The East Carolinian, June 30, 1982






�he 3:aHt (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.67
Wednesday, June 30, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
SGA Budget
Will Be Cut
By ERNEST CONNER
e�� Kdilur
The East Carolina University Stu-
dent Government Association's ex-
ecutive council faces a financial
crises currently as appropriations
for the upcoming school year are
estimated to be up to $29,(XX) over
expected revenue.
The SGA legislature, before it
ended last semester, appropriated
$119.(XX) for various organizations.
Incoming revenue, from which
the SGA appropriates money, is
estimated to be around $90,(XX).
Estimates vary with $90,000 being
the norm and $94,000 to $96,000 be-
ing the high.
1 his presents a problem as the ex-
ecutive council is now faced with the
prospects o what to do.
There are a few options open to
the council. According to Eric
Henderson, SGA president, these
options include cutting the office
supply request out of all organiza-
tions budgets. However, there is
speculation that this cut wouldn't be
deep enough.
Another option available to the
council is cutting all budgets in halt
and letting the affected organiza-
tions go back before the full SGA
legislature in the fall for any addi-
tional funding.
Becky Talley, SGA treasurer, ex-
plained that another option the
council could take is to require all
organizations to reapply for funds
from the fall SGA legislature.
Emergency funding, she explained,
could be provided if the organiza-
tion needed the monev before the
fall.
Other options could also be
taken, and Henderson explained
that the council would make a deci-
sion on what option to take by this
afternoon.
The council, which consists of the
president, vice-president and
treasurer, met Monday and Tuesday
to discuss the situation.
There are few answers on how
this situation came about. Hender-
son didn't assign blame but stated
that Kirk 1 ittle, last year's SGA
treasurer, failed to keep the SGA in-
formed of how much money was
available for appropriation.
Little couldn't be reached for
comment.
Talley claimed that it would be
hard to blame any one person. She
explained that all the student
legislators were in a hurry toward
the end of the semester and nobody
noticed how much money was left to
appropriate.
According to Talley, the ap-
propriation ran over during the last
tew sessions o the SGA legislature.
Hey, can you eat this stuff?
Yes, at the weekly watermelon feast. The event is sponsored by Mendenhall Student C enter and held each
21. They will continue until Jul 26. The ECU Student Union urges all students to come out and en
Mondav at noon. The first was held on June
j the fun. The event is free.
Milk Companies Curtail Theft
B TAMI HAKKEY
sinlf Wrtirr
Dairy companies are being taken
for millions of dollars a year
through the loss oi milk crates, and
:he companies are putting a stop to
it.
It's long been known that college
student use these crates for
everything from record racks to
bookshelf supports to moving
crates But what hasn't been
publicized is the confiscation of
these crates by the grocery stores.
If you'll notice when driving by a
milk company, the crates will be sit-
ting outside with no type fence or
covering, just waiting to be stolen.
Though they are unprotected it is
Counselors Answer Questions
still a theft and in some states
punishable bv fine and imprison-
ment.
Greenville dairy companies
haven't gone this far, but discus-
sions toi a new law are in the p �
cess.
It seems that the grocery .tores
are getting out easy, because they
are the customer ot the dairy com-
panies, but nonetheless they arc still
stealing the merchandise. Once milk
crates are dropped off in these
stores they attain new uses just as
when college students get ahold of
'em. The grocers arc using them for
potato holders, fruit crates, and any
other container that is needed and
can be thought of.
But a new law is being disu-
which calls tor a deposit to
on the crates. This way the grocer
returns the crates and in turn is
,n his monev back, r il
decides to keep a few. the dairy
company keeps the money. What
the deposit fee will be is unkn
but the cost of each crate is between
S3.())and S3.50. Just what the solu-
tion is for Greenville college
students stealing crates is unknown,
but it's sure that it will not be as stiff
as measures taken; at the I n
ot Oklahoma, where the dauv com-
panies have made arrangem
with campus police to go through
student dorms and look foi the
missing merchandise
Double Take
moto By DAVE WILLIAMS
This photographer attempts to bring his favorite subject into focus. He should be warned that the trumpet will not
take pictures.
Doctor Discovers Drug Effects
Students Provide Guidance
A cardiologist at the East
Carolina University School of
Medicine has found evidence that a
drug frequently used to diagnose
coronary artery disease may in fact
cause a heart attack or produce
unreliable test results in some pa-
tients.
Dr. Allen F. Bowyer, professor of
medicine, presented the results of
his research on ergonovine maleate
at the Ninth World Congress of
Cardiology in Moscow this month.
Bowyer says moderately large
doses of the drug are commonly
given to patients whom doctors
suspect have coronary artery
spasms, a condition which can cause
severe chest pain, arrhythmias, sud-
den death or heart attack. The
medication is used to provoke a cor-
onary spasm so that physicians can
visualize obstruction in the arteries
during an attack.
The research conducted at ECU
documents how much the normal
coronary artery constricts when the
drug is administered. Bowyer's
study concludes that a normal artery
narrows its diameter in proportion
to the amount of the drug given and
shows that the usual dose of the
drug creates a 40 percent constric-
tion in the normal artery.
He says the results indicate that it
a patient has a pre-existing,
moderate narrowing of a coronary
artery, the drug could provoke a
heart attack from loss of blood flow
to that portion of heart muscle sup-
plied by the artery. The drug may
also falsely create a spasm.
Bowyer's investigation of
ergonovine maleate is one of three
research projects he shared with the
35,000 cardiologists who attended
the Moscow meeting June 20-26.
B SPENCER STEPHENS
Sdfl Wrilrr
Do you have a problem? If your
answer to this question is yes, the
East Carolina's department of
counselor education may be in-
terested in you.
The department is sponsoring a
counseling practicum to provide its
students with practical counseling
experience.
The second and possibly more im-
portant purpose of the practicum is
to provide guidance or a receptive
ear for anyone who desires it.
Room 130 of the Speight
(psychology) building is where the
counseling takes place and accor-
ding to Bill Bradshaw, one of the
student-counselors. Anyone who
wishes to come is welcome.
Interested persons are asked to
make an appointment with the
secretary who is on duty just outside
room 130 from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Usuallv a
person can make an appointment
and receive counseling on the same
day.
The student-counselors have all
completed ECU's counselor educa-
tion curriculum and are engaged in
the practicum as the final step
toward receiving a master's degree
and certification in counselor educa-
tion.
The approach of the student-
counselors is guidance oriented, and
they usually will discuss with a per-
son his problems and concerns to
clarify and identify all alteinatives.
Often, too, says Bradshaw if
we can help people to know
themselves a little better, we can can
simultaneously help them to make a
wiser decision. Also, people are
often worried about having
something wrong with them because
they went to a counselor. All we are
doing is providing a person with so-
meone who will listen
It should also be noted that the
service is free and highlv confiden-
tial. Anyone who wishes to receive
counseling can do so without cost or
fear of disclosure.
The people who have received
counseling under the practicum
have had concerns ranging from
career choices to academic problems
to unstable relationships with
boyfriends or girlfriends.
If a person comes to receive
counseling and has a concern which
is out of the student-counselor's
scope, that person would probably
be referred to a more qualified pro-
fessional, explained Bradshaw
Identical practicums arc held
several times per vear, and while this
one will end with the second sum-
mer session, interested persons can
receive counseling at other times
later this year.
ECU Graduate Student Voices National Socialist Party Views
By JOHN WEYLER
Stiff Wriler
Editor's note: This article is the
second installment of a series ex-
amining the activities of fascist
groups in the United States, North
Carolina and Greenville, focusing
on the National Socialists or Nazis.
It should be noted that the views ex-
pressed in this series are those of the
individuals designated and not of
The East Carolinian or its staff
Richard F. Becker, 39, is a former
high school teacher currently atten-
ding East Carolina University as a
graduate student in history. He is
also a former member of the Na-
tional Socialist Party of America.
Becker is also the author of In
Defense of Liberty, a book of Nazis
beliefs and philosophy which he
says he no longer wholly believes in.
"Everybody has their own story
to tell and this is mine Becker says
in the introduction to "In Defense
of Liberty
"In first and second grade
Becker states in his bookI attend-
ed a school for the mentally retard-
ed. This human garbage dump was
run by the Jews for their benefit and
profit. It was the stinking kike
psychiatrist (name withheld) who
comdemmed me to the idiot school
for the rest of my life. That ex-
perience was over 30 years ago, but
it left an indelible impression on my
mind. It was definitely not the best
start in life that a young fellow
could have
In 1967 Becker received a
Bachelor of Arts from Elon College
and became a teacher to avoid the
draft, he said in a 1981 interview.
For several years he worked in a
South Carolina high school
teaching, according to him,
"primarily black students who were
reading on a first or second grade
level
"I was supposed to teach
American history, yet they couldn't
even read the textbook. So it was
difficult for me to get any basic con-
cepts of American history across to
them. I was something of a bleeding
heart liberal at that time. I as not
much into National Socialism then.
"I was very dedicated to being a
professional educator, trying to
civilize. Christianize and that type
of thing. In those days I had a much
different outlook than I do now. I
was more or less awakened by that
experience. My teaching experience
taught me to discover the dif-
ferences in intelligence and abilities
in the races, most certainly. And it
verified my interest is National
Socialism
Becker quit teaching and later
moved to Greenville, where he had
an experience that further changed
his life.
During 1976 and 1977 Becker
claims a man, "compiled a dossier
containing vicious falsehoods and
slanderous information in regard to
my character, reputation and men-
tal abilities in which he fabricated
false charges which he intended to
use in a court of law to have me con-
victed and sentenced to the North
Carolina State Hospital for the In-
sane in Goldsboro, known as
Cherry Hospital.
"On 25 May 1977, I was un-
justifiably and forcibly incarcerated
in Goldsboro, N.C, by the order of
a doctor, at the urging of a member
of the Pitt County Mental Health
Center. First, the Right to Freedom
of Information, as guaranteed by
the Civil Rights Act of 1974, was
denied to me by these gentlemen.
Next, without sufficient cause, I was
arrested, beaten, and lied to by the
PIGS of the Greenville City Police
Department, who dragged me out of
my house, threatened me and ab-
ducted me without a valid warrant. 1
was not charged with a crime
"However, I was denied the right
of bail, the right to an attorney, the
right to a hearing or trial, the right
of a phone call, and the right to
habeus corpus. My communistic
captors subjected me to cruel and
unusual punishment in the form of
injections, beatings, choking, at-
tempted murder, solitary confine-
ment, and brainwashing under the
influence of drugs in the hopes of
destroying my political beliefs
"Rather than being destroyed bv
the experience, I emerged a
stronger, more determined, and
dedicated individual to the purpose
for which I struggle and live he
concluded. Becker's week-long in-
carcerntion in Cherry Hospital is
described in often-shocking detail in
In Defense of Liberty. The book in-
cludes a reprinted copy of a
psychological evaluation of Becker
done by the Division of Vocational
Rehabilitation. The report, dated
1980, lists his full scale intelligence
quotient as 127, states that he
"possesses extremely high verbal
See NAZI Page 3


ii





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 30, 1982
Announcements
EDITOR
The East Carolinian has an
opening coming up for the news
editor's position Experience
necessary interested persons
should contact the East Carolinian
to apply for the position For more
information call 757 636
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send i' to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as vou want
ano suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
paper ano 5 pm. Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper No an
nouncements receiveo after these
deadlines will be printed
This space s available to an
campus organizations ana depart
ments
USHERS
It you would like to usher for
GREASE July 5 10 and thereby
see the play free you may sign up
on the bulletin board in the
MessicK Theatre Arts Center A
limited number of ushers is need
ed Requirements men must
wear ties, ladies must wear
oresses Everyone must arrive in
the McG'nnis Theater nc later
than 6 45 p m
PSI CHI
Are you interested m self
ac'uaiization educational
psychology intellectual deveiooe
ment, sexual behavior or
s'atistica' interpetation0 Come to
'he Psi Chi Library Book Sale held
in Spfight 202 Books pried from
05 to 85 Psi Chi throws in a
bonus quiet atmosphere for stu
dymg wth a comfo'tabie coucn to
relax in Hours from 6 to 1 Come
tc our Book Sale to understand
human behavior ano be a better
person for it
ATTNTION ECU
ORGANIZATIONS
The Buccaneer still needs your
help if you want you organization
to represented in the year book,
call now, you have already had
three weeks to respond The
following groups had better call or
come by the Buccaneer this week:
Sigma Nu. Kappa Delta, Sigma
Alpha lota (Music), Phi Mu Alpha
Simphonia, Honor Council Review
Board, WZMB, N.A.S.W Alpha
Phi Alpha, S.C.E.C, Newman
Club, Psi Chi, Chi Omega, Alpha
Phi, Rebel! Staff, R.O T.C Foun
tain of Lite Christian Fellowship,
National Phsics Society, Delta
Zeta, Alpha Delta Pi, Kappa
Alpha Order, Delta Sigma Psi- Pi
Kaps, Collegiate 4 H, Student
Athletic Board, P E Majors Club,
Gamma Sigma Sigma, H.S A.P
Alpha Omicron Pi, Greg Owens,
and Nelson Jarvis, Lester Oneil,
and Carter Fox You don't have to
be an officer to help get your
organization in the year book.
This is the final announcement so
get busy and call Mike Davis at
757 6501, or 752 5543
EQUIPMENT
CHECKOUT
The Department of intramural
Recreation Services provides an
equipment check out service for
students, Faculty and Staff if you
have playful notions but lack the
right equipment stop by the equip
ment check out room located in
115 Memorial Gym Equipment is
available for Basketball. Football.
Frisbee, Horseshoes, soccer,
Volleyball. Softball. Racquetbali,
Tennis and Badminton to mention
a few items This is a free service
(excluding late fees) so take ad
vantage of a good opportunity
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every Wednsday at the
Catholic Newman Center Dinner
ana good friendship follows Mass
every Wednsday. so come out and
bring a friend
CHEERLEAOING
ECU win host a cheerleader
camp July 11-15. Instructors for
the camp will be provided by the
Universal Cheerleaders Associa-
tion. The camp is open to all high
school, junior high and middle
school cheerleaders.
Participants will receive in
struction in new cheers, sideline
chants, pom poms, tumbling and
will participate in private
coaching sessions each day.
Special seminars are also plann
ed for the camp.
Further details about the camp
may be obtained by calling
1 800 238 0286 or Mrs Gay
Biocker, Minges Coliseum, at
757 4441.
TENNIS
First Annual Colonial Invita
tional Doubles Tournament, Mens,
Ladies, and Mixed Doubles in
Edenton, NC at the City Courts on
July 23 25. Pick up entry forms at
H. L. Hodges or Bonds Sporting
Goods. Entry deadline Is Monday,
July IV at noon.
RECREATION
RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
ment rental service has been pro
vided through the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices. Items available for rent in
elude: Backpacks, tents, canoes,
and tandem bicycle. The outdoor
recreation center is located m the
equipment room 115 Memorial
Gym Hours of operation are
2 00500 p.m. Monday through
Friday, information is available
on State and Federal Cam
pgrounds, backpacking Trails,
Day hiking Trails, and Canoeing
Rivers.
CHAIRPERSON
The SGA is now accepting ap
plications for Fall Election
Chairperson Interested persons
should apply in person at
Mendenhall Room 228.
GRADUATES
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown from the Student Supply
Store, before leaving school
These keepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing the graduation
fee has been paid For those
receiving the Masters Degree the
tee pays for your cap and gown,
but there is an extra fee of $11 25
for your hood
Hot all clinics are tne same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's made
easier by the women of the Fleming Center.
Counselors are available day and night to
support and understand you. Ccmfort, safety,
privacy, and a friendly staff that's what the
Fleming Center Is all about.
XnraraiMM aooaptad
An tMfcMfcra few
UptoiaWMki V�ry �arly pxgnancy
Can 781-8880 day or niitht
Tha raining Cantor male� the difference.
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
� . u will be needing a room
male or would like to find and
share an apartment for Fan. con
'act the Off Campus Housing Of
fice, 211 Whicnaro Building
757 6881 before June 14 Orienta
tipn will oegm a tha' time and
many s'udents will be seeking ac.
commodafions We need your
St
Gl Camouflaged Fa'iqucS and
T Shu 1s Sleeping Bags
BaCKpacks Camping Equip
mint S'eel Toed Shos,
Dish.s and Ovet 700 Different
New and Used Hems Cowboy
Bun's S3 IS
ARMY-NAVY
1 SCi S Evans
Street
STORE
The East Carolinian
s�i mi :he vompus mmmmmii
umr ioV
Puoiisheo every Tuesday ano
Thursday during tne academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng the summer
The East Carolinian , the of
ficiai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, ano published for ano
by the students of Eas"t Carolina
University
Subscription Rate S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. NC
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 75? 436 4367 6309
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
758-HELP
1i 17 Evans Street
Greenville,NC. 27834
�� ���1�� P I a I 1 fwl
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 131
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
�!�$ 00 Pregnancy Test, Rirth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
ther information call 832-0535
(Toll Free Number
800 221 35��) between A.M.
and 5 PM. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C.
Classifieds
CARICATURES by Weyler: Have
a full-color,by 10 cartoon por
trait done of yourself or a loved
one A unique gift idea. Call
752 5775
COTTAGE for Rent at N. Myrtle
Beach. Sleeps 6 Rent by
weekweekend. Call 758 020
ROOMS FOR RENT: West 5th
Street. Single, $125.00, double
180 00 Utilities included, call
75433
NEED A PAPER TYPED IN A
HURRY? Call Mary at 355 240 for
quick, dependable service. Pro
ofreading offered. Will be glad to
type papers of all sites. Inexpen-
sive, but professional.
FOR SALE: Good used furniture.
Sofa S3S, clubchair $10. double bed
set (mattress, boxsprings, metal
frame) $45 All in good shape,
clean Call 7S1-S77S.
MALE ROOMMATE needed to
snare energy efficient duplax. 3
blocks from campus. Half ex-
penses. Call Jimmy at 752 Me? or
7M 6422 Ready Aug. 1.
CHEAP JEEP. Unusual: Right-
hand drive, automatic transmis-
slon. Good condition 757 1312
TYPING: Term, thesis, resumes,
etc call: 757 3�2 before p.m.
NEED PROFESSIONAL Typist
for your term paper, thasls,
manuscript, etc. Call Susan
Byers � 7S7-S4M or 7SI-I141.
PEK1KG CUPPER-
"A VOYAGE OF TOTAL ELEGANCE "
WP9&& CUPP&Z mtS WfflAVD WOMEN
a commute & CBMog
. A COMPLY YmjV OF UAH? "ITS
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. rcm&iUAL sopy wrap, (ivcuge, aiM!)
call rot MJAtaavmwr:
1005-A mAMOW ST.
NEW AND
USED BOOKS
(Formerly Central News and Card Shop)
321 Evans St. Mall � Phone 752-3333
Open 9 to 6 Seven Days A Week
v All Used
Paperbacks
ALWAYS
Vi PRICE
skill
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and
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sub
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St
2711 E 10th St.(Across from Buck's Gulf)
FFERING THE BEST
SELECTION
OF SAND WICHES
IN TOWN
A TTITUDE
ADJUSTMENT
HOUR
2pm-6pm Mon-Fri
2$t OFF Any
Sandwiches from
6:00pm-8:30pm
PHASE BRING COUPON
Phone ahead for take-out orders.
Dial 752-4297
COOOOOCOOOOM
Celebrates It's First Anniversary
With Inflation Fighting Prices
4:00 P.M9:00 P.M.
Sunday Thru Thursday
Reg. Shrimp Dinner s339
Large $459
$339
c
Large
Oysters
$459
Our Way Of Saying Thank You For Making Our First
Year A Successful One.
Bob Herring, Manager
105 Airport Road
Greenville, N.C.
758-0327
m
m
Professional TYPING service ex-
perience, quality work, IBM Selec-
tric typewriter Call Lanie Shlve,
758 5301 or Gail Joyner. 75 1062
TYPING: Term, thesis, resumes,
dissertations, etc. Professional
quality at lowest rates. Call Kern-
pie Dunn anytime. 752 4733
TYPING: TERM PAPERS ALL
SIZES. Proofreading offered.
Dependable typist. Call Mary.
355-240
BASS GUITARIST: top 40 country
band based in Greenville, N.C.
Successful recording act with
steady bookings. Serious inquiries
only. (?!�) 7M-1771 night, 7S�-MM
day.
NEED SOMEONE to commute
from Wiihamston Classes from �
to I M-P. Please call m-UM.
TYRONE: Man. d�t party the wui
a blass. I drank so much Thunder-
bird an' grapefruit juice dat I
could hardly see duh road on duh
way home In my Cadillac. Oh wail,
you be sho an' tall me when duh
nex one gonna be, an' I be sho an'
com, hoah Claudell
MYRNA Thanks tor tha great
weekend I certainly enloyed the
studying and tha chess tourna-
ment. And watching the late, late
documentary on the leeches was
really keen Oh well, golly, I sure
hope we can get together again
soon and continue our discussion
on Plato and Aristotle. PEAIODY
SPORTING GOODS
DOWNTOWN ANtRLINGTON BLVD
All Star' Pro Mesh Oxford.
The coolest shoe with the
hottest styling in
basketball.
28.95
Reg. 33"
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
Presents
IN CONCERT
Back by Popular Demand
A Rock 'n' Roll Legend
LEON RUSSELL
and His Eleven Piece Musical Revue
Baseball and Softball Shirts
ZA length and
Vi length sleeve
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Now 20�7oOFF
MIKASA B1000
Rubber Basketball
��t7SdNoN4tiidias�.jliaS
Sale
10.95
Reg. I4V5
waMaMaiaiaia
Baseball and Softball gloves
are now REbuaED
wiawawawgjaaiawaaawaaMaMey
Prices Good Thru Sat.
TUESDAY, JULY 6th
ADVANCE TICKETS � $8.00 PER PERSON
ADVANCE TICKET LOCATIONS:
pie Records � Western Pleasure � Record Bar (Pitt Plaza)
Roadies (Goldsboro) � Carolina Opry House
(HANK WILSON IS BACK')
i
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I
S





THEEAS1 CAROI INI AN
JUNE 30, 1982
Nazi Tells Philosophy

Continued From Page 1
skills which can be associated with
very superior intellectual ability
and notes that, "his high perfor-
mance on the comprehension
subtest in relation to other subtest
scores is somewhat characteristic of
a paranoid schizophrenic and
neurotic
In 1981, Becker was inspired b a
"force" to write In Defense oj
I ibert the book states. Becker's
book desctibes in detail his
philosophy, which is based on the
reality principle. It America is to be
the greatest nation on earth, it musi
follow the principle, which states: 1)
struggle is the father of all things; 2)
virtue lies in strength, and the U.S.
must rebuild it's physical, mental,
moral, military, and economic
strength; and 3) living space is
primary and defense
Our living space must be defend-
ed against our enemies, who are the
international bankers and big
business, in league with the com
mumst countries. These forces are
masterminded b Judaism, accor-
ding to the book. Becker added in
the interview, "This is my own
philosophy of National Socialism.
"It is not a philosophy of gassing
the Jews, or killing the blacks. I'm
not interested in doing any of these
things. 1 do feel that black people
would be happier in their own land
of Africa, than they are here in
America, most certainly
In an interview conducted this
month, Becker stated that some of
his viewpoints have changed. "I'm
itill very much an American na-
ionalist. My racial philosophy has
changed somewhat in recent months
1 no longei feel that the black
people are a threat to the existence
of this country . . . I'm quoting
from my book here, 'Some in-
dn lduals of that race have many ad-
mirable qualities. Others of them
are uncivilized, arrogant, and in-
herently and genetically stupid
Certainly, blacks are at a disadvan-
tage on the average, in respect to in-
telligence. So I'm not really retrac-
ting anything I've said before,
although I'm saving that I no longer
have, sav, any anti-black sym-
pathies, as 1 had in the past. 1 don't
belong to the stance of the National
Socialist Party or the National
States Right Party anymore
FOR A GOOD TIME
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�ft East (Earnlintatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ow�.��
Mike Hughes, K,anaKmfu,ior
Waverly Merritt. Dm � �r um nu Cindy Pleasants, tmnemm
Robert Rucks, �M�n�5 -B, Ernest Conner, ,�, &�
Phii i ip Maness, � itap Steve Bachner, ������ cm
C HRIS I.ICHOK, l iHuloiion Managtr MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
June '0, ls82
Opinion
Page 4
Foreign Policy
Secretary Of State Vital
Although the resignation of
Secretary of State Alexander Haig
has already produced mixed emo-
tions among U.S. politicians and
the American people alike, the tran-
sition comes at an uneasy time in the
history of U.S. foreign policy an
uneasy crucial time. And Americans
may soon find out just how impor-
tant, how vital, the secretary of
state is to U.S. foreign policy.
With tensions still high in the
South Atlantic, the Middle East
erupting into new violence daily and
the dollar plummeting on foreign
markets, the image of the United
States is suffering greatly abroad.
And with the U.S.Soviet arms race
escalating into inconceivable pro-
portions, our image isn't all that's
at stake.
Let's just hope the United States
can survive the upcoming lag in
foreign relations.
Alexander Haig came under fire
repeatedly during his 18-month
tenure as secretary of state. Those
who worked closely with Haig said
he insisted on putting his own
"personal stamp" on every action
of importance. Thus, they felt that
some other important problems
were put aside while Haig concen-
trated on matters of more worldly
renown, such as the
"time-consuming" Versailles
economic summit.
And perhaps Haig was wont to
spend more time on such
internationally-acclaimed missions.
Perhaps he deemed these questions
more important to U.S. foreign
policy. After all, that was his job.
Certainly, any position in a
presidential cabinet requires a cer-
tain amount of principle and techni-
que compromise � especially
Haig's former position. But it is
highly unlikely that Haig and
Reagan differed so sharply on
policy that numerous proposals by
the former secretary were disregard-
ed by the president. So, why, in
fact, were the proposals neglected?
Naturally, Haig's critics will say
that he was far too concerned with
his own image, far too little con-
cerned with the image of the United
States. They will undoubtedly
forget to credit him with the
countless hours he put into the
cause of American foreign policy.
They will forget that his was a
thankless job.
Haig's critics will, however, recall
the crucial error of judgment he
made following the assassination at-
tempt on President Reagan on
March 30, 1981, when he attempted
to calm and assure the American
people that he was in control of the
White House. His assurances were
presumed, by many, to indicate
some supposed thirst for power on
Haig's part. His popularity, if in-
deed he was ever popular, diminish-
ed from that point onward.
Secretary of State designate
George P. Shultz has been
characterized as more of a "team
player in contrast to Haig Shultz
says he views the job as an op-
portunity to do what I can to ad-
vance the cause of peace, freedom
and justice in a world so troubled
and so anxious to hope for a good
future
Indeed, his aspirations are
honorable. And if he can capitalize
on that "opportunity" and suc-
cessfully advance the causes of
peace, freedom and justice, then
more power to him. We certainly
could use some lasting peaceful rela-
tions
But God help him when his job
gets past the theoretical stage. God
help him when he attempts to
establish his own style � which is
inevitable. From that time forward,
blatant criticism and disagreement
aren't too far down the road.
Everyone cheers for the theory; yet
everyone hisses at the attempts to
realize those theories.
Just consider the recent history of
American secretaries of state: Cyrus
Vance, the three-year man under
former President Carter. He resign-
ed in 1980, following a "policy
dispute" with that administration.
The vacancy was filled by Sen.
Edmund Muskie, whose term of of-
fice took the form of caretaker. Ac-
tually, the lack of solid individual
achievement was not totally
Muskie's fault. His short term of
office barely enabled him to learn
the ropes of his new position, let
alone embark on diplomatic mis-
sions.
And that year (1980) saw still
more transitions. Out went Carter,
and in came Ronald Reagan. Subse-
quently, in came Al Haig. But even
Haig's appointment proved a major
to-do, as politicians were skeptical
of his involvement in the Nixon ad-
ministration and leery of his sup-
posed "warmongering" nature.
Senate hearing were heated; Haig's
tenure got off on the wrong foot.
Enter George Shultz. Although
approval is still a factor in his ap-
pointment, Senate leaders have
already indicated that they foresee
no problems in giving the okay.
However, Shultz's own involvement
in the Nixon White House will in-
evitably come up. So, who knows?
If and when he does assume the
position, Shultz will be faced with
adversity and tension on virtually all
fronts. And if the past holds true,
he'll find much of the same disap-
proval on the home front.
But hopefully not. Hopefully,
there's enough mutual respect bet-
ween Reagan and his new choice for
secretary of state to allow for a cer-
tain amount of individuality.
Maybe individuals working together
can bring our foreign relations back
to par.
THE EAST Ct&OUNiM
-Campus Forum'
Student Gives 'Inside' Prison Story
Editor's Note: The Jollowing comment
is a copy of a letter from Patrick O'Neill to
Magistrate F. Stewart Clarke of (he U.S.
District Court, Eastern Region in Eayet-
tenlle, the judge who sentenced O'Neill to
90 days and a $400 fine. O'Neill is current-
ly incarcerated in federal prison in Atlanta.
"I was in lief Nam � in the jungles,
and I ain 't seen worse than this The
words oj inmate Barry Homes, commen-
ting on the conditions oj the Sampson
County Jail, Clinton, N.C
Dear Mr. Clarke:
I've been in prison for over a week now;
I've never been to Viet Nam, but never in
my life � except during a missionary trip
to Haiti � have 1 seen such human
degradation and suffering.
The Sampson County Jail in eastern
North Carolina was indeed the worst, but
since my transfer to federal prison in
Petersburg, Va I have come to believe
that incarceration � no matter where �
has no measurable degree of value to me,
anyone in here (including the guards) or
society in general.
I feel certain that prisons and jails, in
and of themselves, represent the greatest
cause of crime in our nation. Incarceration
seems to be society's response to the pro-
blems of poverty and social injustice. Our
prisons and jails bulge from the weight of
our social neglect. Minorities and the poor
account for a disproportionate number of
the people in here.
"Racism is used to prevent larger social
reforms said Robert Lynch, graduate of
the Harvard School of Law and now a
staff person with the Prison and Jail Pro-
ject in Durham. He made these comments
while leading a workshop on the
"Possibilities of Alternatives (to incarcera-
tion)" two weeks ago in Greenville. I
organized that workshop. "There's no
criminal justice without social justice
Lynch concluded.
Mr. Homes, the man 1 interviewed in the
Sampson County Jail, is a poor, black
migrant worker. He travelled to North
Carolina from Florida to pick cucumbers.
He was in jail for allowing a person
without a driver's license to operate his
motor vehicle.
Homes was being held in lieu of a $100
bond. He had $40, but the bail bondsman
didn't want to tak: a risk on a transient
migrant worker. His court date was set for
July 27 � seven weeks after he was ar-
rested! He was literally trapped in the
Sampson County Jail.
Homes was not allowed to make a phone
call or get a medical prescription (for his
chronic emphysema) filled for the first
week he was there. Fortunately, Alex
Charns, Mark Beaty and myself were able
to organize the inmates to demand their
rights from Sheriff W.C. Fann. Homes
subsequently made his phone call, got his
pills and was released the next day.
Why did it require such radical action
from us to get Mr. Homes his rights? Is
that justice? Sampson County Jail was un-
necessarily over-crowded, full of vermin,
always damp from faulty plumbing and
poorly ventilated. Seventeen-year-old boys
were in the same cells with violent
criminals � even murderers. As a matter
of fact, during my entire stay in three jails,
I have been in the same cell with violent
criminals every night.
How does a situation like this help
rehabilitate anyone? 1 asked one of the
17-year-old boys, David Jordan, if he felt
his stay in jail would help him be a better
person: "Not when I learned a hell of a lot
of good criminal tricks in here he
replied. "They don't treat us like adults
out in the world, but when you do
something wrong, they throw you in here
with a bunch of killers
North Carolina has almost 17,000
women and men in its jails. Fifty-six per-
cent are minorities � the highest per-
capita rate of incarceration for any state,
in both categories. All these people in
jail and our recidivism rate still stands
at nearly 60 percent! Mr. Clarke, I appeal
to you. Stop sending people to prison for
non-violent crimes You can see the futile
results of vour actions, look for alter-
natives. You can choose the humane op-
tion and save the taxpayers money.
This week, 1 will be sent to another
federal prison in Atlanta. The other in-
mates tell me it's real bad there. I'm lone-
ly, and I'm a little scared; my physical
safety is threatened daily. Thank God I
have faith.
Last week, several hundred innocent
peasants were murdered in El Salvador �
by the same troops the United States train-
ed at Fort Bragg. 1 remain here, at peace,
still maintaining my opposition to my
government's policy.
Mr. Clarke, all people must join
together if the struggle for justice is to be
won. I would like to enlist your support
and cooperation. Thank you. Peace.
Patrick O'Neill
One More Time
Well, 1 guess it's time for a rock and roll
fan to voice an opinion in the campus
purveyer of conservative policies.
However, 1 don't want to criticize The East
Carolinian.
Friends, students, and all who are avid
listeners of WZMB. 1 come hopefully to
quell all fears of the ignorant. But let me
make myself perfectly clear. WZMB is
without a doubt a different radio station in
this market (shown by the type of pro-
gramming which we operate under).
Before I explain, I must first emphasize
that in theory there should be absolutely
no type of struggle for power involved in
the station, the newspaper, or for that mat-
ter any student-funded organization. We
here at the station have, for the present,
risen above this. Anyway, there is no
power as I define the word, outside of
campus. 1 feel that anyone who would be
satisfied with this small amount of
"power" has, in my opinion, small goals. 1
contrarily think big.
I am from Charlotte, N.C, and have
been upon this campus for three years. (1
would explain an occurrence in my past
dealings with the previous station.) 1 was
but a freshman and offered my services; I
was politely told to get lost by the girl that
was working there. As a matter of fact, we
came across the application a few weeks
ago in the process of cleaning up.
To explain the station's format. Yes,
Virginia, there is a format clock. This is a
nw addition to the station. It's purpose is
to acquaint the jocks with the operation of
a professional necessity. WROQ, FM 95;
WBCY, FM 108 � these are top-market
stations in Charlotte. K-94, WQDR,
WSFL, WRQR � all these stations are big
in this area also, and let's not forget Robot
93. All of these stations are
"professional They operate with a for-
mat. This being the first commandment of
broadcasting.
WROQ is the only station I listen to at
home. WZMB is the only station I listen to
in Greenville. Both play rock and roll.
However, on the "Q classical music runs
from 7 a.m. till noon on Sundays. 1 feel
this would not sit well with Greenville's
classical set.
The clock operates in groups of heavy,
medium, low and oldie airplay. This is
decided with advice from Billboard
Magazine, established artists and sugges-
tions from the music director. Consequent-
ly, this is the mode of operation for any
station I have come in contact with.
The oldie system requires the jocks to
have an extensive background in that the
jock must program his show with songs
that have not been played. If anything, he
has the freedom to make his own shows.
There is a massive amount of in
available to those who know music Q
a few stations require the jock to play cei
tain oldies. In the bins of heavy, medium
and iow, the jock still has a choice of m
cuts on the albums. So, whatever goes
the air is chosen bv who is operating
board.
The soul show, 1 am pleased with. Tin
is great music there that rock and roll ,
based on. Chuck Jordan is our jazz guru:
without a doubt, he knows his jazz. There
is no disco, which isn't music in m op
mon, played on his show. But hold
when 1 want to dance, I'll go to the Elbo
So, I don't hate disco entirely.
Mr. Wilkins voiced the opinion that new
albums, for example the live Stones album.
should be played more often. Why wear il
out? The entire album was featured
Keith Mitchell's show last Sunday night.
The oldie system keeps us from pla-
the same Stones, Beatles or whatever
repeatedly. Let's face it, gang, these an
fantastic songs, but thev get old after a
short while of being played over and over
It would be super to have a compute
Ask our Media Board, which we all mil
operate under. 1 am under the impression
that the newspaper has a terminal.
To explain album buying, we must bu
w hat is current to keep abreast of the flow
New music is released monthly. We will
buy more older music when more monev is
available. Ot that, you can be assured.
As far as new wave is concerned, it's no:
my bag. To my knowledge, the listeners
are happy with its time slot or they would
say something it they were dissatisfied.
WZMB is supplying the Greenville area
with the most varied format I have ever
heard. All types of music are not alwav
played on commercial stations; they can't
do it and make a profit. They have to ap-
peal to the most listeners at all times. We
are, thankfully, free of this. We do not ap-
peal to Robot 93's audience. I have noticed
format changes on stations of this area
For instance, I heard the Guess Who's
song "American Woman" on 93 a few
weeks after we went on the air. Thi- is
pleasing to me personally, that they aren't
forcing their listeners to listen to top-40 al!
of the time.
WZMB is, without a doubt, a learning
experience. It is acquainting students with
the operation of the industry, the jocks
who play the records and those who read
the news. It is the great teacher; with this
type of business, one can study it all in
class, but to really learn the business, one
has to do it. I must compliment those peo-
ple who spend many unpaid hours plann
ing their shows and prereading the news,
which, in my opinion, is the hardest job
because it involves the longest time on the
air.
As for Edith Jeffreys, if she wants to
learn how we operate, she is welcome to
come down anytime. Broadcasting classes
are an absolute necessity for people to do
this type of stuff. If you have questions on
WZMB, feel free to contact us at 757-6656.
757-6657, 757-6658. Talk with Warren
Baker, Jim Ensor, Chuck Jordan or any
staff person. I'm on Tuesday and Thurs
day nights from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.
I honestly feel that those who are griping
about the station's operation are not
familiar at all with the way in which the in-
dustry operates. After all, these people
aren't paid � except a few. I was always
taught, if you can get a good job done for
nothing, don't look the gift horse in the
mouth.
P.S. Regarding requests, as a closing
note, most stations do not allow for them
to be played because of the strict format.
WZMB, however, allows for requests.
This is one of the functions of the oldie slot
on our format. If it is played, it is at the
jock's discretion.
Lee Walden
Drama-Speech
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 30. 1982
Page 5
'Blade Runner'
Throwback To
Gumshoe Days
By JOHN WEYLER
Si.ff Wnlrt
"Sam Spade in the 21st century
"It was slow-moving but worth it,
because there was always something
to look at
"It was very depressing
The above comments are capsule
critiques overheard at a recent Plaza
Theatre's showing of the new film
Blade Runner. These carelessly-
considered and delivered comments
are printed here because they sum
up some of the most vital aspects of
Blade Runner, one of the most com-
plex, creative, and challenging
movies made in recent years.
"Sam Spade in the 21st cen-
tury Blade Runner has all the
trappings of the traditional detective
story. The protagonist is a rugged
law man living in the underbelly of a
big city, determinedly stalking clues
and encountering killers, misfits and
mysterious women. But Blade Run-
ner is set in the future, so fantasy
film fixture Harrison Ford is the
detective, rather than Humphrey
Bogart. And instead of tracking
down The Maltese Falcon, Ford is
chasing replicants, renegade flesh-
and-blood robots. These creatures
look, act and bleed just like human
beings, so whenever he blows one
away, which is his job, he is sicken-
ed by it.
4 7 was slow-moving but worth it
because there was always something
to look at Despite the several
quite blood-curdling battles Ford
gets involved in, Blade Runner is
not a Raiders-style thrill-a-minute
spectacular. Instead, it is a mostly
low-key and slow-paced film, which
is fine, because that gives the viewer
a chance to grasp the incredible
complexity of the setting. Every
frame is filled to bursting with a
thousand-and-one details about the
world of the future. From the
crowded, decayed streets packed
with street people, punks and
policemen, to the high-tech towers
of the privileged few, the Blade
Runner landscape looks alive and
REAL, down to the clouds of pollu-
tion that hang over everything
"It was very depressing The
world of Blade Runner is millions of
light years away from the sanitized
Star Trek future, full of bright high
See NEW, Page 6
Harrison Ford stalks a renegade Teplicant" in this scene from Ridley Scott's futuristic thriller The Blade Runner.
Spielberg Calls On Childhood For Inspiration
B MICHIKO KAKLTAM
NEW YORK � As a child growing up in the '50s,
Steven Spielberg knew, just knew, that another magical
and somehow terrifying world lay just beyond the placid
surface of his family's suburban life. Even the tiny
crack in his bedroom wall, illuminated by the hallway
light, promised all sorts of awful marvels.
"I remember lying there, trying to go to sleep he
says, "and I used to always imagine little Hieronymus
Bosch-like creatures inside, peeking out and whispering
to me to come into the playground of the crack and be
drawn into the unknown there, inside the wall of my
home in New Jersey
To this dav, Spielberg says he continues to be
fascinated by "what I think is there but cannot see
That capacity for wonder, combined with a prodigal im-
agination, has informed nearly all his films from Jaws
to Close Encounters of the Third hind to Raiders of the
lost Ark.
In his latest pictures, Spielberg returns to the subur-
ban milieu of his own childhood, but invests that world
with two dramatic and highly disparate visions of the
supernatural: Poltergeist, which he produced and co-
wrote, is a darkly imagined horror movie, portraying a
family threatened by the vengeful spirits of the dead;
while E. T the story of a 10-year-old boy who befriends
an extraterrestrial stranded on earth, is, in effect, a con-
temporary fairy tale, offering a vision of innocence and
hope.
" Poltergeist is what 1 fear and E. T. is what I love
Spielberg explains. "One is about suburban evil and the
other is about suburban good. 1 had different motiva-
tions in both instances: in Poltergeist, I wanted to ter-
rify and I also wanted to amuse � I tried to mix the
laughs and screams together. Poltergeist is the darker
side of my nature � it's me when 1 was scaring my
younger sisters half to death when we were growing up
� and E. T. is my optimism about the future and my op-
timism about what it was like to grow up in Arizona and
New Jersey
Poltergeist and E.T. are now playing at the Plitt
Theatre in Greenville.)
A romantic and an idealist when it comes to making
movies, Spielberg is not so much interested in depicting
life as it is, so much as life as it might be � heightened
and idealized on the screen.
Ghosts (Poltergeist), extraterrestrials (E.T.), UFOs
(Close Encounters) and vengeful killer sharks (Jaws)
help animate his pictures. In others, a single incident �
a young outlaw couple's decision to retrieve their child
in The Sugarland Express, for instance, or the ap-
pearance of a Japanese submarine off the coast of
California in 1941 � triggers an accelerating sequence
of events, the sort of wonderfully improbable events
that happen only in the movies.
"I have a real chemical imbalance between what's
real and what's not Spielberg says. "1 tend to side
with what isn't real in picking a subject, more than I do
with what's really happening out there in the street �
enough directors make movies that reflect life as we see
it every day.
"There's no proof UFOs exist or that ghosts exist,
but it's always nice to imagine what you think could be
there, and the best movies I've ever seen are movies that
are slightly above one's normal eye level � something
you have to reach up to and suspend your disbelief
Indeed, the sort of movies Spielberg likes to make
have the same effect on audiences that the pictures he
saw as a young boy had on his youthful imagination:
They enthrall and entertain and they "take people out
of their seats to get them involved � through showman-
ship � in a kind of emotional dialogue" with the film.
Spielberg says he never dreamed of becoming a direc-
tor as a child; he dreamed of becoming "all those heroic
people up there on the screen And as far as he is con-
cerned, making movies still provides a certain vicarious
pleasure, a kind of celluloid substitute for all his Walter
Mitty dreams.
"In the past he says, "I've made movies about ex-
periences that I've never had because that way I can ex-
plore all those 'what ifs You see, I'm all the characters
in my movies. I was as much Indiana Jones as Harrison
Ford was in 'Raiders and in E.T I was E.Ts eyes
Through the movie, I had to imagine what it would be
like to be a creature visiting earth and what life would be
like from his perspective
The real heroes in most of Spielberg's pictures.
however, are not such anomalous charactes as E.T but
people who represent his version of Alfred Hitchcock
innocent bystanders. They are "ordinary people a
Dr. Lacombe says in Close Encounters, "under extraor-
dinary circumstances" � people like the suburban
families in Close Encounters, E. T. and Poltergeist, who
live in pleasant ranch houses filled with appliances and
television sets and refrigerators stocked with beer and
Cokes and potato salad.
"They're common, everyday types of people to
whom nothing really happens until 1 come along.
Spielberg says. "In the movies I've made, I've tried
very, very hard to take the bystander, toughen him up,
thereby robbing him of his innocence, in order to corn-
See SPIELBERG, Page 6
Vonnegut On Film
'Slaughterhouse Five' Tonight
Gregg Smith Singers On Tap For '82- '83 Artists Series
Th Crete Smith Singers perform both contemporary and rarely-done older music and have recorded
more th" fifty albums. They have received awards from Stereo and Hi-Fi magazine as well as three
G�mmy Awards. The talented singing ensemble will perform as part of the upcoming MSC 82-83
AalfffaT Abo slated are flutist Julius Baker, the Tokyo String Quartet, Bolcom and Morris,
rhambeTEroup Orpheus, and pianist Peter Serkin. For information about season tickets call the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, at 757-6611, extension 266.
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff V filer
Billy Pilgrim, the outer space optometrist, Montana
Wildhack, the interplanetary porno star, and all the
gang from Tralfamadore will beam down to Men-
danhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre tonight, June
30, at 9 p.m. and tomorrow, July 1 at 9 p.m. At those
times the Student Union Films Committee will present
the 1972 adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut's modern classic
Slaughterhouse Five. Admission is free with ECU ID
and Activity Card or MSC membership.
Vonnegut is today's most popular, prolific and puzzl-
ing writer. Though most of his books are bestsellers,
they rarely make it to the screen: directors are
understandably awed t trying to visualize Vonnegut's
strange synthesis of science fiction, farce and
philosophy. At least the author helped George Roy Hill
by writing the screenplay, when the director decided to
tackle Slaughterhouse Five. Their collaboration resulted
in a unique, not always successful, yet intriguing film.
Michael Sacks stars as Billy Pilgrim, an average
middle-class American, respected optometrist, president
of the local Lions Club chapter. Mr. Pilgrim has one on-
ly problem: he has become "unstuck in time" and is
constantly slipping mentally (and physically?) through
time and space, back and forth from his own future to
his past.
The time and place of most concern to Billy, and the
viewer, is Dresden, Germany, in 1945. As a POW hiding
in an underground cellar ("slaughterhouse no. five"),
he survived the fire-bombing of the city by Allied
forces. This event became one of the most controversial
questions of World War II: did the Allies have the
moral or military right to destroy the beautiful old
town, and nearly every single human being in it, when
the area was not being used by the enemy0
Slaughterhouse Five doesn't answer this query directly:
it sees it as another example of the insanity of war.
"Vonnegut's book and the film's eye affectingly see a
lot of the military on both sides as press-ganged school
kids said The New Yorker. "The young Billy looks
sixteen at most; allotted a coat that an English officer
bracingly calls not so much as coat as an insult, before
being very good to the boy. All the scenes in real time
are done with feeling for human attentiveness, with a
comic sense of the behavior of different nationalities
locked up together, and with piercing truth in the sound
of Bach and the shots of lost baroque pieces as the
Allied prisoners of war march through Dresden
Billy travels from the past to the far future, as he is
abducted by unseen aliens and whisked away to their
planet, Tralfamadore. There Billy's all-American
Everyman receives every all-American man's wish
dream: a sexy starlet to do with as he wishes. The
Tralfamadorians want to mate Billy with Montana, the
curvy ex-sex film performer. (Valerie Perrine in one of
her earliest roles). The couple lead an idyllic existence in
their somewhat-sterile but cozy cage, but Billy cannot
stop time-slipping and reliving the horrors of World
War II.
Said a critic for Swank, "Billy represents not precise-
ly Everyman, but rather illustrates the apathetic majori-
ty �� an analogue between Billy's inanimate innocence
and that apathetic state of the German people that nur-
tured Nazism. A watchword for Slaughterhouse Five is
indifference: the vision is of a world of outrage met with
total indifference. It is the crass of 20th century man.
� � �
t





�r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 30, 1982
New Sci Fi Is
Eye Popper
Continued From Page 5
hopes for the human
race. Blade Runner's
cityscape is grim, gritty
and often disgusting,
akin to the people who
inhabit it. There are no
nice folks in this film:
Ford's disturbed detec-
tive is only slightly
superior-grade repli-
cant played by Rutger
Hauer with all the Nor-
dic nastiness he
displayed in the recent
TV biography of Nazi
leader Albert Speer.
A few rays of light
do manage to penetrate
Spielberg
A Wizard
Continued From Page 5
bat the forces that are
against him. 1 love
movies where there are
opposing forces and
they're stronger than
the hero and the hero
must succeed either by
finding a way around
or straight through
In the case of E.T
Spielberg points out,
the opposing force is
not a tangible enemy
like the shark in Jaws,
but the intrusion of the
grown-up world.
Whereas 10-year-old
Elliott wants only to
love and be loed by his
cxtraterrestrian friend,
this grown-up world,
represented by corps of
doctors and technicians
wants to preserve E.T.
as a specimen of alien
life.
"1 always thought of
the adult world as being
symbolized by tall peo-
ple who cast giant
shadows Spielberg
says, "people who
don't think like kids,
but think like profes-
sionals. That's
dangerous � they
might understand E.T.
biologically and scien-
tifically, but they'd
never ever understand
that he had a heart
A similar message
has long been a favorite
theme in children's
literature � from J.M.
Barrie's Peter Pan to
Antoine de Saint-
Exupery's The IMtle
Prince � and E. T. is
filled with references to
well-known books and
films. During one
scene, John Williams'
score recalls the music
used in The Wizard of
Oz to accompany the
Wicked Witch, Miss
Gulch' and in the
movie's penultimate
scene, Elliott and his
friends soar into the
sky on their bicycles, in
much the same way
that Peter Pan and
Wendy flew off to
Never Never Land.
Most of Spielberg's
movies have featured
children in important
or emblematic roles.
Sugarland, Close En-
counters and
Poltergeist all involve
the attempt of a mother
to regain custody of her
child. And in both
Close Encounters and
E. T it is a child � and
those adults who main-
tain a childlike in-
nocence and openness
to the possibility of
miracles � who is
granted communion
with these visitors from
outer space and a vision
of a more lovely world.
While enrolled at
California State Col-
lege in Long Beach,
Spielberg spent most of
his free time sneaking
onto the Universal lot
and making his own
16mm films. In 1969 he
made Amblin a
24-minute short about
a pair of hitchhikers,
which won awards at
the Venice and Atlanta
film festivals.
That led to a contract
with Universal, and
Spielberg was soon
directing television
episodes of Night
Gallery, Marcus Welby
and Columbo.
the polluted gloom,
however. Ford falls in
love with a beautiful
replicant, well-played
by Sean Young, a being
he is instructed to
destroy. Likewise,
Hauer's character's
man-made humanity
surfaces in a crucial
scene with Ford. Blade
Runner ponders the
perplexing riddles of
life, death and what it
means to be human,
and ends on an affir-
mitive note.
The excellent acting
of Ford, Hauer and
Young, the taut script-
writing of Hampton
Fancher and David
Peoples (bases on
Philip K. Dick's science
fiction classic Do An-
droids Dream of Elec-
tric Sheep), the
astonishing art direc-
tion and design of
Lawrence G. Paull,
David Snyder and Syd
Mead, the flawless
visual effects of master
Douglas Trumbull, the
superior
cinematogrophy of Jor-
dan Cronenweth, and
the eeire musical score
by Academy Award-
winner Vangelis, super-
vised by the great
talents of Ridley Scott,
director of Alien, com-
bine to make Blade
Runner an excellent
motion picture ex-
perience. Blade Runner
should compete with
Steven Spielburg's E. T.
to be the summer's best
film and another land-
mark of science fiction-
fiction cinema.
V
a CaroH,
July 5-10
8:15pm
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ECU STUDENTS: 5-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 30, 1982
Page 7
QB Slot Worries Kiffin;
Veterans Provide Hope
The East Carolina football team
will face N.C. State in its opening
game of the season.
The Wolfpack, under the direc-
tion of head coach Monte Kiffin,
defeated the Pirates last year by a
margin of 31-10, a game much
closer than the score indicated.
With only 1:56 remaining in the
third quarter, the two teams were
tied at 10-10. But the fourth quarter
belonged to N.C. State. With two
long punt returns by State's Louie
Meadows and the ability of tailback
wonder Joe Mclntosh, the
Wolfpacks were in complete
domination.
Mclntosh exploded, debuting his
100 yard plus performance and win-
ding up with 167 yards on 24 carries,
including a 40-yard touchdown.
State had 277 yards rushing com-
pared to ECU's 197.
But Coach Kiffin didn't attribute
the win to offensive play but rather
defense instead. "I think our
defense needs to be commended
he said. "They've taken a lot of
criticism
ECU head coach Ed Emory,
however, was not going to criticize
the Wolfpack.
After suffering an embarrassing
56-0 loss against UNC-Chapel Hill
the previous week, Emory com-
pared the two teams. "I thought
roming into the game that State pro-
bably had a better defense than
Carolina from an experience stand-
point he said, "because of the
linebackers and the people up front.
1 also thought State's offensive line
was better and 1 still feel this way
But that's all last year's news.
What can the Pirates expect from
the Wolfpack this season?
State has thirteen starters and
forty-five lettermen returning to the
1982 squad. Three junior college
transfers; Greg Huber(defensive
tackle), Don Wilson (Defensive
back) and Tim
Esposito(quarterback) will be added
to this season's roster.
State's prized possessions,
although, are those returning
players.

Cindy
Pleasant s
A Look Inside
Joe Mclntosh. The statistics are
already phenomenal. The ACC's
"Rookie of the Year" led the league
in rushing with 1,190 yards in ten
games and on 222 carries. The
tailback averaged 119 yards per
game and was ranked as the nation's
eleventh best collegiate runner.
Eric Williams. The defensive
back led State in interceptions last
year with seven, which was also tops
in the ACC. He was the team's
number six tackier with a total of
81. Kiffin said he has seen some
great defensive backs at Arkansas
and Nebraska but Williams may be
the best of any of them.
Sam Key. The 6-0, 211-pound
senior is acknowledged as the team's
hardest hitter. He was State's se-
cond leading tackier last season with
a total of 150.
Louie Meadows. Labeled as the
most versatile player on the team,
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Pirate Slugger John Hallow
Pirate AD Announces
Selection Committee
Athletic Director Dr. Kenneth
Karr has announced the names of
six people who will serve on the
committee to select East Carolina's
next basketball coach.
Karr will serve as the chairperson
and other committee members are:
Jack Minges, a Greenville
businessman; Bill Jackson, a Fayet-
teville businessman; Dr. Robert
Capps, a Greenville businessman
and a member of the Pirate Club ex-
ecutive board; Dr. Jon Tingelstad,
chairperson of the Department of
Pediatrics at the East Carolina
Medical school; Dr. Ernie Schwarz,
the strong safety had his finest game
against ECU, returning three punts
for 105 yards and a touchdown. He
was among the nation's top five
punt returners until breaking his
hand against South Carolina.
The Wolfpack does have talent
but there still are problems. After
losing.four of five starters, State will
have to build its defensive line and
develop strong reserve players.
But defense was not Kiffin's main
concern during spring practive. His
top priority was filling the quarter-
back position. The four contenders
vying for the spot are: Jeff Hoshor,
Ron Laraway, Tol A very and
Esposito. Kiffin said all of the can-
didates had their moments during
the spring work-outs but none were
really consistent. And like any other
coach, Kiffin knows how important
the aerial attack is.
"We've got to be able to throw
the football well if we are to give
ourselves a chance at a successful
season this fall he said.
Kiffin is not only reshaping his
offensive play but also his coaching
staff as well. After last year's 4-7
season, four of Kiffin's assistants
resigned. Carl Smith, an offensive
coordinator from Lamar University
in Beaumont, Texas was hired in
January. And according to a few
sources, Kiffin will hire an offensive
line coach sometime in the very near
future.
The way it looks now, the
Wolfpack's offensive game is one
big question mark. And more than
likely, the effectiveness of State's
passing game will be a real key on
September 11.
(Next week: A preview of ECU's
next opponent-East Tennessee
State.)
Photo By JON JOROAN
nwwww
Photo By JON JOR0
Left: N.C. State Head Football Coach Monte Kiffin. I pper Right: ECU receiver Norwood Vann in action
against State in last year's 31-10 loss. Lower Right: State powerhouse Joe Mclntosh in the 1981 clash with the
Pirates.
Spikers Unite For Success
By KEN BOLTON
Miff Writer
In volleyball, there is no such
thing as a superstar. No one person
can carry a team. And according to
head volleyball coach, the secret is
teamwork and dedication.
Lynn Davidson, who is also an
assistant softball coach, led the
ECU women to a 26-17 record last
season.
"We had a tremendously suc-
cessful season because of the pro-
gress we made. We played com
petitively with some of the best
teams in the region
Davidson described her players as
being very committed to volleyball.
"The enthusiasm and drive is
tremendous. We don't measure suc-
cess in terms of won-loss records.
We measure it in terms of perfor-
mance.
During last season, the players
practiced up to three times a week at
5:30 a.m. because they were unable
to use the gym. Assistant coach Sue
Martin said, "Our kids put up with
a lot but because of their love and
dedication for the sport, they are
able to make sacrifices that other
teams won't Davidson said.
The volleyball program has
become a solid one but it hasn't
been easy. Because the team is not in
a conference, it functions as an in-
dependent. The independent status
not only eliminates any automatic
qualifying for regional berths but it
also causes problems in scheduling.
The major volleyball teams in this
area (UNC-CH, N.C. State and
South Carolina) are no longer re-
quired to play ECU, thus leaving lit-
tle chance for the Pirates to receive
any recognition
Recruiting has also been hard for
Coach Davidson. At this time, there
are no members of the team on a
full scholarship and only six players
with partial scholarships. Martin
said, "Women today are looking
for full scholarships and a lot of
them are getting them
Despite obstacles, Davidson did
manage to land some very good
players. Raleigh native Johanna
Frey will be the only future Pirate
on a full scholarship. Frey played
for the Raleigh Junior Volleyball
team. Davidson predicted that
newcomer Lorna O'Fallon from
Milburne, N.J. will see a lot of ac-
tion in the fall and described walk-
on Ann Guida as a "tough little
sparkplug
Dav idson also has a large number
of returning players, including
Stacey Weitzel. Weitzel was ECU's
most valuable player last year.
Another returnee, Mitzi Davis, won
the coach's award and was named to
the All-America softball team this
past year. Lexanne Keeter, who was
designated as the most improved
player, will be returning to the 1982
squad.
Bucs Blast UNC
In Doubleheader
faculty representative for ECU and
Mrs. Earline Leggett, assistant
athletic director for business affairs.
Karr said the committee will be
receiving applications through July
1st and will begin screening
sometime after July to reduce the
number of finalists.
According to Karr, over 60 ap-
plications have already been receiv-
ed.
The committee will begin conduc-
ting interviews sometime after July
15 and intend to name the new
coach by August 1st.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Kdllor
The Pirates swept a doubleheader
from the University of North
Carolina Friday night, winning 7-0
and 8-5.
ECU's Bob Davidson, now 4-3,
pitched a four-hit shutout against
the Heels, striking out seven and
walking one.
East Carolina gained the lead in
the first, scoring two runs. John
Hallow walked and stole second.
Evans walked and Charlie Smith
doubled, driving in Hallow. Evans
scored on an error.
The Pirates scored three more in
the fourth. Jack Curlings walked
and Art Barnhardt reached second
after an infield error. Nichols singl-
ed, Barnhardt and David Wells
walked, and a single by Hallow
brought in both Shank and Nichols.
In the fifth inning, Shank singled,
stole second and scored on a Rob
Langston single.
Evans knocked a homer in the
sixth to score ECU's final run.
The second game got underway
with Carolina out in front with a
run in the first inning. UNC's Jeff
Scott singled, stole second and
scored on Chris Mench's single.
The Pirates retaliated, coming
back with three runs in the bottom
of the first to gain the lead.
Nichols singled, stole second and
moved to third on an error. Wells
singled him in. Smith and Mike
Williams walked and Curlings
doubled to bring both Wells and
courtesy runner Barnhardt in.
The Bucs scored two more in the
second. Langston hit a single and
Nichols reached when his sacrifice
was overthrown at first. Langston
then came home and Nichols wound
up on third before scoring on a
sacrifice fly by Hallow.
In the third inning, Curlings tripl-
ed and Parsons ran for him. A
single from Shank brought Parsons
in.
Carolina tried for a comeback in
the fourth, chasing Smith from the
mound and scoring thee times. Cut-
ting the lead to 6-4, East Carolina
bounced back with two more runs in
the fourth. Nichols walked and
stole second, scoring on a single
from Wells. Wells was out on a hit
from Hallow and Evans doubled.
Smith and Williams walked bringing
in Hallow.
The Heels scored in the sixth
when Eddie George came in on a
double by Mitch McCleney.
Hallow had two hits in the opener
to lead the Pirates. Wells, Curlings
and Langston each had two in the
second game. McCleney had two in
each game for the Chapel Hill.
Head coach Gary Overton said,
"This is the first time this year that
we've put together two victories.
We really needed these two
Overton commended Davidson
for his performance along with the
rest of the team.
"We did a lot of things well
tonight. We played with a lot of in-
tensity and like the games really
meant something to us. The defense
did a good job, as it has all year
he said.
Photo By KIP SLOAN
Volleyball players set up a spike
Camels Sweep Twinbill
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports r dilor
Campbell University was just hit-
ting too well for East Carolina's
oummer baseball team Saturday
night.
The Pirates were rolled over by
the Cartels in the North State Col-
legiate Baseball League
Doubleheader, losing 13-1 and 5-0.
In the opening game, Campbell's
Bob Spicer and Bob Posey hit
singles. Bob Wilkes then walke 1 to
load the bases. Kelly Hoffman
walked to force in the first run and
Tom Lynch reached on an error to
score the second.
A single from Rodney Stovall
chased Brian Peterson and brought
in another run. And Ron Ammons
hit a two-run single to boost the lead
to 6-0.
A homerun from Posey added a
seventh run in the second inning and
Spicer singled in the fifth and scored
on an error after moving up on
Posey's hit.
The Camels gained four more
runs in the sixth on a pair of
doubles, each hit by Posey and
Spicer, and two singles and a walk.
The Camels scored its final run in
the seventh.
ECU's Mark Shank singled, mov-
ed up on an error and scored the
Pirate's only run when Robbie
Langston grounded out, bringing
him in.
Posey and Spicer had four hits
apiece in the game.
In the second game, the Camels
scored all five runs in the third inn-
ing. Spicer reached on an error,
stole up, and scored on Kevin
Barger's single. Barger moved up
on a wild pitch and Wile's reached
on another error. Hoffmann was
also safe on an error and brought
Barger in.
A hit by Lynch started a three-run
streak to boost the Camels way
ahead, shutting out the Pirates.

T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 30, 1982
A
Pirates, Pack
In 'Wild' Game
"It was a wild one
That's the way baseball
coach Gary Overton
described Monday
night's game against N.
C. State.
Lenny Woodson, the
Wolfpack's freshman
third baseman, hit a
three-run homer in the
bottom of the 11th inn-
ing, making the final
score, 4-2.
With two runners on
first and second,
Woodson bat led with
two outs left.
Last Carolina had
gone ahead in the top
of the 11th. Catcher
Jack Curlings hit State
reliever Kim Caulk's
first pitch of the inning
over the left field fence
for a 2-1 lead.
Overton said, "We
had every opportunity
to win between the 7th
and I lth but we just
didn't do it
The Pirates are now
5-12 and will meet N.C.
State here tonight in a
doubleheader.
Gametime is 6 p.m.
ECU will also face
Campbell University at
home Friday night in a
doubleheader.
Summer Recreation
A ctivities Scheduled
Don't think that putt tournament, tennis
summer recreation has tournament, one-on-
come to a halt! The one basketball, a fun
run and a softball tour-
tollowing activities will nament. For more in-
be offered during se- formation, call
cond session: A putt- 757-6387.
J h
ks Qimversitp
Ofcaircutters
is offering a
20 discount
to all ECU Students wvalid I.D.
Phil Jones
specializes
in easy-care,
low maintenance
precision
haircuts
Located on corner
of Mth 4
Chrles Bivd
Phone 7SJ 0SS�
T.
JC
o
rvvvvv
:P oc6

�&'
l.ntertainment
line up
far the week
WED SIDEWINDER
t.Cl Students only toc admission
THURS
WHEELS
.50 can beverage
8:45-10:30
FRI "SAT In Concert
FOOLSTAR
SUN 4th of July Concert H
THE
STATES
and Special Guests
SECRET AGENTS
And
1. Foosball Tournament
2. 50c can beverage
3. Giveaways
TUES TEZZER
ECU Students only 1�� admission



:Ml'l,lll'liVfr"iB"WHfr
SVrtow
USDA Choice Beef Loin
USOA
CHOICE
3 Lb Canned
Armour
Whole or Half Seai-Boneless
15 Lbs or Do. Sliced Fre.
Dinner Bell
USDA Choice Beef Loin
T-Bone Steak -@ u. 298
Holly Farm Grade A
Chicken Breast
Lb.
$118
Each - Size 12
Jumbo
Cantaloupe
Package of 12 12 Oz. Cans
Miller
750 ML - Bianco Lambrateo Roiato
Cella
Wine
10!Hi
Pb�. of 12 � 12 Oz. Cane
Schlitz
2 Liter
( Iella
97 Sheets - Large Roll
T
Towels
Why Ply M.03
A'
I " - ,��-a
. J
289
8 Pack - Food Town

Quart
Why Pay M.29
Half Gallon - Sealtest
Orange
Juice
Why Pay -119
4100
15 Oz. Can - Dog Food
Ken-L Ration Stew,
399
16 oz. - Phillip s
Pork & Beans
400 Sbeeti - 4 Roll Pack - Coronet
Toilet Tissue

Coronet
Prints
� �oc t�o m.i
porkn
beans
- ��� �� -i
49 Ounce
Cold Power
Half Gallon � White House
Apple Juice
12.5 Oz. Sausage Pepperom
Cheese Hamburger
Totino's Pizza
JF
�� 'r hkl Si
r
489
3 0z. � Libby s
Potted Meat
39
5 Oz. - Libby s (&�
Vienna Sausage
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22 Ounce
Why Pay 1 19
3
crnktecut
trench
fned
potatoes
f
Why Pay 1 t9
TOMATO
CATSUP
Prices good at Greenville Food Town Store only
'��' �hiip





Title
The East Carolinian, June 30, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 30, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.203
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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