The East Carolinian, June 23, 1982






�be SaBt (Uarnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.65
Wednesday, June 23, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Jury Notes Explain Hinckley Verdict
WASHINGTON (UPI) � In a
decision that surprised many
Americans and outraged others.
John W. Hinckley Jr. was found in-
nocent by reason o insanity and
escaped a possible life prison term
for nearly killing President Reagan.
Hinckley, who also wounded
three others while firing at the presi-
dent, will be moved within days to a
Washington mental hospital. He
was shifted at 5:35 a.m. yesterday
from his courthouse basement cell
to the Army stockade at Fort
Meade. Md.
A spokesman for the U.S. Mar-
shal's Service said Hinckley would
be under "necessary security for lus
protection
Notes from the mostly black jury
that spent four days in apparently
rocky deliberations disclosed today
that the panel took the highly
unusual action of switching jury
foremen early Monday.
The notes, made available to
United Press International, disclos-
ed that the jury sought transcripts of
testimony from Hinckley's parents
and from a lead defense psychiatrist
about the 27-year-old loner's
"formative years" before making
its decision.
Hinckley became the first assassin
or would-be assassin of a major
political figure to be acquitted on in-
sanity grounds in modern history.
His acquittal is sure to set off a con-
troversy over the future use of the
insanity defense for major crimes.
At least one member of the jury
indicated the decision was affected
by a judge's instructions that the
panel must conclude Hinckley was
sane "beyond a reasonable doubt"
during his attack on the presidential
party March 30, 1981.
The verdict cannot be appealed by
the government, which portrayed
Hinckley as a cool, calculating
would-be assassin. Hinckley's
lawyers depicted him as a forlorn
wanderer living in a fantasy world
and suffering from a form of
schizophrenia.
The judge in the case set a July 12
hearing. It was unclear what will
transpire at the hearing. However, it
was learned that if government
psychiatrists complete a mental ex-
amination of Hinckley by that date,
U.S. District Judge Barrington
Parker could hold a hearing at that
time on whether Hinckley shall be
committed to St. Elizabeth's Mental
Hospital in Washington for an in-
definite period or released, either
conditionally or unconditionally.
Under laws covering the District
of Columbia, Hinckley is entitled
within 50 days after his commitment
to a hearing. If lawyers can prove he
is no longer a threat to himself or
society, he could go free.
The victims � Reagan. White
House press secretary James Brady,
Secret Service agent Timothy Mc-
Carthy and Washington police of-
ficer Thomas Delahanty � declined
comment.
Treasury Secretary Donald
Regan, emphasizing he was speak-
ing only for himself and not for the
administration, said yesterday.
"Frankly, I'm outraged at that jury
decision He called the verdict
"beyond belief
"I just think it's pretty incredi-
ble one Washington resident said,
expressing surprise. One of the six
alternate jurors who were se-
questered during the process, Willie
Reives, 44, a post office clerk, said
he was "surprised" by the verdict.
"I think I would have voted guilty
he said. "I just think he (Hinckley)
was aware of the circumstances. He
just knew what he was doing
Most of the twelve jurors, whose
verdict brought an end to Hin-
ckley's 42-day, $3 million trial, were
mum about what went on in their
four days of deliberations and
sought a return to private life.
However, Virginia Smith, 61,
wife of a retired city policeman, told
reporters the jury considered "all
the evidence" and concluded the
psychiatric experts at the trial
agreed Hinckley had some kind of
mental disorder or illness.
Juror Woodrow Johnson told
NBC News, "It was about half and
half, six and six, in the beginning
with half the jury favoring an inno-
cent verdict "right from the start"
while the others were split between
guilty and undecided.
At 5:06 p.m. EDT on Friday, the
second day of deliberations, the jury
sent Parker a note requesting three
items: the transcript of the parents'
testimony, the testimony of Dr.
William Carpenter of the University
of Maryland on Hincklev's
"formative years" and a list of the
evidence presented.
Hinckley's parents each described
him as a deeply depressed, aimless
loner who clung to his family.
Carpenter said he suffered from
such isolation he developed fan-
tasies that became deep delusions.
The jury's note was written in one-
hand, and signed in another in the
name of Roy Jackson, the 64-year-
old retired blue-collar worker
elected jury foreman in the early
hours of deliberations.
Parker responded with a note in
structing the jurors: "You are to re-
ly on your recollection of their
testimony on both direct and cross-
examination
At 9:15 a.m. Monday, another
note was sent to the judge, saying
"Mr. Jackson, Juror No. 7, our
foreperson has declined the burden
of that responsibility. We are
respectfully requesting your honor's
and the court's permission to
change forepersons and have Mr.
Coffey, Juror No. 1 take that
responsibility
At 6:20 p.m. EDT Monday, in a
final note to the judge, the jury said,
"Your honor, The jury has reached
a verdict The note was signed by
Lawrence Coffey, a 22-year-old
hotel banquet houseman who stood
up as foreman and passed the ver-
dict to the court.
ECU Professor Tells His Story
World Still Faced With Nazi Threat
By JOHN WEYLER
�i�f! Writt-r
Green vtile. North Carolina-
Despite all the efforts oj the Jews.
C 'ommuntsts, and the setbacks caus-
u Harold Covington of the Sa-
ttonal Socialist Party of America,
North Carolina, our people have
continued to net our information in-
to the hands of our race. Seven hun-
dred mobilizers and leaflets; 25 red,
black and white posters: 275 stickers
and other items have been
distributed in the just a Jew months!
What have YOL done? -trom the
spring 1981 issue of the National
Socialist Mobilizer, the official
publication of the National Socialist
League.
National Socialism or Nazism,
did not die along with Adolf Hitler
in a bunker in Berlin in 1945. Nazis,
as well as other fascist groups such
as the Ku Klux Klan and the Na-
tional States Rights Party, are alive
and active in varying degrees in
America, North Carolina and
Greenville itself.
With this issue, the East Caroli-
nian presents the first of a series of
articles examining these groups,
their beliefs and activities. Upcom-
ing installments will include an in-
depth interview with a former
member o the National Socialist
Party of America, who is currently a
student at East Carolina University.
Fascism is a philosophy based on
exalting one's self and affiliations.
A fascist believes that his ethnic
group and nationality are supreme
over all others.
All people otherwise affiliated are
enemies to be reviled and overcome.
Fascist governments are dictator-
ships that favor the use of force in
solving internal and international
difficulties.
Persons attracted to this
philosophy are usually insecure, ex-
hibiting a desire to be told what to
do, and frustrated, having a feeling
of being unable to cope with per-
sonal and social problems in a nor-
mal way. This fear can lead to
resentment and aggression, accor-
ding to psychologists.
Large groups turn to fascism for
almost the same reasons individuals
do.
Dr. Bramy Resnik of ECU's
foreign language department says
that in order for a country to turn
fascist, "you have to have an
economic chaos, lots of unemploy-
ment, where one can blame a certain
You guessed it; they're freshmen
Photo By CHAP GURLEY
Orientation is underway again. The sessions, which are being held between June 13 and July 13, are for transfer
students as well as incoming freshmen. A special students' session is also being held.
Orientation Helps New Students
ByTAMIJ.HARKEY
Miff Writer
"Out of one school and into
another No doubt this is the at-
titude of many upcoming freshmen
as orientation has them rushing
from meetings to tests to meals and
on to more tests.
Delayed a week because of high
school closing at a later date,
freshmen orientation began on June
13 and will be completed on July 13.
Five different groups, each hav-
ing two and one half days, will be in
and out within a 15 day period.
Although orientation is required
and consists mostly of testing, it is
designed to be helpful to the stu-
dent. It helps them to choose their
field of study, adjust to university
life and make a few friends before
fall.
The staff that works with the in-
coming students is composed of 16
seniors or graduate students. These
staff members adminster the tests,
stay in the residence halls and are
available for counseling on any sub-
ject.
Orientation has proved to be an
experience for those who have never
visited East Carolina before. The
first thing that was discovered by
many of the new student were the
long walks to class, and many had
the added pleasure of pouring down
rain.
Some of the in-coming students
commented on the "overwhelming"
friendliness of the students, but
what that lacked, the night life of
Papa Katz, Pantanna Bob's and the
Elbo made up for.
A special treat was the bus tour to
familiarize them with the campus,
but the new students soon
discovered that learning their way
around would take lots of trial and
error.
Orientation is not only for
freshmen. It is also for transfer
students and the special studies
group.
This group is composed of
students whose high school records
do not quite meet regular college re-
quirements. Their first year is spent
with special classes designed to in-
crease their basic skills in reading,
writing, communication and study
habits.
The program began in 1974 with
approximately 250 students per
academic year. The special student
program has been very successful
with the majority of students
achieving equal or higher grade
point averages than the regularly ad-
mitted freshmen.
group.
"And that's what happened. Ger-
many had unemployment and blame
went to certain groups: the com-
munists and the Jews, two
minorities in Germany
Resnik went on to explain that "it
was easy for certain interest groups
to put that blame and (once) the
military got in power they were able
to mushroom that (blame) into a
larger area, in saying, 'They are at
fault and we're going to remove that
fault. We're going to give you a car
in every garage and a chicken in
every pot
Resnik knows fascism first-
handle survived four years in a
Nazi concentration camp. It all
began in 1940, when he and his
family fled to Poland from their
native Czechoslovakia, to escape the
German war machine. They fled
"from the frying pan into the fire
Resnik says, because Poland was in
chaos and overrun with Nazis.
"We had some money with us,
and when the money ran out, of
course, we had to go around and
look for some food he recalls.
"And when we came into a place to
ask, literally beg, for food, the per
son said, 'who are you? Upon
identifying themselves as refugees,
the man reported the family to the
German authorities. "We were im-
mediately taken into a compound,
an old police station, and without
much adieu, we were hurled into a
truck and taken to this camp
Resnik remembers the concentra-
tion camp as, "a former military en-
campment which was converted into
a working camp. (The camp) had
triple barbed wire; it was an area
where dogs would run around, and
one particular fence was electrified.
And there were towers at various
locations, with machine guns, and il
you walked within a few paces of
the gate, (you were) automatically,
shot at
When Resnik and the rest of the
prisoners first entered the camp, the
Nazis examined them, one by one,
and sent some of them to join a
group standing to the left, the rest to
the right. Says Resnik, "we found
out that if you went to the left you
never came back, they took you to a
ditch and mowed you down with a
machine gun. And so I was told
through the line, 'say you're a
tailor They needed tailors to
make clothes for the German army.
So I said 'I'm a tailor And I had
never held a needle in my hand but
somehow I managed
Working as a tailor, and in
various other jobs, Resnik managed
to keep himself alive. His camp was
for forced labor, not one of the
death camps in which thousands
were executed daily. However, he
says, "the mere fact that they never
gave you enough food, never gave
you good shelter, and you didn't
have any clothes or sanitation
facilities, and through disease and
malnutrition, there was a natural at-
trition. People were dying like flies,
every day Besides the slow
deaths described above, Resnik and
his fellow inmates constantly faced
the threat of sudden, violent death.
See HOLOCAUST Page 3
Newly-Installed Blue Light Security System
Ptio�o Sy SCOTT LA �SO
Blue Light System Ready
To Shine Over Campus
ByTAMIJ.HARKEY
sciff Writer
Attention students! We have a
blue light special on the East
Carolina campus for the remainer
of its existence.
That is, if someone will stop steal-
ing the blue lights.
As many have heard, ECU has
been blessed with a new type securi-
ty system which should be com-
pleted by fall. It is not a new securi-
ty unit or watch dog, but a red pole
with a blue light on top and a soon
to be telephone on the side.
There are just a few small com-
plications before the pole can be
equiped with the telephone. Some of
the blue lights were stolen (and they
are not cheap).
This factor is a major cause of
delay, because maintance has to
take the poles down and put them
back up again when the telephone
are ready.
The telephones, which are inside a
protective box, are designed to ring
automatically once the receiver is
picked up. The signal will be receiv-
ed at the Howard House on 5th
street, and regardless of if a person
has a chance to speak or not, securi-
ty wi" know the location.
Theu are a total of 11 telephone
locations, but due to a few com-
plications which Julian R. Vain-
wright, business manager for ECU
said "is no one's fault only five of
the simpler models have been in-
stalled. The locations for these are
near Minges, Belk and Tyler corms,
Mendenhall bus stop and the back
of the library.
All of the phones have been
ordered, so its only a matter of time
before the new system is complete.
So when walking alone and
frightened or bothered by someone,
look for the blue light.
Champion Named At
Town's Annual Contest
By SPENCER STEPHENS
Staff Writer
Spivey's Corner is barely a dot on
the southeast portion of a North
Carolina map. It is also the home of
the National Hollerin' Contest held
annually on the third Saturday in
June.
About 13,000 people showed up
at this year's contest to cheer,
scream, hoot and holler a Henry
Gaston of Gastonia, North Carolina
was named the 1982 National
Hollerin' Champion.
The crowd which ranged from
families to motorcyclists to bikini-
clad sun worshippers also enjoyed a
whistling contest, a fox hornconch
shell blowing contest and down-
home country music accented by
fried chicken, barbecue and plenty
of cold beer.
The purpose of the June 19 affair
was to support the Spivey's Corner
volunteer fire department. Some
people, though, see the contest as a
way to preserve hollerin
Hollerin' started many years ago
when farmers hooted messages to
each other from their distant farms.
Each farmer developed his own
See CONTEST P�fe 3
T
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 23, 1982
Announcements
TESTING
Three tests quanting college
graduates for advanced studies
will be given at ECU during June
The tests are: Law School Admis
slon Test, to be given June 16; The
Graduate Record Examination.
June 13, and the Graduate
Management Admission Test,
June 23
Persons interested in taking the
tests must register in advance
Further information and ap
plication materials are available
from the Educational Testing Ser
vice. Box ��a R. Princeton. N.J.
0850 or from the ECU Testing
Center. 105 Speight. ECU, Green
ville NC 27834
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development pro
grams begin June 10, Darkroom
Photography l, June 12, Small
Computer July 7. Aerobic
Exercise, July 8, Nutrition and
Weight Control. For information
Call 757 6143.
NIGHT CLASSES
Credit classes will be offered on
weekday nights for the Summer
Monday and Wednesday courses
include. ECON 2133, MATH 0045,
PSYC 1050. Tuesday ana Thursday
nights courses include. SOCl 2110,
SPCH 2080, FINA 2244, and ECON
22 2 3
Classis begm June 16 ana end
August 5 Registration begins on
June 14 at Erwm Hall For further
information call 757 6324
ATTENTION ECU
ORGANIZATIONS
The Buccaneer needs your help
it you or a friend of yours was a
member of an organization either
Greek. Service oriented, or
academicaly or professional
oriented and your group had your
group picture made for the
1981 1982 Book, please call the
Buccaneer. We need some
assistance in identitying the
members and find a little bit more
about your organization Call
757 6501 between 2 5
GRADUATES
Remember to pick up your cap
ana gown from the Student Supply
Store, before leaving school.
These keepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing the graduation
fee has been paid For those
receiving the Masters Degree the
fee pays for your cap and gown,
but there is an extra tee of Sll 25
for your hood
CLASSIFIED ADS
vou may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly Leave
space at end ot line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over tne phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad
All ads must be prepaid. I nclosc
7SC per line cm fraction of a line
Please print legibK' Use capital and
lower case letters
Kelurn lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
offiee b 3:00 I uesda betort-
e1nesda publications.
Name-
Address.
Tar Landing Seafood
Resuurut
CityState.
No. lines �
.Zip,
.Phone.
ai 75� per line J.
. No. insertions.
� lr�


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RECREATION
RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
ment rental service has been pro
vided through the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices items available for rent in-
clude Backpacks, tents, canoes,
and tandem bicycle The outdoor
recreation center is located in the
equipment room 115 Memorial
Gym Hours of operation are
2:00500 p.m. Monday through
Friday information is available
on State and Federal Cam
pgrounas backpacking Trails,
Day hiking Trails, and Canoeing
Rivers
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT
The Department of Intramural
Recreation Services provides an
equipment check out service for
students, Faculty and Staff. If you
have playful notions but lack the
right equipment stop by the equip
ment check out room located in
115 Memorial Gym Equipment is
available for Basketball. Football,
Frisbee, Horseshoes, soccer.
Volleyball, Softball, Racquetball,
Tennis and Badminton to mention
a few items This is a free service
(excluding late fees' so take ad
vantage of a good opportunity
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
ioin in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday m the Biology
Lecture Hail starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every Wednsday at the
Catholic Newman Center Dinner
ana good frienoship follows Mass
every WednsOay. so come ou' ana
bring a friend
USHERS
H you would like to usher for
GREASE July 5 10 and thereby
see the play free, you may sign up
on the bulletin board in the
Messtck Theatre Arts Center A
limited number of ushers s neea
ed Requirements men must
wear ties, ladies must wear
dresses Everyone must arrive in
the McGinnis Theater no later
than 6 45 p.m.
CHEERLEADING
ECU will host a cheerleader
camp July 12 15 Instructors for
the camp will be proviaed by the
Universal Cheerleaders Associa
tion. The camp is open to all high
school, junior high ana middle
school cheerleaders
Participants will receive in
struction in new cheers, sideline
chants, pom poms, tumbling and
wili participate in private
coaching sessions each day
Special semmars are also plann
ed for the camp
OFF-CAMPUS
HOUSING
"If you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find and
share an apartment for Fall, con
tact the Off Campus Housing Of-
fice, 211 Whichard Building
757 6881, before June 14. Orienta
tion will begin at that time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
listing
PSI-CHI
Are you interested in self
actualization, educational
psychology, intellectual develope
ment, sexual behavior or
statistical interpetation' Come to
the Psi Chi Library Book Sale held
in Speight 202 Books pried from
05 to 85 Psi Chi throws in a
bonus, quiet atmosphere for stu-
dying with a comfortable couch to
relax in Hours from 8 to 1. Come
to our Book Sale to understand
human behavior and be a better
person for it.
What are you doing on June 22,
at 4:30� Psi Chi is having a cook
out in the wooded area between
the Biology Greenhouse and 10th
St. Advance tickets will be sold at
in the Psi Chi Library for 12 or
S2 50 a' the Door' This includes
good food, drinks, and beer, plus a
chance to win a fifth of Jack
Daniels Drawing will be at 6 00
This is good way to relieve post
exam anxieties and start the se
cone Summer Session in style For
more information come by the Psi
Chi Library. Hours 8 1
JOBS AND JUSTICE"
A march for "jobs and Justice"
sponsored by the Southern Chris
tian Leadership Conference will
be coming to Greenville on Thurs
day. All students are invited to
participate The march will begin
at 401 Moyewood Drive at 4 p.m
Everyone must get together to
"stop Reagans war on the poor"
and help to win extention of the
Voting Rights Act. For more infor
mation call 758 6820.
The East Carolinian
V1 ini' fttf t uiniuommtirul
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
car and every Wednesday aur
ing the Summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficiai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
perated, ano published tor and
toy the students of East Cari.i.na
University.
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ol ECU.
Greenville, NC.
POSTMASTER Send ancir.ss
changes to The Eas'Car ' ,an
Old Sou' Building, EC ree"
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 757 3�. 6367 6309
Marsh 's
Surf & Sea
Downtown Greenville
V
Some items specially marked Vz price
AH women's swimwear 20 off
We still have a large selection
of O.P Hobie, Sundek, Quicksilver &
Stubbies shorts and bathingsuits.
EDITOR
The East Carolinian has an
opening coming up for the news
editor's position. Experience
necessary interested persons
should contact the East Carolinian
to apply for the position. For more
information call 757 6366
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd-sized paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There Is no charge for an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline tor announcements
Is 5 p.m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5 p.m. Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper. No an
nouncemenfs received after these
deadlines will be printed.
This space is available to ail
campus organizations and depart
ments.
Popcorn
Shrimp
$C39
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st Light
Locked one blork down on left
rc
a
std
tu
sul
enl
col
Wll
th
Classifieds
WED.&
THURS. ONLY
CARICATURES by Weyl.r Have
a full-color, I by 10 cartoon por-
trait done ot yourself or a loved
one. A unique gift idea. Call
751-5775.
COTTAGE tor Rent at N. Myrtle
Beach. Sleeps 6. Rent by
weekweekend. Call 758-OI04
ROOMS FOR RENT: West 5th
Street. Single, Si25.00. double
MOM. Utilities included, call
754 3 J
NEED A PAPER TYPED IN A
HURRY? Call Mary at 355 MM
for quick, dependab t service.
Proofreading offered. Will be glad
to type paper of all sizes.
SUMMER JOB: Need student
technical draftsman. Must have
working knowledge of electrical
schematics. Pay commensurate
with skill and productivity.
757711 D. Luimey, R. Morrison or
A. Salt.
Professional TYPINO service- ex
perience, quality work, IBM Selec-
tric typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
750 5101 or Gail Joyner, 7 5 103
TYPINO: Term, thesis, resumes,
dissertations, etc. Professional
quality at lowest rates. Call Kem-
pie Dunn anytime. 75Z-71
ITALIAN NITE
LASAGNA
41
AND
BASS GUITARIST: top 40 country
band based in Greenville. NC.
Successful recording act with
steady bookings. Serious inquiries
only (�l�) 750-1777 n.gnt 75 MJt
TYPING: TERM PAPERS ALL
SIZES. Proofreading offered.
Dependable typist, wall Mary,
355 244
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
SPAGHETTI
EVERY WEDS.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT �uh ,n you
Plus Garlic Bread C"QQ can eat souP
Jj and salad
$3.99
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
KSKPP FRENCH �IES. COLE SLAW, TARTAR
SAUCE ft HUSHPUPPIES
Sp'
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PHONEYS
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C.
vA
GENE PHILLIPS
FOR JUDGE, N.C. COURT OF APPEALS
IN THE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY
QUALIFIED BY ABILITY, CHARACTER, LEARNING,
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CALL fM JW APPOMTMEMT:
IOOS-A UAMIL7W ST.
7U�WW� - 78 - ISO?
Many veteran North Carolina lowyers,
including Alien Bailey-Charlortejohn
Burney Wilmington,Robert Morgan-
Li'lingtonBill Thorp-Rocky Mount and
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Educators
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r hi i AsrcARoi inian
JUNE 23,1982
I
I
Costs Of Travelling Continue To Escalate
B MIKE HAMFK
Maff Writer
Well, I might take a
plane, I might take a
tram, but if I have to
walk, I'm going to get
there just the same. -
I eiber-Stoller.
These, words from
the classic blues,
"Kansas City may
have particular
relevance to East
Carolina students and
staff who will be get-
ting ready to take their
summer vacation at the
end of the first or se-
cond summer session.
W ith the price of
transportation climbing
upwards, many people
will be taking a hard
look at whether or not
they will be able to af-
ford a trip during their
vacation.
According to
statistics from the May,
1982 issue of the Mon-
thly Labor Review
comparing cost of
public transportation
from February, 1981 to
February. 1982, the
cost of flying has risen
44 percent on the Con-
sumer Price Index. The
cost of bus transporta-
tion has increased 55
percent in the last year,
and travel by train has
jumped 38 percent over
the same time period.
The cost oi gasoline
has fluctuated in the
past year, but unfor-
tunately, it seems to be
climbing now
These higher costs
may deter some, but
resourceful students
and staff members will
find a wav to get where
they are going.
Moving a family in-
expensively is going to
take some doing, but
there are possibilities.
Amtrak and the major
bus lines offer family
rates, but these rates
still cost more than
driving.
One of the best bets
for either a family or a
small group is to call an
auto drive-away com-
pany, whose business is
getting cars from one
location to another.
Tell them where you
want to go, and they
just may have a car that
needs to be delivered to
that area.
Auto drive-away
companies can be
found in the yellow
pages of any larger city.
Most of these com-
panies will pay for the
first tank of gas.
Then there is always
the old standby, hit-
chhiking. Although hit-
ching has its dangers, it
has certainly been my
favorite way to travel in
the past. It offers the
possibilities of getting
somewhere fast and in-
expensively, and you
can meet all sorts of
folks whom you would
probably not meet in
any other way.
There is still no such
thing as a free lunch, so
you should always be
prepared to help out
with the gas, the driv-
ing or certainly conver-
sation. And you should
always be willing to
reciprocate by picking
up hitchhiker when you
are fortunate enough to
have a car.
Most experienced
hitchhikers would agree
that the best way to
hitch is as a couple. So,
the next time you do a
hitching trip, invite an
adventurous person of
the opposite sex along.
One seasoned hit-
chhiker always carried
his guitar along that he
would have something
to do when he got
bored. He reported get-
ting a high proportion
of rides from pickers as
well as some great
discussions about
music. A camera,
sketch pad or fishing
rod, to name a few
would probably bring
the same results.
One word of warning
about hitchhiking.
Always check the state
laws concerning hit-
ching, especially on in-
terstates. The police in
Richmond, Virginia,
for example, will put
you in jail for hitchhik-
ing on 1-95 if you do
not have the money to
pay the fine.
There are some great
airline deals in effect
since deregulation. For
example, $29 from
Norfolk, Va. to
Newark, N.J. is not a
bad deal. You do not
have to fly at night or
on the weekend, but
travelling cheaply does
not usually involve
maximum convenience.
Riding freight trains
is the hardest to pull
off, but it is also tIn-
most romantic way to
go. The friend win)
taught this, writer to
ride the trains recom-
mended that it be done
only west of the
Mississippi.
It is a terrifically
cinematic way to see
the United States. The
boxcar door is about
the same sie as your
movie screen.
Don't plan on getting
any good sleep in a
boxcar. The bounce
too hard. Make sure
that you know where
the train is going before
you hop on. Also make
sure both of the doors
are open (in case one
closes) and do not try
to get on a moving
train, just one slip, and
you could easily end up
with a broken leg.
1 am sure there are
other ways to go which
I have not mentioned.
However you decide lo
Holocaust Reaction
Concerns Professor
(Ontinued From Page I
"Just at the whims oi anyone, any
German, any Nazi, if he felt like
shooting or got angry, he just took
out his gun and started shooting.
And there were tormal executions as
a lesson. If you did something, il
you stole, for example you were
executed and they did it in front of
everyone
In 1945, Resnik managed to
escape from the camp. Most of his
family died during the Holocaust,
Hitler's attempted extermination of
lews and all other peoples that
displeased him. Today, as a member
of Governor Hunt's North Carolina
Council on the Holocaust, Resnik
educates people about the fascist
nightmare.
One aspect of the Holocaust that
particularly concerns Resnik is the
question oi why the Allied govern
ments and religious leaders, in
eluding the Pope, did not try to stop
the Nazis even though they knew
what was happening. "They knew
that people were being literally tor-
tured and burned and mowed down
by machine guns and gassed, and
yet nothing was being done. The
world stood still Why didn't
(anyone) speak out even earlier,
when Hitler came to power, and
Jews were being beaten on the
street? That's the question to be
answered
Contest Helps State Tourism t
pipe dreams
LtKjjvGa:n-v Aa.e:AD�
Continued From Page 1
vocal style so that he
could be easily iden-
tified.
As time passes
however, changes must
occur. In the case of
hollenn change has
come in the threatening
forms of telephones
and two-way radios
The people o
Spivey's Corner
recognized this threat
and wanted to preserve
ho 11er in so the
organized the contest
so that everyone could
enjoy this unusual form
vommunication that
has been elevated to an
art form.
In addition to sup-
porting the volunteer
fire department and
preserving hollerin's
cultural heritage, the
hollenn' contest helps
North Carolina's image
and economy.
According to Clen
Mays, one of the con-
test's judges and travel
editor for the North
Carolina Division of
Travel and Tourism,
the contest attracts a lot
of positive attention to
North Carolina and br-
ings in tourists.
"Also says Mays,
"a lot of people are
familiar with only one
North Carolina town:
Spivey's Corner A
large number of out-of-
staie license plates in
the contest's parking
lot added validity to
May's claim.
Bernard Thomas, a
French photojournalist
attended the contest
with camera in hand
and shook his head in
disbelief at the unusual
holler of 81-year-old
Leonard Emanuel, the
hollenn' champion
trom 1971.
According to
Thomas, "Zees ees zee
most countries! place
een zee whold United
States and I can find no
other place as
zeesever
Will there be a
hollerin' contest next
year? The answer came
in the form of a
tumultuous roar as the
contest's emcee posed
the same question to his
audience.
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�tie East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, &�� mmp
Mike Hughes, mm�b��mm
WAVERLY MERRITT, Pun tf Itfn iWm WlLLIAM YELVERTON, wm.�,n�
Robert Rucks, mm m�w Ernest Conner, s,��.�
Phillip Maness, c-m mum Steve Bachner, ��.���m
Chris Lichok, nvmkximmmm Mike Davis, wui�.m $mm"
June 23. IW2
Opinion
Page 4
An Exercise In Futility
Isn't it comforting to know that treaty. Some progress had been
our country has the capability of made, but there was no agreement
destroying the earth several times to stop the proliferation of multi-
over? The fact makes one wonder warhead missiles,
how Americans ever fell secure Presidents Ford and Carter
before the dawn of nuclear gallantly pursued the cause o
weapons. How did we ever sleep human rights in their arms talks
nights? with the Soviets, much to the ap-
The "atomic age" is said to have parent chagrin of Brezhnev and the
started with the explosion of a test Kremlin. Definitely a gallant effort
bomb on July 16, 1945, near on the presidents' parts, but
Alamogordo, N.M at 5:30 a.m. "human rights" became yet another
The bomb was placed on top of a obstacle to SALT negotiations and
steel tower, and observers were sta- to U.S.Soviet relations in general,
tioned in bunkers 10,000 yards Finally, on June 18, 1979, Carter
away. The explosion vaporized the and Brezhnev signed the SALT II
steel tower, produced a mushroom treaty in Vienna. However, Senate
cloud rising to 40,000 feet and ratification of the treaty was doubt-
melted the desert sand into glass for ful at best. And following the Soviet
distances of up to 800 yards from invasion of Afghanistan, Senate re-
the tower. jection of the treaty became a cer-
Only three weeks later, the first tainty.
operational use of an atom bomb This brings the history o' arms
took place, when a uranium bomb limitations talks to the present.
was exploded over Hiroshima, Now, after two days of talks with
Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. Three days Soviet Foriegn Minister Andrei
later, another bomb, this one of Gromyko, Secretary o' State Alcx-
plutonium, was exploded over ander Haig has charged the Soviets
Nagasaki. The results were with engaging in an
devastating. "unprecedented" level and number
Advancements and setbacks have of strategic missile tests while
brought the history of nuclear publicly "extolling" disarmament.
weapons to the present. Now, more In short, he accused the Soviets o'
than 20 nations around the world hypocrisy.
have nuclear capabilities. And it Haig said the U.S. currently has a
seems that a weapon designed to list of proposals for arms reduction,
spread the influence of peace lias These new plans set forth, specific
worked to the exact opposite end. cutbacks for individual weapons
� � � and ground forces, which is all fine
It is difficult to know just what it and good. Without some limitation
is that pulls nations apart � placed on the manufacture and
especially countries formerly allied placement of these weapons, there is
� but nuclear proliferation must no telling how far the arms race will
somehow be at fault. Certainly, in go. Indeed, the race has already
the case of the United States and reached frightening, if not asinine,
Soviet Union, differences in proportions.
political theory have worked to But it seems apparent thai while
alienate one country from the other, both sides argue over specifics, the
But it is the inherent competition in- whole principle behind arms limita-
volved in nuclear proliferation tions slips out the window. It would
which has spurred the hatred bet- seem the purpose of limiting nuclear
ween our two peoples. And despite arms is to promote more peaceful
what politicians may characterize as relations between our two countries.
"differences of opinion" between But if our world leaders overly
our governments and leaders, there concern themselves with specific
docs exist a full-scale hatred. demands and conditions, the true
Each year, both countries spend spirit of international peace will
an incomprehensible amount of never prevail, and it is conceivable
time, effort and money on the that no workable agreement will
nuclear arms race. Each side pro- ever be reached.
claims vehemently that the arms Naturally, specific reductions are
buildup is intended to secure peace, a necessary part of any agreement if
Peace, however, is not at hand. The that pact is to be feasible. However,
historv of arms limitations talks bet- the success of any treaty will rely
ween the U.S. and U.S.S.R. is the first and foremost on a desire and
case in point. commitment on both parts to
Former President Richard Nixon reduce nuclear arms. Both nations
visited the Soviet Union for summit must realize the absolute futility of
talks in May 1972 and concluded the arms buildup in order for any
that the two countries had reached agreement to work.
agreements on arms limitations. Leaders must take to heart the
Hence, the signing of the SALT I principle and spirit of nuclear arms
treaty. The welcome Nixon received reduction. They must realize that
in Moscow was regarded by some as agreements and limitations must be
proof that the 25-year cold war had respected. And they must unders-
ended. tand the stupidity behind the arms
But history would not have it so. buildup. Until that futility is realiz-
Subsequcnt meetings in Washington ed, we will continue to cuddle up in
and Moscow between Nixon and our make-believe security blanket,
Soviet President Brezhnev failed to the nest we've built among the
produce an expected permanent warheads.
THE EAST CAKOLINIAH
ca�w
.�fflG3
&5B�
-Campus Forum
WZMB 's General Manager Defended
This letter is in reference to Edith Jef-
freys' comments in the tune 9 East
Carolinian.
It seems to me that the decision of the
general manager of WZMB lo change
the programming was in response to all
the belly-aching that has been going on
due tii the poor selections the D.Js were
playing. Most of the letters in the Cam-
pus Forum concerning the selections be-
ing played have been favorable since
WZMB went on the air. All I used to
hear was hard rvk music. It all the DJs
like rock music and that is all they play,
the) are being individualistic and not
thinking of what other people might like
to hear. Therefore, is the general
manager (who is concerned about the
whole student body) a tyrant, or are (he
D.ls u rants when they push their own
mufiical preferences on everyone else?
Mike Mills
Junior, Accounting
Staffer To The Rescue
11 was with great disrespect that I
completed what can be considered
nothing more than a personal, purely
non-professional attack on the per-
sonality and professionalism of
WMB's most competent staff member,
Mr. Warren Baker.
As a member ol W ZMB when it was
WECU, l cannot only attest to Mr.
Baker's professional attitude but com-
mend his person! attitude for putting up
with "stones" thrown in light of
another's personal opinion.
As to whether or not you have to
"assume" a station such as WZMB is
"live" or not, such is a matter of listen-
ing. I ic voices do not attempt com-
munication to those students who will
hear.
V lo the individuality of tastes, the
enure staff of WZMB including special
show hosts have the utmost ability to
freely choose and play according to in-
dividual tates. That "pie" graph is the
most important part of station equip-
ment. For those of you who apparently
have need lo be informed, a graph is
representative of the format by which
general purpose music is played. It is
there for more than that. All stations
have one, although it may not be in the
sight of the general public.
In light of the fact that WZMB has
been an ultimate target by those
'vvellaring students of yore" another
point that should be stressed is the ac-
countability of the students for the
music that is currently being played.
Through individual surveys and
"grapevine" gossip the managers have
tried (and damn well succeeded) in
displaying a well-rounded course of
music.
A great amount of toleration of in-
tolerance is also involved in all
managerial positions. Certainly, Mr.
Baker has an influence upon the music
played; otherwise, there would be no
need for a general manager in the media
budget. He was chosen by our media
board. It was they who felt the impor-
tance o his "shadow" around the sta-
tion and they were correct in their judg-
ment.
You must consider the trials of the
"rebirth" of a radio station into an era
totally different from that which it left.
Conditions warrant the use of brand-
new production equipment within the
confines oj usnidio which needs to be
remodeled to accommodate the new
technology These, as with all things
worthwhile take time in development.
Any mother on this earth wouldn't allow
her newborn into the world without
preparation. Such is the state of WZMB
at this present time.
Mr. Baker hasn't moved overboard
with ottr radio station. He. as with all
corporate professionals must answer to
another in a position above him. Dif-
ferences in the station from its concep-
tion to the present date must be justified
in the growth of WZMB.
"To hell with consistency?" Con-
sistency is the main objective in all radio
stations. WZMB is the most profes-
sional and most effective radio station
Down East. So take this to heart, yon
junior of "bits and pieces if you don't
know what you're talking about it is best
to just keep your ignorance silent and try
not to make yourself look like a jackass.
But do remember this; as long as WZMB
is "on the air we set the pace; others
must follow.
Calvin Li. Johnson, Jr.
WZMB Staff Member
Imperialism
On the editorial page of the (June 9)
issue of this paper appeared an article
entitled "Imperialism a Worldwide
Threat I agree.
The author, in twelve paragraphs of
bleeding-heart mumbo jumbo, implid
that Britain and the United States are the
chief instigators of worldwide im-
perialism, having mentioned both coun-
tries nine times. Yet the largest empire in
the history of mankind, that controlled
by the Soviet Union, was not mentioned
once.
Since 1921, with the Soviet assistance
of a communist takeover in Mongolia,
they have used either direct military
force or covert operations to impose
communism on unwilling peoples
Through military force they seized the
Baltic states (Lithuania, Latvia,
Estonia), the eight countries behind the
iron curtain and Afghanistan. By covert
means Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia,
Angola, Zimbabwe. Mozambique,
Ethiopia, South Yemen, North Korea,
Cuba, Nicaragua, etc. They have been
set back in only a lew places, such as
North Yemen, South Korea, Malaysia,
Zaire, and recently, Chad. At this very
moment. Communist movements in LI
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras.
Morocco, Somalia and the Sudan are be-
ing supported by Sov iet propaganda and
Soviet arms.
Since the cm of WWII, the U.S. and
her Luropcan allies have done nothing
but give up their colonies. Practically
speaking, right-wing aggression ended at
Nagasaki. Since 1972, right-wing dic-
tators have successfully seized one place
� East Timor, while left-wing dictators
have sent their troops into at least eight
different countries.
Also, don't let anyone tell you that
communist subversion begins merely
because o economic and social in-
justice. Communist terrorists floirish in
West Germany and Italy, two rich and
prosperous nations. Terrorism begins
because it wants to, and if a country is
poor and possesses a bloody dictator-
ship, those are pluses to be exploited. If
the country is rich and democratic,
grievances can be concocted, such as the
anti-nuclear defeatist movement.
Linally, if anyone can show me a na-
tion whose people have willingly voted
communist totalitarianism on
themselves, then Ell toast Patrick
O'Neill in his new home.
Dennis Michael Kilcoyne
Sophomore, POLS
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
'By Reason Of Insanity Jury Finds Hinckley 'Not Guilty'
By MIKE HUGHES
"By reason of insanity John W. Hin-
ckley Jr. � the man accused of shooting
President Reagan and three others on
March 30, 1981 � was declared "not
criminally responsible" for that crime. So,
after session upon session of jury delibera-
tion on the Hinckley case, the question has
finally been resolved.
Or has it? The phrase "by reason of in-
sanity" is very cleverly worded. Perhaps
moreso than meets the eye. In fact, it is en-
tirely possible that that reference to insani-
ty is directly reflective of the jury itself,
because it was obviously "by reason of in-
sanity" that Hinckley was found innocent.
It would seem that a man who could suc-
cessfully plot an assassination attempt and
nearly carry it out must be in control of his
faculties to a certain extent. The jury's ver-
dict makes Hinckley out to be an- in-
coherent man incapable of any intelligent
action � an all-too-easy dismissal of a
guilty man.
It takes a great deal of coherence and
(no matter how we may like to deny it) in-
telligence to plot a crime of this
magnitude. However, attempting murder
is not only antisocial behavior, but many
consider it to be an act of downright in-
sanity.
And, indeed, it is an insane act. Not just
sometimes but everytime. But if this is
true, then why are there "murderers" in
our prisons? How can one person be found
guilty of murder while another is found
"not guilty by reason of insanity?" It is
somehow difficult to believe that justice
has been served. Just where will the line be
drawn? When has there ever been a murder
that was not an act of insanity?
Admittedly, this argument over-
simplifies the dilemma of guilt vs. insanity.
But by the same token, our current system
of "justice" complicates the question to
the point of injustice. The term is becom-
ing too common n United States cour-
trooms.
Those who may argue that Hinckley is
getting off "scot free" are not totally cor-
rect. But then again, they aren't too far off
the mark either. Hinckley will now take
residence at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in
Washington, where he wiU remain for 50
days to determine whether he should be in-
stitutionalized. He will undergo series after
series of tests, but chances are, he will
serve no so-called "hard time" for nearly
killing four persons, including �hc Presi-
dent of the United States.
If his attorneys can show he is no longer
dangerous to society or himself, Hinckley
could be released.
Perhaps this final question is a bit har-
sh,but the jury's decision in the Hinckley
case bring, to mind at least some specula-
tion as to whether Hinckley is "not guilty
by reason of insanity or whether theyury
declared him not guilty by reason of their
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 23. 1982 Page 5

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American Ballet Theatre II Scheduled For Fall Theatre Arts Series
Members of the American Ballet Theatre II are shown performing a North Carolina Dance Theatre (January 19) and The Acting Company
ZiTmTl company will ie coming to who will be performing Shakespeare's Twelfth S&t (March 25) and
XXi Theatre'this November as part the absurdist (KM�r1i further mform.t.on and season
of the MSC Theatre Arts Series. Also on the agenda 'or '82-83 is the ticket prices call 757-6611 (ext. 233 or 266).
Dracula Rises
Tonight; 3-D
Classic Monday
By JOHN WEYLER
saffWHta
Two campy classics of the hor-
rorfantasy film genre are in store
for followers of the Student Union
Films Committee's summer movie
series. The 1979 version of Dracula
will be shown tonight, June 23, at 8
p.m. Next Monday's presentation is
the 1953 3-D extravaganza It Came
From Outer Space to be shown at 9
p.m. Both features will be screened
in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre. Admission is free
with ECU ID and activity card or
MSC membership.
Sex and death are humanity's
strongest psychological obsessions.
They find their most unique expres-
sion in the superstitions concerning
vampirism. Long after mankind
relinquished its belief in the undead,
it has kept its preoccupation with
them alive through the popular
media. Dracula is by far the best
known bloodsucker, created by
Bram Stoker in a 1897 novel and
nurtured for the past 60 years by
Hollywood.
Lust as well as bloodlust has
always been a semi-hidden ingre-
dient of vampire tales. The tradition
has changed in recent years towards
letting it all hang out. The 1979
Dracula trades scares for sex,
presenting a portrait of the vampire
as super-stud.
The lady-killer Count is finely
played by Frank Langella, bringing
with him all the magnetism and
energy he had when he appeared in
the role on Broadway. However, the
Broadway production was an inven-
tive, sophisticated romancethriller,
while John Badham's film version is
marred by the same eye-on-the-box
office sensibility that made his
Saturday Sight Fever a hit. While
Badham's Dracula does develope
some of the appropriate at-
mosphere, it is loaded with
crudities, inconsistencies, and
unintentional laughter. Look for the
scene in which Professor Van Hels-
ing (Laurence Olivier) explains that
the undead have no souls and.
therefore, cast no reflections � this
scene occurs shortly after one in
which he sees a vampire's reflection
in a pool of water.
Almost as crude as Dracula is
Came From Outer Space � but at
least it's in 3-D, complete with
glasses. The usually excellent talents
of director Jack Arnold and script-
writer Ray Bradbury are saddled
with schlock special effects, clumsy
thematic concerns based on 1950s
Cold War paranoia and the amusing
acting of Russell Johnson, best
known as the Professor on
Gilligan's Island. The result is grade
C sci-fi so campy it has achieved cult
status.
Annie' An Elaborate, Expensive New Musical
By KATHY WEYLER
Nl�f f � rilrr
Movie musicals complete with big production
numbers are few and far between these days. The state
o the art has declined somewhat since Gene Kelly hung
up his tap shoes, but it is experiencing a revitalization
this summer with Annie, now playing at Greenville's
Buccaneer Theatres. The most expensive picture ever
made, to date, Annie recaptures a great deal of the style
and good clean fun of the classic movie musicals of the
30s, 40s, and 50s with a 1980s budget.
Director John Huston, better known for works more
serious and complex than Annie, brings his mastery to
the film version of this Broadway hit. Literally, there is
never a dull moment in Annie. Raucous dance numbers
are well-paced, alternating with slow songs and scenes
with onlv spoken dialogue. Only during a discourse on
New Deal policies between F.D.R. and Daddy War-
bucks did the younger children in the audience take to
the aisles.
Of course, the cast is what makes Annie a real delight.
Newcomer Aileen Quinn, a tough little freckled
youngster, plavs Annie. Critics have complained that
she is too plastic, too unchildlike, too unrealistic. This is
all true. Annie is a musical, remember? This tyke is sup-
posed to stand out from the crowd, to be a bit cheerier
and gutsier than her fellow orphans � otherwise why-
spend about $55 million to do a movie about her? If you
Cinema
want realism, don't expect to enjoy Annie. But if you
enjoy entertainment, this film and its little leading lady
may be to your liking.
Outshining the other cast members are Carol Burnett
as Miss Harrigan, libidinous headmistress of the girls'
orphanage, and Albert Finney as Daddy Warbucks, An-
nie's mentor. At last a movie role has come along that
makes full use of Ms. Burnett's comedic talents. Lur-
ching about the orphanage, lustfully panting after any
man in the near vicinity, Miss Harrigan is a perfect
caricature of the woman frustrated in her career and in
her love life.
Always versatile Albert Finney adopts an American
accent once again and makes a perfect Daddy War-
bucks, the tough-talking, completely bald businessman
with a heart of gold. Finney illuminates for us War-
bucks' self-discovery as this gruff, bulky billionaire
learns to love � thanks to Annie.
Also noteworthy is the performance of Ann Reinking
as Grace Farrell, infatuated secretary to Daddy War-
bucks. Unfortunately, this role does not allow us to see
much of the dancing skill that brought Ms. Reink.ng to
the world's attention in All That Jazz. However, she ex-
cels as Miss Farrell, a poised, efficient, attractive career
woman a la 1930s � willing to chuck it all to devote
herself to Mr. Right.
A few other actors must also be praised. Tim Curry
effectively portrays a small time gangster type who hap-
pens to be Miss Harrigan's brother, Rooster. Bernadette
Peters � whose own musical talents are virtually wasted
in this film � plays Rooster's mistress. These two are
the film's Bad Guys, and together with Miss Harrigan,
they provide a nicely nasty note. Punjab, Warbucks'
mysterious bodyguard from the Orient, is portrayed
with the proper blend of comedy and drama by Geot-
frey Holder of TV commercial fame. Edward Herr-
mann successfully re-creates his role as F.D.R he
seems to be making a lifetime career of portraying our
thirty-second president. And, of course, a shaggy mutt
named Sandy plays himself with a great deal of natural
talent.
Annie is a movie strictly for entertainment. Almost
entirely missing from the film is comic strip creator
Harold Gray's commentary on politics in the 30s. Gray,
very much a right wing conservative, outspokenly op-
posed New Deal policies and, as a result, "Little Or-
See ANNIE Page 6
Real Man's Book
9�
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Are We A Nation Of Wimps?
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By KATHY WEYLER
suff Writer
Bookstores today are filled to overflowing with all
kinds of humorous guidebooks � how to be a preppy,
how to not be a preppy, how to make love, what to do
with a dead cat. Sandwiched in between these instructive
manuals is yet another guidebook, one that promises to
teach the modern male how to be a Real Man.
Real Men Don't Fat Quiche by Bruce Feirstein
(published by Pocket Books) is basically a fun little
book good for a guffaw or two, but behind the humor
is a tribute to the, old-fashioned American ideal of
masculinity. Feirstein and his truck driver buddy, aptly
named Flex Crush, lament the downfall of the stoic
American male in the introduction. Crush says, "There
was a time when this was a nation of Ernest Hemm-
ingways Real Men. The kind of guys who could
defoliate an entire forest to make a breakfast Fire � and
then go on to wipe out an endangered species hunting
for lunch. But not anymore. We've become a nation of
Feirstein proceeds to instruct these wimps, these
"Alan Alda types these "Phil Donohue clones in
the fine art of masculinity as it was meant to be.
Real Men he tells us, are tough, no-nonsense, no-
frills buys They're realistic and level-headed, able to
appreciate the gentle, delicate things in life but equally
able to deliver a well-aimed punch when the time is
right Real Men detest anything "phony affected
mp" and "without merit Hence, the title of the
rTok. Quiche, you see, is perceived as having all these
revoltingly wimpy qualities. �. u.
Feirstein covers ail the aspects of Real Manhood. He
gives us role models such as James Garner, Robert Mit-
chum and Margaret Thatcher (yes, women can be real
men, too) and proceeds to give instructions in becoming
Real Men. What to wear (nothing that makes you look
"like you're trying out for a spot with the Village Peo-
ple") what to drive, how to conduct your romantic life,
what sports to play and watch, and what to eat (nothing
from the "wimp food group like avocado, lemon
mousse or tofu) are among the topics covered.
After you've chuckled through twenty-five short
chapters of how-to's and cartoons, Feirstein has a few
words to say about Real Women. If Betty Friedan has
read this book, she has probably suffered a major cor-
onary Suffice it to say that Real Women, as perceived
by Feirstein, are quite likely to be among the young
ladies pictured in Playboy (where excerpts from this
book originally appeared, incidentally).
Though Real Men Don't Eat Quiche is essentially a
tongue-in-check book, a great gift, perhaps, for a male
friend secure in his masculinity, in the wrong hands, this
guide could be lethal. If taken seriously, it could set
male-female relations back a good fifty years, back to
the days when "big breasts" and "trust funds" were the
most important qualities in a woman. And, as for inter-
national relations � may the higher Being help us all if
the guys in Washington adopt their creed the Real
Man's one simple rule: " Never settle with words what
you can accomplish with a flamethrower
Seriously though, Real Men Don't Eat Quiche isn t
meant to be read with a straight face. The most solemn
thought you should have is one of gratitude that men to-
day don't have to live up to the guidelines Feirstein sets
forth in order to be Real Men.
.


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And Now, For Everybody's Eyes, Another Bond Festival
The immortal .007 (Roger Moore) fires at the fleeing henchmen of the �"��"�"��?"���
from the most recent Bond epic For Your Eyes Only. The equally immortal Student Union Films Com
!��f��T� fi.ni. part of a Bond Festival this fall. Also slated are the classics Dr. So and
Koii Only Live Twice (both starring Sean Connery as the durable secret agent).
it
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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 23. 1982
'Annie A Kiddie's
Extravaganza ThaVs
Not Really For Kids
Continued From Page 5
phan Annie" disap-
peared from many
comic strip pages. With
so many movies at-
tempting to make
political statements to-
day, Annie,
miraculously, does not.
We sec Daddy War-
bucks' Horatio Alger
beliefs, but they are
shown only as his. An-
nie doesn't try to sway
your politics. It's just a
good story about a
plucky kid, her dog,
and the people who
come to love her.
This reviewer has but
one major criticism of
tnnie, and this fault
does not actually
detract from the
movie's entertainment
alue. Annie takes
place in the 1930s, in a
cry depressed USA.
Where is all the pover-
ty? The soup kitchens?
The unemployed?
True, the orphanage is
pretty shabby, and the
girls are badly treated,
but this is handled with
a disarming lack of
seriousness. These little
girls don't really seem
to be the suffering vic-
tims of cruelty and
poverty; rather, they
seem to be engaged in a
perpetual game of
"let's outwit Miss Har-
rigan
In other words,
there's no real contrast
to Daddy Warbucks'
wonderful world of
wealth. We can't fully
appreciate Annie's
amaing good fortune
without a clearer pic-
ture of the world out-
side Fifth Avenue.
Though it's about a
little girl, Annie isn't
really a kid's picture,
and not because of the
PG rating earned by a
bit of profanity and
Miss Harrigan's sug-
gestive behavior. The
movie is just too much
for smaller children to
take in with its fast pac-
ed story and musical
numbers. But Annie
has a way of making
you want to be a kid
again with a kid's
simplistic vision of the
world. There's good
and there's bad � clear
Smugglers
Snagged
FAYETTEVILLE,
N.C. (UPI) � Two
men who fled into the
woods after authorities
intercepted a tractor-
trailer loaded with an
estimated 20,000
pounds of marijuana
had not been arrested
late Tuesday night, a
Cumberland County
Sheriff's Department
deputy said.
The rig was spotted
traveling south on In-
terstate 95 south of
Fayetteville about 7
a.m. Tuesday.
"Two occupants in
the cab of the truck
spotted the roadblock
and ran into the
woods said Hershell
Barbour, public infor-
mation officer.
He said officers sear-
ched for the two men in
a heavily-wooded area
about a mile south of
Fayetteville in
Cumberland County.
Authorities had not
determined who owned
the tractor-trailer,
which carried North
Carolina, South
Carolina, Florida and
Virginia license plates,
Barbour said.
Authorities found
out about the trailer
and its contents
through an ongoing in-
vestigation, he said.
Cumberland County,
state Highway Patrol,
State Bureau of In-
vestigation and
Cumberland County
narcotics officers
cooperated in stopping
the truck.
and uncomplicated.
Annie is a pert, freckle-
faced kid with a big
voice who just wants to
be loved. And, for this
movie, that's not much
'o ask.
If you're going to
Annie, be sure to arrive
early for a good seat,
especially at matinees.
Some really large
crowds have been pack-
ing the Buccaneer for
this long-awaited
musical, so the
management kindly
asks you to use the side
exits when leaving the
theatre to help ease the
traffic jam in the lob-
by.
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price
PIZ'GsLNN haS chan�ed al1 that
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pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758 6266
GREENVILLE BLVD
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(East Carolina Roadrdeing Association)
Professional Bicycle Equipment
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Speedometers, Freewheels, Shorts,
Welding Torches and Equipment,
Unimat Lathes and Milling Machines
KIP SLOAN 756-0246 (8-5), 757-1680 (after 6)
Not all clinics are tne saxneT
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easier by the women of the Fleming Center.
Counselors are available day and night to
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Insurance accepted Free pregnancy tasting
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Up to 18 Weeks Very early pregnancy testa
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The Fleming Center makes the difference.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 23. 1982
Page 7
Swim Coach Recruits
The men are looking to improve on last year's 5-6 season.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Animal SfOrtt MHor
Summer is that time of the year
when coaches anxiously prepare for
next season's line-up. But men and
women's head swimming coach
Rick Kobe believes he already has a
headstart on the upcoming year.
The men's swimming team set 11
freshman records and two team
marks last season and will only lose
two swimmers, leaving a team made
up of freshmen and sophomores.
Kobe said, "The men's team is by
far the best freshman class we've
ever had. Breaking thirteen records
is quite phenomenal
The women's team, which will
begin its sixth season this fall, set 13
records and four freshman records.
AH of the lady swimmers will be
returning to next year's squad.
Kobe, who served as the assistant
coach at ECU for two years, an-
ticipates an outstanding 1982-83
year. "Last year was the best year
we've ever had in recruiting for both
men and women he said, "but
this year we've gone beyond that
Fifteen-year coach Ray Scharf
recommended Kobe to fill his post
when he announced his resignation
In March and described his assistant
as an enthusiastic individual. "He's
dynamic and a good coach with all
the tools. And he's a heck of a
recruiter
Scharf's evaluation of Kobe's
recruiting talent is apparently right.
Kobe has already recruited twelve
women and said the swimmers will
all be fast. "Six of those girls are
already faster than our current var-
sity records
Among the 12 swimmers, Kobe
mentioned three stand-outs. Junior
college all-American Sandra
Schieder from Daytona Community
College, Michelle loyner who made
the junior national cuts last year and
Jo Anne McCauley from Adelphi,
Md will be joining the team this
fall.
Twelve men swimmers will also be
added to the 1982 roster, including
accomplished sprinter Chris Pattelli
from Cranbury, N. J.
The men finished 5-6 last season
and Kobe is looking forward to im-
proving their overall record. "I
would like to see the men have winn-
ing dual meet schedules and to ad-
vance in championship meets he
said. Kobe added that he believes
the men have a chance to qualify in
the NCAA Division 1 next year,
which he defined as the fastest meet
in the world.
Not only does Kobe look for a
successful swimming season but also
thinks the diving program will ex-
cell. ECU will have six divers, in-
cluding state champion Scott Eagle
next year.
According to Kobe, both swimm-
ing teams are loaded with talent �
one of the requirements needed to
succeed against a competitive
schedule.
"We (swimming teams) have always
had a quality schedule he said.
Kobe described ECU as being a
spoiler � always beating teams it
wasn't suppose to beat and then
having trouble with re-scheduling.
The swimming teams compete
against such teams as N. C. State,
UNC-Chapel Hill, Navy, Villanova
and Old Dominion. "We don't
have any soft spots on our
schedule he said.
Yes, Kobe is an enthusiastic in-
dividual but justifiably so. He will
be coaching two teams that are
young and coming back faster.
"We have the potential to be the
best ECU has ever been he said.
mimsk)UAWkMMkMkmk
The women's swim team will begin its sixth season this fall.
Television Offers
Hours Of Sport
Camel Player
Soccer Coach
Steps Down
By THOMAS BRAME
iatsIMI Sports r dltor
Brad Smith has resigned, effective
July 1, as the ECU soccer coach.
Smith stepped down after a four-
year stay to pursue his doctorate
degree at the University of Ten-
nessee.
Smith spoke highly of the bright
future for the soccer program.
"With the proper motivation and
work next year's team could be one
of the best ever at ECU said
Smith.
"The most talented group of in-
dividuals are returning next fall
said Smith. He also feels this is a
great group of recruits coming in
next year.
"All the recruiting was ac-
complished by Brad before he
resigned said Helmick.
"We regret the loss of Brad
said Helmick. "However, we
understand his furthering of his
education
"We are in the process of selec-
ting a new coach now Applica-
tions are being taken until July 1.
"We hope we can have a new coach
by August 1 said Helmick.
Former Coach Bred Smith
Strength Coach Resigns
After Two-Year Term
TV Sports
"
lYi
illiam
Yelverton
There's never a dull moment
on television for sports. Well, at
least not very many. But with the
summer months offering an
endless supply of televised sports,
here's a few broadcast per-
sonalities you can watch or watch
out for. The categories are
baseball, tennis, golj and boxing.
Baseball. By far, the best an-
nouncing team is Eddie Doucette
and Nellie Briles of the USA
Cable Network, specializing in
Thursday night double-headers.
Doucette is very easy-going, has a
brilliant baseball mind and never
gets so excited that he forgets his
duties. Not that he doesn't get ex-
citied, though; he is a very en-
thusiastic announcer, very lively.
But he never loses his composure.
Briles, on the other hand, is able
to give the viewer a unique inside
view of the game since he was a
professional pitcher himself. He
is very articulate and never at a
loss for words.
A close second is WGN-
Chicago's team of Harry Caray,
Lou Boudreau and Milo
Hamilton, broadcasters of
Chicago Cub games. These guys
are real professionals and always
make viewers feel they're in the
press box with them. If the Cubs
make a mistake, this team is sure
to comment on it.
Tennis. The class act on the cir-
cuit is the BBC's Allan Baskell
and John Barrett, who are doing
the Wimbledon Championships
now, viewable on Home Box Of-
fice. They work very well
together and don't make the avid
tennis fan feel ignorant by
describing every little shot, just
the difficult ones. They do ex-
plain tennis terms so a new viewer
will understand the techniques of
the game. This team is 100 sets
better than NBC's Bud Collins
and Donald Dell, whose tennis
vocabulary consists only of
"Ooooooooh" and
"Aaaaaaaah
Golf. ABC has the broad-
casting rights to the U.S. Open �
played last week � and the
British Open. Since these are
usually the only tournaments
they cover, they can afford to go
all out. Which they really do.
Reporters Bob Rosberg and Peter
Allis are top-notch and the addi-
tion of Jack Whittaker adds a lit-
tle class to this dignified group.
But the only fault here is "host"
Jim McKay, who only seems con-
cerned with the scenery (such at
Pebble Beach) and not the
golfer's performances. During
last week's coverage, though, the
network did a good job of keep-
ing up with their "dream" battle
� Jack Nicklaus vs. Tom Wat-
son � even though McKay was a
little too sentimental.
CBC's crew of Ben Wright,
Vince Scully and company is a
close second. Wright is an expert
analyst, and Scully is a perfect
host, always articulate and well-
expressed.
Boxing. Home Box Office's
Barry Tompkins, Ray Leonard
and, Larry Merchant always have
the headline fights, but the best
team comes from CBS. An-
nouncer Tim Ryan and color men
Gil Clancey and Angelo Dundee
� each of whom have countless
number of years in the sport �
offer the best insight found
anywhere. HBO's Tompkins is a
very credible and knowledgeable
commentator but his perfor-
mance is tarnished by the biased
reporting of Larry Merchant,
who introduced a journalistic low
in reporting the Holmes-Cooney
fight on HBO last weekend.
By THOMAS BRAME
Autstaal sportj Editor
East Carolina strength coach Jeff
Johnson resigned after a two-year
stay at the helm.
"I feel he has done a great job
with the students said assistant
athletic director Bob Helmick.
During his stay, Johnson helped
establish a strength complex for the
As
North State
League Player
Of The Week
RALEIGH (AP) � Campbell
outfielder Bob Posey, who had
three home runs as the C amels won
five of six games last week, has been
named North State League baseball
player of the week.
Posey, a 6-foot, 200-pound
freshman from Ashley Falls, Mass
collected nine hits in 19 at-batc for a
.474 average and had seven RBIs.
His three homers gave the league
lead with four for the season. His
batting average is .500.
Posey helped the Camels move to
within two games of league-leading
North Carolina State. Campbell
began the week at 2-5 but now is 7-6
after winning five of six, with two
victories coming against the
Wolf pack.
Other contenders for player-of-
the-week honors included Mike
Pesavento and Tracy Black of N.C.
State and East Carolina's David
Wells. Pesavento pitched the
Wo'fpack to two wins last week,
while Black batted over .400 with
eight RBIs. Wells did well enough to
take the league batting league at
.529.
��&.
ECU'i Robert Wells
athletics to train year-round.
"Jeff was the driving force
behind setting up the strength
center said Helmick. "Our
strength center facilities are as good
as anyone's in the country
Applications are being taken until
July 1. "We hope to fill the posi-
tion as soon as possible after July
1 said Helmick.
Pack Nips
Hawks, 2-1
As Peterson
KO'sFive
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina State's Dave Peterson
hurled a seven-hitter as the first-
place Wolfpack defeated second-
place North Carolina Wilmington,
2-1, Monday in North State League
baseball.
Peterson struck out five and
walked none in outdueling the
Seahawks' Kenny Smi�h, who
allowed six hits while fanning seven
and walking one. Peterson evened
his record to 2-2, while Smith suf-
fered his first loss and is 4-1.
N.C. State picked up an unearned
run in the first inning. Shane
Gahagan led off with a single, mov-
ed to second on a passed ball and
scored on a two-out hit by Tracy
Woodson.
In the third, the Wolfpack scored
what proved to be the winning run,
bunching singles by Woodson, Jim
Toman and Tim Bar hour.
UNC-Wilmington got its run in
the fifth when catcher Bobby Bryant
hit a 390-foot home run.
The victory improved N.C.
State's record to 10-4 and gave the
Wolfpack a one and a half-game
lead over the Seahawks, who fell to
9-7.
4
?
r
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 23, 1982
All-America Team
Announced Tuesday
HAMPTON, Va.
(UP1) Ramona Mc-
Castle of Mississippi
Valley State was the top
vote-getter and
Tuskegee Institute plac-
ed two players on the
first team of the fifth
annual National
Association for
Women's Sports All-
America basketball
team announced Tues-
day.
Joining McCastle on
the first team were
Gladys Mitchell and
Sonya Kennedy of
Tuskegee Institute,
Norma Knight of Nor-
folk State and Jackie
Moore of Knoxville
College.
McCastle, 5-fot-6
senior who averaged
20.8 points and had 193
assists, received 49
points.
Mitchell was next
with 46 points, and
Kennedy had 43.
Named to the second
team were Lyndora
Geter and Deborah
Davis of Claflin Col-
lege, Toni Goodman of
Hampton Institute,
Camille Howard of
Fort Valley State, Irma
Jean Jones of Bethune-
Cookman, Sybil Rivers
of Florida A'M, Toni
Jackson of Grambling
State, Jimi Gatlin of
South Carolina State,
Melody Ballard of
Clark College and
Stella Phillips of Paul
Quinn College.
Coach Joins Dallas
MEMPHIS. Tenn.
(UPI) ' Pete Cordelli,
who has been an assis-
tant football coach at
Memphis State since
leaving the
become a
the Dallas
1980, is
Tigers to
scout for
Cowboys.
Cordelli
Memphis
started at
State under
former coach Richard
Williamson and then
stayed on the staff
when Williamson was
replaced by Rex
Dockery.
Last year, Cordelli
worked with the Tigers
tight ends and handled
some recruiting chores.
Cordelli has worekd
as an assistant at
Arkansas and Texas
Christian University.
He is a 1977 graduate
of North Carolina
State, where he
quarterbacked the
Wolf Pack to a 1973
Liberty Bowl victory.
'Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags
Backpacks, Camping Equip
merit. Steel Toed Sho s.
Dishes and Over 700 Different
New and Used Items CowBoy
Bol 3� �S
ARMY-NAVY
STORE "���"
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
JI85 00 Pregnancy Tetl, B4rfh
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fur
ther information call 13 0S3S
(Toll Free Number
100 ?2l 2S48) between AM
and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N.C
o
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0V v.
.
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Entertainment
line up
for the week
WED CONTROL GROUP
ECU Students FREE
THURS SNUFF
FRI DIAMONDS
SAT DIAMONDS
SUN SUPER GRIT
TUES SUPER GRIT
WED SIDEWINDER
SUPER PREMIUM BEER only 50
8:45-10:30 (cans only)
DOOR SPECIALS FOR LADIES
BAR SPECIALS FOR LADIES
GIFT SHOP SPECIALS FOR LADIES
tlilJIVIIIlVaKI'rLMBAft
FOOD TOWN
USDA Choice Beef Chuck Boneless
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1.S Liter � Chakiis Rhiee
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Peeke 14 11 Oi. Cane
Millet
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Paekage ef 11 12 Or Cm Reg
Old
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Why Pay 99
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TUNA
7.2S Oz. - Food Town
12 Or Large
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Why Pay 2 61
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22 Ounce
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Why Pay M.09
J
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Gallon - Liquid
389

CZ
14 Or Liver Ego, & Beeon Beef & Cheese
Beef & Egg Beef Dog Food
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Half Gallon - S0 Off
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32 Ounce
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399
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6 or 6.S 0; Tuna Beef & Liver
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400 Sheets 4 Roll Pk. Coronet
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Why Pay M 09
Prices good at Oreerwille Food Tourii Store only
itfiSiMaSOC�i�S'W�WW
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 23, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 23, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.202
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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