The East Carolinian, March 18, 1982






�te lEaot Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ll
Vol. 58 No.49
Greenville,N.C.
Thursday, Marcher i982
10 Pages
Assault Incidents
Rise Near Campus
B FRANK FIELDS
stuff nirr
An area near the East Carolina
campus was the setting for a number
of incidents of indecent exposure
prior to spring break, the Greenville
Police Department reports
Nine separate occurences have
been reported, said Detective Peter
E. Lavin. In each case the female
victims reported being "flashed" by
a man. and two of the incidences
were described as assaults with in-
tent to commit tape.
Seven ot the crimes occurred in an
area near the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center, in a region loosely bounded
b First and Fifth Streets. Lavin
said most of the victims were either
going to or departing from the art
building
One ol the assaults occurred on
Fifth Street, where a woman was
pushed to the ground by a jogger
and was then accosted. I avin said.
The othei assault occurred at a
local 'laundromat, where the victim
reported first being flashed and then
assault)
rhe incidents began occuring with
ne frequency during mid-
Februarx and seem to have ended
rathe; abruptly a few weeks later.
Lavin noted that more than one
person may be behind the crimes,
but that there re similar descrip-
tions in eight ol the cases. All of
those accounts have described a
white man. s, feet tall, slightly built
with a light complexion and light
hair.
Sgt. Eugene McAbee, an Last
Carolina campus police officer, said
he wa- aware oi three reported
assaults on women in the same area.
He added that the Greenville police
ate likely to have more reports than
the campus police department. Both
McAbee and Lavin said they had
received no reports of incidences oc-
curing on the ECU campus.
Both officers stressed the need for
caution and a clear head, not fear
and panic. Women should take all
precautions when walking on cam-
pus or in surrounding
neighborhoods at night, the officers
said.
Another suggestion was to avoid
poorly-lighted, secluded areas. Most
importantly, the officers stressed,
women should never walk alone.
Students in or around the art
building can take advantage of the
"nightwalks" service. Throughout
the building there are typed lists
with the names and studio locations
of male students willing to escort
anyone desiring a companion.
The officers urged anyone who
may be "Hashed" or assaulted to go
to the nearest occupied place with a
telephone and report the incident. If
possible, the victim should offer a
description of the assailant and any
vehicle involved.
Lavin said he suspected numerous
incidents go unreported. but urged
anyone involved in such a situation
to report it to the police.
"We need help if we are to help
rid this area of the problems
Lavin said. "Many people do not
report to us because they are startled
originally. But we urge them to
please call us. Even if they are not
wishing to prosecute, any informa-
tion they can give us will help
Detective Lavin can be reached at
the Greenville Police Department at
752-3342. Sgt. McAbee can be
reached at the campus police depart-
ment by dialing 757-6150. The
REAL Crisis Center, a counseling
hotline, is also available at
758-HEI P.
r-tj
First Sign of Spring
While the appearance of robins and jonquils marks the
start of spring for some, for many East Carolina
students the beginning of warm weather is signaled by
the sighting of coeds on the nest campus near Reade
Circle.

On The Inside
Conservative columnist James
Kilpatrick (left) br.eflv visaed ECU
Wednesdav but not without praismq
No'th Carolina's senators See page 5
Weather Watch
(UPI) - Partly cloudy today with a high
in the 70s Cloudy and warm Fr.day with
highs m the m the 70s to low 80s Chance
of showers Saturdav and Sundav with
highs in the 60s
Group Explores Rehabilitation
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinion
Campus Forum
Style
Learning About College
Sports
Classifieds
2
4
4
5
7
8
10
B PATRICK O'NEILI
si, Wnl.r
First oj Two Parts
"Prisons are colleges of crime
that have tailed to rehabilitate
(criminals)
This was the conclusion of two
presidential commissions, in 1966
and 1973, according to Kristin
Paulig, a staff member with the
Prison and Jail Project.
The Prison and Jail Project is a
statewide, private, non-profit,
public policy, research and ad-
vocacy group, which was founded in
1976 to encourage public education
and citizen involvement in the
ECU Water Bill Boiling Over
B JKM'K JONES
stall V nler
Though it only costs about SI.56
per 1,000 gallons when it's cold, it
can cost up to $7 per 1,000 gallons
v. hen it's hot.
ECU uses too much of it
It's water, and its cost is going up,
as are the number of complaints
about it. There are problems with
ECU's water system, especially in
the older center-campus buildings
� problems with temperature con-
trol, waste and general
maintenance.
Despite the problems, Larry
Snyder, who is in charge of the
steam plant, insisted that "more ex-
pensive controls aren't justified
This is also the viewpoint of
Director of Housing Dan Wooten,
who explained that there are
"impossibilities" inherent in the
system � impossibilities such as
achieving the delicate balance bet-
ween cost and efficiency. Wooten
also pointed out that there have
been no serious injuries due to
breakdowns in water system
maintenance.
All center campus buildings are
on the same system. This is an in-
stantaneous heating system, a
system that has been basically the
same since the 1930s. Water is cir-
culated through central heating
See CONSERVATION, Page 2
criminal justice system, t
Paulig says one of the project's
goals is to move towa. Js building
"a safer, more just society for all
The project "is a clearinghouse for
information" and also tries to res-
pond to "conditions problems for
prisoners, victims and their families.
The) also work closely with the
"North Carolinians Against the
Death Penalty an organization
which, rccieves separate funding.
Various alternatives to incarcera-
tion are encouaged and endorsed bv
the project.
Alternatives make a lot of sense
for the taxpayers as well as the of-
fenders, according to Robert
Weber, ECU professor of social
work and corrections. "One out of
ever) 100 persons is under the
jurisdiction of th Department of
Corrections in North Carolina he
added.
North Carolina has the largest
number of prisoners in the United
States with 16,000. These prisoners
are incarcerated at a cost of $9,500
per prisoner per year. "If you in-
clude social costs, such as welfare
payments and lost taxes, it goes up
to S 16,480 Paulig adds.
There is "a critical need to ex-
amine our criminal justice system in
terms of its true purpose, its utiliza-
tion and its impact on society in
general according to Delano
Berry, an ECU accounting lecturei
and former department ol correc-
tions employee.
Berry says that excluding all
humanitarian concerns, "the cost
savings of alternatives to prison
would be substantial and would
place the convicted person in a posi-
tion to pay restitution to victims at a
much earlier time
Berry feels that alternative will
allow more convicted criminals to
remain free and productive, as up-
posed to becoming "watds of the
state
He adds that "differing degrees
of supervision" would be necessary
and that "the promotion o the
alternatives-to-prison idea is not a
call for abolition of prisons
Pre-trial release, client-specific
planning and restitution are three
types of alternatives that the Prison
and Jail Project supports.
Pre-trial release would make more
people eligible for release before
their trials. "The jails in North
Carolina are full of people who
can't afford to pay bail Paulig
said. She adds that "being held in
jail pre-trial, above and beyond an)
other factors about a person, in-
creases his or her chances of being
convicted
Pre-Tnal release program staff
people ask the defendant various
questions to determine eligibility.
Certain offenses would be excluded
from the program, and only those
with "higher scores" on the ques-
tions would subsequently be releas-
ed on their own recognizance or
with some other stipulation such as
"third partv custody
The pre-trial release alternative is
presently being used in Charlotte
and Raleigh. "Those counties
recognize that pre-trial releasecan
save them money Paulig said, "by
cutting down on unnessary pre-trial
detention
Paulig points out that the bail
system is used only to "assure ap-
pearance at trial, and that is the only
reason(it should be used). People
are being held for other reasons
she adds.
"It is more desirable to fund pre-
trial release than it is to have an
overcrowded jail or to build a new
one. Paulig said.
NEXT: Paulig points out that
North Carolina has spent $111
million on prison construction since
1975. Has a helped'
UNC President Argues Against Proposed Cuts
B MIKE HUGHES
.�iiitni MtWi fdilor
"We need to be educating more,
not fewer Americans, and the
sooner we are about it, the better
Testifying before the Congres-
sional Subcommittee on Post Secon-
dary Education on March 3, UNC
President William Friday made this
and several other arguments against
the Reagan administration's pro-
posed 1983 budget cuts.
Friday explained to the represen-
tatives that despite North Carolina
"policy of low tuition in the public
institutions thousands of students
throughout the state rely on federal-
ly funded programs.
According to the testimony, large
percentages of students would lose
Their financial aid if the proposed
cut- were to take effect.
Pell Grants, for example, which
served more than 31,000 in the state
See Related Story, Page 5
in 1981, would decrease by nearly
15,000.
In the school year 1980-81, 7,956
North Carolina students received
supplemental educational grants.
According to Friday, the cuts pro-
posed for next year could affect all
of these recipients.
Likewise, the proposed cuts
would affect college workstudy
programs and recipients of aid from
other federally funded programs.
The State Student Incentive
Grants proposal, Friday claimed,
would terminate all funds for more
than 3,600 students, since that pro-
gram is "recommended for dele-
tion
"I need not go on with this recita-
tion Friday said, "other than to
make the point that all of these
statistics represent human beings
aspiring to be better, more produc-
tive, more responsible citizens, and
today it is our national policy that
he or she is to have that chance
In addition to informing the
representatives about the adverse ef-
fects the proposed cuts could have
on college students, Friday also sub-
mitted an alternative.
Friday's own proposal called for
the federal funding of 95 B-l
bombers in the 1983 budget, rather
than the 100 B-l bombers the
Reagan plan proposes.
"I find it difficult to believe
Friday said, "the nation's security
and its defense would be jeopardiz-
ed by the construction of five fewer
B-l aircraft.
"But I do know that the funding
provided by such a reduction would
provide educational opportunity for
several hundred thousand young
iPCow�,
Americans, who, because of their
education, will make a more
substantial and lasting difference to
the future and security of our coun-
try
Friday reminded the subcommit-
tee members that the federal govern-
ment has traditionally turned to col-
leges and universities for
substantial help in essential research
and manpower development.
"Similarly he continued,
we must not fail to develop to
the fullest the intellectual capacity
of an entire generation of American
youth when the need for their in-
formed leadership and scholarship
is so great
Friday also recounted for the
representatives the many problems
of desegregation the state and na-
tion have had and has been attemp-
ting to overcome for several years.
"The proposed reduction in stu-
dent financial aid will have an
especially devastating impact on
minority students, and they will.
therefore, jeopardize all that we
have done and aspire to do in in-
creasing access to higher educa-
tional opportunities for minority
Americans
"We are on a course that will
diminish the best hope these young
people have to prepare themselves
for a creative and productive life
Friday said. "This condition must
not continue.
"I fervently hope he conclud-
ed, "that soon someone in authority
at the national level will assert clear-
ly, and with conviction, that the na-
tion's schools and its colleges and
universities, both public and
private, are indispensable national
resources that are fundamentally
essential to the achievement of our
national purposes.
"The development of the abilities
and talents of our youth must be
primary among the priorities of the
nation

t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18, 198.
Announcements
i
I
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) v typed ano
double spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the production
manager
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies ot our new announcement
application for your upcoming
events.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your �nnounce
men! will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity.
The deadline tor announcements
is 5 p m Fndav lor the Tuesday
papesr and 5pm Tuesday lor the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
ISA
There will be an international
Student's Association meeting at
the international House (306 E 9th
Street) behind McDonalds' on
Saturday, March 20 at 3 p.m. All
interested students are invited.
GROUND ZERO
Get involved - A campus pro
ject to discuss and look for ways to
avoid Nuclear War Numerous
campus groups will be involved m
this most crucial issue during
�Ground Zero Week" April 18 to
25 Plan a proqram, hold a study
group, or Oin some other groups
already working on projects For
further information call 752 4216
SOULS
Souls will have its annual Miss
Souls Pageant on Sunday. March
28 at 7 p m All interested ladies
are asked to submit applications
by Friday. Feb 26 to any Soul's of
ficer For further information con
tact Barbara Battle at 758 9550
ECU POETRY FORUM
The Esat Carolina poetry
workshop with author Ai Poulm
has been rescheduled for tonight
a' 8 p.m m Austin 201. Everyone
commq .s asked to please brino
10 20 copies of their work
PREPPY PROGRAM
REFUNDS
II you have not yet turned in
your tickets for the Official Prep
py Program with Lisa Birnbach
(originally scheduled for
February 9), you must do so by
Friday. March 19 You can get
your refund bv bringing your
ticket by the Central Ticket Office
m Menoenhall Monday through
Friday from 10 am to 4 p.m.
There will be NO refunds after
March 19 Again, we apologize for
the cancellation
ACTING
Stephen B Finnan, formerly ol
ECU'S Drama and Speech Depart
men! will be teaching an adult
class m Beginning Acting starting
Saturday, March 20. at the
Methodist Student Center, 5th and
Holly Streets The class win meet
for ten consecutive Saturdays
Irom 11 am to 1 p m and will m
volve a registration fee of S8 For
further information, call Mr Fin
nan at 757 3546
CHEAP SUPER
CAR WASH
The Convenient Mart on 14th
Street and 264 Bypass is the place
to be Saturday for a sparkling
clean car. Only St with an advance
ticket or $150 at the site. Come on
by from 9 am to 2 p.m. Sponsored
by the pledges of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity.
ALL SING
Alpha Xi Delta would like to re
mind all Fraternities and
Sororities that the 1982 All-Sing
will be on Thursday, March 25 We
hope to see everyone there
THE WALK
"The Walk is only 2 weeks
away Sign up to "walk or spon
sor a friend The nth Annual
"CROP WALK FOR HUMANI
TY" will be held on April 3 at 8 30
a m The money raised will be us
ed to help poor countries become
self sufficient Church World Ser
vice and The ECU Hunger Coali
tion are working together on the
"walk" sign up cards will be
available from ECU campus
ministers or from tables to be set
up on campus next week More
more information call 752 4216 or
come to our meetings at 7 30 p m
on Thursdays at the Newman
House.
PPHA
The Preprofessionai Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday. March 18
This meeting will be held at 5 30
p.m at The Afro American
Cultural Center All members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The Physical Education
Physical and Motor Fitness Test
will be administered m Minges
Colsieum at 1 p m on Tuesday.
April 27 (Reading Day) Satisfac
lory performance on this test is re
quired as a prerequisite tor ot
ficial admittance to the Physical
Education maiors program
Satisfactory performance is also
required on this test before one s
allowed to student teach. More
detailed information concerning
the test is available by calling
757 6497
COR SO
To all Correction and Social
Work maiors and intended ma
lors CORSO is proud to sponsor
Wilson's Director ot Social Ser
vices. Jerry White, as he speaks
on "Social Workers Look at
Children's Homes " Please Oin us
Thurs March 18 at 7 pm m
auditorium Refreshments will be
served!
MCAT
The Medical College Admission
Test will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
April 24. 1982. Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
the American College Testing Pro-
gram, PO Box 414. Iowa City,
Iowa 52240. to arrive by March 19,
1982 Application blanks are
available at the Testing Center.
Speight Building, Room 105 East
Carolina University
FALL SEMESTER 1982
ROOM RESERVATION
SIGN-UP INFORMA-
TION
Students who plan to return to
East Carolina University Fall
Semester 1982 and who wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing
are required to reserve rooms dur
ing the week of March 22 26. Prior
to reserving a room, a student
must make an advance room pay
ment of $60 These payments,
which must be accompanied by
housing application contracts will
be accepted in the Cashier's Of
fice. Room 105. Spilman Building,
beginning March 18. Application
contracts may be obtained from
the residence hall offices as of
March 16.
Room reservations are to be
made in the respective residence
hall offices according to the
following schedule: (Exceptions:
Assignments tor Fleming Hall will
be made m office in Jarvis Hail
and those for Umstead Hall will be
made in Slay Hall )
Monday, March 22 and Tuesday,
March 23: Students who wish to
return to same rooms they
presently occupy must reserve
such rooms
Wednesday. March 24 through
Friday, March 25: AI! other refur
nmg students will be permitted to
reserve rooms on a first come,
first serve basis.
The hours for room assignments
will be:
8:30 am. to 12:30 p m.
1:30pm, to 4:00 p.m
Returning students enrolled Spr
mg Semester will have priority for
residence hall housing for Fall
Semester 1982 only if they reserve
rooms durmg the week of March
22 26 Based on this, returning
students who do not reserve rooms
duing the week of March 22 26 pro
bably will be unable to live on
campus Fall Semester.
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test will be
offered at East Carolina Universi
ty on Saturday, April 17, 1982 Ap
plication blanks are to be mailed
in time to be received by the Divi
sion of Educational
Measurements, American Dental
Association, 211 East Chicago
Ave , Chicago. Illinois 60011 by
March 22. 1982 Applications may
be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room 105
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
April 24. 1982 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service. Box
966 R, Princeton. Nj 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than March 19, 1982 Applica
tions may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105
Speight Building
WATERSHIERS
All serious recreational and
competetive waterskiers in
terested m beginning a waterski
club on campus please contact
Tracy Watson at 238 Aycock.
phone 758 8895 by March 18
SGA
Applications for (82 83) Honor
Council members ar being taken
in the SGA Office, 228 MendenhaM
Student Center Between 8:00 am
and 5:00 p.m . Monday thru Fri
day.
UNITED NATIONS
Going to New York City for the
2nd United Nations Special Ses
sion on Disarmament? A group of
ECU students, faculty and staff
will be and all are invited to
pilgramidge with us. We have a
local campaign working on the UN
project that meets on Friday even
ingsat6:30p.m We meet at 610 S
Elm St. For further information
call 758 4906
REVIVAL
The Fountain of Life Christian
Fellowship will be having its an-
nual Spring Revival March 18, 19,
and 20 in Jenkins Auditorium.
Various speakers and choirs will
be present each night. Services
start each night at 7:00 p.m and
everyone is invited to attend.
SOCIAL WORK
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services at East
Carolina university will offer
courses during the first summer
session ot 1982. beginning May 17
and running through June 22,
which will be of interest to profes
sionals m the human service field,
ministers, lay persons, and to
students preparing to enter these
fields
SocW 4001; Death and Dying
deals with loss, bereavement, and
coping with terminal illness, it is
designed to assist in understan
ding of the conditions and pro
blems involved m facing death,
dying and survivorship.
Awareness, values, and attitudes
are stressed as they relate to pro
fessional practice.
SocW 5001: Human Behavior
and the Social Environment, is
designed to assist individuals in
the development of a social
systems concept of the biol
psycho social elements of mans
bemg. Emphasis is given to
deeper self awareness ot one's
own behavior, attitudes , beliefs
and values as they relate to profes
sional practice
The courses will meet a
minimum of seven and one halt
hours each week The time will be
announced Students may be
allowed to indicate scheduling
preferences
For Information about applica
tion andor registration you may
write or call
Department of Social Work and
Correctional Services
School to Allied Health and
Social Professions
312 Carol Belk Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C 27834
(919 757 6961)
MUSIC LISTENING
CENTER
Stop by Mendenhaii and spend
some quiet time m the Music
Listening Center The Cantor i�
open daily from 2 00 p m. until
10 30 p m Bring your own music
or make your selection from the
wide variety available at the
Center Also current magazines
are available for your reading
pleasure
BAHAMA MAMA '82
The 192 Bahama Mama Party
sponsored by the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity will be held Thursday,
April 1. 1982 starting at 8 p.m. at
he Kappa Sigma across from
Unstead dorm on 10th Street.
Grand Prize is ar all expense paid
trip to Nassau, Bahamas Tickets
are $1 a piece on sale now. For in
formation call 752 5543
ACM
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet this Thursday, Mar 18 at
3:30 in Austin room 132. This week,
Mr. David Sowell, Research
Associate and Software Engineer
to the ULTRA project at ECU will
speak on the second part of design
ing and building your own
microcomputer Anyone in
terested is invited to attend
Conservation Stressed
Continued From Page 1
coils; then is pumped out through
two loops that follow the layout of
the central campus, and then is
recirculated, reheated and sent back
out through the two loops.
State energy conservation
guidelines set a standard of 120
degrees maximum for domestic hot
water. Because of the distance that
ECU's water has to travel before it
can be reheated, average water
temperature can vary between 100
to 130 degrees.
Sudden changes in water pressure
can temporarily cause drastic
changes in the water temperature;
this is the reason some dorm
residents have to give warning yells
whenever a toilet is flushed. 160
degrees is considered to be the
minimum water temperature
necessary to cause physical damage.
Though the problems of water
temperature control are generally
too minor for any comprehensive
cost-effective solutions, dramatic
rises in the price of fossil fuels, and
thus of hot water, are forcing the
maintenance people in housing to
look for new methods of water con-
servaton.
Flow-restrictor shower heads are
being ordered to cut an average out-
put of 6 to 12 gallons per minute
down to 3 gallons per minute. In-
cidentally, because the shower heads
will cut down on the amount of
water flowing at any given time,
sudden pressure changes such as the
flushing of a toilet will have less ef-
fect.
People having water or other
maintenance problems are requested
to go through proper maintenance
channels. For small-scale problems,
dorm residents should contact their
resident advisors who will then fill
out "Residence Hall Maintenance
and Repair Work" forms and send
them to the housing office.
For lafger-scale emergencies,
especially those happening after
housing office hours, dorm
residents can call the security office.
Problems beyond the capacity of
Security will be put on a call-back
list and will be serviced as quickly as
possible by the appropriate
plumber, carpenter or electrician.
Something
Personal To Say?
Whisper It In
Our Classifieds
Bahama
Mama '82
Coming
Be There
Aloha!
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
REQUESTING
FUNDS FROM THE S.G.A.
The SGA recently approved an annual budget resolution. Student groups
requesting funds from the SGA are allowed to submit a budget for the
1982-83 school year for consideration by the Spring SGA Legislature. The
budgets must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. Monday, March 22, 1982, to the
SGA office.
When the budget is reviewed and approved, funds will be available at the
beginning of the fiscal year (July 1, 1982). Budgets not submitted by March
22 will not be considered by the Legislature until the Fall Semester.
No funds will be appropriated over the summer months except for summer
projects or cases with special circumstances as determined by summer
legislature.
IN ALL CASES BUDGETS MUST BE SUBMITTED ACCORDING TO
STATE LINE-ITEM CODES.
Copies of line-item codes and SGA appropriations guidelines are available on
request in the SGA office.
PITT COUNTY HEALTH
FAIR
The East Carolina University
School ol Medicine is recruiting
nonmedica! and medical
volunteers lor the Pitt County
Health Fair. The Health Fair is be
ing sponsored in conjunction with
WRAL TV and will be held Thurs
day, April 22 through Saturday
April 24 at Carolina East Mali n
Greenville
The hourslor the Health tair will
be from 1000 a m until 8 00 p .m
It you are interested in working a
shift as a volunteer, please contact
Barbara Berman or Ann Dili at
the Office of Health Services
Research and Development. ECU
School of Medicine, 757 6510 or
757 6735
DREAMGIRL
The search is on for contestants,
ages 4 22 years old The pageant
will be held August 6 7, 1982 at the
High Point college in High Point,
N.C Winners in each age division
will receive a crown, trophy, and a
cash scholarship. This pageant
will be a wonderful experience for
many girls across the slate, and
will be worthwhile for the "Triad
Society for Autistic People" Each
age divsion will be limited so
hurry and send a stamped self
addressed long envelope to Miss
North Carolina American Dream
Girl Pageant, P O 5432
Greensboro, North Carolina 27403
YHDL
The Young Home Designers
League will meet Tuesday, March
23 at 4 30 m Conference Room 143
(across frorr the Preschool Home
Ec Bidg.) Elections ot officers for
next year and meeting a candidate
for a position in Housing ana
management is slated All Hous
mg maiors and minors are en
couraged to attend!
SHOW BOAT USHERS
If you would like to usher lor
SHOW BOAT, March 31. April 1.2.
3. 5. 7, or 8 and thereby see tne
play free, you may sign up on the
buiiiien board m the Messick
Theatre Arts Center A limited
number of ushers are needed Re
guirements Men must wear coat
and tie. ladies must wear a dress
Everyone must arrive m the lobby
of McGmms Theatre no later than
6 45 p m
SIGMA BIG BROTHERS
There will be mandatory
meeting for all Sigma Big
Brothers on Tuesday, March 23 at
600 at the house All brothers
please plan to attend!
GAMMA BETA PHI
We invite family and friends of
members to the induction and in
stallation of new officers taking
place m Mendenhall's Multipur
pose room and to begin at 6 00
p.m on March 18
NAACP
The ECU Chapter of NAACP
will have its regualr meeting Mon
day, March 22. 1982 in the Multi
Purpose Room m Mendenhaii at
6 30 p.m This meeting is very im
portant! All members please at
tend!
AKA FASHION SHOW
Alpha Kappa Alpha presents
"Fantasia a fasion show that
will include fashions in designer
leans, lingerie, sportswear, semi
formal, formal and many more It
will be held in the Mendenhaii
Auditorium on Thursday March
25, 1982 at 8 30 p.m Tickets are
$1 00 and at the door $1.50. So come
on out for a night of enjoyment
SEMINAR
A senior seminar entitled "What
You've Always Wanted to Know
About Money but Really Didn't
Know Enough to Ask" is being
sponsored by the career Planning
and Placement Office on Wednes
day, march 24, from 3 4 30 p m in
Mendenhaii Student Center, Room
221. The purpose of this seminar is
to provide tips on making the tran
sition from student to fun time
employee Workshop topics in
elude 'Strategy For The Small In
vestor You Should Know About
Borrowing Money' and many
more All interested faculty, staff
and students are invited to attend
BYOB
Bring your own bible Learn to
read God's word accurately and
apply it to your daily life
(Hebrews 4 12) The Word of God
is the will of God Come to our
fellowship and increase our
knowledge toward perfect living
Thursday, the 18th of March at
7 30 pm, rm 242 MSC. or call
752 2078 lor more information
(keep trying)
GAY?
If you would like to iom in a
discussion on homosexuality,
come and get involved m the East
Carolina Gay Community on
March 23 Jim Shay and Kim
Patrick will be leading a discus
sion group Please come and aou
your comments Have a wonderful
Spring Break and don't forget the
meeting
COCA-COLA 10K RACE
The Coca Cola 10K race will be
held as part of the Springiest '82
festivities on Saturday March 27
The 10,000 meters' race begins at
9 30 am and the one mile run
starts at 9 am Both races start m
Greenville, at the corner ot Reade
and Second Streets The overall
male and female winners in the
10,000 meters race will receive
trophies and the top finishers ol
the age groups (male and female)
will receive merchandise awards
T shirts will be given to the first
300 entrants in the 10.000 meters
race The age groupings are as
follows 19 � under, 20 29. 30 34
35 39. 40 44. '50 and over Split
times will be called out at miles
one, two. three, four, and five
Final times will be recorded by a
chromonix and manually Pre
registration for the races is now
bung accepted by writing Coastal
Carolina Running Club. PO Box
3045 Greenville, NC 27834 Atten
tion Jed Pascarella
ECU LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society will meet
Wednesday, March 24. 1982 at 7 00
in Room 212 of Mendenhaii Stu
dent center Guest Lecturer wit
be Judge George R Greene ot
NC DiStrirt Court 10, Wake Coun
ty For further .ntormation, please
contact Diane Jones, 756 6556
PRE�MEDICAL
SYMPOSIUM
An those interested in the
medical and dental fields should
attend this symposium to be held
on Saqturday March 20, at UNC
Chapel Hill, Berryhill Hall, Room
103 The deans of Admission from
the four North Carolina Medical
Schools and Chapel Hill Dental
School will speak There will be a
special talk by Dr John Henry
Pfifferling, a presentation on
financial aid, and medical
students will share on specific
aspects ot medical school
Registration .s at 9 00 a m
RAPE PREVENTION
The Family Child Association
will sponsor a speaker on Rape
prevention Mrs Mary Ellen Max
well of the volunteer Tidewater
Rape Information Service, Board
of Directors for the Crime against
Women Task Force Albermarie
Area and a member of the Status
of Women will give a presentation
on Rape Prevention on March 23.
1982 in vamandingham Room in
the Home Economics Building at
5 00 p m Anyone interested is m
vited to attend
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The Philosophy Club will meet
Tuesday march 23 at 7 00 p m m
Brewster 8D 313 Profesor Karen
Seubert of the Philosophy Depart
ment will present "Markandaya
An Ancient Hindu Myth" All in
terested persons as welcome
LAMBDA CHI
CAR WASH
The Lambda Chrs are holding a
car wash this Saturday, March
20th, at University Exxon across
from the Spilman Bu'ldmg It will
run from 12 00 3 30 and will only
cost a low SI so per car Come out
and get your car clean for Satur
day night cruism
BOWLING
SPRING" into action with
receation at Mendenhai Student
Center Specials scheduled
throughout the Spring Semester
offer something lor everone for
conplete information vsn the
recreational area at Mendenhaii
or call 757 6611, Ext 260
Specials include
DISCOUNT DAYS-13 OFF reg
pr.ces-3 00 PM 5 30 PM
Biiiards and Table Ten
ms- Tuesdays
Bowling�Fridays
RED PIN BOWLING-7 00
PM 10 00 PM. every Sunday
Chance to win one (1) FREE
GAME with every game bowled
FACULTYSTAFF DAY -Every
Wednesday from 5'00 PM I 00
PM ECU faculty and staff MSC
members may bowl 2 games aria
get a 3rd game free
MOONLIGHT BOWLING -Sun
days 5 00 PM 7 00 PM Bowl m the
moonlight' and nave a chance to
wm a FREE GAME One winner
each hour at the Bowling Center
RENT A
LANE Saturdays 17 00 N 6 00
PM i3 00 per hour per lane
SPRINGFEST'82
The best music Greenville has to
offer will be m downtown Green
v.lle on March 27. 10 4prn Spr
ingfest 82 Jazz, folk country
gospel rock, barbershop and
bluegrass will be heard for six
hours m downtown Greenville
Groups include Chuck Bail ane
Laurie Lofton, Blues Plus.
Hometown Boys. ECU Jazz Bones.
RYZE. Rattler. Molly Small and
the Celestials SPEBSQUA. Billy
and Sandra Stmson, TESSER and
Voices of Zion Music, crafts, art.
dance, food and much more, it's
all tree
SIGMA TAU DELTA
The ECU chapter ot S gma Tau
Delta English Honor Society will
have 's 1987 induction Ceremon.
for new memoers on Tuesday.
March 23 at 7 30 p m in
Mendenhaii Studnt Center. Room
244 Prior to the ceremony, Julie
Fay, Assistant English Professor,
will read several of her ac
complished works ol poetry Julie
has published her poems in The
American Poetry Review ana
other literary magazines She it
currently working on a book Of
poems to be published with the
Ralston Creek Press
All current and new members
are encouraged to attend Those
interested m an evening ot
cultural entertainment arp also
welcome
WZMB
"The Electric Rainoow Radio
Show" s a rock n roll machine
gun Every Saturday and Sunday
niqhi from 10 to 1 Keith Mitchell 'S
your host as he fires Oft heavy
metal rocK ano great album
specials Saturday's abium
special wil be by the Scor
pians Animal Magnetism
Featured on Sunday will be the
latest album by Aldo Nova Tune
m and enioy only on WZMB. the
ECU'S student radio network
BE STRONG
Through God s Word we can
withstand an things According to
God's Word in Phil.ppians4 13 vou
can do an things through Christ
which strengthened you You can
learn to be strong m Christ by
understanding. The oeautr ana
Simplicity ol God's Word written
to us today Come to our fellowship
and Imd out Thursday. March 18
at 7 30 p m in room 242,
Menoenhall Student Center
PI SIGMA ALPHA
THere will be very important
meeting of all regular and new
members on Thursday March 18.
at 7 00 B'ewsTer C 105 If you
nave any questions contact either
Churk Sm.th at 758 5976 or
Political Science office at 757 6030
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Ail mrmnru. new ano oia, who
wish to participate in the game on
Sunday March 21, should come to
practice at 4 00 on Thursday,
March 18 on the soccer held beside
Mmges Any questions'7 Can
355 6795 or 752 8698 for more infor
mation
COOP
The Cooperative Education O
fice, located in 313 Rawi Building
currently has iob openings for Fan
83 Interested students should
stop by today to complete the
necessary forms and to s�gn up for
interviews
NIH - A representative from
the National institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD will be on campus
March 22 and 23 to interview
students who would Ine to work m
a clinical setting as Normal
Volunteers Students will be paid
daily stipends All interested
students must attend a general
meeting ar 7 30 p m on Monday
Aarcn 72 before having inter
views
Navy A representative from
the Navy Cviuan Personnel Office
win be on campus March 23 and 24
to interview students Jobs are
available throughout the U S
They are primarily interested in
the following maiors Business
Computer Science. Psychoiog.
Sociology, Accounting. Finance,
industrial Technology, and Prm
tmg Management Related maiors
are also encouraged to apply
The East Carolinian
Srrtng i he campus communr,
imcr ��
Published every Tuesda. and
Thursday during the academic
ear and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned,
operated, and published for ano
oy the s'udents of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate. 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
vi lie. NC 2734
Telephone: 757-6366, 6367, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina.
�ta
SHOP AT
OVERTON'S
ANDSAVE
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
on all orders $10.00
or more.
Expires 3-20-82.
Student Name.
ID Number
Amt. of Purchase.
"Home of Greenville's Best
11
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
Viil
ed
mui
anj
Mi)
si
hei
a.ti
ec I
i
anc
m
Gri
am
Sn

f
.
Mi
inc
i
I
1
I
I
Bri

lai
i
SI
w
Wj
p
11
I
.u
aj
o
m
I
eM
a

ar
g
el





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18. 1982
l
pie
i
l"een
�gat
'Springfest '82' Coming To Town
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Staff Writer
"Downtown Green-
ville will be transform-
ed into a haven of
music, dance, drama
and art said
Elizabeth Stewart of
"Springfest '82 to be
held March 27 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Stewart is the ex-
ecutive director of
"Springfest '82 She
and her steering com-
mittee are promising
Greenville residents
and East Carolina
Students a day of uni-
que enjoyment and best
of all it's free.
"Springfest '82" will
feature a showcase of
"all facets of art by
regional and local ar-
tists said Stewart.
The "celebration" is
being sponsored by the
East Carolina 75th An-
niversary Committee,
Downtown Greenville
Association, Greenville
Recreation and Parks
Department, the Pitt-
Greenville Arts Coun-
cil.
Greenville police will
be closing off several
connecting streets near
Fifth and Evans streets
so festival-goers will be
able to walk freely and
safely to different
events.
Exhibits and
demonstrations in
various art fields are
planned. Included will
be exhibits in clay,
fibers, basketry, wood-
work, leather, water-
color, photography,
stained glass, batik,
and quilting, plus
demonstrations by
quilters, weavers, spin-
ners, potters, mimes,
dancers, magicians and
face painters.
"Springfest" artists
will have items
available for sale to the
public. Food will also
be sold by "commercial
and non-profit
organizations
Stewart said, with lots
of "festival favorites
"Springfest '82"
promises "a widely
diverse program for
music lovers Stewart
said. Downtown
Greenville will
reverberate with sounds
of jazz, folk, country,
gospel, rock, barber-
shop and bluegrass
Scheduled per-
formers include Chuck
Ball and Laurie Lof-
ton, Blued Plus,
Greengrass Cloggers,
Hometown Boys, ECU
Jazz Bones, RYZE,
RATTLER, Molly
Small and the
Celestials, SPEBS-
QUA, Billy and Sandra
Stinson, TEZZER
Voices of Zion.
and
For the running en-
thusiasts there will be a
10-kilometer road race
through Greenville
sponsored by Coca-
Cola, Coastal Carolina
Running Club and the
Pitt-Greenville Arts
Council. Race time is
9:30 a.m. at the corner
of Reade and Second
Streets. A one-mile
"funrun" will also take
place at 9 a.m.
All the public is
welcome and invited to
join in the fun. For fur-
ther information call
757-1785.
Week Shows 'No Major Incidents'
B GREG RIDEOUT
Staff H rilCT
The police blotter for
March 5 to March 16
showed a relatively
crime-free campus.
"There were no major
incidents occuring dur-
ing Spring Break
commented detective
Sgt. Gene McAbee. Ac-
cording to one source,
"If something had hap-
pened it would have
been reported bv
now
following
are campus-
The
reports
related:
March 5. 11:50 a.m.
Douglas W.
Brinklev of 401-B Scott
dorm reported the
larceny of a C.B.
antenna from his vehi-
cle. 12:10 p.m. �
Samuel Huddleston of
185 Jones reported the
breaking and entering
of his residence and the
larceny of a camera.
3:15 p.m. � Donald
Stovall of 205-A Belk
reported the larceny of
his bicycle from the
rack adjacent to Belk.
11:30 a.m. � Bud
Bright of 408 Aycock
reported the breaking
and entering of his
ehicle while parked
south of Ficklen
Stadium.
No incidents were
reported on March 6.
March 7. 1 a.m. �
Elizabeth Bartlett of
Greenville reported the
larceny and breaking
and entering of her
vehicle while it was
parked in the Fifth and
Reade lot. Sharon
McLawhorn of Green-
ville reported the
breaking and entering
and larceny from her
vehicle in the Fifth and
FeadeSt. lot. 3:15 p.m.
� John Wilson of
214-B Scott dorm and
Susie Koenig of Wilm-
ington were found in
violation of the
visitaiton policy.
Koenig was banned
from campus.
March 8. 2:15 p.m.
� Ken Smith of Sports
Information reported
the larceny of a cooler
and Pepsi from under
the north balcony
bleachers at Minges
Coliseum. 6:35 p.m. �
Darlene Rose reported
that two juveniles were
discharging a fire ex-
tinguisher in the base-
ment of Memorial
Gym.
March 9. 8:15 p.m.
� Sharon Marie
Frazelle of 810 Clement
reported the larceny of
her purse containing
credit cards.
March 10. 11 a.m. �
Dee Brockman of
Joyner Library
reported the larceny of
some money from the
cash register at the
library.
March 11. 4:30 p.m. �
David Broadfoot of
Greenville was arrested
for simple assault. 6:40
p.m. � William Jones
of Greenville reported
the larceny of a watch
from Memorial Gym.
No campus incidents
were listed on the police
blotter for March 12
and 13.
March 14. Jeffrey A.
Padgett of 242 Aycock
dorm ws served with a
warrant by Sgt.
McAbee for possession
of stolen property.
March 15. 1:15 a.m.
� Jeffrey Cloninger of
283 Jones was served
with a warrant by Cpl.
Anderson for larceny. 3
p.m. � Two female
students reported
receiving harrasing
phone calls.
March 16. 1:30 p.m.
� Waller McCall was
observed panhandling
for money in the lobby
of Joyner. 4:15 p.m. �
Linda Fave Buck of 333
Cotton reported the
larceny of four hubcaps
from her vehicle parked
in the Ninth Street lot.
Hunt Proclaims 'Ground Zero Week'
Bv PATRICK
O'NEILL
"Whereas the threat
of nuclear war is the
grertest threat to
humankind ever
With these words,
North Carolina Gover-
nor James B. Hunt
began a proclamation
calling the week of
April 18-25 "Ground
Zero Week" in the
state.
Hunt continued to
say that "the govern-
ment of the United
States must move for-
ward into unchartered
waters with decisions,
policies and actions to
avoid this potential
holocaust
He recommended the
observance of Ground
Zero Week to North
Carolina citizens.
The Ground Zero
program is a non-
partisan and non-
advocacy effort to en-
courage the American
people to study, discuss
and express themselves
on this threat of
nuclear war.
Governor Hunt's
proclamation brought
elation from Greenville
and ECU "Ground
Zero" organizers. "We
are very pleased and
greatly encouraged by
the Governor's
response said Dr.
Oris Blackwell, an
ECU professor of en-
vironmental health.
"He has set the tone
for the state with his
proclamation and his
sincere call for citizen
participation
Blackwell continued.
Blackwell is a
member of the ECU
Ground Zero commit-
tee which has invited
Hunt, North Carolina's
Senators Jesse Helms
and John East, First
Congressional District
Representative Walter
B. Jones, North
Carolina actor Andy
Griffith and evangelist
Billy Graham to par-
ticipate in ECU's
scheduled campus
events as featured
speakers.
The letter drafted by
the committee is asking
each speaker to address
the three key questions
raised by Ground Zero:
�How could a nuclear
war or explosion oc-
cur?
�What would it be like
or what would happen?
�What can we do to
avoid a nuclear war?
The letter was signed
by Ground Zero
volunteer organizer
Dick Welch. Other
members of the ECU
committee are: Dr.
Patricia C. Dunn, Dr.
Lon S. Felker, John T.
Gardner, Dr. James M.
Jeyce, Dr. John C.
Moskop, Sister Helen
Shondell, and SGA
Speaker of the
Legislature, Gary
Williams.
An accompanying
letter endorsing the in-
vitation was written by
EC U interim
Chancellor Dr. John
Howell. In his letter,
Howell stated that he
joined "the many
faculty, staff and
students who look for-
ward to hearing vour
views on this vital
issue
Governor Hunt add-
ed that for "a
democracy to function
most efficiently, it must
have an informed and
politicallv active
public
During and leading
up to Ground Zero
Week many activities
will be taking place on
East Carolina's cam-
pus.
Lectures, discus-
sions, film showings
and debates are some
of the planned ac-
tivities.
Speakers are
available for classes,
clubs and organiza-
tional meetings. All
students, faculty and
staff are welcome to
participate. For more
information call
752-4216.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
mm
mm
mm
Current undergraduate pre
medical �rud�ti may now compete
tor several hundred Air Fon
tcholonhipt. These jcholonriipi are
to be awarded to students accepted
into medico schools as freshmen or
at the beginning of their sophomore
year The scholarship provides for
turhon, books, tab tees ond equip-
ment p'ut a $530 monthly
allowance. Investigate this financial
alternative to the Wah cost of
medical education
Contact:
I S.A.F. HKALTH
PROFESSIONS
RrXRtlTINO
Suite Gl I. IIOONavahoDr
leigh, H C 276-9
Phone CoNeae (�1�J7SV�i34
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Ivans Seafood I
Has openings for part-time people in the
Junior Sportswear Department. Experience
preferred.
Job requires working during the
summer and willing to work next
Apply at
Brody's, Pitt
Plaza. Monday-
Friday, 1:30
p.m5:00 p.m.
Sirloin M
Western Sizzlln introduces
the No. 1 Sizzlin, our most pop-
ular menu item. USDAChaioe
western beef sirloin steak that
� x comas
complete
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday & Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
We're here when you need us.
NO.l
SIZZLIN'
SIRLOIN
ONLY
3.39
ft!
p.m. mm
�ttatei
IfrMMri
TmtlNIt
with baked
potato or
franoh
fries and
toast The
No. 1
Sizzlin is
the star
HcoHP01
V at Western
Slzziin And it's awaiting your
comments nowl
4
T�r� Qroovllt Local
M �. look Slrool
Mof.WW
t
After a real fascinating lecture.
study the real taste of beer.
Pabst Blue Ribbon.
O '962 Pats B'ew.ng Company Mwaoee Wisconsin
IfsiNG �andwich
Delicatessen
E. 10th Street
Between Village Green & King's Row
jL
All new hours
to serve you better!
7:30 a.m11 a.m.
BREAKFAST
2 eggs, bacon or sausage,
grits or hash browns,
toast & coffee
$185
plus tax
11 a.m9p.m.
SANDWICHES & SUBS
OF ALL KINDS
Happy Hour
from 2 p.m6 p.m.
2 12-Oz. Mugs for
1.00
10 Off coupon for all ECU Students
from 6 p.m9 p.m. Monday thru Friday
and 1 free 12-Oz. Mug of your favorite
beverage.
Please bring coupon with you
i





3ttp East Ear0liman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree. mmcm
Charles Chandler, ��,�,�, �,�,
Ric Browning, �,�,�-oj Tom Hall, stw Editor
Fielding Miller, bus, m, William Yelverton, spannum
Alison Bartel, m Manag� Steve Bachner, ����� Ed�or
Steve Moore, arcuu.no Monger Diane Anderson, m �
Opinion
Page 4
Elections
Students Should Take Part
It is that time again � the time
that our student government of-
ficials for the coming year are to be
elected. Therefore, there are a few
guidelines that all of us as students
should attempt to follow.
Firstly, we should all vote.
Nothing is worse than hearing
hordes of students complaining
about SGA officials when these
students did not even make it to the
polls the previous year.
Secondly, we should prepare to
vote. This newspaper will be prin-
ting brief platforms for each of this
year's candidates. These are printed
for a purpose � to inform the
students of this university and to aid
them in selecting our leaders for
1982-83.
There will surely be other chances
to hear and talk to the candidates.
We urge you to take every advan-
tage of these opportunities. If a can-
didate knocks on your door, hands
you a card and asks for your vote,
don't allow him or her to get away
without talking about the election.
Thirdly, we should avoid destruc-
ting or tampering with campaign
ads and posters. Already there have
DOONESBURY
been examples of this. Marking a
candidate's campaign poster with
vulger, obscene words and drawings
shows no consideration and NO
class whatsoever. These candidates
care; that's why they're trying to
serve us. The least we can do is show
them some respect.
Fourthly, we should all take this
election seriously. It is not
something to scoff at. It is, rather,
very important to the future of this
university. In the past, some non-
deserving candidates have been
elected to office apparently because
students did not care enough to
study their choices carefully. How
can you know who you favor or
who you do not if you do not ex-
amine each candidate?
We at this newspaper would also
like to point out that we will not be
backing any candidates. By vote of
the paper's editorial board Wednes-
day, it was decided that we would
merely print the platform and cover
the election objectively. We have no
intentions of advising you who to
vote for. We only ask that you
weigh your decision carefully. After
all, it is your decision.
by Garry Trudeau
GcTWUi
soon DOC
ALL YOUR
etev.ies
MISS
YVU'
SOME PEOU JUST
UOKT LtT OW
UOUUDS H6AL.EH,
m KJS51NG6R
.
yOUM&Hl
SAiTMT.
UUL. I CAN SYMPATHaZ WITH
TreiR tmJNOS. MtfSI hEiPBP
cmck touR. aesiLAsruoNm i
�Cmf STrVTW TUNKJNG ABM
MrC&GINTUE
MOVEMENT.
iTjftANAHffZJH6M0Met(r. ASUE
HH&�VtP Tie THf&&fBSS ITSD-
DBVHnHeTmimwNeTre
temoFAMmiK&enuc&HAP
OHxciKxitev
CfATH'
&mmm�
�myv�t
vTfAHrT
BELIEVES STUDENTS
SHOULD SPEAK ONLY
WHEN ORDERED
TO. CONSIDERS
TORTURE A
PROPER TEACHING
METHOD. EXPECTS
CLASS TO
ADDRESS HIM AS
TUHRER
&Z-THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Paper Applauds SGA Donation
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
editorial appeared in The Courier-Times in
Roxboro, TV. C. this past week.
Let's hear it for the Student Government
Association at East Carolina University!
In a rare move the other day, the East
Carolina SGA announced it was putting up
some $1,200 to help underwrite the cost of
a study that will assess the potential effects
of President Reagan's New Federalism on
30 counties and 54 municipalities in
Eastern North Carolina. The study is to be
carried out through ECU's political science
department; the results are expected in
May.
Dr. Edwin Griffith, a political science
professor at the university who will direct
the research project, has observed that all
kinds of agencies and groups are looking
into the potential effets of New Federalism
on the state, but no one is taking a look at
how it and the proposed federal budget
cuts will affect local governments. Indeed,
we should think that the latter have more
than just a passing interest in the matter.
ECU's Student Government Assn. does
not normally give its money � which
derives solely from student activity fees �
to academic research projects. But the
school's political science department asked
the SGA for assistance on the project,
noting that U.S. Sen. John East, a former
ECU political science professor, and his
colleague Sen. Jesse Helms, both have ask-
ed to receive copies of the study. SGA
Treasurer Kirk Little observed, "If they
want to use the study on the floor of the
U.S. Senate, isn't that worthwhile? I
reflects well on ECU
It certainly does. But more than that, it
reflects well on the caliber of students
enrolled at East Carolina University. They
are to be commended for their support of a
study that could be quite helpful to local
governmental officials who now are puzzl-
ing over Mr. Reagan's proposals and mut-
tering to themselves: "What does it all
mean?" Thanks to the ECU students and
the study, they may get a line on the
answer before the other shoe drops.
'Don't Play Cute With Us, David'
Campus Forum
By ART BUCHWALD
When I saw David Stockman being grill-
ed by the House Budget Committee on TV
news last week, I couldn't help being
reminded of the way they interrogate
suspects on the police shows 1 watch every
night.
"All right, David, come clean with me.
What did you do with the money?"
"I don't know anything about any
money
"Don't play cute with us, David. Your
budget happens to be short $91 billion.
You told us last year you'd only be short
$41 billion. What did you do with the other
$50 billion?"
"I didn't do anything with the $50
billion. It just happens after I added up the
figures I realized I had made a mistake. We
have a much larger deficit than we
thought
"Do you see what I'm holding in my
hand?"
"A copy of the Atlantic Monthly"
"We like to refer to it as a smoking gun.
You confessed in this magazine that
Reaganomics was a Trojan horse, and it
wouldn't work. You lied last year when
you testified it would. Why should we
believe you now?"
"I was talking off the record then. Now
I'm telling the truth. Every single dollar in
the $91 billion deficit is accounted for
"What if we told you that you came up
short $29 billion and the deficit will be
$120 billion?"
"Can ! have a glass of water?"
"Sure, David, as soon as you tell us
where we're going to get the money to keep
the country from going bankrupt
"Through tax cuts. Once we're out of
the recession more people will be working
and the eeconomy will turn around, and
everyne will be able to buy a new house
and a new car, and we'll get the $91 billion
back, and more
"Wall Street says you're responsible for
the recession
"They're lying
"Where were you the night the banks
raised their prime interest rates to 20 per-
cent?"
"I was in my office playing with my
computer. My staff will testify to that. Do
you have to shine those lights in my face?"
"David, we're your friends. We're try-
ing to help you. But nothing in your
budget makes sense. If you would just try
to explain to us why the figures don't add
up, we'll let you go. It's no crime to have
made a mistake, but the economic predic-
tions you've just given us are criminal.
You've cut out all social programs, per-
jured yourself as to how much mcney you
were going to give back to the states and
cities in block funds, and with it all, you
still won't tell us where the money is
"It's all in the budget. Can I have a glass
of water?"
"Give him a glass of water. Now,
David, it seems you've given the military
$250 billion to spend as they see fit
"I did that on President Reagan's
orders
"How do we know you haven't
laundered the $91 billion in the Pen-
tagon?"
"They had to have the money to beef up
the military. They need every dollar of it.
There is no hidden money in the Pentagn
"In the Atlantic Monthly article you
said Reaganomics wouldn't work unless
you also cut the military programs. Now
you're telling us something entirely dif-
ferent. What are we to believe?"
"I only said that then because the
reporter was torturing me. Now I'm telling
the truth
"Chief, let me just work him over a lit-
tle. We ain't getting nowhere with this
stonewalling
"No rough stuff, Kowowski. I'm sure if
we let David sit in his chair long enough
he'll start singing a different tune
"If I don't stick to mv story the White
House will kill me
"You should have thought about that
hen you had a chance to resign as Budget
Director
Columnist Told To 'Stop Watching John Wayne Movies

In her February 25 column concerning
the activities of Interior Secretary James
Watt, Kim Albin blatantly portrayed her
own ingnorance of the "Anti-Watt
types" viewpoint. She appears, herself,
to use the "Doonesbury" strip as a
parameter for interpreting our views on
government land use. Her editorial also
suffers from a sense of grouping for a
"John Wayne type" hero figure.
Perhaps some explanation of
"Anti-Watt" opinions might provide
some alternative information if the
aforementioned author doesn't mind the
lack of drawing and hilarity provided by
Gary Trudeau.
First and foremost, the "few loud-
mouth and uncontested liberals" who
signed the dump Watt petition number
well over 1 million, and represent only a
fraction of those opposing him. As for
the petitioners being uncontested, the
nature of Watt's actions provide strong
if not overpowering opposition to those
who would like to see preserved what lit-
tle is left of our undeveloped unique en-
vironments. Additionally the nature of
democracy is such that if a person, or
group of persons, does not make their
opinions known then effectually they
have no opinion.
The reasons for the petition are the
manifestations of the fears of the en-
vironmentally aware. Thr�e years ago
Secretary Watt was a lawyer represen-
ting several Colorado mining corpora-
tions. His duties included attaining ac-
cess to protected or semi-protected land
for natural resource exploitation. As a
United States Government Employee, he
has been given responsibility to oversee
these protected lands and his objective
seems to have remained intact. Hence
the fox guarding the chicken coop fears.
The recent bill introduced to Congress
on Watts' behalf entitled the
"Wilderness inventory Preservation Act
of 1982" includes among it's provisions
a ban on mining and drilling in
Wilderness Areas until the year 2000.
Although this provision is intended to
pacify his critics and take some of the
heat off of the Reagan Administraiton.
It's primary intention ironically is to get
a bill through Congress that extends
land use in Wilderness areas.
The Congress has proved unwilling to
extend a 1982 deadline for acceptance of
applications for exploratory drilling and
mining in Wilderness Areas. Only weeks
ago Watt sought this 20 year extension.
Now his bill has been introduced that
conforms to Congress' wishes. The wor-
rysome part is the "riders" attached to
the bill, including:
�Opening approximatly 24 million
acres of previously protected land to
development unless Congress votes to
protect each parcel of this land within
the next two to six years.
�Giving the president the power to
open any protected land to resource ex-
ploitation in the event of "urgent na-
tional need This is an ambiguous and
undefined term in the bill that gives the
President (the man that appointed
James Watt) complete control of the
Wilderness Areas, excluding Congress'
ability to vote a majority overriding the
President's decision within 60 days.
My interpretation of this Bill is not as
a favorablechange in policy, but as a
Trojan Horse wearing a compromise
hat.
Ms. Albin pointed out that Secretary
Watt advocates the upgrading of further
facilities in currently protected lands.
The money for these projects would
come from funds allocatd for the pur-
chase of new land. Why, she asks, buy
new land that needs development when
existing parks are in such a state of
disrepair. Did it ever occur to Ms. Albin
(certainly it has to Secretary Watt) that
new land purchased need not be
developed? That there are those of us
who would prefer to enjoy a unique and
delicate environment (two criteria for
Wilderness area designation) in the
absence of hotels, pavement, sewer lines
and bridges.
In addition the price of repairing a
cracked bridge, or burying an exposed
sewer line (which isn't necessarily a
health hazard anyway) won't buy much
land these days. This policy manifesta-
tion is just another Watt smokescreen
that alot of people apparently don't
have the high beams to see through.
In these times when economic and in-
ternational political issues tend to over-
shadow, if not obscure, environmental
concerns, serious attention should be
given to groups (such as the petitioners)
that speak with such a strong, unified
voice. As we have all seen, man can
destroy in months what it took nature
billions of years to create. Where rare,
undeveloped environments are threaten-
ed with the heavy hand of unreasonable
development and resource exploitation,
it's time to stop watching John Wayne
movies and reading comic strips and
take note of exactly what is about to
transpire.
WILLIAM SERVICE
Senior, Environmental Health
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library
For purposes of verification, alt letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj.
Ni
Ei
E
Ml
Of
T!
1.
I d
to
wh
he
pol
ru
Nl
de
ed
thr
un
to
ofl
Fel
Ca
tel
f
' -�
J� H� M�ri�MiHg�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
style
MARCH 18. 1982
Page J
ECU Playhouse Revives 'Show Boat'
r
m
iss
w
f-
a
let
t I r� Rumu
It's been many years since Eastern
North Carolina has heard the cry,
"Show Boat's a-comin" but the
East Carolina Playhouse and the
ECU School of Music have revived
the call and are sending out the
word that "America's Grandest
Musical Show Boat, is the grano
opening production of McGinnis
Theatre on the ECU campus April
1. 2, 3 and 5, 7 and 8 at 8:15 p.m.
This new production of Show
Boat heralds the year-long celebra-
tion of East Carolina University's
75th anniversary and is marked by a
cast of some 65 actors, singers and
dancers; 10 complete scene changes,
200 costumes and 23 orchestra
members.
According to Director Edgar
Loessin, this "the most extravagant
production we have ever mounted
here, and it comes with the grand
opening of what we think is one of
the best-equipped and spacious
theatres in the southeast
Written by the legendary team of
Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome
Kern, Show Boat was originally pro-
duced by Florenze Ziegfeld in 1927.
Since then it has become a beloved
musical around the world and the
only show of the last 30 years to
have been given four first-rank pro-
ductions in New York. Three movie
versions have been released, the
latest starring Howard Keel and
Kathryn Grayson.
The memorable Old Man River,
Make Believe, Why Do I Love You,
Can't Help I.ovin' Dat Man and
other timeless songs in the show are
woven into a story about high-
spirited Magnolia Hawkes,
daughter of a river boat theatre im-
pressario on the lower Mississippi of
the 1880's.
Magnolia falls lyrically in love at
first sight with Gaylord Ravenal, a
handsome drifter addicted to
gambling. Their idyll as man-and-
wife takes them to the splendors of
the Chicago World's Fair of 1893.
where Ravenal, incapable of respon-
sibility, deserts his wife and their
daughter, leaving Magnolia to make
a new life for herself and young
Kim.
The poignant story concludes by
showing Kim grown up to be a star
of the modern theatre, and the
wandering Ravenal returning, old
and defeated.
According to the New York
Times, "Show Boat is the most
beautifully blended musical show
we've had in this country The
New York Daily Mirror said:
"Show Boat sets the standard for
musicals. It's magnificent "A
masterpiece the New Yorker call-
ed it. Said the New York Post
the most engaging musical romance
known to our stage
"We think this is a very special
theatre everrt for the state because
Eastern North Carolina provided
the impetus for the original novel.
Show Boat, explained East Carolina
Plavhouse General Manager Scott
Parker.
"Edna Ferber, a writer living in
New York City in the early '20's,
heard of a show boat working the
waters of Eastern North Carolina,
and came down to research the life
aboard the floating theatre. From
that experience she wrote the novel,
and from that Hammerstein and
Kern wrote the musical show.
"So, not only are we opening a
lovely new theatre center, but we're
doing it with a magnificent musical
that grew from the show boats of
North Carolina
Parker noted that many North
Carolinians remember the old show
boats, and that several of these have
been have invited to attend the
opening night performance.
Show Boat tickets go on sale
March 18 at the McGinnis Theatre
Box Office, which is open each
weekday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Telephone orders may be made by
dialine 919-757-6390.
Kilpatrick Praises NC Senators
B DIANE ANDERSON
Styk tdiior
In a grey, three-piece business suit
fresh off of the plane from
Washington, D.C conservative
columnist James J. Kilpatrick very
frankly but good humoredly iold
members of the press that he had
not called the press conference,
which was held yesterday afternoon
in Mendenhall Student Center,
referring to it as "incestuous
stating that journalist should not
subject other journalists to such in-
terviews, but should be allowed to
remain anonymous.
The interview preceded his speech
to students at 8:00 last night, in
which he stated among other things
he would discuss his views on the
political movement on college cam-
puses "heading sluggishly towards
the conservative
"There is no great issue such as
Vietnam or civil rights that would
attract the attention, enthusiasm of
college students he said, pointing
out that with the present economic
situation, most students are very
career minded and concentrate most
of their time on preparing for the
job market.
His grey hair and piercing blue
eyes add to the distinguished air that
this man presents, along with his
background on national television
in such nationally recognized pro-
grams as "60 Minutes" and the con-
troversial "Point-Counterpoint"
segments, which enhanced his
reputation as a conservative jour-
nalist.
He is free with his opinions on
current politicians, referring to
President Ronald Reagan as the
"most consistently principalled con-
servative I've ever known
He added that "the press has been
pretty rough on ReaganHis policy
on El Salvadore has been very one-
sidedly treatedpretty biased
Reagan coverage on the whole
Kilpatrick descried Senator John
East, a former ECU political science
professor, as well regarded, even
tempered, and said "He is right im-
pressive presiding over committee
hearings with fairness and even-
handedness.
He also spoke very highly of
Senator Jesse Helms, stating, "I
just happen to like Jesse very much.
We have been friends for about 20
years
Kilpatrick said that Helms had
become almost a folk hero among
the far right wing, although he is
such an easy target. "He's big, he's
aggressive, he's out in front stated
Kilpatrick, reciting an incident
where an entire hall of people ap-
plauded just at the mention of the
senator's name.
Kilpatrick also referred to former
Vice President Walter Mondale as
"a little too liberal for my taste
going so far as to call him an
"ultra-liberal
Regarding his candidacy for the
presidency in 1984, he said, "He is
raring and tearing to run, and he is
kind of the obvious candidate. 1 am
not at all certain he can get the
nomination unless he develops a
more conservative image than he
has now
The columnist also seemed to in-
dicate that there has "been a move
Richard St. George, a member of the ECU drama faculty, portrays Captain
Andy in the ECU Playhouse production of "Show Boat" by Hammerstein
and Kern. The production will run April 1-3, 5, 7-8.
towards Republican conservatism
here in the south
Kilpatrick described politics in
general as "a matter of percep-
tions He said that people react to
government depending on how they
perceive the state of the economy.
judging by interest rates, auto sales,
housing, unemployment, etc.
Regarding the outcome of the
November elections. Kilpat.ick
said, "It depends on the state of the
economy by September 1st, what
pe plc perceive
New Directions At Gray Gallery
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
'New Directions: Clay and Fiber, 1982 the most recent exhibit at ECU's
Gray Art Gallery, provides a look at new trends in the area of modern art.
By JOSEPH OI INK K
(all W nlrr
After a year of development and
organization. New Directions: Clay
and Fiber, 1982 has materialized in
ECU's Gray Art Gallery. The ex-
hibition, which is partially funded
by the national Endowment F-or "he
Arts, was organized by Randolph
Osman, the director of Gray Art
Gallery, and will travel throughout
the country to other galleries.
With the consultation o other art
authorities, Mr. Osman put the ex-
hibition together. One of his main
objectives was to display art that ex-
emplified some of the newer trends
in modern art and that is done by
some of finest artists in the country.
Aside from benefitting the cultural
aspects of this area, Mr. Osman
believes the exhibition will give the
Art School and ECU some good ex-
posure because it will carry the Art
School's name with it as it travels.
The development of the New
Directions exhibit was heavily due
to a grant from the National En-
dowment for the Arts. Mr. Osman
seemed doubtful that other grants
Student Government Grant To
Research Study Widely Praised
would come from that federal
organization. According to him,
"Reagan is trying to demolish the
National Endowment For The Arts.
Theory has it that the private sector
will pick up the tab. But, that's not
the case
In general. New Directions is hig-
l succesful in presenting the newer
trends in art, it's main intention.
Dina Barzel's felt and fiber
sculpters. Red Mings, Bowl With
Wings, and hgg, utilize a relatively
new material: fiber pulp. Using
basic pulp, the artist has created
very distinct sculptures. Moreover,
Red H ings has intricate extensions,
the wings, which one would tend to
think would be impossible to do
with fiber pulp.
Rina Peleg, in her two untitled
works, used thin strands of clay,
about an eighth of an inch in
diameter, then wove them together
so that they are almost identical to
basketry. With this method, Ms.
Peleg has created her two untitled
sculptures in the exhibition, and
they are two displays of talent,
workmanship, and creativity, and
are astonishing. It is hard to believe
they are actually clay.
Canyon No. 2, a print by Shigeko
Spear, is one of the better works at
the show. The artist uses dark,
purplish shades to define the edges
of an image of a canyon. Then, with
progressing and degressing inten-
sities of shade, the artist defines the
inner space of the canyon-like im-
age, which has smooth, curby, and
subtle transitions. Clearly, the artist
has control of shade and color and
knows how to use it.
June Precipitation, a tapestry by
Judith Fawkes, is alive with intense
colors that appear to vibrate into
one. In other words, it is hard to
pinpoint one color on the tapestry
because the composition is very
unstatic. The grid of geometric-
shapes of progressing and degress-
ing tones of color electrify the
tapestry.
Sherri Smith's Geometry, a work
of cotton webbing, is exceptional. It
is composed of three-dimensional,
pyramid-like shapes that are fused
into one plane. The artist takes ad-
vantage of the three-dimensional
aspect for the pyramid-like shapes
that project from the work and puts
different colors on the sides of each
of the shapes. This creates some
great color fields when the work is
viewed from a distance, allowing the
eye to assimiliate the colors. The ar-
tist uses this optical-mixing effect
well, placing the color fields that are
created by the eye well. There are no
harsh transitions. The work main-
tains a cool aura, yet is far from be-
ing passive.
Slight Window, a multi-media
work by Janice Lessman-Moss, may
take progressive steps by using in-
dustrial materials; still, it is bad.
The latticed ground of industrial felt
is plain and ineffectual. The same is
true for the triangle of black ribbon
on top of the black felt ground.
Other than the fact that the work is
bad, not much can be said about-
Nighl Window. Really, there is not
much to it.
Sky Grid by Arturo Sandoval is
mediocre, if not bad. The grid of
computor tape that rests on a
See MODERN, Page 7
By DIANE ANDERSON
A recent action by the ECU Stu-
dent Government has been applaud-
ed by the media in many cities
throughout the state. The rather
unusual action was a grant awarded
to a political science research study
of the effect of the "New
Federalism" on eastern North
Carolina.
"I think it shows a great deal of
leadership and initiative on the part
of the student government to do
something like this said Dr. Ed-
win Griffith, a poltical science pro-
fessor and director of the graduate
seminar which will conduct the
research. "This is very unusual for
student governments to reach over
and support the academic sideIt is
a very responsible move the SGA
has taken. It brings students and
faculty closer
The $1,202.50 grant will cover
telephone, computer, and printing
costs incurred in the study which
looks at 30 counties and 54
municipalities in the state. Targeted
areas include social services, com-
munity development, the Employ-
ment Security Commission, mater-
nal and child health care, public
health, and alcohol, drug abuse,
and mental health. The study will
not look at education, Griffith said.
Although there are other pro-
grams that will have an impact on
local government, Griffith explain-
ed how these particular areas were
chosen. "We took each one of the
seminar students and picked a pro-
gram area in which he had some ex-
pertise or interest he said.
The untraditional action of the
SGA by funding an academic
research project was described as
"the kind of 4PR' this school lacks"
by Gary Williams, speaker of the
legislature. "In terms of it being
beneficial to the university and for
the knowledge received, we felt that
it would be good for the university,
especially if we are the only one in
the state undertaking a project like
this he said.
The letter to the SGA requesting
funds says that Senators Jesse
Helms and John P. East have re-
quested copies of the study. East be-
ing a former ECU political science
professor, and just the senators' in-
terest probably had some influence
in the decision to approve the funds.
"Last year the student legislature
was very, very frugal Williams
said. "We had a nice surplus this
year and we were very careful in ap-
propriations. This was not a
frivolous decision. 1 think the
discussion on it lasted about an
hour
The grant will provide the major
portion of the project's funding,
enlarging the capability for students
to extend research through
telephone surveys. This experience
will be very beneficial to the
students involved, explained Grif-
fith.
"There is the learning experience,
and they are learning a great deal.
From the standpoint of the graduate
students involved, certainly if they
do a good job it will give them an
added visibility in the job market. .
.From a professional point of view
it will assist them Griffith said.
The Seminar in Intergovernmen-
tal Relations, within the Masters in
Public Administration program, is
conducting the research.
��� �� DAVC WILLIAMS
The Chi Omega Sorority raised 'Shamrocks for Muscular Dystrophy' on St. Patrick's Day.
T





1HI I ASIC AROl INI AN
MARCH 18. 1982
Cherokee Reservation'Community Of Contrasts'
By JOHN WEYLER
In 1818, the United
States Army marched
through North
Carolina rounding up
all the Cherokee In-
dians the could find,
herding them into con
centration camps
before leading them on
a forced match to a
desolate reservatin in
Oklahoma On this
trip. "The frail 0
rears one out of
every foui Cherokees
died from cold, hunger.
01 disease A fe who
escaped enroute, 01
eluded capture in the
first place, hid in the
Smoky Mountains,
where today they live
on the Cherokee Reset
v, at ion. an ideal place to
visit foi anyone wishing
to witness tust hand to
current condition of the
American Indian.
Located about fifty
miles west of Asheville,
criss-crossed by U.S.
Highways 441 and 19,
is the city of Cherokee,
the official and com-
mercial center of the
reservation of the
Eastern band of
Cherokee Indians
Cherokee is a com-
munity of contrasts,
showing on one side
great respect for the
Native American's
heritage, and on the
other, degradation and
disagree
The latter is seen in
the substandard condi-
tions most of the
Cherokees live in. and
in the misrepresenta-
tion and commercial
exploitation ol their
culture, a by-product
of the tourist industry.
Tourism is the area's
major industry, for, as
John Gulick writes in
"Cherokees at the
Crossroads every
summer come hundreds
of "families on
vacaiton or holiday
who are attracted by
the beauties of nature
(especially protected in
the Great Smokey
Mountains National
Park) and the presence
of Indians. These two
attractions were on the
scene long before the
development of
automative tourism
"Tourist interest has
stimulated the installa-
tion of other attrac-
tions, such as a large
number of souvenir
shops, frontier and In-
dian museums, frontier
and Indian model set-
tlements, and the out-
door dramas at
Cherokee and Gatlin-
burg. Served by an
ever-growing number
of motels, service sta-
tions, and eating
places, the tourist is
constantly and various-
ly reminded of the
frontier culture of
Boone and Jackson and
of the Indians whose
long, losing struggle
against the inroads of
that culture is featured
in both of the outdoor
ddramas
The commercializa
tion of the Cherokee
culture is best sym
bolized by the Indians
who sit in front of
tepees or walk around
in full feather war bon
nets and other regalia,
posing for photographs
for a fee. One of them.
( hiet I om lumpei, is
quoted (in "My Friends
The C hei okees" by
Roy Cantrell) as say
ing, "they (the tourists)
come here fro m
everywhere and don'l
know much about us.
They want to know
about my people and
how we used to live
They want to know
where they can gel real
Indian made pro
ducts
Howev ei. as (iulick
writes. "Cherokees do
not now , and nevei did,
wear feathei wai bon
nets, carve totem poles
or live in tepees 1 ui
thermore, most ol the
Indian souvenirs foi
sale were not made by
local Cherokees and
many were not made by
Indians a) all I o main
Americans, items such
as these then
originals derived from
several diffei ent Indian
cult ui es ha v e
become svmbols ol In
dianness generally; and
therefore present -day
Indians who wish to
continue to be iden-
tified as Indians, as
many ol them do, Imd
it convenient (as well a1-
financially profitable)
to display such sv mbols
even it thev were nol
originally pan ol then
own particulai iiadi
tion I he situation is
verv much the same
everywhere in the
t nited States � here In
dians meet tourists
Fortunately, there
also exist inhero!
many institutions
which celebrate the
authentic nd inspiring
heritage ol the people.
I'ct hap - 'he in
famous ol these is the
at oi e-meni ioned i ui
door drama,
1 hese Hii
Presented by the n
profii li
Historic al A i ition,
the play tells the true
tale ol the Indians.
from the arrival ol
DeSoto nd the Spa
conquerors in lc40 to
the " I rial il I ears" in
1818
C her okee
ociation
i he
andrails
goal o 1

and
I �
h 1 In
Mutual
inch
I h
Hisi
a I s o
Qualla A '
Mutua
alive the i
crafts
Ban
sells authenic artwork.
h piece of work is
,cd with a descrip-
tion ol the object, the
material used, the iden-
tity of the artist, and a
declaration 'hat the
organization is
recognized by the In-
dian Arts and rafts
Board of 'he U.S
Department ol the In-
terior as an Indian
terprise dealing in ge-
nie I r a 11 s.
n foi -ak- include
handmade baskets of
ak, cane or
kle, intricate
headword. wood carv-
See Ml SEUM, Page 1
Barn well Expresses Pride
In ECU Medical School
B NGEI ROACH
Maff Wnlfr
He was horn where
the flowers bloom
everyday in the year.
He serves as the assis-
tant dean for a major
university and is at the
same time president of
the oldest Black
medical society in
North C aroiina. This is
a concise description of
a man with a not so
concise background.
Dr. Syndey Barnwel.
Serving at ECl tor
the past live years, l)r
Ba r n w e 11 expressed
pride in being a pan of
the personnel. His first
i ob here w a s as
Associate Professor ol
Pathology. Now he
server av Assistant
Dean of Minority Af-
fairs in the School ol
Medicine. "ECl is the
school in the state to at-
tend he stated con-
cerning its medical pro-
gram Although many
other schools in North
(. aroiina have medicine
deeply imbedded into
their history. Dr. Barn-
well believes "we just
have to work harder.
One has to work hard;
nothing is given
One senses the
sincerity in his words, it
doesn't seem to be a
product of employment
but o an intense belief
and high hopes in the
administration. He
declares this to be the
be institutiton
because it provides in-
dividual attention,
various assistance labs,
and is a young school
furnished with practical
objectives alongside ef-
ficacy and enthusiasm.
"There ate many ef-
forts to help students
understand the material
taught. These efforts
are, in my own estima-
tion over and beyond
other schools
I ove for E( I is evi-
dent in conversation
and in deed. The ex-
altation flows quickly,
smoothly, yet sincerely.
Dedication rides on the
contours of his face.
His experiences with
such prominent univer-
sities as Howard and
Tuskegee make the
stature of his
statements extend
greatlv upward.
Old North State
Capital Association is
HffMilllll!lill!llll!lll!lllllll!l!lll!llff
the oldest Black
medical society in
North Carolina. It
functions as an
organization of fellow
physicians, makes an
extreme effort to pet-
suade more blacks to
involve themselves in
the field of medicine,
and conveys to the
legislature means ot
aiding the under-
privileged. The associa-
tion has kept the in-
terest in the medical
field alive in the spirit
of many black youth
while helping the pro-
fessional cope with the
many problems that
arise At present it is
concentrating on block
grants and the recent
cuts in Mcdicaid. The
poor would not suffer
di spr opo11 i ona tely
Dr. Barnwell states. He
is the President of the
association
The medical society
will hold its annual
seminar during June in
V inston-Salem. This
year it will be a joint
convention of black
dentists and lawyers of
North Carolina.
Guyana, South
America, where he was
born is a modern
country with the
average and modern
facilities as you would
have in Nort h
Carolina he says. He
has made the US his
home for the past
thirty-four years. "The
problem with Guyana
is economics he con-
fesses. He has not,
however, given up on
his homeland. He visits
there every five or six
years.
Dr. Bamwell's duties
now as Assistant Dean
for Minority Affairs
are divided into recruit-
ment and retention.
Presently, there are
seventeen minority
medical students enroll-
ed in FXU. "1 don't
think there is as great
an interest in medicine
as there was twenty or
more years ago because
so many other avenues
have opened up,
engineering for exam-
ple he comments on
the situation. His per-
sonal reasons for
deciding to become a
doctor was because
there was a great need
for them in his country,
and he knew a number
of persons in the field
as he was growing up.
His hobbies are
growing roses, collec-
ting antique furniture,
and studying black
medical history. He
was featured on
"Awaken Channel 9
Alive's new show, ap-
proaching the subject
of the continuing
developments of the
medical field. His
know ledge and
character make him a
perfect prospect for
talk shows
Not only can Dr.
Barnwell be proud of
but was discontinued in
1914. North Carolina is
rich in medical historv.
Dr. Barnwell is deter
mined to learn, un-
cover, and investigate
the thickness of this
richness.
Dr. Syndey Barnwell
is entwined with this
campus and intrinsic in
its progress. He strives
to upgrade standards,
to promote worthwhile
endeavors, and to in-
itiate drive. Modesty is
as important to him as
perfection. Adherance
to hard work in both
this public institution
and his own private
practice. These
characteristics, along
with genuine concern
for people positioned
on all levels, make him
well suited for the
capacities in which he
operates. Intensity is
ever present and ECl
hopes that intensity in
this particular man
continues on campus.
Fast Carolina is
striving to make Dr.
Barnw ell's dreams
become reality with the
building of the medica
ECU but ECU can be
proud of Dr. Barnwell.
He isn't a flatten- but
no one can o.nit his
statement that ECU is
the best. His sincerity is
evident when one looks
at the universities he
has been a part o He
graduated form
Howard University
Medical School and
practiced at Tuskegee
Institute's Veteran
Hospital for sixteen
years before starting a
practice in New Bern.
He is now a private
practitioner and works school. However, it is
in conjunction with not just the bricks and
Craven County
Hospital. Craven
County is as native to
Dr. Barnwell as his
homeland of Guyana.
He has also served as its
medical examiner.
In his spare time, Dr.
Barnwell studies black
medical history. One
interesting fact is that
Shaw University in
Raleigh was the first
university to implement
a four year curriculum
in its medical school.
The plan began in 1885.
mortar of the facility
but the stamina of the
personnel and the unity
that will keep the pro-
gram together. ECL
has made many un-
forgettable contribu-
tions to the area. Dr.
Barnwell has played his
role and is willing to
continue at the present
pace. Without people
there is no program;
without a program
there is no progress. It
is fortunate ECU has
all three.

CONSOLIDATED THEATRES
All Sears $1.50 Everyday Til 5:30 P.M.
IIIIIIIMWIIIIIIHIIIM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Gr�sen�ille Square Shopping Center j
THESE FEATURES START TOMORROW!
HE IS THE JUDGE AND JURY!
A SLICE OF DEATH '
12:45,2:50,4:55,7:00,9
JOHN HURT
INC
lllllilHBIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIltlllllllHIiHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllliHIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIHI
j a true story, (pgj
ATTIC
Souths No. 6 A Rock Night Club
THURS MARCH 18
PKM
FRI. & SAT.
MARCH 19, 20
EAZE
SUN MARCH 21
SOIREE DE LA FEMME
EAZE
lKIDD BLAST!
DRIVER
THREE BANDS WITH FEMALE LEADS
LADIES LOCKOUT (8:30-10:00) LADIES
FREE
ALL GIRL FOOTSBALL TOURNAMENT
-HUNDREDS OF SSS IN DOOR PRIZES
FREE VACATION TO WINTERGREEN


BUSCH. The official beer of The Charlie Daniels Band.
O Anhe.iv B i li '�'�� M






ki-
ts
IP-
he
Ml'
t
Ihe
t IS
v.
Ian
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MALCH 18, 1982
L�A�)�fe A6WJT CocUfcf- TH� Hp Wai
m Pavip AloMIS
you sflueP A 6ML
Of SfAGH�TT( - o !
oo M AC60M cove.
v�
(JCKT YOU.
rto, f pwr,wWv-
Modern Art Described As 'Primitive'
Continued From Page 5
ground of plain computer tapes ap-
pears like it was splotched with
bluish gray paint randomly with no
thought at all. Moreover, the red
splotches on the work look like they
were just thrown on any old way.
Floating World . a quilt by Nan-
Museum Shows Cherokee Crafts
Continued From Page 6
ings and pottery.
The past may also be
relived at the Museum
of the Cherokee In-
dian, where exhibits
and audiovisual techni-
ques tell the people's
tale. On display are
such items as pottery
dating back 2000 years
and stone weapons over
10,000 years old. As the
Museum's brochure
says, "The intriguing
story of the Cherokee
Nation will excite your
imagination as you
follow these proud peo-
ple through their poig-
nant history of peace,
conflict, deceit, and re-
emergence without
defeat
Information and free
brochures on the
Museum, the
Oconaluftee Indian
Village, the Qualla Arts
and Crafts Mutual,
"Unto These Hills
and more, may be ob-
tained by writing The
Cherokee Historical
Association, P. O. Box
398, Cherokee, N.C.
28719.
cy Halpern, is one of the best works
in the exhibition. Truly, it projects
the image of a floating world. It is
composed of geometric forms which
are arranged in a manner that make
them appear like modern architec-
ture. The effect of dark and light
geometric forms gives this architec-
ture a sense of shape and form. The
small world rests on a silverish sea
that has curving and moving stit-
ching on it, giving it a sea-like ef-
fect.
Jenny I.ind's two untitled works
seem out of place in an exhibition of
modern art. Her images on
porcelain are primitive, to put it
mildly. Perhaps they were copied
off the wall of some pre-historic
cave. In one of them, there are four
rabbits and a chicken that look like
they were roughly done in crayon.
Around them, there are crayon
scribblings and scrawlings that are
child-like. Many times, people
without insight say a child could do
modern art, which, in most cases, is
an unjust generalization. However,
when studying Jenny l.md's art, one
has to wonder if she is out of
elementary school. Truly, her work
is primitive.
In general, New Directions: Clay
and Fiber, 1982 succeeds in it's ob-
jective of presenting new trends in
modern art.
Maggie Ree Performing This Friday
Thirteen-ear-old singer and pianist Maggie Ree brings her patented
blend of R & B and jazz to the Coffeehouse this Friday night at 9 p.m.
The Coffeehouse is located in the basement off Mendenhall Student
(enter. Admission for the performance is S.75. The show is being spon-
sored b the Student I'nion Coffeehouse Committee.
IKU4-
Y
R
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
BIKINI CONTEST
Doors open at 9:00
Ul FirrZE � $T00 plus merchandise
'2nd PRIZE � $50plus merchandise
3rd PRIZE � $25 plus merchandise
Interested participants call 355-2615
BE A
HERO
ABORTIONS
;j ,x k terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1 BOO 321 0575
1
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks, Camping Equip
ment, Steel Toed Shoes.
Dishes and over 700 Different
Items. Cowboy Boots SM.S
ARMY-NAVY
i S Evans
STORE "
Pick up
your
Hero Bouquet
today
Greenville'
Flower Shop
1027 Evans Street
758-2774
MC & Visa Welcome
i THE VILLAGER j
OWNED AND OPERATED BY
JIMMY EDWARDS
LOCATED 10th ST.
NEXT TO VILLA ROMA
SPECIAI HAIRCUTS REG.$5.00
VOW $4.00 WITHTHISAD
Call 758 3768 or come by
MonFri. � 8:30-5:30
few: ysma x�ec�o�e sckwmmmmmmm

1
i
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S185 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fur
ther information call S32-OS3S
(Toll Free Number
S00221 2SA8) betweenAM
and S P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C.
VOTE
DAVID COOK
President
KEITH
NEWBERN
Vice President
BECKY
TALLEY
Treasurer
SGA Elections
Wed March 24.1982
IT'S WAR!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce you to our mouth watering style of pizza, we're mak
ing two incredible offers With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2 00 on a large Godfather's Pizza
What's holdin' ya? The doors are open now1
Godfather's Pizza
$100
A OFF
Medium
$
2
00
OFF
Large
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Boulevard Phone 756-9600
Offer expires March 31, 1982
Limit oie puia per coupon
3UB�r
ARTISTS!
ENTEROUR
WALL PAINTING
CONTEST
PRIZES!
100-
50 - 2nd
s25 - 3rd
COME TO SUBWAY
FOR RULES& REGULATIONS.
208 E. Fifth 758-7979
Sun. Thurs. � 11 a.m2a.m.
FriSat. � 11 a.m3a.m.
GRANDMA
BOY FRIEND
SISTER
UNCLE
THE YEARBOOK etc
got youf
picture takgn
Sign Up March 15-19 9:00-5:00
Sittings March 2?-April 16 9:00-5:00
Buccaneer office
Coll 757-6501
Buccaneer office
Varden Studios, Inc.
t
?
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 18, 1982 Page 8
Scharf Stepping Down After
15 Years of Pirate Loyalty
Ray Scharf, East Carolina swim-
ming (and diving) coach for 15
years, resigned Tuesday to concen-
trate on helping young people in
another area � academics.
Two-year assistant Rick Kobe will
assume the position, as the resigna-
tion takes effect June 30 of this
year.
"I'm going to continue my job
teaching at East Carolina Scharf
said. "I've completed the things I
set out to do. I'll never divorce
myself from aquatics, that's my life.
When you stop having challenges,
you stop living. People lose their
vitality when they don't seek new
horizons
Kobe, 28, is a native of Winsor,
Vermont, and previously served as
head coach of the Raleigh Swim
Association from 1978-80. He was
also an assistant coach at West
Virginia from 1976-78.
Kobe earned his undergraduate
and masters degree in physical
education and health at Fairmont
State and West Virginia, respective-
ly.
"I think Rick is a young and en-
thusiastic individual the 45-year-
old Scharf said. "If I didn't think he
could continue the same kind of
loyalty and pride, I wouldn't have
recommended him or stepped down.
He's dynamic and a good coach
with all the tools. And he's a heck of
a recruiter. Swimmers coming here
will have the opportunity to swim
under one of the better voung
coaches in the country
"I'm very excited about the posi-
tion said Kobe. "As a young
coach, it's always a goal to get a
head coaching position. My goal
will be to take East Carolina swim-
ming as far as it can go and to have
the best teams we've ever had. And
we're close to that. Recruiting has
gone great. Next year, we have the
potential to be the best we've ever
been here. I'm excitied to be involv-
ed in it
� � �
In Ray Scharf, East Carolina is
losing a coach who compiled a 93-55
record in men's dual meets and led
this year's women's team to a 16th-
place finish nationally. His men's
team finished in fifth place at the
Eastern Intercollegiate Champion-
ships.
He has coached 24 women All-
Americas � eight this year � while
winning 11 consecutive Southern
Conference titles from 1966 to 1977.
Eighty-six of his swimmers were
named All-Southern, and over 40
have qualified for NCAA Division I
titles.
He has been the recipient of the
Eastern Intercollegiate's "Coach of
the Year the NCAA's 15-year ser-
vice award, and has been honored
by the College Swimming Coaches
Association.
He is a graduate of SUNY-
Brockport and has gained a masters
degree at Arizona while serving as
an as assistant coach there in 1962.
He will remain at East Carolina,
serving as director of aquatics.
Ray Scharf
ECU Bombs
Stags Twice;
Keep Rolling
Homestand Continues
Over The Weekend
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Sports r dnor
Pirate ace BUI Wilder (Gary Patterson)
Taking A Stab
In The Dark
W hat is more unpredictable than
the NCAA Basketball Tournament?
Hard to find an answer, isn't it?
Lach year the championship is
tilled with surprises, cinderellas and
upsets. All of this makes predictions
a near impossible task.
Charles
Chandler
With the NCAA field down to the
sweet 16 picking a winner is still
difficult, as is selecting Final Four
favorites. Nevertheless, here's a stab
in the dark at who should (might)
end up in New Orleans.
From the East Region I like North
Carolina. The Heels should get by
Alabama in Friday's semi-finals and
meet tough Memphis State for the
right to advance to the Final Four.
The game should be hotly contested,
especially underneath with UNC's
Worthy-Perkins combination
meeting super freshman Keith Lee.
Two are better than one, giving the
Heels a slight advantage.
The Midwest is the only region
without its top seed still competing.
Boston College was the spoiler here,
upending second-ranked DePaul
last Saturday. Missouri is no doubt
the favorite now to win the region.
Don't be surprised to see BC make
the Final Four, though. They are
playing very well and are my upset
pick.
The Mideast is bogged down with
worthy contenders, as Louisville,
Minnesota, Virginia and Alabama-
Birmingham remain. UAB has a
distinct advantage in that the
regional is being played on the
Blazers' home court. Still, look for
Virginia to survive and make the
fabulous foursome. The Cavaliers
got enough of a scare last Sunday
from Tennesse to keep them on their
toes from here on out.
Remaining in the West is
Georgetown, Fresno State, Idaho
and Oregan State. Head coach John
Thompson will be a happy man
once his Georgetown Hoyas make
the Final Four. With big frosh Pat
Ewing and All-America guard
Sleepy Floyd on hand, the D.C. club
seems headed to New Orleans.
If all these teams prevail, the
semi-final matchups will have top-
ranked North Carolina vs.
Cinderella Boston College, and
third-ranked Virginia vs. number
four Georgetown.
The latter matchup would really
be something, with 7-4 All-
Everything Ralph Sampson going
against 7-0 super freshman Pat Ew-
ing in the pivot.
But, of course, anything can hap-
pen. It's not too far-fetched to
foresee Villanova, Kansas State,
Alabama-Birmingham and Fresno
State in the Final Four. The old
adage is very true when it comes
NCAA time � anything can hap-
pen.
East Carolina baseball coach hal
Baird says his "guys are still a little
mad" about a recent trip to Clem-
son that resulted in two tough losses
to the sixth-ranked Tigers.
"We should have won one of
those he says.
The Stags of Fairfield University
can surely can attest to that.
Especially after the Pirates delivered
a sound whippin' Wednesday after-
noon, sweeping a double-header,
9-1 and 9-0, for their sixth and
seventh straight win
East Carolina is now 9-3.
Catcher Fran Fitzgerald belted
two home runs in the double-header
� one in the first and another in the
second � while Chuck Bishop and
Todd Hendley added two more
round-trippers to power East
Carolina's 23-hit assault.
Fairfield could manage on ly
three hits in the first game off Peter-
son, 2-0, and two in the nightcap of
Charlie Smith, also undefeated in
two starts.
Baird was especially pleased with
his team's pitching as freshman
Peterson and Smith went the full
seven innings without much trouble.
"Our pitching's been very good
Baird said. "I'm proud of it. I can't
really ask much more (of the team).
We're swinging the bats well, play-
ing good defense �
The first game was similar to the
second as the Pirates, hitting over
.300 as a team, collected nine runs
off 11 hits and two Fairfield errors.
Peterson kept the Stags off balance
all afternoon, allowing only three
safeties.
"Brian (Peterson) threw the ball
well said Baird. "He did have a
little trouble locating his breaking
ball, though
In the second contest, catcher Fit-
zgerald and third baseman Hendley
were the hitting stars for East
Carolina, each going three-for-four
with a double and a homer.
The Pirates gave Smith a two-run
cushion in the second inning after
Mike Sorrell led off the inning by
beating out a bunt down the third-
base line. Sorrell went to second
after John Hallow walked and later
scored from third after a pick-off
attempt at second failed.
Hallow scored after Hendley
singled to center.
However, the big inning for the
Pirates was the third when they
picked up five runs on five hits.
Todd Evans led off with a suc-
cessful bunt down the third-base
line, and scored when Hendley sent
the next pitch over the trees in left-
center for a 4-0 East Carolina lead.
Fitzgerald followed suit im-
mediately by hitting what Baird call-
ed one of the longest homers he had
ever seen over the trees in left field
for a 5-0 lead.
With one out, Robert Wells walk-
ed and advanced to second when the
infield misplayed Bishop's fly ball.
Sorrell then hit a liner to short,
moving Wells to second and Bishop
to third. David Wells then walked,
loading the bases, and John Hallow
looped a double to left, as the
Pirates picked up their sixth and
seventh earned runs of the game.
East Carolina added another run
in the fourth when Fitzgerald �
who needed only a triple to hit for
the cycle � doubled to left. Robert
Wells singled to left after shortstop
Kelly Robinette and Bishop flew
out, scoring pinch-runner Carl
Daniels.
Hendley doubled to left to open
the Pirate half of the sixth and
scored when Robinette's grounder
to short took a sharp hop.
Smith struck out Ronald Clarke
� his sixth of the game � to end
the contest.
"All the Northern teams we play
have something in common �
sound pitching and good defense
Baird said afterwards, when aked
about the degree of difficulty of
playing a team that was just opening
the season as was Connecticut (the
previous opponent) and Fairfield.
"When you're that kind of team,
it's less of a disadvantage than not
having played as much.
"Fairfield has been down here for
three years. And Connecticut four.
This is the first time I can remember
the games being so one-sided
The Pirates host conference foe
George Mason � "We expect a real
battle says Baird � today and
Friday before ACC member
Virginia comes to Greenville this
weekend. Saturday's Virginia game
begins at 2 p.m Sunday's at 1:30.
The game's with George Mason
begin at 3.
ECU's Fitzgerald sends one oarin Wave Williams)
Todd Evans at the plate (Gary Patterson)
Pirates In Florida
PIRATE BASEBALL NOTES
Unofficially, the Pirates' are second
in the nation behind Oral Roberts
earned runs allowed per game. (The
NCAA does not keep baseball
statistics)The team posts a bat-
ting average of .302 before the
double-header with Fairfield. John
Hallow is batting .432, 16-37 with
eight rbi's; David Wells, .360;
Chuck Bishop, .347Defensively,
the Pirates are performing well,
posting a .955 fielding percen-
tage East Carolina has outscored
opponents 80 to 30
By C YNTHIA PLEASANTS
Vvi�imii Sport I- diliw
"People just don't realize what a
positive sport we have here said
ECU's men's track coach. Bill Car-
son.
"We win or place in almost every
event we enter
The track team will travel to the
Domino's Pizza Sunshine Relays in
Tallahassee, Fla. ihis weekend,
March 20-21, their first meet of the
outdoor season.
The mile relay team placed sixth
in the IC4A Championship meet in
Princeton, N. J. two weeks ago,
after competing against eighty-live
teams.
Runners Lawrence Ervin, Terry
Ford, Keith Clarke, and Tim
Cephus combined for a time of
3:19.71.
According to Carson, the top
relay teams in the nation will be par-
ticipating in the meet, and he was
optimistic about ECU's chances to
do well.
'We usually accomplish
something just about everywhere we
go he said.
The track team will run in the
400- and 800-meter, the mile, and
the sprint medley relay events.
H
war
com
Soft!
joint
Deps
will
Sum
will
Marc
the
singlj
it wil
years
Pro
ar
this
will
plau
to t
t-shii
paini
get
nual
menlj
Hisk
The
Chai
Joini
for t
ln
Tri-
the
the
Stac
poin
tossc
A
Enf
pionj
struj
and
slim
Tl
ting
oint.l
Davi
scor
of tl
scor
tracl
sprii
agail
The I
play
CAM
J
Ca
Ca
Ch
Le
Ch
wJ
Wr
U
Le
Lod
?
i
T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 18. 1982�
I
Warm Weather,
Softball Mix
MILLER INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL
Here comes the warm weather And with the
warm weather comes softball. And with softball
comes the Third Annual Miller-ECU Intramural
Softbll Tournament. The tournament, sponsored
jointly by the Miller Brewing Company and the
Department of Intramural-Recreational Services
ill be held March 19-21, Friday, Saturday and
Sunday. The first 32 mens' and 16 women's teams
will be taken. Entry dates for the ran through
March 17. The $5.00 entry fee covered the cost of
the officials. The tournament format will be
single elimination until the quarter-round, where
it will change to a double elimination event. Last
years' champions, Roundtrippers (men) and All
Pro (women) will have to play excellent if they
want to repeat. A strong field is expected to enter
this year's event. The Miller Brewing Company
will be awarding troph ies to the first and second
place teams in each division, individual troph ies
to the members of the championship teams,
t-shirts to the top two teams in each division and
painter hats to all participants. So don't forget to
get your team together and enter the Third An-
nual Miller-ECU Iniramural Softball Tourna-
ment.
BASKETBALL SEASON PACKED AW AY
Historv repeated itself on the basketball courts as
The Dribblers captured the Women's All-Campus
Championship for the second year in a row, while
Joint 8 tok the Men's All Campus Championship
for the third straight year.
In women's action, 100 Percent Gotten beat
Tn-Sigma to gain a spot against the Dribblers in
the finals. The 39-16 victory shows the strength of
the championship team and the hot shooting of
Stacev Weitzei, who led the scoring with 14
points. Emily Habig and Virginia Carlton both
tossed in six points for the Tri-Sigs.
A 37-27 win over Phi Kappa Tau put the Jones
Enforcers against Joint 8 for the Men's Cham-
pionship. The first half was an up-and-down
struggle with neither team establishing dominance
and ended with the men from Joint 8 holding a
slim 30-26 lead.
The second half opened with the Enforcers get-
ting into some serious foul trouble. From that
oint, the "8 led by Steve Hison's 21 points and
David Battle's 17 began to pull away. The final
score, 57-49, was not indicative of the closeness
of the contest. For the losers, Anthony Martin
scored 22 points.
Playing Carolina In Raleigh
Doesn 9t Matter
A labama
TUSCALOOSA,
Ala. (UP1) Playing
No. 1 North Carolina
in Raleigh isn't much
different than taking
on the Tar Heels on
their home court,
Alabama Coach Wimp
Sanderson says.
"It will be tougher
than most games
because it will be like
playing on their home
floor, but I think we've
prepared ourselves for
this situation said the
coach of the 12th rank-
ed Crimson Tide at a
news conference.
Alabama (24-6)
meets North Carolina
(28-2) Friday night in
the East Regional
semifinals.
Raleigh isn't far
from the Tar Heels'
home court in Chapel
Hill, Sanderson
pointed out. But play-
ing tournament teams
close to their homes is
nothing new for
Alabama.
"We won the
Southeastern Con-
ference Tournament by
beating Kentucky on
their home floor, and
we beat St. Johns's on
pretty much their home
floor he said.
Alabama upset Ken-
tucky in the league
tournament and
qualified for the
Raleigh trip by beating
St. John's in Union-
dale, N.Y 69-68.
"We're going in
there to play as hard as
we can, hopefully as
good as we can he
said. "We're not going
to back down to North
Carolina
Sanderson said he
considers North
Carolina one of the top
three college basketball
programs in existance.
"As far as experience
is concerned it
(tournament play) is
nothing new to them
he said. "For us, it's a
new experience.
"If you had to rank
basketball programs.
North Carolina would
probably be ranked in
the top three
The other Eastern
Regional game pits
Villanova against
Memphis State. The
winners play for the
light to advance to New
Orleans.
Sanderson said
Alabama's game plan
against the Tar Heels
won't vary much from
the type game the Tide
has played all season
"We're probably go-
ing to go pretty much
with what we've been
doing he said
"Whatever gets you to
the dance ought to be
good enough to keep
you there.
w
756-6000
JAY
Season Begins
The FC'l I's women's
track team open their
spring season today
against Elon College.
The match will be
played at Elon. and
begins at 2 p.m.
The men's tennis
team will play UNC-
Wilmington today at
Minges courts. The
match begins at 3 p.m.
JAY NICHOLS WILL:
� Support the Arts ffff,
� Reduce wasteful spending
and improper allocations of Jf
student funds.
� Introduce a student hotline
for complaints and
grievances.
�Oppose charging for student
tickets to any atletic event.
�Strive to maintain a standard
of quality for WZMB � your
student radio station.
WE NEED
JAYNICHOLS ;
for
PRESIDENT
OFTHESGA y
FOR
INTERNATIONAL
FOODS & GIFTS
M0COTANCHEST. 752-3411
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
e;c 10-50
V " Salt Glaze Wine Set
f
OFF From
Regular Price
Card Box
CANDY DISHES, FIGURINES. MUSICALFIGURINES&
SOLID BRASS ITEMS ALSO ON SALE
Canape Dish
: s3400
14
Hi,
99
u shi sea Weeds
Kim I hee
Alfafa Sprouts
Mung Bean Sprouts
Temple Garden Kimono
Chinese Silk Jacket
hinese Quilted Jacket ;ii'fi:
I4K Gold Bracelets
14k Gold Chains
Reg � 00. $29.00
.��? .??.�9.$59.0u
Shoji
Screen
Phi
& Sigma
Pi
presents
5th ANNUAL HEART FUND
BIKINI CONTEST
Tuesday, March 23,1982
Admission� $1.00 Doors open at 8:30
Sponsored by: PriCS
PANTANA BOBS Is $125.C
SPORTSWORLD
plus weekend for two at Atlantic Beach
w Jet Ski Rentals & 1 yr tree pass to the EL BO
Herr,ng Bone�eg U 00 $g W
, Rea S?7 0C $19.00
18 Req S42 00 $21.00
14K Gold C harms,
Shell
Plabo Bunny
Rnj
S7.99
Heart ���� S9.99
Horn�� $9.99
U BE.
CROW'S NEST
TODD'S STEREO
Prizes provided by
HAIR PIZZAZZ
UNITED FIGURE SALON
RECORD BAR
FOSDICK'S
SCISSOR SMITH
APPLE RECORDS
FREDDIE'S
2nd � $35.00
plus keg � plus I yr tree pass
to the fcLBO
3rd � $25.00
plus pony keg � plus l yr tree pass
to the EL BO
plus Prizes tor all other contestants
Contestants can sign up at Student Book Store Lobby
AH Day Thursday, Friday, and Monday
CALIFORNIA CONCEPT
MARGAUX'S
SWENSON'S
SHIRLEY'S 264 OUTLET
All Name Brands - Discount Prices - All 1st Quality
JEAN
BONANZA SALE
fSA
Kfi SALE �-�
ThursFri Sat. Only
Oik Discount
Pnce
Reg Pnce
Calvin Klein (100 cotton I sa
Calvin Klein (stretch lycra I �wml 536 oo
Chic Junior (100 cotton m $2398
Levi Junior (100 cotton). . hw 523 9b
Chic Missy (100 cotton). kl
Wrangler Missy (stretch lycra I nwa
Wrangler Missy istretch lycra)
Levi Missy (stretch lycra)
Levi Missy Istretch nylon) ��
Lord Isaac Jr. & Missy Any Pair � $3.00 oft our already discount price
plus unadvertised specials this weekend only
(Thursday, Friday, Saturday)
Also
Shirley's Stout Shop Specials - Jeans
$2998
5W-ML $23 98
WWBL $30 98
SALE
PRICE
$24.98
$29.98
$20.98
$18.98
$20.98
$23.98
$19.98
$24.98
$23.98
Shirley's 264 Outlet
Located beside Southern Sportsman Post
264 By-Pass
Farmville, N. C.
Shirley's Stout Shop
Located 264 By Pass
Marlboro Intersection
Farmville, N. C
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's)
Tuesday Night -
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 wID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
x : x x x x x
H.L. HODGESBONDS
3 DAY SALE
Nike
All Court
Lady
All Court
Sugg. Retail $24.95
Sale Price
18.95
Thurs Fri
Sat. only
Take to court with
the All Court.
Style with comfort!
H.L. HODGESBONDS
DOWNTOWN
SPORTING GOODS
for men
t





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 18, 1982
The Ups and Downs
Mike Grego (left picture, right) easily dominated his opponent in the 175 pound weight class in the TKE Boxing
Tournament being held this week. Greko is from Greenville and is the returning champion.
The fighter above wasn't so lucky and went down after 22 seconds had elapsed. (Photos by Gary Patterson)
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD: Lost Mon Feb 8th
Brown Cordoroy Ladies Pocket
Book with Bamboo Handles Lost
in Food Town and Fosdick s Area
Please Call 756 4323 Home and
7S4-10H Business Ask for Danny
or Gmny
LOST: Timex watch 1st or Jnd
floor "stacks' Joyner Library
Catl Trudy 753 2981
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours
Monday � I 15 3 00
Tuesday � 1 00 3 00
Wednesday � I IS 3 00
Thursday � 2:00 3.00
Friday � I IS 2.00
You must place the ads m person
and pay for them in advance
Rates are SI for the first 15 words
and S 05 per word after the first fif
teen
FOR SALE
"URNITURESofa. 2 maple
rame arm chairs, one end table
Good Condition Puce Negotiable
Call 754 5323
SKIS: K 2, 185 comp 810 ski's with
Soloman Bindings SI25. Call
757 3210 and leave number
TOYOTA l�8l Corolla hardtop
AC AM.FM stereo, tape deck,
automatic 10 months old, like new
56400 neg After 5 00 756 4425 or
754 5420
VIVITAR ZOOM Lens 75 210 with
Macro for Nikon Mount used only 2
times S16S call 757 3210
DOUBLE BED with mattress and
box springs, dresser with mirror
S400 or best offer Call 757 I8S�
TRAILER FOR SALE set up in
Greenville 2 BR all electric, ac,
excellent condition 52V95 call Tar
boro 823 9894.
79 FORD FIESTA red wred in
tenor. 38 000 miles 4 spd, very
well maintained 42 mpg. 53800
757 1001
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
one bedroom apartment 575 plus
one halt utilities Call Scott at
752 4S47
STUDENT TO share a fantastic
place Hot tub, spa, sauna and sun
tan booth. Private Bedroom SI 50
plus shared utilities. 752 5048.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted:
For nicely furnished apt. at
Cypress Gardens. Within walking
distance of campus Call 758-3894
COMPLETELY FURNISHEDone
bedroom apt utilities included
Across from College 758 2588
GOING TO Summer School and
need a place to live? How about a
nicely furnished apt instead of the
dorms? Available May thru Aug
Walking distance to campus. Call
758 3894
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
BR Apt in Wilson Acres Pool.
Sauna, tennis Call 752 4787 or
757 3509.
SHARE WITH STUDENT
Spacious Apt m large house S1S0
per mo includes Everything
Females only Call 758 8170 after II
pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
July 23 Aug 24 Rent 5125 plus l2
utilities Call 758 3462
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
to Sublet May Aug Two miles
from Campus Call 355 4792 or
756 4151
PERSONALS
Do you know someone with an in
teresting or unique hobby or
craft? If so contact the Buccaneer
757 6S0I.
RUSSELL, You think your cool,
but we know what a prompt toker
you really are. Have a cracker
then TAKE OFF
JOANNE: Happy Birthday, Sun
day. Love Scott
PHI KAPPA TAU Your rush
stunk We have never met such
unfriendly gentleman (?) in our
lives Straightne up your act
SIGMA'S Thank you tor your
great hospitality in Ft Luader
dale We dor't know what we
would have done without you We
hope you had a great time, we sure
did J G W R B.H HP , D M
and Pledge B D
FLETCHER: You thought you
could hide the only thing that's
hidden is my scar and you'll never
see it. so get a real Ob
TO JEN AND GIN As we laid
there m your beds, lustful thouqhts
ran through our heads Ya'll were
there in your panties and fop
almost making our departure
come to a complete stop Our leav
mg you both because of classes
tomorrow was in itself a thmq of
sorrow But we shall return to qet
in your sacks and we II even qet in
your favorite position, on our
backs Love Big R. and Sludly
RETRIEVER PUPPIES:
Chesapeake Labrador mixed.
Beautiful Puppies. Call 756 9930.
HOOVIE: Just a thank you note
lor always listening. I love
ya BJED
COTTENS OWN sex pistols, JB
and LQ want to make it with the
Sigma Nu's
HELP
WANTED
NEED MONEY You wont get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training for editor positions and
training on computer terminals
Apply at the East Carolinian of
fice, Old South Building.
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED
Apply with the Media Board
secretary, Old South Building,
757 6009
BASS PLAYERS: Exp bass need
ed for country rock band. Must be
serious Call Steve 754 3314 Drum
men and Lead Guitarist also
needed
POSITIONS AVAILABLE at
Camp Leach for summer 1982
Especially looking for Registered
Nurse and Arts and Crafts Direc
tor. For Information write to
Camp Leach Manager, 215 E llth
St Washington, NC 27889
TRUMPET PLAYER wanted Top
40Beach group Weekend work
Vocal ability prefered Call
756 6495
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea S10 for 8 x 10. black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING TERM, Thesis.
Resumes. Dissertations, etc. Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 756 3660
SUMMER HOUSE SITTING
Responsible individual will tend
animals, plants, etc In residence
or periodical checks Faculty
Recomendations Write: 146 Jar
vis Hall. ECU, Greenville
RIDERS
ATTENTION COMMUTERS
FROM WILSON I need a ride da.
ly from Wilson to ECU and back
daily. We could trade rides or
share expenses Please call
Sherry at 243 30t9 ASAP Would
like to start immediately
IF YOU WANT TO BECOME INVOLVED WITH
SUPPORTING ECU ATHLETICS . . . COME SEE
WHERE YOU FIT IN THE SAB COMMITTEES OF
PUBLIC RELATIONS, SPIRIT, PEP RALLIES,
HOSPITALITY, CHEERINGCARD SECTION,
PARENTS' DAY, PROMOTIONS, FUND RAISING.
I THURS MARCH 25, AT 5:30
L �
ECU ATHLETIC SUPPORTERS
BASKETBALL�GOLF�BASEBALL�SOFTBALL�TRACK
SWIMMING-TENNIS-SOCCER � VOLLEYBALL FOOTBALL
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Mar 17.
thru Sun Mar 21. 1982
in Greenville
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
- '
Vt
-
V
L
�'
V

y
X

' w
n

r I'
�I


'? A
� ,ffes

'mm

W
I
I
3
JL


600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 am to 9 p m
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised Items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale in
each Kroger Savon, except as specifical-
ly noted in this ad. If we do run out of n
item we will offer you your choice of a
comparable item when available reflec-
ting the same savings or a rai'neheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days.
m BUDDY L 2407
PORTABLE, FOLDING
&
24" Grill
7
�fir
PREMIUM -5g
Miller Beer
49
POLAR PAK
Ice Cream
$419
Reg'
1514.95
SAVE
S991
t'?
Vi-Gal.
Ctn.

&


12-Oz.
Cans

tr

i

r.T ?!
�iat iawaw
�ilMK
I ��ll;l
UlDllt
TAB, SPWTE OB
Coca-Cola
239
MADE FRESH DAILY
PEPPERONI OR
Cheese Pizza
2!5
WASHINGTON STATE
Red Oelicioui
Apples
138-
Size
Each
SAVE
30�
THOMAS
i�
v I 6-Ct.
PKQ.
KROGER ALL MEAT
CHUNK STYLE
Bologna
fy
rft
LA
DUKE'S
Mayonnaise
32-Oz,
Jar
IN OIL OR WATER
CHICKEN OF THE SEA
BAGGED
v&
Chips & Snacks
Hi
or
KfTAK.
�$5�2
sWOz
Can
16
t
tutmt
tmn mmiM��wm�ii �fc � n& '





Title
The East Carolinian, March 18, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 18, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.186
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy