, of
course; also fascinating.
In 1972. the individual critics listed so many films that
even the first-place winner,iiizen Kane, was voted for
bv only 32 of them, or barelv more than a third; the two
films that tied for 10th place. Mioguchi's geisu
Monogatari and Bergman's Mild Strawberries, made
the list with only nine votes apiece.
Still, the international critics' poll does reveal trends
in the movie opinion marketplace.
The first time the poll was conducted, in 1952,iiizen
Kane did not even make the list. Although it was releas-
ed in 1942. it had such an erratic exhibition hist or) that
manv criiKs simplv had not seen it.
Bv 1962, it jumped to the top of the list, and by 1972,
director, Orson Welles, received more votes (46) for
his various films than anv other single director. Jean
Renoir was next, with 41.
Indeed.iiizen hane and Renoir's Rules of the Came
were the onlv clear winners in the poll. They were voted
tor bv 32 and 28 critics respectively, far out in front of
the third-place Battleship PtHemkin, with 16.
Other trends became clear after tne first three polls,
covering 1952 to 1972. Among the great silent comedy
directors, Charlie Chaplin's stock dropped sharplv (The
Cold Rush and City I ights, both in the 1952 top 10,
dropped out of the 1962 and 1972 lists entirely). Buster
Keaton's reputation grew, and his The Ceneral placed
eighth in 1972.
Although the poll has an obvious built-in bias in
favor of more recent films (critics can only vote for
films they have seen), silent movies did better in 1972
than in the previous three polls. Three silents made the
top 10: Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin, Keaton's The
Ceneral and Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of ire.
Will Newcomers Oust Standards?
Now the time has come to compile the 1982 "top 10"
list. One of the heated topics of conversation at the
Sight and Sound anniversary dinner involved which
films from the 1972 list would drop out altogether this
time, and which newer films might have a chance of
replacing them.
Here were the 1972 winners: Welles' Citizen Kane,
Renoir's The Rules of the Came, Eisenstein's Battleship
Potemkin, Fellini's 81 Antonioni's I 'Avventura,
Bergman's Persona, Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of
Arc, Keaton's The Ceneral, Welles' The Magnificent
Amhersons, and a lOth-place tie between two Films
about men searching for the meaning of life,
Mioguchi'sgetsu Monogatari and Bergman's Mild
Strawberries.
My guess is that C iiizen Kane and Rules of the Came
will finish first and second again, and that it's up for
grabs from then on.
Potemkin, a widely-acknowledged silent masterpiece
will probably survive. H a film about filmmaking,
may survive as an insiders' favorite. I doubt that Anto-
nioni's I Avventura will place in the top 10; the film's
cool arrogance reminds us of the sorts of "art films"
that cause the eyes to glaze.
The Magnificent Amhersons won't make it; Welles
will get his first place with Kane but other directors will
squeeze his second film off the list. And I gefsu, a lovely
ehost siorv. and Mild Strawberries, a wonderful but
creakily old-fashioned film, will be replaced by newer
contenders.
What films will move into the top 10? The leading
contender is probablv Kubrick's influential 2001, releas-
ed in 1968 and obviously an artistic and commercial
watershed film that has defined how we see outer space
and space travel. It was the fust of the new generation
o "event films based on special effects, and it
fathered the Siar liars phenomenon.
Another contender is John lord's The Searchers,
which has become fashionable as the definitive 1-ord
film, edging out more traditional lord films like
Stagecoach, The Grapes of 0 rath and My Darling
C lementine.
One movie hkelv 10 leap into the top 10 from out ot
the past is Abel Gance's Xapoleon, the 1927 silent epic
that existed in obscuritv, in several different incomplete
versions, until film historian Kevin Brownlow
plundered the world's film archives to produce a nearlv
complete version.
Amotiki films made since 1972. leading contenders for
the top 10 probablv are Coppola's The Godfather, Bei
tolucci's Last Tango in Paris or The onformist, and
Bergman's Cries and H hispers.
Runners-up mav include Altman's Xashville, I ellini'
Amarcord, W erner Herog's Aguirre. the M rath of
Cod, and one of Bunuel's later films, perhaps Discreet
(harm of the Rourgeoise.
Now. All o this speculation and handicapping has
perhaps just been mv wav ot postponing the moment ol
truth when 1 have to write down, in cold black and
white, mv own list of the 10 greatest films.
What follow are the names of 10 films thai crowded
into the forefront of mv memory, admiration and affec-
tion on this particular afternoon in June L982. 1 list
them alphabetically, as Miss Houston said I could:
Arlher Penn's Ronnie and Clyde, Michael Cum'
Casablanca, Orson Welles' Citizen Kane. Federico
Fellini's la Dolce I iiu, Werner Herog's Aguirre. the
Wrath of God. Alfred Hitchcock's Sotorious, Ingmai
Bergman's Persona, Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver.
Carol Reed's The Third Man, and Stanlev Kubrick's
2001. A Space Odyssey.
Hinckley Liked It
'Taxi Driver' Takes Aim Tonight
BvIOHN WEYLER
UM V nlrr
Tonight at 8 p.m The Student Union Films Commit-
tee will screen one of the most unforgettable motion pic-
tures ever made: Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver. Next
Monday's (July 12) film is Mel Brook's irreverent com-
edy classic Blazing Saddles, to be shown at 9 p.m. Both
films will be shown at Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendri.x Theatre. Admission is free with ECU ID and
Aciivitv Card or MSC Membership.
Taxi Driver was considered controversial and shock-
ing when it was released in 1976, but an event that oc-
cured in 1981 gave the film a truly bizarre distinction:
Taxi Driver is the only movie that is known to have in-
spired an assassination attempt on a United States presi-
dent.
Robert DeNiro stars in an electrifying character study
o the type of person who is driven to commit gruesome
acts of violence. When the audience first sees DeNiro's
Travis Bickle, he is merely a confused, lonely man sur-
rounded by millions of the same. We watch in uneasy
fascination as Travis wheels his cab through the sleaziest
sections of New York City, and his alienation from and
intense disgust with his environment slowly feed on his
sanity.
The only bright spots in his Travis's existence are two
women: Betsy (Cybill Shepherd), a smooth political
campaign worker, and Iris (Jodie Foster), a 12-year-old
enslaved by prostitution. These women provide Travis
with focal points for his frustration and anger. As if to
somehow free them from their traps, he first tries to
assassinate the presidential candidate Betsy works for,
and later kills Iris's captors in one of the bloodiest
scenes ever filmed.
Last year another confused, "nowhere man" attemp-
ted the murder of a political leader. John Hinckley's
obsession with Jodie Foster is common knowledge. Hin-
ckley has, from his initial outcrys and warnings up to
the more recent past, made references to Scorsese's
film.
"Violence is Travis's only means of expressing
himself wrote film critic Pauline Kael in The Sen-
Yorker. "He has not been able to hurdle the barriers to
being seen and felt. When he blasts through, it's his only
way of telling the city that he's there. And, given his
ascetic loneliness, it's the only real orgasm he can have.
"The violence in this movie is so threatening precisely
because it's cathartic for Travis. 1 imagine that some
people who are angered by the film will say that it ad-
vocates violence as a cure for frustration. But to
acknowledge that when a psychopath's blood boils over
so that he may cool down is not the same as justifying
the eruption. This film doesn't operate on the level of
moral judgement of what Travis does. Rather, by draw-
ing us into his vortex it makes us understand the psychic
discharge of the quiet boys who go berserk
For those of you with weak stomachs, or to whom
Taxi Driver simply doesn't appeal, there's still the ac-
ceptable bad taste spawned by the genius of Mel
Brooks. On Monday evening, his Blazing Saddles will,
probably for the fiftieth time, provide us with the antics
of The Waco Kid, Lilly Von Shtumpp and the rest of the
Brooks gang.


?






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 7. 1982

r-

?
'Grease' Played
To Near-Capacity
Crowd Monday
Continued From Page 5
sions. Their vocal problems were not helped by
the technical difficulties experienced with the
microphones during the second scene of the first
act. Houeer, Ms. Nell and Mr. Bennett excel as
character players and their dancing is also skill-
ed.
As 1 have often noticed is the case with main
musicals, some of the supporting roles tend to be
quite memorable. ECU'S Crease boasts a fine
supporting cast with some of its members giving
particularly outstanding performances.
Among the ladies, Shari Krikorian's dancing
lalents are especially eye-catching in her role as
Marty, the precociously mature-in-appearance
Pink Lady. It must be noted that she is well-
paired with Rodney Freeze (ECU theatre-goers
will remember his show-stopping performance as
Frank in last spring's Show Hoar) who, though
cast in the unmemorable role of Sonny, still
manages to bring graceful movements to his part.
Babs Winn (Mrs. Rodnev Freeze) portrays the
street-smart Rizzo with a great combination of
wisecracks and sensuality. Her solo ("There Are
orse Things 1 Could Do") in Act 11 enables her
to use her rich and powerful voice to its fullest,
earning thundering applause and more than a
few cheers from the audience.
Among ihe gents a few voices stand out from
the crowd. Michael W. Hill, as Doody, has
managed to capture the vocal style of a fifties
ballad crooner. Unfortunately only a couple of
numbers allow the audience to really listen to his
pleasing voice. And as Roger (or Rump). Con-
stantine Peters treats us to his smooth, rich voice
as well as a terrifically zany performance.
Though this production of Grease is a good
deal of fun, it's hard to believe there's anyone
out there that isn't at least familiar with this pro-
duction (especiallv after Hollywood cashed in
with one of those big-budget treatments that
deservedly get so much attention in this
newspaper). Still, after overhearing a remarkable
number of comments from shocked patrons, I
feel I must issue a word of warning: Yes, there's
quite of bit of bawdy dialogue in this show. I
know it's hard to believe, but teen-agers in the
fifties were just as interested in sex as contem-
porary teens. If slang references to various parts
ol the human anatomy, sexual functions and
birth control brings a blush to your virtuous
cheeks, vou'd better bring earplugs if you go to
see an production of Hrease.
The plav, the first o four this summer, rum
through July 10. For ticket information concern-
ing an; ot the Fast Carolina Summer Theatre
productions, contact the Centra! Ticket Office at
757-6611, extension 266
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till 10:30 Sat night)
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TUES
WVSP BLUES BENEFIT
(with 3 bands for one price
tSSEISHSfflPP
FOOD TOWN
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t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Stamina
Sports
Trio Berths To Festival
By C1ND PI EASANIS
SporK I- dihtr
On July 13, three ECU students
m ill join 3,400 athletes to compete in
the National Spoils Festival, the
largest amateui sports program in
the country.
c.ail O'Brien, lud Ausherman
and Sam Jones were selected to play
on the South's team handball
squad. O'Brien will be competing in
the festival for the second time.
Main people don't know exactly
whai team handball is. It's an ex-
citing, physical and high scoring
sport. In Europe, il is second only to
soccei
-nd no, it's not throwing a small
, k ball against four walls with
voui hand.
Handball is a team sport, con-
isting ot 12 players; seven of which
lay .il one time.
The concept of the game is sim-
ple. The players of each team try to
throw the ball into the goal of the
opposing team and defend iheir own
goal. The ball is played with the
hand but other parts of the body can
be used, except for the lower leg and
NATIONAL
SPORTS
FESTIVAL
KMANAPOUS
JUY 23-311962
, �. � � . lympci lommtee
the feet. The player can move three
steps and may dribble.
Each game has two 30-minute
halts with a 15-minute halftime and
there are no time-outs.
Team handball is only one of 33
sports to be held in this year's
fourth annual festival in In-
dianapolis, Indiana. The United
States Olympic Committee sponsors
the program in hopes of preparing
future olympians. All games in the
summer Olympics and three of the
winter Olympic games (figure
skating, speed skating and ice
hockey) are included in the festival.
Wayne Edwards, ECU's in-
tramural director and the coor-
dinator for the festival's handball
teams, said transportation, housing,
food and competitive clothes are
provided for, costing the committee
about four million dollars.
Edwards served as coordinator in
last year's games and was accom-
panied by several ECU students.
"There were six women and one
man on the South's team last year
he said. "ECU had more students
than anyone in the United States in
the sports festival
Photo By JAN KCFPLC
.S stinger, a member of the East team handball squad, attempts to make a goal against the South team dur-
ing last year's National Sports Festival in Syracuse. Stinger is being guarded by ECU s Maureen Buck.
The weeks in Indianapolis will be
exciting for the athletes. Edwards
said the festival's environment is
like that of the Olympic games and
the accomodation would compare
to an Olympic village. "The athletes
gain the experience of playing in an
Olympic atmosphere he said,
"which most people never get to ex-
perience
The competition will take place at
nineteen different sites. The hand-
ball teams, along with the swimming
and diving teams will compete in the
new 4,700-seat natatorium.
During the 14-day event, the
athletes are housed at seven loca-
tions across the city. The handball
team will be staying with the soccer,
volleyball and rowing teams.
After the sports festival has
finished, the U. S. Olympic commit-
tee will will select members for the
1984 Olympic teams.
Edwards stated in an earlier inter-
view that he believes Jones definite-
ly has a shot at the Olympic team,
escpecially since she has gained
more experience during her Euro-
pean tour with the U. S. National
team. Jones returned on July 4
after playing in West Germany and
Paris. "The Olympic team is called
the U. S. National team until
1984-the Olympic year he said.
Edwards said Jones has a tremen-
dous chance to make the Olympics
but she must be willing to make the
personal sacrifices.
If Jones is selected by the Olympic
committee, she will immediately
move to New Jersey to train until
the Olympics are held in Los
Angeles, California.
Edwards heard about Jones's
ability as a basketball player and
decided to attend a game. That's
when Edwards spotted her poten-
tial.
"Sometimes 1 don't always make
the right choices he said, "but this
time I was right
Jones had the four essentials
needed to play team handball:
JULY 7, 1982
Pa�c7
By JAM KCPFIC
Rita Clanton, a graduate of Auburn University, demonstrates the handball
player's ability to jump and throw passes simultaneously. Clanton is a
member of this year's national team.
dedication, intensity, a good
disposition and strength. Edwards
described Jones as a person who
always gives 100 percent and wasn't
the type of player to fly off the han-
dle. Because off the stiff time
penalties, handball players must be
able to control themselves.
"You get hit a great deal in hand-
ball he said, "And if you're a
hothead, you won't last long
A handball player must also be
able to jump above the defense and
be strong enough to throw long
passes-skills Jones developed as a
basketball player. In fact, the ma-
jority oi handball players are ex-
basketball players, Edwards said.
The athletes will leave on July 13
for their training camps. The
players will have ten days of practice
sessions with two-hour workouts
twice a day.
The Opening ceremonies will
begin on the evening of July 23.
Entertainer Bob Hope will be per-
forming for the athletes and the
coaching staff.
The round-robin competition
starts July 24 and will end with
teams competing for gold and
bronze medals. The top two teams
will play for the gold while the re-
maining teams will battle for the
bronze.
World
I v
1
i
By Neil Admur
V limrs e�� srniir
WIMBELDON, England � The
first time Jimmy Connors won at
' imbeldon, it seemed like a fairy
tale. He and Chris Evert were the
tournament's "love double" in
1974, went to the victory ball as an
engaged couple and danced to the
musical strains of "The Girl That I
Marry �
There was no dancing at Sunday
night's champions dinner. Martina
Navratilova, a three-set winner over
Mrs. I loyd in the women's final,
teasingly popped open an umbrella
before her victory speech and told
the gathering, "The weatherman
said il as going to clear today, but
I didn't trust him
Eighl years after he won his first
imbeldon title. Connors, now 29,
thanked the management committee
for its more helpful attitude toward
the players, thanked his wife Patti,
and then paid tribute to John
McEnroe, whom he had beaten
earlier in the day in five long sets.
"The final we had today was the
. a it should be Connors said of
his 3-6, 6-3, 6-7, 7-6, 6-4 victory.
British sports fans agreed, toasting
onnors Monday as a popular
.hampion. In 1974, Ken Rosewall, a
sentimental runnerup at 39, was the
peoples' choice.
"I was out in the street this morn-
ing Connors said, packing at his
hotel, for a return to the United
States today, "and I think
everybody in London watched the
match
Connors wanted to win this year
more than he had been willing to ad-
mit during the fortnight.
"Awfully bad said Patti
McGuire Connors, whom Connors
sought out for a kiss in a corner of
the center court seconds after he
won Wimbeldon's longest final in
history. "I think he wanted to win
this one real bad
"When you win your first one
Connors said, "you never expect to
do it. Then after you win it, you
think you'll never win it again. 1 had
a couple of chances slip by. It got to
the point where I hadn't won a
Grand Slam event in four years. 1
hadn't really thought about that un-
til after the match. I wonder if 1 had
thought about it before whether it
would have affected my play
At a time when some rivals
thought he might be losing some of
his zest for the game, Connors is en-
joying one of his finest years. He
has won five of 11 Granp Prix tour-
naments, was the runnerup in three
others and leads the Volvo Grand
Prix point standings, which carries a
$600,000 season-ending first prize.
Asked after the McEnroe match if
he had a chance to win the year's
No. 1 spot, Connors said. I'm play-
ing like it. That has been my line all
along
Patti Connors has seen positive
changes in her husband. "Having
Brett has matured him she said,
referring to their child. "And he's
opened his mind a little more. He
used to be narrow-minded about
some things
One quality about Connors that
has not changed is his emotional
level on the court.
"1 don't think it's possible for
John and me to play all five sets at
one level because of what we're both
trying to do Connors said. "We
have a rivalry that's great because of
the way we play each other. He's go-
ing to play his serve-and-volley, and
I'm going to be out there hitting and
attacking.
"But the most important part is
our attitude � the way we play �
my respect for him and his respect
for me. There's a lot more that
enters into it besides our tennis.
That's what was on my mind in the
beginning of the match. Should I go
for the first-round knockout? What
happens if 1 don't get it, and the
match goes five sets? I broke him in
the first game, but then I started
thinking. That's when we had the
lull. 1 said if he goes five sets, I can't
play 110 percent. 1 have to drop to
92 percent or maybe 90 percent.
"I think that's why things were so
uneven out there. There were even
times for me when the match was
boring. But from 3-5 in the third,
that was high-powered tennis all the
way. There was some unbelievable
tennis out there
Connors said he often is unaware
of how he revs up on the court.
"You play, and everything that
goes into your thoughts, everything
See BRATS, page 8
Pirate Offense Worries Coaches
Imvroved Bua
Seek Revenge
East Tennessee State head foot-
ball coach Jack Carlisle can only be
optimistic about the upcoming game
with the Pirates on Sept. 18.
After being defeated 66-23 in last
year's homecoming game, Carlisle is
determined not to let that happen
again if there's any way possible.
"One thing's for sure he said.
"We'll try not to get beaten as badly

Cindy
Pleasant s
A Look Inside
38 points in the First half of the
game. Nine ECU players scored in
the game, and senior placekicker
Chuck Bushbeck set a school record
with nine of nine extra points. The
high score marked ECU's highest
point total in 22 years.
The Bucs did have an exceptional
some blue chip prospects. Carlisle's
staff recruited all over the United
States, signing players from Ten-
nessee, Virginia, Pennsylvania,
Georgia, Florida, Ohio and
Mississippi. 23 men will be joining
the Buccaneers in the fall.
"1 know that this group of men
this year
The Pirates were fired up, scoring
game, but there were only problems who signed with us are the most
o" ' i -i. i:u. �raA i-ilav�r� in i.hirh
for East Tennessee. And their kick-
ing game was at the head of the list.
For example, after receiving the
opening kickoff and driving to the
42-yard line, punter Phil Wilso
fumbled a snap from center and
dropped 13 yards-setting up ECU
for perfect field position.
"Our kicking game killed us
heavily recruited players in which
we have been interested he said.
"Our assistant coaches did an
outstanding job in signing the young
men
The East Tennessee Buccaneers
will have 31 lettermen and 14
starters returning. Carlisle said he
lost 13 lettermen and his starting
Carlisle s d "We were banged up quarterback from last season. We
when we came into the game and we will only have five seniors on the
gotmoreTanged up L the game team he said, "so we're going to
went on nave a young team
The Pirates got 421 total yards in
offense compared to East Tennessee Carlisle said his.team will lack ex-
State's 211 perience against a high grade of
Carlisle had nothing but the ut- competition � something ECU has
most praise for the Pirates. "East established. Tougher schedules, I
Almost Anything Goes
n ECU summer league baseball player tags an N.C. State opponent during run homer. The Pirates fell to Campbell University Friday �
Wednesday" doubTeheader. The Pirates lost in the opening game, M, but and 4-2. ECU's Todd Evans hit one-run homers in both games. (Photo by
came buck to win the second contest, 11-10, after David Wells hit a three- Scott Larson)
Carolina is completely out of out
class he said. "Heck, most of our
players have never been to Green-
ville but they know what kind of
team ECU has got
As for this year, Carlisle does not
believe their kicking game will be a
downfall. "Our kicking game will
be okay he said. "It's in good
shape
But the head coach is not quite as
confident when it comes to punting.
"Our punting game is unknown
right now he said, "but we did
sign a couple of punters
East Tennessee has signed quite a
few players this year, including
different division and scholarships
are three areas Carlisle cited for the
contrast in ECU and ETSU. "Some
15 years ago we were about the
same he said, "but things have
changed. A school like ours may
come along and beat ECU once
every couple of years, but that's
about it.
What is Carlisle's strategy for
Sept. 18? "We really won't know
what our strategy is until we see the
tapes of East Carolina's earlier
games this fall he said. "We do
know ECU is going to have a new
offensive formation so we'll just
have to wait and see
f





�2��THE EAST C AROl INIAN JULY 7. W82
First Session
IM Results
By NANCY MIZE
Inlramurth l�ir
The numbers are less
and the atmosphere is
more relaxed, but the
fun and enjoyment of
participation in in-
tramural activities dur-
ing the summer is as
great as ever!
In first session finals,
the Sharks infested the
co-rec softball program
by defeating the All-
Stars and Moody Blues
to gain the title.
In co-rec volleyball
action, the Polish Na-
tional Squad went into
the play-offs
undefeated. However,
after defeating the
Night Spikers, they
found the Jammers to
be stiff competition. In
the final match, Tom
Curry and Co. jumped
out to a one game lead
before losing the next
two games to give the
Jammers the title.
The Great Canoe
race was won b y
Maureen and Robert
Fox, in what they con-
sidered to be an un-
contented race. They
have extended a
challenge to all would-
be canoeists to par-
ticipate in the next race
on Thursday. July 15!
Tony Saleeby and John
Winston came in se-
cond after the favored
team o' Billy Dixon
and Keith G o I d c n
found the Tar River to
be a rather wet
challenge.
In the Men's Singles
Tennis tournament, it
was a battle between
Billy Dixon and Cliff
Moore. After losing in
the second round of
competition to Moore,
Dixon fought his way
through the losers
bracket to re-challenge
Moore in the finals of
the double elimination
tournament. However,
Cliff was too strong
and defeated Billy,
10-3, in the regulation
pro set.
Anthony Martin and
Co. and The Enforcers
easily gained the title in
three-on-three basket-
ball. The Runaways
gave them a run for
their money but were
unable to defeat the
strong threesome.
On the racquetball
courts, a lot of action
occurred for both men
and women. Nancy
McCloskey, playing in
her first tournament,
was victorious over
Cheryl Meletis to gain
the women's title. In
men's competition,
Frank Schaede escaped
with a victory over Jack
Crouch to come from
the loser's bracket and
win the championship.
The Tri-Humps con-
tinued their winning
form in the men's soft
ball tournament by
defeating I umber
Company and The
VValtons to emerge as
champions of the dou-
ble elimination
tourney.
Three Track Stars Sign
Letters of Intent With ECU
Ml SPORIMMOKMAIIUN
Three more
women's track stars
have signed letters of
intent to attend ECU
on track grants-in-
aid under first-year
head coach Pat
McGuigan. The trio
� Jamie Cathcart of
East Forsyth High
School, Kathy
Leeper of High
Point Andrews High
and Teresa Hudson
of Salisbury High �
join previously-
signed Delphine
Mabrey of
Southwest
Edgecombe High
School and Regina
Kent from New
York City.
Cathcart, also a
member of the
Greensboro Paceset-
ters, was a member
of the 1982 N.C.
State champion
440-meter relay team
at East Forsythe
High. Cathcart plac-
ed second at the 1981
AAU Junior Olym-
pic in Lincoln, Neb
in the mile relay and
third and fourth in
the 440 relay and 800
meter run respective-
ly in the 1981 N.C.
State meet.
Leeper ran the an-
chor leg in the 880
and mile relays for
Andrews High in
High Point the last
three seasons. Her
squad finished first
in the mile and se-
cond in the 880 at
the 1982 State meet.
Her 880 foursome
also copped State
championships in
1980 and 1981, while
her mile relay squad
placed second both
years.
Hudson, a
sprinter from
Salisbury, N.C, was
conference cham-
pion in the 100- and
200-meter races
Two Generations Of 'Brats9
Struggle In Wimbledon Finale
Continued from page 7
that comes into play is an emotional
buildup. For me, to let it out is im-
portant. It's actually going crazy;
that's what it is. Maybe that's what
it takes for me to win a match � go
crazy
Connors said he heard McEnroe
"doing the same thing" during the
crucial fourth-set tiebreaker, which
Connors won 7-5.
"He was yelling 'C'mon to
himself and trying just as much as 1
was. That's what made it great
By the time he went to serve for
the match at 5-4 in the final set.
Connors was talking to himself and
gesturing after each point.
"That might be bad he said.
"Instead of concentrating on how
to play the point, I was saying 'three
more, three more Then after I hit
that backhand volley, I said 'two
more, two more 1 was at such a
position as far as my attitude and
adrenaline that 1 was joing berserk;
I was flying. 1 couldn't get any
higher
The match lasted four hours, 14
minutes. "I'm a little beat Con
nors said. "I'm glad 1 don't have to
play today. I don't think the whole
thing will take effect until I get
home
Connors said he declined an in-
vitation to play for the United States
against Sweden in the Davis Cup
quarterfinals this week in St. Loius
because of his schedule.
"I feel for McEnroe he said.
"To go into play this eek, it's going
to be rough on him. Last year, he
was like a basket case against
Czechoslovakia after he won
Wimbeldon. It's difficult to go and
play after a match like we had.
Don't forget, he rides prettv high,
too
For A Sporting Good Time
Call Dwart Fourquarts
Or Terez Balzov
At 555-121
M
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 7, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 07, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.204
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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