The East Carolinian, March 2, 1982






She itast (Eatrnltntan

Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No.if
Tuesday, March 2, 1982
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
rOn The y&ktei
The latest
foreign film to
win an Academy
Award appears
Wednesday
Mendenhall bee
page 5
Weather Watch
Mostly sunny today with highs near 60
Lows tonight m the 40s Far Wednesday
with highs m the 60s
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinions
Campus Forum
Entertainment
Learning About College
Sports
-sifieds
Plan Proposes Censuring' Braxton
By MIKE HUGHES
u�tani n�s I.dilor
A resolution went before the SGA
Monday that, among other things,
will require a lot of explanation.
In what Vice President Marvin
Braxton termed a "surprise move
the SGA heard a resolution which
calls for the "censuring and ad-
monishment of the vice president of
the Student Government Associa-
tion
John Greer, who was the princi-
ple author and promotor of the
resolution, said that the action was
not aimed at being a "personal at-
tack on Marvin. We just felt that the
actions he presented were unap-
propriate for an SGA meeting
So just what did Braxton do to
provoke such an action?
It all took place after the Feb. 22
meeting of the SGA. Following
what was termed a "routine
meeting the attention of the the
few remaining members of the
legislature turned from verbal
debate to a physical action in the
seats.
Braxton, who claims he was pro-
voked to physical action by a note
containing an "ethnic slur had to
be pulled off Tim Mertz, another
student at the meeting.
The note referred to a social rela-
tionship Braxton has with Diane
Anderson, a member of the staff at
The East Carolinian.
After the gist 01 the note was
relayed to him through Anderson,
Braxton claims he made a motion to
Mertz to exit the meeting room and
discuss the note outside.
Following Mertz's refusal, Brax-
ton attempted to use physical coer-
sion to force Mertz to talk about the
note.
Editor in chief of The East
Carolinian, Jimmy DuPree, who
also remained after the meeting,
says he attempted to keep some
distance between Braxton and
Mertz.
According to several persons at
the scene, there was very little
physical action between the two.
"1 don't mind in politics if people
take verbal stabs at me Braxton
said, commenting on his action in
the Feb. 22 meeting. "But when it
comes to my friends, that's another
thing.
"I'm just saying that my actions
are just Braxton told the SGA
Monday. "I think enough of this
legislature that I won't tell you what
was done last week
In addition to censuring and ad-
monishing Braxton from the SGA,
the resolution called for the vice
president to issue a formal apology
to all parties involved.
"Be it further resolved the
resolution continued, "that if Mr.
Braxton is involved in any further
disruptions of the Legislature, he
will be held in contempt of the
Legislature and barred from any
and all meetings of the SGA
B axton would not comment on
why he feels Mertz gave him the
note, and Mertz could not be reach-
ed for comment on the incident.
"In the past Braxton added,
"there have been a lot of different
campaign tricks or political so-
called ploys done on this campus.
But it has brought disgrace to the
students.
"I have had a great year here, and
1 have enjoyed working with you a
lot. I sort of look at the SGA as a
learning process. Sometime or
another, I don't think I would mind
becoming a career politician, but 1
don't think college is the place
Commenting further on the
legislature, Braxton added, "The
SGA has a lot of potential, but peo-
ple have to grow up and realize that
there is life after ECU. This is just
the beginning
Braxton did say that Mertz may
See BRAXTON'S. Page 3
Chancellor Search Narrowed
By TOM HALL
The East Carolina Board of
Trustees closed its meeting to the
public Sunday afternoon to discuss
what board chairman Ashley B.
Futrell called "personnel
While some sources claimed that
the Chancellor Selection Committee
had narrowed the field of 148 ap-
plicants for the post to "less than
10 Futrell, the committee chair-
man, refused Monday to reveal the
number of applicants remaining.
"It's been cut down con-
siderably Futrell said. "We're on
schedule. We hope that we can be
ready some time in April to present
the two people to Dr. (William) Fri-
day and the Board of Governors
The committee met at 10 a.m.
Sunday in the Willis Building. Only
two finalists will be submitted to
University of North Carolina presi-
dent, Futrell said.
In the open session, the board ap-
proved the construction of a bus
shelter north of the Speight
Students Given Opportunity
To Search For Sunken Ships
By GREGORY SLGGS
SUN �nm
College seniors and graduate
students throughout the United
States will have the opportunity this
summer to participate in an under-
water search for sunken ships off
North Carolina's Cape Lookout
coast.
This is the fourth annual Field
School in Maritime History and
Underwater Archaelogy co-
sponsored by East Carolina Univer-
sity and the North Carolina Division
of Archives and History.
A two-week classroom introduc-
tion to maritime history, Under-
water Archaeology and Nautical
Science will start the specially
selected students on their ar-
chaeological project. From the ECU
classrooms the students will travel
to the Cape Lookout project site.
There they will combine forces with
personnel from the North Carolina
Division of Archives and History.
Aboard the Research Vessel Mur-
phy Base, the junior archaeologists
See STUDENTS, Page 2
Building.
Trustee Katie O. Morgan was
named the seventh member of the
ECU Endowment Board. James H.
Maynard, whose term expired, was
re-elected to the endowment board.
A first edition of the Federalist
papers of 1788 and letters written by
Jonathan Swift were donated to
Joyner Library, according to Dr.
Susan McDaniel. Speaking for Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Robert H. Maier, McDaniel said
Elizabeth Ross of Washington
donated the manuscripts.
Dr. William E. Laupus, dean of
the School of Medicine, said the
Brody Medical Sciences Building
should be completed by mid-May.
"We're moving at a rapid pace to
complete the building Laupus
said, adding that a formal dedica-
tion was scheduled for Oct. 29.
Financial aid programs for
students may change in the next
academic year, according to Elmer
E. Meyer Jr the vice chancellor for
Student Life. "Most students will be
taken care of for 1982-83 Elmer
told the board.
Meyer also said WZMB-FM was
"doing quite well from the students
point of view" but "not so well
from the faculty point of view
Some faculty members have com-
plained that ECU's revived radio
station blocks the signal from the
UNC station in Chapel Hill, Meyer
said. Futrell later asked the board to
let him know "if you know of any
other way to block them out
A recent survey shows that fewer
ECU freshmen choose a major
because they like learning about it,
Meyer said. Forty-five percent of
the freshmen last year chose majors
in subjects they enjoyed, compared
to 38 percent this year. The number
of freshmen whose mothers attend-
ed ECU has risen from 8 percent to
15 percent, while freshmen with
fathers who studied at the university
increased from 4.8 percent to 5.3
percent.
F. Douglas Moore of the Institu-
tional Advancement and Planning
office told the board that 10 area
newspapers had planned special edi-
tions in March commemorating
ECU's 75th anniversary.
Acting Chancellor Dr. Robert
Howell said representatives of the
Southern Association of Schools
and Colleges will visit ECU on
March 14-17.
The board's next meeting is ten-
tatively scheduled for April 3.
Students Hold Vigil
For El Salvadorans
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Wrilrr
Approximately 30 concerned
students and Greenville citizens
took part in a 90-minute "Silent
Vigil for the People jof El
Salvador"in front of the ECU Stu-
dent Supply Store Monday.
Rev. Bob Clyde, the ECU Baptist
campus minister, ed a brief opening
prayer, "For Justice Where There's
Injustice, For Healing Where
There's Bloodshed" at 12:40 p.m.
"The "Silent Vigil" was organiz-
ed "in recognition of the tremen-
dous suffering and loss of life
among the people of El Salvador
according to a leaflet distributed by
some of the participants.
"I wanted to draw attention to
our government's involvement in
another country's affairs said
Harry Warren, an ECU graduate
student in history. "If we're to be
involved in another country's inter-
nal affairs, let it be in a humanistic
manner instead of a militaristic
manner
"I feel the student body needs to
be more aware of our country's
position in El Salvador added
Glenn Maughan, an ECU education
major. "Our nation's strong
military commitment there can lead
to a possible confrontation with the
Soviet Union, Cuba, and other Cen-
tral American countries
Warren said he did not "believe
in the basic argument that we should
be there because the Russians or
Cubans are there. Two wrongs
don't make a right
According to ECU student Randy
Alley, a spokesperson for the group,
the coverage from local television
stations was "excellent" but "we
haven't really reached the student
body well enough yet He said he
felt that with "time and effort" this
would improve.
Students at the scene stopped to
take leaflets and a few joined the
vigil after asking the participants
some questions. "I've had a student
come up to me and ask me more
questions, so I think the interest is
there Warren said.
"If this is supposed to be a
democracy, where the hell is the
people's voice?" Maughan said.
Warren said he thought interest in
the El Salvadoran question would
increase "when the students realize
that they have a personal stake in
the international situation
Promotion of a military solution
in El Salvador is "real dangerous
Maughan said. He added that
students may find themselves the
"unlucky recipients of "draft
notices" if the situation didn't
cease. "Somehow I don't feel this
situation only applies to men
Maughan said he thought the
situation could easily escalate "to a
point where we're alienating the
Soviet Union and Cuba" by military
sanctions, blockades or a naval-
force build-up.
According to the group's leaflet,
they hoped "to help bring these
issues into the forefront of current
debate. Congress is now in the pro-
cess of making crucial decisions on
these matters, so public input is
vital
The group urged students and
others to write or call President
Reagan and their representatives to
express their opinion.
In the leaflet it was printed that
there is "not enough adherence to
basic human rights" in El Salvador
and that "as U.S. citizens we are all
responsible for our government's
policies and actions
Maughan said he hoped "the stu-
dent body realizes that their and
their parent's tax dollars are being
used to train El Salvadoran soldiers
at Fort Bragg He added that these
soldiers would soon return to El
Salvador "to kill their own people
Opposition to the training of
these El Salvadoran soldiers was ex-
hibited Saturday at Fort Bragg when
approximately 1,000 people
demonstrated the presence and
training of the El Salvadoran
soldiers there.
The group presented letters of
?��oto Bv GARY PATTERSON
Clink ! C lank ! a wn! C rash!
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority members overcame their late-night jitters to win
the can-stacking contest at a campus "all-nighter" Friday and Saturday.
Many Say Haitian
Refugees Mistreated
Monday's silent vigil on the ECU campus (top); protestors at Fayetteville's
Pope Park Saturday: "a personal stake in the international situation
(Photos by Gary Patterson and Dave Williams)
protest to military officials at the
base, calling for an end to the end to
this training.
Recent press reports have charged
that the El Salvadoran soldiers are
murdering unarmed civilians and
peasants. The Reagan administra-
tion denies these reports, but the re-
cent visits by some congressmen to
El Salvador confirm some of the
reports.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff VI nIrr
"The United States does not treat
the Haitian people as human be-
ings said J.B. Obas, a manpower
counselor at the Haitian American
Community Association of Dade
County (HACAD).
"They're like in a prison. They
treat them more or less like animals
Feed them, find them shelter and
that's it added Father Marcel
Peloquin of the Catholic Haitian
Center.
News Analysis
Obas and Peloquin were referring
to the plight of more than 2500 Hai-
tian refugees being held in detention
centers in the continental United
States and Puerto Rico.
Like many critics, Obas and Pelo-
quin say the detention camps are
more like concentration camps
where detainees are poorly clothed
and fed, kept in isolation from
family members, and subjected to
the psychological torture of conti-
nuing loneliness and boredom.
Obas, formerly from Haiti, has
lived in the United States for 17
years. He works in Miami with
HACAD to provide support to the
families of refugees being kept in
the Krome Avenue Detention
Center. HACAD is also lobbying
for the release of the refugees.
"We have even sent telegrams to
Reagan spoken to senators and
our own congressmen Peloquin
said. He visits the Krome Ave.
center to say Mass and provide
counseling services once a week for
the refugees. Peloquin has asked the
political leaders to intercede for the
release of the refugees, but "so far
we haven't touched first base he
said.
The policy of retaining refugees
was begun by the Reagan ad-
ministration to discourage the hun-
dreds of Haitians illegally entering
the United States by way of boats,
many of which are in poor condition
and overloaded.
Criticism and charges of racism
have been endless since the start of
the policy. "1 know it's racially
motivated stated Congresswoman
Shirley Chisholm (D-N.Y.) at a re-
cent lecture at East Carolina.
Chisholm said that "never before,
in the history of this land, have we
ever used such a policy with
anybody coming to this country
Rev. Gerard Jean-Juste, the first
Roman Catholic priest from Haiti
ordained in the United States and
director of the Miami Haitian
Refugee Center, said the United
States is resettling 500 Indochina
refugees daily while the Haitians are
still detained. He questioned why
the United States also treats Polish
and Cuban refugees differently
from the Haitians.
See HAITIAN, Page 3
Ameling
Appearance
Cancelled
The appearance of internationally
known soprano Elly Ameling,
rescheduled from last Tuesday even-
ing, has been cancelled.
Ms. Ameling had been slated to
sing this evening in Hendrix Theatre
but was forced to cancel a second
time due to a prolonged illness.
No indication has been given that
Ameling might reschedule for a date
later this spring.
t
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1982
Announcements

!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
oriel as possible) typed and
double spaced to the East Caroli
n.an in care ot the production
manager
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies ot our new announcement
application tor your upcoming
events
There is no cnarge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline tor announcements
is 5 p.m Friday for the Tuesday
papesr and S p m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
SOCIAL WORK
AND CORRECTIONS
The Department of Social Work
fc Correctional Services at East
Carolina university will offer a
coursse of particular interest to
staff members and administrators
in human service organizations
such as mental retardation
centers, psychiatric hospitals,
mental health centers, home
health agencies, departments ot
social services, correctional
facilities and programs and to
selected undergraduate and
graduate students The course
SOCW 5000: Organization and
Management of Social Service
Agenices will be taught by Dr
Walter F Lamendola
For additional information
about admission to the course and
registration procedures please
contact the Department of Social
Work & Correctional Services, 314
Allied Health Building The coures
has tentatively been scheduled to
meet from 2 3 15 on Tuesday and
Thursday but this may be changed
uoon sufficient oemand
BASKETRY
In this beginner's workshop, the
student will be shown how to con
struct baskets using two different
methods � weaving and twinning
Covering handles, manipulating
shapes, and developing a personal
approach to basketry will be ex
plored Baskery. a non credit
workshop offered by Mendenhall,
will be taught on Wednesdays,
March 15. 22. April 5. 12, 19 and 29
from 4 9 pm Class space is
limited so register now at the MSC
Crafts Center
SOULS
Souls will have its annual Miss
Souls Pageant on Sunday. March
28 at 7 p m AM interested ladies
are asked to submit applications
by Friday. Feb 26 to any Soul's of
ficer For further information con
tact Barbara Battle at 758 9550
VARSITY
CHEERLEADER
TRYOUTS
Will be held at 7 p m on Tues
day, March 30 on the mam floor of
Memorial Gym The first practice
session will be held a' 5 p m on
Wednesday, March 17 at the east
end of Mmges Coliseum All guys
and girls interested in trying out
for the 1982 83 squad should be pre
sent at this first practice session
AED
Alpha Epsiion Delta premedical
honor society will meet Tuesday
March 2, 7 30 p m in Flanagan
307 Dr Simmons of the Dapt ot
Psychiatry will be the guest
speaker This meeting is man
datory for all people planning to
attend the convention m New
Orleans All interested people art
nvited to attend
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter o Ph. Sigma Pi Na
t.onal Fraternity will have its
monthly dinner meeting at 6 P m
Wednesday at Parker s
Restaurant on Memorial Dr.ve
The all you can eat dinner is S5
MUSIC MAN
Wanted Singers. Dancers,
Musicians for the Broadway
Musical "Music Man" Tryouts
March 1. 2. 3 at 7:30 p m til done
at Martin Community Auditorium
near Holiday Inn. Williamston.
N.C To be presented May U. 15 at
8 p m by Martin Community
Players Call 792 6144 for more m
formation
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
Come and defend the world'
Mendenhall Student Center has
two now video type games to add
to their recreational area Try
your skill at "Solarquest" and
Vanguard Be prepared to tight
aga'nst evil invaders with
Mendenhails "Defender video
game
RECREATION
"Spring" into action with
recreation at Mendenhall
Specials scheduled throughout the
Spring Semester offer something
for everyone For complete mfor
mation visit the recreational area
at Mendenhall or call 757 Mil,
Ext 260
SKATE FORMS
March 4 from 8 to 10 Cost only
SI includes skate rental Spon
sored by Circle K
FLOOR LOOM
WEAVING II
in this six week class, the stu
dent will begin to explore the uses
of color, texture, and pattern in
the woven item Emphasis will be
made on construction of a gar
ment or other functional items
Floor Loom Weaving ll, a non
credit workshop offered by
MendenhaNI, will be taught on
Thursdays, March 18, 25. April 1.
8, 15, and 22 from 6 9pm Class
space is limited so register now at
the MSC Crafts Center
SPS
The Society of Physics, students
and physics faculty is continuing
their weekly seies of nuclear
power interest with consideration
of nuclear weapons This will be in
coordination with nationally spon
sored Ground Zero Movement dur
mg the week of April 18 25. This
series of nuclear arms will begin
with a film about Einstein and his
inadvertent contribution to
nuclear warfare The film will be
in room E 205 of the Physics
Building if will begin Thursday.
March 4 at 4 30 p.m
BEST TAN
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority will
be sponsoring a "Best Tan" Con
test at the Elbow Room the Tues
day after Spring Break. March 16
So en(oy the sun and fun over Spr
mg Break 1982 and then come
down to the Eibo the 16th and show
us your tan!
GAY&
It you would like to join n a
discussion on homosexuality,
come and get involved in the East
Carolina Gay Community on
March 23 Jim Shay and Kim
Patrick will be leading a discus
sion group Please come and add
your comments Have a wonderful
Spring Break and don't forget the
meeting
DARKROOM
TECHNIQUES
This workshop will provide in
struction mdeveiopmg black and
white film, contact printing,
enlarging techniques, use of
filters, types of paper, and some
basic photographic techniques.
Participants must have a 35mm or
double lens 120 camera to use dur
mg the duration of the workshop
Darkroom Techniques, a non
credit workshop offered by
Mendenhall. will be taught on
Mondays. March 15. 22. 29. and
April 5 from 6 30 9 30 p m Class
space is limited so register now at
the MSC Crafts Center
SKATE ATHON
Skate A Thon sponsored by
Gamma Sigma Sigma Service
Sorority March 28 from 1 p m to 5
p m at Sports World All proceeds
go to the Hospice Program in
Greenville Sponsors are needed
Contact Lou Anne Forbes at
758 8042
FAITH & VICTORY
Do you want to live a victorious
life? You can be totally free from
life's worries and cares through
Jesus Christ, who was your
substitute by bearing all the sms of
mankind on the cross By accep
ting Him as your personal Lord
and Savior you can be totally
made free and have that security
that you are going to Heaven
Faith and Victory Fellowship
meets every Friday night at 7 p m
m Jenkins Auditorium � the Art
Building.
PHI ALPHATHETA
John Broadwater, head of the
Virginia Underwater Archaeology
Research Program will present a
slide show lecture entitled "The
Yorktown Shipwreck Ar
chaeological Proiect A Study of
the Sunken British Fleet at
Yorktown, Virginia on March 3
at Brewster B 104 at 8 p m
Students To Dive For Sunken Ships
Continued From Page 1
will make a map of a
one-mile ocean floor
section, directly off
Cape Lookout. A
magnetically sensitive
device, the proton
magnetometer, will aid
the researchers in
locating potential
sunken ships. If a
target is found, it is
marked and then in-
vestigated by dive
teams.
According to ECU
Maritime Historv Pro-
fessor William N. Still
Jr "the value of
sunken ships is from a
historical point of
view Anything from
clothing, cooking uten-
sils to cannonballs can
reveal significant
historical information.
These ships are in
essence "time cap-
sules
ECU has one of the
two Underwater Ar-
chaeology master's
degrees offered in the
United States. Because
of this, the ECU
Underwater Ar-
chaeological Field
School has attracted
the attention of
students nationwide.
Last summer's Field
School involved 11
students from nine dif-
ferent colleges. Yale,
Penn State, Rhode
Island University, and
Louisiana State Univer-
sity are just a few of the
schools represented by
students attending
ECU's Field School.
A senior- or
graduate-student level
is the only prequisite
for applying for Field
School admission. The
10 to 12 students
ultimately chosen may
come from a wide
variety of scholastic
studies. Students ma-
joring in geography, ar-
See DIVERS, Page 3
SOCIAL WORK
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services at East
Carolina University will offer
courses during the first summer
session of 1982. beginning May 17
and running through June 22.
which will be of interest to protes
sionals m the human service field.
ministers, lay persons, and to
students preparing to enter these
fields
SocW 4001 Death and Dying
deals with loss, bereavement, and
copmg with terminal illness It is
designed to assist m understan
ding of the conditions and pro
biems involved in facing death.
INTERVARSITY
Come Wednesday night to the
intervarsity Christian Fellowship
meeting m MenoenhaH room 221
This week we will discuss the
Ouest.on of Women's Role in
Society with Greg Kennedy
dying and survivorship
Awareness, values, and attitudes
are stressed as they relate to pro
tessional practice
SocW 5001 Human Behavior
and the Social Environment is
designed to assist individuals m
the development of a social
systems concept of the biol
psycho social elements of mans
bemg Emphasis is given to
deeper self awareness of one's
own behavior, attitudes . beliefs
and values as they relate to profes
sionai practice
The courses will meet a
minimum of seven and one half
each week The time will be an
nounced students may be allowed
to indicate scheduling
preferences.
For information about applica
tion andor registration you may
write or call
Department of Social Work and
Correctional Services
School fo Allied Health and
Social Professions
312 Carol Belk Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C 27834
(919 757 6961)
PSI CHI
The national honor society for
psychology maiors, will meet on
Tuesday March 1 at 7 p m in Sp
129 The guest speaker will be Dr
Castellow The topic for the lee
ture will be Sleep and Dreams All
members and interested others
are urged to attend
ILO
The international Language
Organization will be meeting on
March 3 HI room BC 301 The
meeting will be at 2 p m All m
terested peopie are welcome to at
tend and all members are en
couraged to attend
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
w.ll hold .ts next meeting on
March 4, Thursday at 8 p m in the
Mendenhall Center (Hm Wh
Some of the topics discussed win
be the coming of our Lord Jesus
Chnst Everyone s .nv.ted to
come and refreshments w.u be
served at the conclusion ot the
meeting
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
There will be a meeting on Tues
day. March 2 at 7 p m in Brewster
D 313 tor the presentation ot "The
Dialectical inferences of Pure
Reasons" in Kant's CRITIQUE
OF PURE REASON (The
Transcendental Dialectic. Book
II) by Norns Hoggard All in
terested persons are invited to at
tend'
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will meet March 3 at
4 p m m Rawl 130 AH members
are requested to bring money
and or candy Also, any member
interested in attending the state
convention is asked to contact
Janice Irvine
PRCCLUB
Will meet at 7 p m Thursday
March 4 m the PRC Building to
nominate officers Ballots will be
cast Monday and Tuesday. Marcn
15 and 16
LAMP SALE
On Wednesday. Ma'rh 3 at 4
p m on the mall the lampados of
Omega Psi Ph. Fraternity will be
auctioned off to the highest bidder
So come on down to the mall and
buy one of the most unique people
m the world A man who dares to
accept the challenge that Omega
PSi Phi presents to all rnen Cash
on Delivery
JOBS
A speaker from the Carreer
Planning and Placement Service
will be at the Ledona H �
Cultural Center Wednesday.
March 3 at 7 p m Anyone in
terested in summer employment
and iob interviews is inv.ted to at
tend
SUCCESS
Success is getting what i want
Happmess is wanting what l get
Learn the key to Success and hap
pmess Come and iom us every
Tuesday night, 7 p m at
Mendenhall Coffeehouse
NCSL
There will be a mm
N C Student Leg.siatur- or. t
day, March 2, a' ' P � r
Mendenhall 212 Session on book
will be distributed and pians loi
session wm be discussed A-
members and .nterested person-
are welcome
PREPPY PROGRAM
REFUNDS
If you have not ,f '
your tickets tor the OH �l Pre)
py Program w.th Lisa B
(ongmaiiy scheduiec
February 9), rOu must 00 SO by
Friday March 19 �
rour refund by brmflti .
ticket by 'he Centra' T.ret O" �
,n Mendenhall MoncM,
Friday from 10 a m tc 4 p n
-mere will be NO � I
March 19 Aga '
the cancellation
LATTER DAY SAINTS
Studem i spot
mg a free film arc retr. �
every Tuesday evening at
Mendenhall Coffeehouse
rftts wee A M
Build Temples n '
,Oih us' For more .nformd'
752 7344 or 757 3748
BALOON A GRAM
Send that special someone a
baloon a gram on St Patrick's
Day Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority
will be selling these baloon a
grams in front of the Student Store
from 9 2. March 2 5 and March 15
4. 16 and will deliver on March 17
to all campus locations ano to an
fraternity and sorority houses
Surprise your little elf on St
Patrick's Day1
I I I I I I I I
auitiiiii
I I TT
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800-321-0575
SunThurs. 11:00-11:00
FriSot. 11:00-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
mm
m
Current und�rgraduott pre
medical iiudtnii may now compete
tor several hundred Air Force
ickolartkipt TTvete ickolonkipi ore
to be avorded to students accepted
into medicai schools os tresnmen or
at tke beainrmg of rtveir sophomore
yea Tke scholarship prov�des rot
tuition, books, lab tees ond equip
ment. plus a 5530 monthly
aflovonce Investigate tins financial
alternative to the high cost ot
medicol education
Contact
I .S Vr Hr K TH
PROrKNMOVs
Rr( HI HIM,
Swte GL 1. 1100 No. ah o t
Roievgh. N C 27M9
�fcarvo College 91 9 7 55-4 I 34
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
11
mm
inquire at
Evons Seafood I
Game
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Free Delivery
From 5:00 to 12:00
Midnight Daily
Every Day - BuHat 11:00-2:00279
�9 RO
Mon. & Tues. - Buffet SKKWKW M1
Wed. - "All You Con Eat" Spaghetti 5:00-8:00 '2.25
FREE DELIVERY ON CAMPUS
HB��������
The Media Board is now accepting applications
for Media Heads for all Student Publications
for 1982-83.
Please pick up applications in the Media
Board office in the Publications Bldg. � 2nd
Floor.
M�F 8-1 or 2-5
Deadline for accepting
applications is March 1.
PWtcwr4
7AWUAlw
ADD �82�
nrf-
v ring Gift CDMPcnnow
l�
$ jO-ALfttf N � T-QUlKr-ftOQ � QjT4 �m
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wm mm v Rounds
no AIUN -PAS3 � DINNB?
Pizza Inn
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
MonSun. 1-1:30-2:00 $2.69
Mon. & Tues. 6:00-8:30 $2.89
WMCKaFQ: 75t'4&0Ti��. MOUSE
4m& -Qm$WSP&D� rtOwtOtoG
tf
WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
LARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
GARLIC BREAD $188 � aA
BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR $.49
Hwy. 264 Bypass, Greenville
SAMMY'S
COUNTRY
COOKING
f
Just Opened!
Conveniently located
at 512 E. 14th St.
Hours: from ll:00a.m9:00p m.
TAKEOUT ORDERS-
PHONE 752-0476
Specializing in good old fashioned cooking
Fried & BBQ Chicken, Chicken Pastry,
Country Style Steak, BBQ Ribs, Spaghetti,
Pork Chops, Roast Beef, and many other
items.
Look for our Doily Special priced at
ONLY K � �
Come on by and check out our generous
portions and see our free refill plan.
fTar Landing Seafood
ResUarut
Ap:r. Rul
StmbtUU. Berk OkUu
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left ot 1st Light
Located one block down on left
SPECIAUZES IN:
RESUMES
and
THESES
DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
In The Georgetown Shops
Good Tuesday
& Wednesday
ONLY
� Copies Cost 6C to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 M-F 9-2 Sat
758-2400
Haul
Stan
a'ter
I
"wdi
polil
a po
adm
I
Hai
I
I
41
I
I
)
I
� �
I
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 2, 1982
Haitian Refugees Find United States Shores Unfriendly
Continued From Page 1
Some U.S officials claim the
Haitians only come to the United
States for economic reasons in an
attempt to flee the widespread
poverty of Haiti, the poorest coun-
try inthe Western Hemisphere.
According to U.S. immigration
policy, an illegal alien must have a
"vs ell-founded fear of persecution"
� based on race, religion or
political opinion � to be considered
a political refugee, the grounds for
admission to the United States.
Official policy enforcement has
historically been limited, often en-
tirely disregarded, until the recent
Haitian boat situation received
widespread attention.
Haiti lies orj the western half of
the island of Hispanola � the
Dominican Republic is on the east
� and is ruled by President Jean-
Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier.
Under the rule of Jean-Claude's
father, Francois "Papa Doc"
Duvalier, many reports of human
rights violations were documented
(1957-71). In this era the Ton-Ton
Macoutes secret police was formed.
The Macoutes were reportedly used
to squash any resistence to the
Duvalier government.
A 1979 Inter-American Commis-
sion on Human Rights report found
that numerous people had been ex-
ecuted or died during incarceration,
cases of torture were reported, legal
safeguards were restricted and basic
economic and social rights were
nonexistent due to extreme poverty.
"Hundreds of journalists and
other persons" have been missing
"as a result of the work of the Ton-
Ton Macoutes Chisholm said.
He ("Baby Doc" Duvalier) will
kill you, put you in jail Obas said
of people who criticize the Haitian
government. "I don't believe
Duvalier has any interest in the Hai-
tian people
Obas cited the large numbers of
refugees as proof that "the same
situation still remains" under the
government of Baby Doc. "Maybe
worse than it was before he con-
tinues.
Chisholm said trfe reason the U.S.
treats Haitian aliens differently is
"because we have a positive
diplomatic relationship with a right-
wing repressive regime She said
she believes that even refugees from
a communist government would not
have many of the same entrance
problems.
Jean-Juste adds that Haiti is a
fascist criminal government far
worse than that of Cuba or Poland.
"It's discrimination, in a sense
said Peloquin, "that they seem to
treat the Haitians in a different way
than they do the other nationalities
that have been coming in
Obas claimed that Haitians are
political as well as economic
refugees. "They don't have no
education; they don't have
anything he said. Obas urged the
U.S. to discontinue giving aid to
Duvalier, because Obas feels the
poor never see the money.
"The only government they (the
U.S.) support is a dictator who goes
around killing people for nothing
'Dramatic Starvation' Said To Kill 50,000 Daily
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
stiff Wrilff
"Fifty thousand peo-
ple die every day from
'dramatic starvation
that's one person every
6 to 8 seconds said
Ed King, the director of
CROP for North and
South Carolina.
CROP was founded
as an emergency relief
project. The words that
made up the acronym
are no longer used, but
CROP is now the
organizational arm of
Church World Service
(CWS), which oversees
economic relief and
development aid to
third world countries.
CWS is made up of
protestant churches
throughout the United
States.
King said there was a
cleaT gospel mandate
for Christians to "feed
the hungry" during his
presentation to the
monthly Greenville
Ministerial Meeting at
the First Christian
Church Monday.
King was in Green-
ville to help promote
the 11th Annual "Walk
for Humanity" which
will be under the spon-
sorship of CROP for
the first time. "I'm
pleased that Greenville
and the university have
gotten together on the
CROP walk King
said.
Braxton 's A ctions Criticized
Continued From Page 1
have written the note to incite him
to action so he would "look bad" if
he were to run for SGA president
for next year.
"But 1 don't even have any plans
to run. I did until last December,
but then I changed my mind
Greer pointed out that despite the
fact that the resolution did not get
the necessary two-thirds vote for
adoption, "the bill is still on the
floor Furthermore, Greer said
that in committee, a simple majority
is needed to pass a resolution.
In further business at the meeting.
the SGA discussed the possibility of
Sen. John East speaking on campus
during the Handicapped Awareness
Week (April 5 through 8).
Among several other actions by
the legislature, Chuck Blake was ap-
proved as the 1982 elections
chairperson.
Also, a resolution for support of
Greenville merchants was approved.
This resolution calls for the support
of the SGA in the "collection ef-
forts of the merchants of Greenville
and in prosecuting these irresponsi-
ble students if debts (from the
writing of worthless checks) remain
uncollected
CROP promotes
"Integrated Rural
Development" � self-
help relief projects that
include "appropriate
technology" with a
below-5-percent
overhead for ad-
ministrative costs.
King said one fourth
of all deaths in the
world are of children
under six years of age.
"Kids equal security"
in a labor-intensive
agricultural economy
with no social security
for parents when they
grow old, King added.
"700,000 North
Carolinians were
malnourished 40
percent of all pre-
school kids were
malnourished. -That's
one out of every seven
in North Carolina
King said, citing a 1975
nutrition survey.
He added that due to
food stamps, W1C
(Women, Infants, and
Children) and AFDC
(Aid for Families With
Dependent Children)
the situation had pro-
I
bably improved
dramatically, but "why
don't we have one (a
new survey) now?"
King said that "New
Federalism the
newly-coined term for
the Reagan budget,
wouldn't want to show
that Social Programs
were "really doing
what they're supposed
to
King challenged "the
government as a peo-
ple" and the churches
to stop supporting
"huge expenditures"
for military build-up
and "to take a stand"
against it.
He said the root
cause of hunger is
poverty and that some
poverty stemmed from
injustice in the division
of land and resources.
He added that many
military projects use up
vital resources and this
was one of the causes
of injustices.
The CROP Walk For
Humanity is scheduled
for April 3. The walk is
a 20 kilometer (12.6
mile) route through the
streets of Greenville.
Obas said. "The Haitian people
should realize they don't have the
United States behind them. The
United States is behind Duvalier
Despite promises from immigra-
tion and government officials,
prison-like conditions at the refugee
centers continue.
They're just sitting there all day
with-nothing to do Peloquin said.
Hunger strikes and attempted
suicides have been frequent at the
camps. Numerous riots have taken
place outside the Krome Ave. camp,
as the otherwise-passive mood of
the Haitian people has become more
noticeably militant.
"Practically all of the Haitians
have sponsors in Miami and
elsewhere Peloquin said. A spon-
sor is typically a family member or
friend who can give the refugee a
permanent place to live and help in
starting 1 new life.
"If the administration wanted to
release them, they would have some
place to go Obas said.
Haitian-Americans and various
support agengies are calling for the
abolition of the camps. "The camps
should be closed down and never
reopened Obas continued.
"They're just taking their time in
doing this kind of work Peloquin
adds, referring to the legal hearings
a refugee is entitled to. "We have a
whole group of lawyers in Miami
trying to find some legal way of get-
ting these people out, but they
haven't succeeded
More recent policies suggested by
the Reagan administration include
moving all refugees to an unused
Army base near the Canadian
border in upstate New York.
Critics have compared this sug-
gestion with Russian exiles being
sent to Siberia. A policy of intradic-
tion at sea is also being im-
plemented.
Under this policy, a U.S. Coast
Guard vessel can stop a boatful of
refugees, process the cases right
away through an interpreter and
send the boat back if they decide
against granting political refugee
status to the passengers.
Chisolm called intradiction
"some kind of kangaroo court set
up
Some Coast Guard personnel
believe that some boats may have
sunk without discovery.
"When we picked up the
newspapers Chisolm concluded,
"and we saw these 10 black bodies
sprawled across the front page,
when they were washed up on the
shores that morning, there was no
outcry in this country; they were
black. America, we can't let this
happen
SP0BTSW0BLD
756-6000
MIME
FOCLOT
fa .
and � time
when every message
and every momento
Is cherished
c
for the finest In
ddlng stationery
come to
Morgan Printers, Inc
311 Wot 9th 5�reit
GrtiBTtllc. NC �7B&
758-51B1

flP
Something
Personal To Say9
Whisper It In
Our Classilieds
9
8
m
i
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's)
M
I
M
Tuesday Night - �
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 wID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students ate admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
O
1
Divers To Search For Sunken
Ships In Atlantic Graveyard
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks. Camping Equip-
ment. Steal Toed Shoes,
Dishes and over 704 Different
Items. Cowboy Boots S3� �5
ARMY-NAVY
STORE W'S Evans
Continued From Page 2
chaeology, history or
any other area of study
are encouragd to "fuse
together knowledge
from the different
disciplines" in an effort
to maximize research
potential. Still said.
He added that of the
10 to 12 students
chosen to participate in
the Underwater
Research, "I would
prefer to have five or
six ECU students
Still, who was presi-
dent of the Monitor
Research Foundation,
said, "Field schools are
fun; you work hard and
play hard Students
get a firsthand impres-
sion of what under-
water research is all
about, Still said, ad-
ding that because the
research is historically
valuable, their efforts
are meaningful.
"Underwater Ar-
chaeology is just now
developing Still said.
"There are thousands
of sunken ships that
could be in our rivers,
sounds and harbors
In the summer of
1980, the Field School
received world-wide
publicity when a
Revolutionary War
vessel was discovered in
the Edenton harbor.
This archaeological
find was featured in the
Pans Tribune.
Still said he would
like to commemorate
the 400th anniversary
of the Lost Colony by
conducting the 1984
Field School off the
Roanoke Island coast,
where the colony was
located. The objective
of this research would
be to find the original
remains of the settle-
ment, which are believ-
ed to be underwater
due to erosion.
Students interested in
the 1982 Field School
can contact William
Still or Gordon Watts
in the history depart-
ment.
SEA OATS MOTEL
702 South Ocean Blvd.
Myrtle Beach, S. C. 29577
STUDENTS! Plan your Spring Break
now! For reservations and information
call
(803) 448-8494
Now Booking For Easter Vacation
1
liW;Mii
lllsV 4TH STREET PHONE lit 0704
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
7 DOORS FROM COX FLORIST
We repair Shoes, Boots, Hand
bags, Belts and some suitcases.
We now have Leather and
Leather Goods for sell.
Large selection of leather tooled belts
Come bv. Pt �u' ont o� oor designs Let
us make you one.
Witn the price ot NEW SHOES, we can
save you money by having your old ones
repaired
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
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ALL GOLD & SILVER
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CHINA i. CRYSTAL
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HKMONY MOUSt SOUTH) PHONE 7523866
YOUR PROFESSION AL PIRM ANfMT DIALER
mzznznnznnznzEmnnzzzm
Cliffs Specials
rr mJ Located 1
1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tues. & Wed.
POPCORN
SHRIMP
2.95
A PLATE
"ALL YOU CAN EAT
POPCORN SHRIMP, OCEAN PERCH
AND CRAB CAKES
MIX OR MA TCH
5.99
I
s
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s
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!
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V
� SOUTHS �6� ROCK NIGHTCLUB
TUESDAY
� HARRY & SCRAPPY;
WEDNESDAY
ARTIMUS PYLE
Former member of
Lynyrd Skynyrd
THURSDAY
NEW YORK FLYERS;
FRI. ANDSAT.
NO VACANCY
SUNDAY
SIDEWINDER
�WW�atW��f ?�?�??�???
gte
MONDAY - COUNTRY COOKING
- $2.99
TUESDAY- PIZZA BUFFET
LADIES NITE wMIKE EDWARDS
WEDNESDAY - SALAD BAR
SPECIAL
THURSDAY - SPAGHETTI SPEC.
$2.49
MOUNTAIN JOHN - former
Gong SHow winner
FRIDAY - HAPPY HOUR - 4-7
SATURDAY - HAPPY HOUR - 4-7
SUNDAY - LASAGNA SPEC. $299
WEDNESDAY
BILLY PRICE
&
THE KEYSTONE
RHYTHM BAND
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY TKE BOXING
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
BULLPEN NITE
lt beverage � lie wticket stub
from ECU baseball game � Thurs March 4
FRIDAY
END OF WK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
MBgnagnzz2ZZzzzzzzz2zzzzzzzzzzz

Open
Mon Sat
1:30am
1.09a.m.
It takes 12 inches
to make a hero . . .
Deli Sandwiches - Setae's -
Vegitorion SondwicHes
4o�.i?i"�a Soups � Heroes on tresMy tooted rests
Live Music
Is Back!
MARCH 3rd
DAVID GARRY
MARCH 4th
LAUGHING MATTER
(Progressive Rock)
9:00 p.m1 a.m.
Good Food � Good Times
VIDEOGAMES
Attitude Adjustment Daily � � p.m7 p.m
(SUjapfrrX
"Eastern North Carolina's
No. 1 Beach Club"
TUESDAY
Zoo Nile � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies' Night
Free Draft for
all ladies'
THURSDAY
Happy Hour � Free
Free Admission till to
25C Ponies till 11.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY
SUNDAY
NICKEL NITE
Call m-ms for user into �
nfftEBJ1
10? E. 5th St. 752 1361
GOOD TIMES
HAPPY
HOUR
4-7
FREE PINBALL
MONDAY 3-4
Now 5p� j day a ��e � 3 p.m. l a.m.
frLULr. M
IH EAST Stti STREET
'SJ �711
Cartoon Contest
Call for details �752-8711
NOW OPEN FOR
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY AT 4:30
Not open to the general public
1
T
r

I





1
i
OW?e �aat (Earnlittian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, Eduorinchte
Charles Chandler, �����Editor
RlC BROWNING, Director oj Advertising TOM HALL, Sews Editor
Fielding Miller. Business Manager
ALISON BARTEL, Production Manager
Steve Moore, csmwm Manager
William Yelverton, spans Editor
STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Diane Anderson,
March 2 ,1982
Opinion
Page 4
Tourney Time
Pirates Can Make Amends
The last two weeks have not been
kind to the East Carolina men's
basketball team. The Pirates have
lost five consecutive games in the
ECAC-South, resulting in a last
place finish in the conference.
Subsequently, ECU is seeded
seventh for this weekend's con-
ference championship tournament.
The winner of the tourney will ad-
vance to the Eastern Regionals of
the NCAA Tournament.
What has been the Pirates' pro-
blem of late? The club seems to
have lost its intensity, especially on
defense. Opponents scoring in the
80's against the Bucs has become
commonplace. Shooting percen-
tages of foes have also skyrocketed.
Meanwhile, the Pirate offense has
floundered. Shooting percentages
are down, as are point totals.
On the road, ECU has been met
with a great deal of "ribbing" late-
ly. Opponents' fans have made fun
of the Pirates both with words and
laughter.
Very depressing, right? Right!
But. there is still the tournament. It
is there � at Norfolk's fabulous
Scope � that the Pirates can make
amends for all that has gone wrong,
for all the jokes and snickers that
have come their way.
No matter who is at fault in the
team's slump � whether it be
coaches, players or both � the con-
ference tournament provides the
club with a chance to stand up and
be heard.
Watching the Pirates play recent-
ly has not been very pleasant. The
fact is, though, that the team is
capable of playing a good brand of
DOONESBURY
basketball. Enough talent is on
hand to pull off the big upset in this
weekend's tourney. Surely, this will
not be easy, but it can be done.
To the players and coaches, we
say start with PRIDE. Pride in
yourselves, the school and students
you represent. It cannot be very
rewarding getting on a bus, trekking
to a strange coliseum, getting your
ass beat, and returning home with
your head down.
The time has come for the Pirates
to raise their heads. There appears
to be at least a degree of dissention
on the club, as was evidenced by
Charles Watkins' (starting guard)
leaving the team last week. That
dissention, if it exists, has no place
now, not at the end of the season.
This is what the team has sup-
posedly worked for all season. This
is what everyone was so excited
about at the beginning of the year
� a legitimate chance to reach the
NCAA's. Just think, ECU playing
in the NCAA Tournament. Whew!
What a thought.
We are not asking for miracles
and we are not saying that we will
settle for anything less than a con-
ference championship. What we are
saying is that we want and expect a
respectable showing in the ECAC-
South tournament. We know that
the ECU basketball team is capable
of coming through.
So, fellas, hold your heads up.
And don't forget the abuse that has
come your way over the last two
weeks.
Remember: you represent an en-
tire university, one that doesn't like
to be laughed at.
by Garry Trudeau
- ?
(
A UIHAT5
HIS PROBLEM
HESAVSWRE
MRS 60RSVCH �r)v
TW.YOu
saw
AUFUL1
haveyou
3E�Nf!�P
CSi
l�'j
NO, BUT TTS JUST A
mum of time rck
she getting reapy to
lav offanother 750
or so employees the
AG0VCYS
being vec-
U1H0SHE
TAiKJNGTD'
tw.i'hjust
arowthe
aXfRCAH
'WEMEETH
FRONTOF
WRBUKP-
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau
TEN BUCKS7 rTSNOTMY
THAT'S Alt YOU FAULT YOUR.
HAVE f THREE OTHER. HASSEN -
PAYS ON THE OERSpROPt?
0PEr SEA FOR
m bucks r
OUT SIR
LOOK. LETS
FORGETTHE
WHOLE THING,
FELLAH' THIS
IS AH INSULT
NOttl, ST. A PEAj,
ISAPEAL HJE
HAVE OVU. REPU-
TATION TO CON-
SPER HERE
BESiPES, f- MR PETfT-POlS HAS AN
EQJOABLE CHARTER VM SURE
HE'LL MAKE IT UP TO US IN THE
WORP-OF-MOUTH CErVRTMENT LETS
JUST THINK OF THIS RUN AS A
LSADER
LOSS
LEAVER'
UEOUME
ABOARP,
SIR CANI
GETYOU
ANYTHING'
YEAH.lU
TAKEA
BEERIF
YOU HAVE
ONE
U)eHer'5
$�
k
A SPOILED CHILD
PRODIGY WHO
NEVER GREW UP.
ALWAYS WRITES HIS
OWN TEXTBOOKS.
WHATEVER THE
TOPIC, HE ALWAYS
LECTURES ON ONE
SUBECT: HIMSELF.
&2-TH� BAST CAROLINIAN
Ebony Herald Firings Explained
BY SAFARI MATHENGE
EDITOR'S NOTE: Safari Mathenge
served as news editor of The Ebony
Herald until he and other staff members
were fired by Editor Debra Wiggins.
Last week, Wiggins resigned her post,
saying there is no interest on campus for
the publication.
In response to Debra Wiggins' vindic-
tive statements in the Feb. 25 issue of
The East Carolinian, I am forced �
with good reason- � �to throw a little
light on the case concerning the fired
staff that Wiggins' found to be a conve-
nient scape-goat for her own inability to
edit and manage The Ebony Herald
Approximately a half dozen months
ago, during the summer of 1981, I met in
a purely coincidential manner a
dedicated young man by the name of
Edward Nesbitt. "I have a bone to pick
with you" he declared. The subject of
his conversation � "a rebirth of the
Ebony Herald a minority publication
that would represent the individual in-
terests of the different minority com-
ponents of the East Carolina Unversity
Student Body.
Having been a student here for no
more than a semester at that time, I was
unfamiliar with such a publication. But
having been enlightened by A. G. Kelly's
assertion that "the way to get at the
nature of any institution as anything else
that is alive, is to see how it has grown
Mr. Nesbitt and I back-tracked to ex-
amine the historical background of the
then-defunct publicaton. All evidence
indicated that zealous dedication and
organization on the part of the editorial
staff and management would be a
necessary pre-requisite fo the establish-
ment of such a publication.
Tactical and strategic public relations
methods were to be employed in order to
generate public interest. We realized that
the very existence of the publication
would be based on student participation.
From the very start we sought to
achieve this goal. Indeed, even during
those infant months for the publication,
mere conversations with students gave
us what we regarded as "positive
developmental focus" for the paper.
The months that followed strengthened
our commitments to the establishment
of the publication. Unpaid volunteer
writers were eager to join the staff until
such time that the paper could afford to
pay them.
An editorial staff, although rustic and
Campus
Spectrum
wanting in some aspects, worked
together harmoniously and toward a
common goal.
Of course, we encountered many un-
foreseen challenges and headaches, but
with the dedicated leadership of
Associate Editor Nesbitt and that of the
talented cartoonist-writer John Weyler,
business manager Donna Wiyley, not to
mention the indispensible staff writers,
The Ebony Herald was reborn once
again after three years of non-
production.
Thus a baby newspaper had been
born, editorless though it was; it had
been born.
I do not intend to foster boredom here
by way of historical baackground, but I
thought a little insight to the origins of
our threatened publication would help.
When the eve of our second publica-
tion approached, the Media Board, with
all the wisdom embodied in it,
designated Debra Wiggins the editor-in-
chief of the Ebony Herald.
Relieved, we acknowledged our new
editor and after business as usual
(briefings and management procedures)
we sought to advise her on matters that
we had found necessary to the welfare of
the paper. We warned of the delicacy
and sensitive nature of the staff (given
the volunteer nature of it). The editorial
staff, we suggested, must slowly build
interest on the part of the writing staff,
not in a strictly business manner, but in
such a manner as would be employed in
a small family undertaking. To me, this
seemed the best possible policy given the
nature of the project we had at hand.
After the paper was Firmly established,
only then could we conduct business as
usual.
We intended for the Ebony Herald to
be the axis upon which unity and
cooperation could be reached among the
different minorities and the student
body.
Such suggestions are the basic reasons
for Debra Wiggins' remark that "they
did not want to work for me
As soon as she took office, Wiggins'
leadership qualities came to question.
Staff tensions began to grow at an alar-
ming rate. When we (the editorial staff)
Campus Forum
Silva's Analysis Draws Reservations
I am writing in response to Patrick
O'Neil's article on the "Sixth Peace
Vigil at Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base
Mr. O'Neil, thank you for your pro-
vocative and timely presentation of the
Nuclear disarmament issue. There are,
however, a few reservations that 1 would
have regarding Sam Silva's analysis of
the arms race. Mr. Silva seems to feel
that the United States is deliberately ac-
celerating the arms race in an attempt to
weaken the Soviet economy. There is a
certain amount of factual information
to support this claim. For instance, the
fact that the Soviet Union accepted, in-
principle, a British, French, American
proposal to disarm down to internal
police forces in 1955.
There are, never-the-less, certain facts
which would seem to militate against the
view that the United States is solely to
blame for the arms race. The Soviet
Union has a history of aggression in
Hungary, Chechoslavakia, and
Afghanistan. It can be aserted that these
countries simply, became satellite coun-
tries of the USSR after World War II
and that the Soviets, wishing to maintain
a buffer zone between themselves and
hostile neighbors, took action to protect
their interests.
This bit of hypothesis, however, does
not convince everyone. At the other ex-
treme of the ideological spectrum are
people who maintain that the Soviets are
bent upon uncompromising world
domination, because of V.I. Lenin's
doctrine of exporting the Communist
revolution and Nkaita Khrushchev's
statement, "We will bury you which
he addressed to capitalists in general.
When posing the question of whether'
or not to trust the USSR we are Taced
with a dilemma. When contemplating
the issue of the arms race we are con-
fronted with nuclear holocaust.
If we continue 6n our present course
we are assuming that the Mutually
Assured Destruction approach to main-
taining world peace makes sense. This,
however, fails to take terrorist activities
and technological errors which might
trigger a holocaust into account. If the
citizens, on the other hand, coalesce
around this issue without facts their ef-
forts are doomed to failure.
I distrust efforts at propogandizing
issues that are vital to humanity (like
disarmament) either by the right or the
left. Many foreigners who I have spoken
with assert that the American media has
a pronounced right-wing bias particular-
ly in relation to the USSR. But, my
parents and parents of friends who have
lived through the burgeoning of the pre-
sent arms race insist that the United
States has been far too soft to the
Soviets, especially during the last
decade.
I believe that disarmament is a real
possibility. And I further believe that it
is the citizens who must bring it about,
whether through disarmament initiatives
like the one in California or petitions
and letter writing. There is a peace
movement in the Soviet Union. There is
a Peace movement in the United States.
We all want peace. What need is a ra-
tional non-advocacy approach to study-
ing this issue so that we can bring it
about. Hoepfully, students can be in-
stumental in this.
JAY STONE
Political Sci.
warned her of the forthcoming
dissatisfaction among the staff wril
and the clear lack of foresight in her
policy of dictatorial-editorship, she
demanded the voluntary resignatio:
the editorial staff. She threatened
eventually fixed the entire staff of the
paper. The Media Board, again with ail
its wisdom, upheld this acton at
alarm of the entire minority student
body.
The interest that we had conscious
built for the paper slowly dwindled. In
my opinion, this was mainly due to
of public relations between the paper
and the people it was supposed to repre-
sent.
There was, of course, no conscious
fort on the part of the "fired staff" to
initiate a "boycott" ol the publicat
as Wiggins charged.
For instance, advertising in am
publication or media is a purely business
and public relation issue. How can W g
gins blame withdrawal of advertising
support on a non-participating "fired"
staff? In essence, Wiggins alienated the
minority business in the surrounding
area. This was done by m tailing to ap-
point a minority advertising manage
someone who could be easily identified
with the minority publication and hence
elicit generous contributions and sup-
port form the minority businesses whose
advertising constituted over 90 percent
of all advertising income.
To me, such a fatal and tactless lack
of insight is enough to destroy even the
most flourishing newspaper.
Furthermore, any newspaper editor in
any given community must command
high respect as a knowledgeable and
potential leader of that commmunity,
not a mere figurehead who cannot ad-
dress the issues of the day.
But I do not intend to indulge in mere
defensive rhetoric here. If The Ebony
Herald is to survive, its active participa-
tion in the daily lives of the minontv
students here and elsewhere must be its
major priority. Effective public relation-
must be formulated. An effective editoi
� one in touch with the reality as envi
sioned by the minority student body foi
whom the publication is intended ��
must be put into office.
Wiggins' observation that "no one is
interested" and that "there is no need
for a minority publication here" is a
clear indication of her lack of know ledge
concerning the needs that face minoritv
students here.
Many years ago one of the founding
fathers of this country, announced cor-
rectly that "Journalism is literature in a
hurry Is literature a collection of a
society's ethnicity and tradition?
Finally, such an assertion that we do
not need a minority publication here, is
to me, an unforgiveable deprivation of
opportunity to those students who
would like to learn the basics of jour-
nalism and the power that ensues from
the freedom of expression.
In her experience as a newspaper
editor, I am sure, Wiggins has learned
the difficulties involved with the
business in a manner different from
what she would have experienced other-
wise. She had a chance to formulate
answers to problems that faced The
Ebony Herald, but instead chose to flee.
There are able leaders among us and 1
am sure one will come forth and
vigorously provide the leadership we so
desperately need.
I suggest that a high-level convention
among aH the minority groups on this
campus be initiated. From there, ways
and means for establishing a sound
publication that will represent their in-
terest should be established. Should the
Media Board again be left to nominate a
new editor for The Ebony Herald, a
mistake similar to those in the past is
likely to occur.
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IHt t AST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 2. I9K2
Page 5
Award Winner
'Moscow' On
For Tomorrow
Irina Muravxna (left) and era Alenlova in a scene from '81 Academy Award winner Moscow Does Sot Relieve in Tears.
ByJOHNWEYLER
Maff Mrilrr
Tommorow evening at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present
Russia's Moscow Does Sot Believe
in Tears.
The film was the 1981 winner of
the Academy Award for Best
Foreign Film. Vladimir Menshov's
tale is a humorous, appealing slice
�f Soviet life. The film focuses on
fhe lifestyles and loves of three
young women, an examination of
their aspirations and attitudes.
The three are Antonina (Raisa
Ryazanova), Liudmila (Irina
Muravyova), and Katerina (Vera
Alentova), country girls who have
come to the big city, Moscow, in
search of work and romance. We
first see them in the late 1950's, then
twenty years later.
Antonia is a sweet and simple per-
son who settles down to middle-
class suburbia Moscow-style with a
safe, stolid man. Liudmila is a more
flighty, flashy type; a social climber.
She and Katerina take over a rich
relative's apartment in his absence
and throw a formal dinner party in
hopes of attracting some
distinguished gentlemen.
Liudmila nets herself a soccer
star, but later divorces him when he
takes to the bottle.
Katerina is the sensible, studious
one. Though she allows herself to be
seduced and abandoned by a man
she meets at the party, she manages
to raise their illegitimate child by
herself and work her way up to be
manager of the factory she labors
in. She eventually finds romance in
the person of Gosha (Alexei
Batalov), the personification of the
Russian "Mr. Right
This sensitive, amusing sketch of
USSR lifestyles is a departure from
the main-stream of Russian film,
which is best known for the power-
ful propoganda pictures of Eisens-
tein and Pudovkin. Moscow Does
Not Believe In Tears rather
resembles the Hollywood working-
girl comedies of the 1930's and 40's,
See RUSSIAN, Page 7
Fondas Discover New Life 'On Golden Pond'
B CORBY Kl'MMF.R
W nl�rv Mm
LAKE WINNIPESAUKEE, N.H. � Jane Fonda
wanted a friend. Not just any friend, but a man she had
nevei worked with before � her father � with whom
she filmed On Golden Pond (now playing at Green-
ville's Plitt Entertainment Center). Most of their dif-
ferences had vanished with age. but Henry and Jane
Fonda grew closer on the New Hampshire movie set,
where the intenseiv focused script required them to play-
bitter father-daughter scenes that finally led to recon-
ciliation.
As it her problems with her father weren't enough �
her way of working is quite different from his. and the
difference makes her ashamed � she worried about
making another friend. This was someone she had never
met, someone who would plav her mother, someone
who terrifies Miss Fonda. Her name is Katharine Hep-
burn.
In On Golden Pond. Jane Fonda plays Chelsea
Thaver. the only child of a college professor, Norman
Thaver Jr who wanted a son. As the film opens,
Chelsea arrives, after a long absence, at the lakeside cot-
tage where the family always spends the summer. It is
Norman's 80th birthday, and he is convinced that he has
become sharp and unpleasant to his understanding wife,
Ethel (Miss Hepburn).
Cinema
Chelsea has brought along her fiance and his 10-year-
old son. With the help of the boy. who during the rest of
the summer revitalizes him. and his humocous wife,
Norman reconciles himself both to his daughter and to
enjoying the rest of his life.
The story is simple, but the emotions it provoked in
its lead actors were not. "The day of m big scene with
my father I was nauseous all day long Jane Fonda
says, seated on the floor of the cottage set. "1 was sick. 1
had a headache, I couldn't eat. Things were coming
from way deep down that 1 couldn't handle. It was an
incredibly intense experience for me
The scene she refers to takes place in a rowboat on the
lake, where Chelsea finally screws up her courage and
tells her father that she needs to talk to him.
"It's so hard for Chelsea to say this Miss Fonda
says. "He tries to avoid her by saying something nastv
like, 'You're worried about the will, huh? Don't worry.
you're getting everything 1 move down to sit next to
him and say, '1 don't want anything " Chelsea's voice
catches, then she says, "We've been mad at each other
for so long Norman says, "I didn't know we were still
mad at each other. 1 thought we just didn't like each
other
"I reached out to take his arm Miss Fonda says of
her father, "and I felt him shudder, because he wasn't
expecting it. He's not an emotional actor, and everyone
on the crew saw it She whispers, "I took his arm and I
said, T want to be your friend and I felt him trying to
keep the teais back
She stops for a moment and regains her own com-
posure. "It was a great moment. It was a moment of
such intimacy between the two of us I don't even care
what it looks like on the screen
While she must be drawn out on the subject of her
father, Miss Fonda can't stop talking about how much
meeting Katharine Hepburn has meant to her.
"I sense from her someone who is a treasure chest
Miss Fonda says. "She's just filled with wisdom,
knowledge and insights. And she loves to pass them cm.
You're never No. 1 in this business forever, and most
people on the way down get bitter, alienated and
downright crazy. So to find somebodv who's remained
intact is rare. She has a real perspective to her life
See FONDAS. Page 6
Rocketing Rocker
Rod Stewart Back To Basics
By ROBFRTPAI MFR
New ��r1� 1 imrs Nrw Nervier
M V YORK � The history of rock 'n' roll is essen-
tiallv a rags-to-riches story, the music of poor whites
and poor blacks merged in the mid-50s to become the
most popular music in America.
Performers from poor or middle-class backgrounds
have risen to undreamed-of pinnacles of stardom and
earned substantial fortunes through rock 'n' roll �
from Elvis Presley, who was living with his parents in
federally subsidized housing in Memphis when he made
his first record, to Rod Stewart, who grew up in
working-class North London, the son of a Scottish-born
construction worker.
Music
Stewart, now 36-years-old, supported himself as a
street singer and grave digger before becoming one of
the most popular and distinctive rock singers of the
70s He now lives as a tax exile from Britain in the
Holmbv Hills area of Los Angeles, where his neighbors
have included Gregory Peck and Burt Reynolds.
There is such a thing as too much success for a rock
star Elvis Presley's music grew more predictable after
he became a multimillionaire. Mick Jagger's entry into
the upper crust of jet-set society in the m.d70s com-
promised the Rolling Stones' credibility and co.ncided
with the band's musical low point. And Stewart (who
will perform at Greensboro Coliseum tonight at 8 p.m.)
has been attacked by critics and younger rock musicians
for his lavish Hollywood way of living, which reached a
pinnacle of sorts during the late '70s when his former
girlfriend, Britt Ekland, sued him for $15 million in
"palimony � . .
Stewart's responses were an out-of-court settlement
and a phenomenally successful album called Blondes
Have More Tun � the title referred to his penchant for
blondes, from Miss Ekland to Alana Hamilton, the ac-
tress he married in 1978. The album included a song
called "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?" that became a huge in-
ternational hit; but was also a fall from rock 'n' roll
grace into the banal shallows of disco.
It was seized on by Stewart's detractors as proof that
his songwriting had deteriorated markedly since the ear-
ly and middle '70s, when he wrote or co-wrote "Maggie
May "Tonight's the Night and several other songs
that were artistic triumphs as well as commercial suc-
cesses.
But like the Rolling Stones, who bounced back this
year with a superb new album and an American tour
that has been garnering enthusiastic reviews at almost
every stop Stewart seems to have found his second
wind. Tonight I'm Yours (Warner Bros.), his latest
album, is his most consistent and satisfying LP since the
early '70s when Gasoline Alley and Every Picture Tells a
Story established him as one of rock's most gifted
singers and songwriters.
When he visited New York recently to perform on
Saturday Sight live, he brought along the most im-
pressive band he has ever led. And he readily, if
somewhat ruefully, admitted that these improvements
were a response to what many of his fans had recogniz-
ed as a deterioration in the quality of his work.
When he was asked about "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?"
Stewart grimaced. "A lot of us got taken in by disco
he said. "1 drifted further and further away from rock
'n' roll, in my music and in the way I was living
Stewart's marriage, his first, seems to have been a tur-
ning point for him. He was once a renowned drinker,
and when he was living with Miss Ekland, his life
sometimes seemed to be a ceaseless round of Hollywood
parties. His music had put him on the cover of Rolling
Stone in the early '70s; his celebrity status put him on
the cover of People magazine in 1979. He has drastically
cut back on his drinking since then. His wife said that
"we hardily ever go out now. We'd rather stay at
home
In New York, the Stewarts got around more. The
night before his performance on Saturday Night Live,
Stewart visited the Ritz to hear Tina Turner, who donn-
See STEWART, Page 7
Classical Guitarist Lorimer Next Artist In Series
A favorite protege of Andre Segovia, Michael Lorimer will be performing in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre on March 18 at 8 p.m. Lorimer Has been consistently rated among the world's top classical
guitarists and he was the first American guitarist invited to perform in the Soviet Union. He toured the
USSR in 1975 and 1977. Lorimer is being brought to campus as part of the '8182 MSC Artists Series.
i
f





I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1982
L��0s)G A&QUT CoiLgfrS Thc MP 1AM�
PW�, J N��0 TO 0it�
ITS TOO A)01SY H�rt�
-�00rV fO& AWH(C� f
61 PavjIP AJotS
(aJCll
AK�0
Stewart Getting Back To Basics
Continued From P. 5
ed a thatch of blond,
ersatz hair � a Rod
Stewart look-alike wig
� and sang several of
his songs. On the spur
of the moment, he in-
vited Miss Turner to
sing a duet with him on
Saturday Sight live.
The song was "Hot
I egs and Miss
Turner made it ge-
nuinely sexy. Stewart
even took a stroll off
camera to give her
center stage. "Let's
face it he said later,
in the midst of a late-
night party at Studio
54, "rock 'n' roll is
basically about sex
Later still, during an
early-morning conver-
sation at the mid-town
hotel where the
Stewarts were staying,
Stewart amended that
statement.
"Musically he said,
"what you also need to
make good rock 'n' roll
is a good bass player
and drummer
He has them in
bassist Jay Davis and
newly recruited drum-
mer Tony Brock. In the
past, Stewart's bands
tended to over-play
sometimes to the point
of unintentional
parody. His present
group is rhythmically
assured, well-stocked
with inventive soloists,
and notably lacking in
inflated egos.
Tonight I'm Yours is
equally winning, and it
manages to allude to
virtually every phase of
his varied musical
career. First, he was a
folksinger, then an ear-
ly star of the mid60s
British blues boom,
then a hard-rock
screamer with the Jeff
Beck group, then lead
vocalist with the lively
and sometimes chaotic
Faces.
During his vears as a
Face (1969 1976), he
also recorded a number
of albums under his
own name, and he
seemed to save the best
of the songs he was
writing and co-writing
for these albums. When
his longtime friend and
songwriting partner
Ron Wood left Faces to
become a Rolling Stone
in 1976, the group
disbanded, and Stewart
put together the first
band he could call his
own.
On Tonight I'm
Yours, these phases are
recalled by a song, an
arrangement, a vocal
ornament or a frag-
ment of a lyric. And
Stewart's determina-
tion to build his bands
around three electric
guitarists, a formula he
has followed since the
demise of the Faces
despite the tendency of
guitar-heavy bands to
indulge in excess, has
finally born fruit. Each
of the three guitarists
who works with him
now can do a number
of things well, but all
three seem to prefer im-
maculate ensemble
playing to show solo-
ing.
Tonight's
Greensboro perfor-
mance comes at the
tail-end of four months
of touring (he played
Greensboro on
November 11 last year
as part of the same
tour). Stewart is excited
about being on the road
once again. "What I
really look forward to
on the road is getting
back together with the
boys he saicL "I
guess that's kind of
adolescent. But I love
every minute of it
Carolina Recording Artist
THE
NICKY HARRIS
BAND
Appearing
Wednesday, March 3,
at the
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
Ladies' Night
Ladies admitted free.
5C draft
from 8:30 to 10:30
Mil
i j
re;
thq
difl
m
sin
di
mi
thi
XJ
HARBIN HIGHLANDER
CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated Laundry
Self-Service Dry Cleaning
10 lb. load - $6.50
(8-10 garments)
Cleanest laundry in town
Color T. V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8a.m10p.m. 7daysaweek
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hiilowell's Drug and old hospital.
X?
& .J? AC' � 4 �
o x & y. Jr
tr.jf
s
aM
. I � a 1 �
WOLVERINE
TOUGH OUTSIDE PURE
COMFORT INSIDE
I
h. h .
Mt. And
J.P. Davenport
& Sons, Inc.
Phone 752-6930
Hwy. 264 E.
WOLVERINE
IShoes
m��i�V MWi
N4
r�
1 st Annual Pre-Spring Break

-
m
H
Beauty Contest
(WET T-SHIRT)
March 4th at PAPA KATZ
7
?&�
5
"
Good chance to get
extra money for Spring Break
M

Five judges to .
be selected at random
from audience
prize
Sponsors
Overton's Grocery
Crow's Nest
Mr. Gatti's
Nautilus
KA Sorority
Western Sizzlin'
University Exxon
East Coast Waterbeds
(Call David Hill 758-2408)
Sponsored by �0E
Quicksilver Records
108 E. 5th St.
For Heads Only
Clothing Jeans Warehouse
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
For more information call:
Chuck Brown � 752-2941
Glenn Conway � 752-6502
t
i �
tmrnmwmit�9m,tmm wnmiwiww �i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IARCH 2, 1982 7
�7 ! 1 '
rs
E
Fondas Shine On In '80s
( ontinued From P. 5
Director Mark
Rydell believes that
Miss Hepburn and Miss
Fonda "have all the
reasons in the world to
be antagonists. Even
though their politics are
different, Katharine
must recognize a
similar kind of in-
dividuality in Jane that
must have been
threatening he says.
"After all, Jane is the
big star of the '80s and
Katharine was the big
star for so long.
"They were very
standoffish at the
beginning; you had the
sense of two lionesses
prowling the same area.
But Jane made some
real efforts, and
Katharine began to see
that Jane really
respected her, which
she was concerned
about. Now you can see
the two of them walk-
ing arm in arm, and
Katharine giving her
motherly advice
But it is with her
father that Miss Fon-
da's emotions run
deepest. She brushes
off the widely publiciz-
ed conflicts they had,
especially during the
1960s.
"Mv father had
fought in the Second
World War she says,
"and his view of what
the flag represented
and what it meant to go
to war was different
from younger people's.
We had a lot of non-
verbal clashes over
that. But those are
perfectly normal when
you're still not sure of
who you are and you're
seeking your own iden-
tity
Now, at 44, Miss
Fonda says she feels
sure of her identity,
and the problems she
had with her father
have worked
themselves out to a
Soviet Life Examined
Continued From Page 5
especially the Gold Diggers series
with Ruby Keeler and company. t
This film does not carefully follow
Communist ideology. In fact, as
David Denby New York magazine)
noted:
"The concerns of these women
are almost . . . well . . . bourgeois. If
the state is present at all, it's only as
a kind of invisible hand, distributing
punishments and rewards . . . The
accountant in the sky, watching
over the characters with ledger in
hand, obviously worries about such
things as productivity, order and the
family. In the long run, happiness is
a personal matter, but the happy
people are also model citizens
Barbara Amiel (Maclean's) had
this to say about Moscow Does Mot
Believe In Tears:
"In the end, one leaves the movie
uncomfortably on how Soviet socie-
ty is getting to be more and more
like ours, while ours, alas, in its in-
creasing regimentation, its denial of
human motivations and realities in
the name of a spurious
egahtarianism, is getting more and
more like theirs.
"The Soviets seem, through bitter
experience, to have learned many of
the lessons we have yet to teach
ourselves. They may be behind us in
bedrooms-per-household and basic
liberties, but where they are clearly
ahead of us � and so demonstrate
in this film with astonishing
frankness � is in the understanding
that perhaps it is not human nature
that needs changing but the artificial
systems that would suppress and
deny it
much more advanced
friendship than Nor-
man and Chelsea
Thayer will ever know.
"Norman can be
cruel she says. "My
father's not a cruel per-
son. In the movie,
Chelsea has a raw, cold
relationship with her
father, which is not the
case with me and my
father. Whatever pro-
blems we had are gone.
I got older and wiser, I
guess. You know. You
think you're so smart
and then you have your
own kids and wind up
making the same
mistakes.
"You begin to realize
how hard it is to be a
good person, let alone
to always be there for
your children the way
they want you to be.
You try but you can't
always give them what
they need � and they
hardly ever express
their deepest needs ver-
bally. When you finally
understand these things
for yourself, you
understand your
parents a lot better and
begin to be a lot more
forgiving
With age, Henry
Fonda, too, has realiz-
ed the mistakes he
made with his children.
"1 don't know how to
be a good father he
says, relaxed in the
comfortable summer
house he has rented
with his wife, Shirlee.
"I'm an actor, and I
had to be away a lot
when the kids were at
an age when they
wondered, 'Where's
Dad?' Both Peter and
Jane grew up not really
having the kind of rela-
tionship that you feel
children should have
with their father. I
remember being aware
of it at the time, but I
also thought, 'Am 1
gonna quit all this and
sell shoes? No, by God,
1 like being an actor "
Fonda also dismisses
reports of a rift bet-
ween him and his
children. "By the time
Jane decided she
wanted to become an
actress, she went
through what I unders-
tand is known as a
classic rebellion he
says. "She had to feel
that she was doing it on
her own. But there
hasn't been any of that
stuff in 15 years.
"My son, Peter, isn't
home a lot. He's either
on his ranch or his boat
in Maui or on location
someplace. But we're in
communication all the
time. Two or three
years ago, I began to
notice at the end of a
conversation on the
phone he'd say, T love
you, Dad I'd hang up
and think, 'Wow
"But it took me a
while before I was able
to say, T love you,
son Isn't that awful?
But, 1 guess it's not that
unusual
J rNN A
IF YOU ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH DRUGSOR ALCOHOL �
WE CAN HELP � "STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG CENTER � 757-6793
IN RECENT MONTHS, THE ARRESTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS
INVOLVED IN DRUG RELATED INCIDENTS HAS INCREASED
DRAMATICALLY. Because of our concern and in our quest for
RESPONSIBILITY, we would like it known to all the students the new
drug laws now in effect. These are the laws and hence will be enforced!
1. Possession of SO lbs. and less than 100 lbs. of marijuana
prison sentence of 5 years.
minimum
2. Possession of 100 lbs. and less than 2,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 7
years.
3. Possession of 2,000 lbs. and less than 10,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 14
years.
4. Possession of 10,000 or more lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 35 years along
with fines.
5. Possession with, or intention to sell 28 grams or less of cocaine � presumptive sentence of 3-10
years along with fines.
6. Possession with or intention to sell 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams of cocaine �
presumptive sentence of 7 years along with fines.
7. Possession of 1,000, but less than 5,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 7 year prison
sentence along with a $25,000 dollar fine.
8. Possession of 5,000, but less than 10,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 14 year
prison sentence along with a $50,000 dollar fine.
9. Possession of 4 grams, but less than 14 grams of opium � 14 year prison sentence, along with a
$50,000 dollar fine.
L.
H0DGES COMPAmr
DOWNTOWN
THE SPORTS STORE
NIKE SALE
THIS WEEK
FOR MEN:
NIKE WIMBLEDON
22'5 J,
w
� if
Ml
Reg. $35.95
SALE
y

gar � � ���.��� tj
(XT' "
fl?&&SS
f ALL SALES FINAL
NO EXCHANGESOR REFUNDS
ft:
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�'�'
&
as
�� v.vv:
��
$
��:

.i:
���
�38
m
as
�v:?i
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FOR WOMEN:
LADY RACQUETTE
SALE 1995
Re $33 95
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available tor sale
below the advertised price in each A4P Store eicept as specifically noted
in this ad
at or
u
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT MARCH 6, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville N. C.
'AS AfcflP EXCLUSIVE OFFER.
GENUINE
IMPORTED
STONEWARE
From the Highland Floral Collection.
A GBEAT mum JOT A CHEAT PUCK
THIS WEEK'S
FEATURE ITEM
Dinner
Plate
With EacngpSPpIoper placi
5.00 Purchase serrate i�e
A 20-Pc. Service
For 4 Cost Less
Than14
CHOOSE FROM 3 BEAUTIFUL
PATTERNS!
� Fraaoar To Ovan To Tabto Convantanca.
PLACE . Otahwaahar and Mcrowav Safe.
SETTMQPCCE . Extra Strangth, Chip HaSMM
hemHtatufr( icnp�raUr ValurSncciaJ Pnce
mnnimaiiFtni. StitK$3.00� � EACH June �h�h V7 ISOOpurrhmr
CUPSecond. Srvmrh, T�rMih$2.20 44. EACH "AKaT tSOOpurchac
tAucnThiid. THirtrcfwh$1.60� EACH JUQC Wilhrach VGT S OOpurchar
MOTET MSIFourth. Ninrti. Fnurrrrnth$1.60 m EACH JUDJr wh�h "0F �SO0purrh�r
niADt? i iirtTtihrth. Tnuh. hflmtth$1.60j4. EACH "IPaV JS OOpunKaK
jfmmm
( A&PCOUPON )
SAVE 50
When You Purchase A Pair
Of I
Dinner Soup
Bowls
SEE STORE DISPLAY FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.
Rag
5.99
With This C.AQ
Coupon You
Pay Only W For Two
631
Good Thru Sat.Mar 6
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
Sirloin Steaks
68
Bone
In
lb.
2
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
BONELESS WHOLE
Bottom & Eye Round
I87
Cut Fraa Into Bottom
Round Staaks, Roaat,
Eya Round Staafca.
and Roaat, Ground Round
20 To 26
Lb. Avg.
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
Whole Fryer Legs
8 lbs. or
more
89'
A&P QUALITY
Meat Franks
(Beef 12 oz. 1.09)
ASPOUAUTY
Pork Sausage
r if ooe
AV
� a�aaa������ Pj SUPER SAVER COUPON "�
KEG O KETCHUP
iiBinz 3o
Ketchup
UlaTT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER btl.
GOOD THRU SAT . MARCH 6, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. NC.
lP tbaF624
aVP
!�����( jj Jj) SUPER SAVER COUPON ���
A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZHJANCOFFEES
Eight 0'Clock save
Bean Coffee 60
UbBT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT . MARCH 6. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N C
i � � ����"�( PJ SUPER SAVER COUPON )'
7 SELF-RISING � PLAIN
M Red Band s3aove
RED BAND
Flour
AT
UMT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT , MARCH 6. AT AAP IN GREENV'LLE, NC
625
aa�aaaaaiB�aasasiasiaSiaaias j J SUPER SAVER COUPON J1�������'��g
HiA NEW! Save
Eight 0'Clock Bean so-
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AV
1-lb.
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER bag IP! 627
GOOD THRU SAT MARCH 4, AT ASP IN GREENVILLE, NC.
$t?ftvv;
FRESH W1TW OUALTTY
U.S. 1 ALL PURPOSE
White 1ft
Potatoes III
CALIFORNIA SWEET & JUICY
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Navel Oranges Dole Bananas
q4a.wl3ar
t
i





THF EAST CAROL INI AN
Sports
MAK H 2, 1982
I'w 8
Johnson Does It All As Hot USC Nips ECU
F.CT's I orraine Foster shoots. (Photo h Drew Kumhlcv t
Dukes Receive
First-Round Bye
V mpleting its best season ever with a 22-4 record. ECA South
imes Madison has received a first-round bye in the con-
irnameni that begins this rhursday in the Norfolk Sco
rhe tournament champion receives an automatic berth in the NCAA
tout rtament.
i I '� Ca i have been seeded �eehe . om-
ind . fa . . d Richmond, a team the lost to.
Wed
imeni
in tru- opening game ihursdav al 5 p.n
were announced Sundav afi
i -4 41 w in
n -
toui nameni
ason. I
(ld Doi
ed R
a league
oui the
n the Scope Sal ui
6 4 and 1" to
M
M.
' � 15-11) is the numbei three set V liam and
15 111 is numbei foui
,2-4 and 11-13, is � fifth and George Ma oi 2 7 12 I ;
xth.
minion and G ee Ma n meet al 7 p.m. in the second contest
. followed by William and Mary Navy at 9
ner ol Thursday's final game will face lames Madison at 7
1 : day while the other two winners meet immediately following,
lament championship will be decided Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
Richmond
astarolina
semifinal
4 )lil Dominion
Gt'orpe Mason
Semifinal
( hampionship
W illiam and Mar
Saw
Semifinal
James Madison
( hampionship
NC s
Gamecocks Win Despite
Turnovers and Game Bucs
� r
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Managing tdilur
"We tried and tried and tried, but
the ball just wasn't going in the
hoop
I he trust rat ion was evident in the
voice o Cathy Andruzi, East
Carolina women's basketball coach,
following her team's narrow, 86-81,
loss to I3th-ranked South Carolina
Saturday.
The 1 ady Pirates outrebounded
the favored I ady Gamecocks,
43-42, and forced 25 turnovers.
That was not enough to offset 39.1
pet cent field goal shooting, though,
especially when coupled with USC's
60.3 percent accuracy.
rhe I ady Gamecocks were paced
bv the trio o forwards Evelyn
Johnson and Branley Southers, and
center Sheila foster. Johnson, sister
oi professional great "Magic"
Johnson, scored 26 points, pulled
down ten rebounds, and dished out
foui assists.
Southers. a high-jumping
freshman, added 23 points and ten
rebounds, foster contributed 22
points and nine boards.
The 1 ady Bucs were led by Sam
Jones, who scored 26 points, had
four steals, five assists and eight re-
bounds. Even so, "Action" had
what was probably an o night,
making jusl 12 of 33 field goal tries.
lunioi center Mary Denkler add-
ed 20 points and 1 rebounds tor the
Bucs.
ECU jumped out to an early
eight-point cad. al 20-12. but cold
shooting caused it to dissipate in a
hurry. Hot-shooting USC outscored
the Lady Bucs 39-18 over the re-
maining 13 minutes oi the half to
take a 51-38 lead at intermission.
South Carolina built its lead to 18
points, 73-55, by the midway point
of the second half. It was then that
ECU began applying pressure, and
making its subsequent comeback at-
tempt.
ECU narrowed the lead to five, at
86-81, and had two trips down court
in the game's last 60 seconds to tut
the USC advantage to three. The
Buc shots simply would not go in as
the I.ady Gamecocks picked up win
number 21 in 28 games.
ECU fell to 16-9.
"I'm very hard on oui kids An-
drui said. "1 thought the first half
was our really dead spot, when we
dug ourselves into a hole. The press
started working at the end and I
thought we were in a potential com-
eback situation.
"South Carolina is a great team
and played one helluva game Con-
sidering that, our kids did a respec-
table job
Andruzi said she believes tier
club's 16-9 record is good enough to
warrant consideration for the
NCAA Tournament, especially if
the team can finish its regular
season with a win over North
Carolina on Wednesdav.
"People have to look at us she
said. "There's no question about it.
We beat N.C. State, a top ten team,
and lost bv just five points to the
I3th-ranked team in the country
tonight. 1 think we've go! a
shot
��
I s( veniyn Johnson takts charge. (Photo b Kip san
eels-Pirates
Set For Burner
Darlene Chaney for two. (Photo by Kip Sloan).
Tickets Available
There are still 500 individual day tickets left for Thursday
afternoon competition at the ECAC-South tournament at
the Scope in Norfolk, Va. The tickets are priced at $4.50 for
students and $6 for everyone else. East Carolina plays Rich-
mond at 5 p.m followed by Old Dominion and George
Mason at 7 and Navy-William and Mary at 9.
Students who won tickets and have not picked them up
MUST do so by Wednesday morning.
Bv WILLIAM H LKION
"p. ri dllOf
No n what s meihmg
is always al -take when I
Carolina and Normarolina m
Doesn't matte- I re tall
football, basketball or chess.
Even though honor and pride are
evident. Wednesday's 7:30 p.m.
women's basketball encountei
Minges Coliseum is esp
portant. And somethi it -take.
A possible bid to the NCAA t
nament.
The Lady Tar Heels oj orth
Carolina. Alias: Heels Sevenl
and 11 after a win and a loss in last
weekend's Atlantic Coast (
ference tournament. kev area ol
team: powerful front line of 6-foot
Cathy Crawford (15.7 points, 7 I
rebounds), 6'2" rresa Brown 114.2,
7.3) and 6'2" Henrietta Walls (13.2,
8). (Even though Crawford is not
expected to start because ol a
hairline fracture in her right arm,
she will see action). Other key
plavers: Meredith White. 510"
senior. 8 4 points; Pam Hammond,
5'6" freshman guard, b 2 points;
Cindy Miller 5'11" sophomore, 5 2
points. Kev playei ofl bench: Aileen
McCann, averaging 7.9 points but
leads team in assists with 75. Head
coach Jennifer Alley uses about nine
players again.
The lady Pirates oj East
Carolina. Alias: Rats, always
tenacious, scrappy. Sixteen and nine
this season, but hot as of late, hav-
ing won 12 of the last 14 games n
that streak the only two losses have
come to nationally-ranked (third)
Old Dominion and South Carolina
(13th) in close games. Defeated
North Carolina, "1-66. earlier this
season in Chapel Hill. I ast vear.
also won in C hapel Hill but in
: Murn meeting in Greenville, North
Carolina defeated it I . ki
the 1 ad 2
Ke ' ' �
20.3. v n
e at 17.2
�� . . zuar d
1 illion Barnes a
"W
improved ly - I
i ch Cat I .
I North Carolina) are
tui team with a v t
line. I hey're a
thai's
is- H . .
tha line
oi Brown, W alls and c ra ��
"Thewe very big in size ai ta
rhey're very experienced
the players Have been together
two years. Any time w
; line team, we have our w
cut out foi us
ndruzzi say s sl p ased �
the way
matured through
" rhey're dome A
they're just a great I
with. South a was
good team, and we had a tew lap
But we really came back. They h
a great dea I , aracter I'm
ed with the way th
themselves
rhe NCAA bids go
and the 1 ady Pirates are being
sidered as one of the 32 teai
cording to sources 1 here will b
automatic conference
19 at-large bids rournament tea
will be sen;
bat. Mid 1 as w esi and M
W esi
!
tough seas
great
Roundball Pirates Down But Certainly Not Out
Will! AMSIH RCi, Va.
I hmi! have not gone so well lately
foi the I astarolina men's basket-
ball team. Saturdav night was no
different as the club lost its fifth
straight game. 80-61 to William and
M a r v
I he worst part about the Satur-
dav deteat is that it doomed the
Pirates for the cellar in the ECAC-
South As a result, the Bucs were
seeded seventh lor the :v en-team
conference championship tourna-
ment, which is scheduled for this
weekend at the Norfolk Scope.
ECU finished the regular season
2-8 in the conference and 10-16
overall. The club will play second-
seeded Richmond in the tourna-
ment's opening game Thursday at 5
p.m. It will be carried via radio
locally bv WITN-FM (93.3) and
WOOW-AM (1340).
The Indians shot a torrid 70.6
percent in the first half in grabbing a
37-21 lead. William and Marry cool-
ed down little in the second half,
finishing with at 68.3 percent.
ECU, meanwhile, shot just 41.6
percent for the game. That figure
could have been lower had it not
been for a late rally.
The Indians placed five players in
double figures, led by senior Dale
Moats' 14 points. Mike Strayhorn
was next with 13.
Forwards Morris Hargrove and
Bill McNair were the only Pirates
scoring in double digits. Hargrove
talied 17 points, while McNair
finished with 14.
Following the game, ECU head
coach Dave Odom spoke solemly to
the press about the game and his
team's play of late.
"This is about as tought a stretch
of time as I've ever had to endure
Odom said. "In no way, shape or
form have I ever experienced the
feelings of frustration that I have
now
Odom said he was very disap-
pointed in recent fan treatment of
the Pirates on road trips.
"I hope our players never forget
the remarks that have been made
about them, the laughing and
snickering. Those things have no
place in athletics. 1 know things
have a way o changing. Time has a
way o healing all wounds, and the
worm will eventually turn
The Pirates must now attempt to
turn things around before this
weekend's tournament. Three vic-
tories in the event would put the
club in the NCAA Tournament as
the conference representative. If this
is to happen. Odom said, the club
must get more consistent defensive
ly.
"I don't know it we can g
in two days and pick up what w
right lor two months he said
"We have to cleai our minds, get
the right techniques and intei
Thursday
'Ten davs ago, we were holding
our opponents to 48 percent from
the floor. But we haven't stopped
anybody for ten davs





-I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1982 V
I
er
s and
teams
i
ut
I back
uha: we did
r minds, get
mtensitv h
e holding
cent from
t stopped
Pirates Blank Mt. Olive, 9-0
l he EC I) men's ten-
nis team played theii
first match of the
season this past Mon-
day at Minges courts,
and shut out Mount
Olive College, 9-0.
he team will play
again at home against
Atlantic Christian Col-
lege on Monday,
March 15. The match
gets underway at 3 p.m.
This Monday's
results follow:
lUd Mikr Bmri 6 1.6-4; lorn Baltic
IE) d Jraa V-alrru 61.6I. lKa lair-
maa (EJ J lorn t uggia ft I ft -
DOUH.ES
1 �-pprr Owta (rd Md.ff �'�(�
-2. W; tok fciaf Bnaal (I) 4.
Paftaao-4. ofjtia 6-4. 6-1. Barr Parker-
t airman d "wal�ri-Sioa 6-0. 6-0
slN�,t Ks
Knlh ragel (El d )aid Mi�.�
MI.6-V Ifcia KultrdRC lr.1 d. Paul
P agano 6-0 6-1. Kf�ia i�in�,loB It Id.
krrmit Nixon ft 0.t2 Norman Hrvuni
ECU's men's track
team competed in the
Budweiser Metro In-
vitational Meet this
past Saturday at Va
Tech, and placed ir
four events.
Runners Keith
Clarke, Lawrence Er-
vin, Ray Dickerson and
Tim Cephus combined
for a time of 3:21.7 to
take second place in the
1600-meter relay.
Dickerson placed
third in the 800-meter
event with a time of
1:54.7.
Shaun Laney had a
time of 1:05.7 to place
fourth in the 500-meter
race.
In the 55-meter
event, Clint Harris
sprinted for a time of
6.48 to take fifth place.
Jeff Golden placed
sixth in the same event
with a time of 6.49.
Pirates Start Well But Slide
By THOMAS BRAME
Aatl. Sports KaHlof
The ECU golfers got
off to a good start in
the Seminole Inter-
collegiate Classic but
closed with a disap-
pointing finish, accor-
ding to coach Bob
Helmick.
In the opening
round, Pirate golfer
Jerry Lee finished only
one stroke behind the
individual leader, Jodie
Mudd.
The Pirates, as a
team, finished the first
day in eighth place in
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD Lost Mon Feb 8th
Brown Cordoroy Ladies Pocket
Book with Bamboo Handles Lost
m Food Town and Fosdick s Area
Please Call 7S 4373 Home and
7s� 20M Business Ask tor Danny
or Ginny
LOST Timex watcn 1st or 2nd
lloor stacks Joyner Library
Call Trudy 7S2 2981
LOST Silver ID bracelet around
Memorial Gym or Tyler Dorm
area II tund please call 35S 2?4�
and leave messaqe
ATTENTION
Class.tied ads will be taken ONLY
dunr.q the following hours
Mondav MS 3 00
Tuesday 2 00 3 00
Wednesday I IS 3 00
Tnursday J 00 3 00
Friday i '5 2 00
You must place the ads in person
and pav tor them m advance
Rates are $1 lor the first IS words
and S 05 per words after the first
FOR SALE
JVC PORTABLE AM FM
Cassette Piaer RC 6S6 J
Normal Cr02
Manual Auto Recordmq Sep
Bass and Treble Controls 4
. . a jTomobiie plug Ex
it Cond Must Sell S225
752 9704
USED YAMAHA quitar owned 2
irs in qood condition Si 20
� joIp Call ?S7 3107 ask lor
1104 East Tenth Street
MICROSCOPE-Monolu 4038
Magnification to 1200X, four
oculars, four obiectives, built in
coarse and fine adiustments,
wooden carrying case, and slide
preparation tools H75 7S8 5S2S
BAYLEY WETSUITS-L S
pullover top and longiohn com
bmation S60 each or JI00 together
Call Dirk at 7S7 4947 or 758 6354 or
come by Rawl 123.
FOR SALE: two tickets to Rod
Stewart Concert Reynolds
NCSU -March 2 Excellant seats!
Call 758 6710
SURFBOARD FOR SALE 64
Challenger, single tin Good condi
tion, price negotiable Call Bobby
at 752 9662
STEREO RECEIVER Marantz
2230 receiver. Excellent cond Call
756 5323
cAR STEREO Pioneer com
ponents Cassette Deck, 40 watt
amplifier, and 2 cross axial
speakers Price Negot Call
756 5323
FURNITURE 2 maple frame
arm chairs one end table Good
Condition Price Negot Call
756 5323
GUITAR. Alvarez Yain Model
DY 78 with hardshell case Ex
cellent Cond Call 756 5323
FRAP ACOUSTIC Guitar
Pickups Unused, must sell S55 or
best offer Call Danny at 757 1336
ACC TOURNAMENT Tickets
Sec N Row P seals 4 ' 5 Call
758 S258
SKIS K 2 ISScompBIOskiswith
Soloman Bindings S12S Call
757 3210 and leave number
1978 CJ 5 Renegade, 3 speed, V-8
excellent sound system hardtop
sunrool, chrome rims, plus much
more 757 I7IS
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
one bedroom apartment J75 plus
one halt utilities. Call Scott at
752 4S47
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
MS a month plus 12 utilities
WasherDryer, nonsmoker plus
serious student Vera 752 7185
FURNISHED one bedroom apt
for rent. May �August Walking
distance from campus Call
758 7024
FEMALE ROOMATE wanted
For nicely furnished apt at
Cypress Gardens Within Walking
distance of campus Call 758 3894
CYPRESS GARDEN One
bedroom apartment to sublease
J235 per month cable TV, low
utilities Call 758 0467
RESA What happened Sat night?
Sure left a mark on your life or
rather stomach Charlene. Heard
you blew away the F B s, C B s,
and the Marines Have you got
something against Bean Bag
Chairs?
introducing
the No. 1
Sizzlin.
Sirloin
TO THE LOSER S TOMMY. If
B stands for "Bacca what
does "F" stand for? Flunk"?
Mitch We enioyed the FREE
Peter Adonis Show Sat nite There
was definitely a lull moon that
night BRIAN, Want some cocktail
sauce? Go for it, Shrimp'
MICHAEL, why do you take
showers with your key in your
mouth? Paranoid, huh? Still have
slim trained? Bigger stall. Get
urn young. Raise em right Go
Jail Bait SLIM, Better watrh out
Though you didn't want to get in
volved Too Bad Paybacks are
hell B'Cers
ATTENTION ALL LADIES The
men of Aycock Hall invite you to
the Elbo this Thursday March 4
from 7 until 9 15 You favorite
beverage is free while it lasts
After that we will have Happy
Hour prices
Western Sizzlin intjxxiuces
the No 1 Sizzlin, our most pop-
ular menu item USDA Choice
western beef sirloin steak that
�v comes
complete
with baked
potato or
french
fries and
Texas
toast The
No. 1
Sizzlin is
the star
attraction
at Western
HELP
WANTED
NEED MONEY You won't get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings lor writers at the present
time. There is also a possibilitv of
raining for editor positions and
raining on computer terminals.
Apply at the East Carolinian of-
ice, Old South Building
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED
Apply with the Media Board
secretary. Old South Building.
757 600�1
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service. Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea. 110 for 8 x 10, black and
white or coior. Call 752-5775
TYPING: TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: Term,
Research, Dissertation, Thesis,
etc. Fast and Efficient. Low
Rates Call 757 1378 anytime
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
nubhcations. manuscripts or term
papers at home. Call 7S6 340
RIDERS
the 24-team field.
On the third day of
the tournament, ECU
dropped another eight
spots to finish 16th.
Helmick explains the
Pirates' finish by say-
ing, "We beat the
teams comparable to
us. However, we're
capable of beating
some of the others if we
had played better. Only
two players played well
each day, and it takes
four to contend for
team honors
Home team Florida
State won the classic
with UNC-Chapel Hill
a close second.
Tournament favorite
Mudd of Georgia
Southern took the in-
dividual honors with a
69.6 average for the
match.
Inconsistency
plagued the Pirates
throughout the classic,
says Helmick. "Don
Gafner played the best
due to his consistent
scores he said. t
Gafner finished with
the best average for the
Pirates with a 75.6.
Mike Moye was next
with a 76.3 average.
Chris Czaja was close
behind with a 77 for the
tournament
Other Pirate par-
ticipants were Jerry Lee
with a 77 and Don
Sweeting with a 79.
"We are capable of
playing much better,
and we should stress-
ed Helmick.
ABOH-nONSVTO
ifthWEEKOF
PREGNANCY
AMMtTtOMtPatOMIt-U
AT 'IMTHM �KMUMB
�t�m Wwp� ?��. ��
Coatral. ��� pr)ftX44B
(T�l �r�a
WniUMI
aaaJSPJ i
�avumi wottmw
MI4.LTM
0��aMttAT�ON
tl�H�l�lflK
� ���. at.C.
Helmick and the
Pirate golfers compete
in the Fripp Island In-
vitational in South
Carolina this weekend.
RIDE NEEDED to Nashville TN
Spring Break or any weekend
Willing to help with expenses. Call
757 0710
RIDE NEEDED to Winston Salem
area. Can leave anytime after 10
am Friday. Call 752 3449
ATTN WILSON COMMUTERS:
Responsible person to share rides
daily to and from Wilson starting
immediately. Call Sherry,
243 3099. Need someone who com
mutes everyday from 15.
RIDE needed to Philadelphia area
spring break. Will share expenses
and driving call CJ. 754 1765.
RIDER needed to Arkansas or
anywhere along Interstate 40
west Spring break Call 75 0204
RIDE needed to Winston Salem
area. Can leave after 4:00 on Fri
day Call 754 1638
WE ARE READY But we might
miss the Boat. We need a ride to
Florida for Spring Break Ready
Willing and Able to share expenses
and good times Call 758 7335 if you
have room for us
RIDE NEEDED to Ohio for Spring
Break Call 758 8348
I OR 2 roommates needed to share
3 bedroom doublewide beginning
April I or after Nice yard and
area For more info call Connie
758 7386.
I NEED 2 riders to Orlando
Florida leaving Friday Call Don
na 758 4840
CASH PAID FOR
Dl AMONDS AND GOLD
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 EVANS AAALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
JO SPARROW
MIKE ROBINSON
VALERIE HARRIS
(919)758-2452
YOUR INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
College
Graduates
BECOME A LAWYER'S ASSISTANT.
� Program approved by American Bar Association
� Day or Evening classes available
� Employment assistance
A Representative from The National Center for Paralegal
Trainings Lawyers Assistant Program will be on campus
on Tuesday. Mar 16, from 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 pm. at the
Placement Office to meet interested students for more
information contact the Placement Office or The "�f0
Center for Paralegal Training. 3376 Peachtree Road. Nfc,
Suite 430 Atlanta. Georgia 30326. 1404) 266-1060
Please send me information about a career as a lawyers
assistant
Name
State
Zip
Phone���
College� � "
Yr Grad�
1982
SPRING DAY SUMMER DAY FALL DAY
FeD 8 May 7 June 10 - Sept 7 Sept 16 - Dec 21
SPRING EVE FALL EVI
Mar 16-Sept 18 Oct 19 - May 7
THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR
PARALEGAL TRAINING
3376 Peachtree Rd NE
Atlanta, Ga. 30326
404 266-1060
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Mar 3
thru Sun Mar 6. 1982
in Greenville
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
W.J
NO. 1
SIZZLIN1
SIRLOIN
)M
$3.39
Mon & Thurs
Sp.m until
Closing
includes baked
potato or French
tries and Texas toast
-�3
i
:l
L
fACOAIr
Sizzlin. And it's awaiting your
comments now!
Two Greenville Locations
2403 E 10th Street
and 610 W Greenville Blvd
�'li'ifX
�5 �
Tl
L
1
111
I
S
7-THEY'RE
f f RACKU
Sweatshirts
v
600 Greenville Blvd -Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 pm
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale in
each Kroger Savon, except as specifical-
ly noted in this ad. If we do run out of an
item we will offer you your choice of a
comparable item when available, reflec-
ting the same savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days
KROGER
ADJUSTABLE
Chaise
Just in time
for Spring Break!
Limited suppl
All sues avail;
iy
table.
The pastels
you wanted
to show off
your tan!
(Available in
pink and yellow
only )
COMING
SOON:
Lilac colored
sweatshirts.
Sweatpants
in Lilac,
Pink and Yellow.
&
�.
Blue
PABST
Ribbon
f.
Y


,12-Oz.
Cans
SUNKIST OB
br 1
Pepsi
IP�PS�
Ur.
KROGER
NATURAL FLAVOR
Ice Cream
$499
v2-Gal. S
Ctn. �
PEPPERIDGE FARMS
LEMON COCONUT
Cake
$419
Reg.
$10.99
SAVE
sou
WASHINGTON STATE
Delicious
Apples
,12.5-Oz
Box
Lb.
Bag
I
fiat Qtfokfl

.IIMM
�-t.fcwini
i him � �
x
i
f

J
COST CUTTER
Tea Bags
10
SAVE
60-
SERVE N SAVE
SLICED
Luncheon Meat:
$4 28
1-Lb. m
Pkg m
ake a bit oj
tL to Florida
with you this year
ECU
STUDENT
SUPPLY
STORE
Owned and operated by
the University
Wriqht Building
Sale Continues
on Shorts, T Shirts
and Jackets �
March 15.
A) ioo-ct.
f , Box
64-Oz
Btl
COST CUTTER
Apple Juice
14 09

o
1 tfoTJ-
VAN CAMP'S
pork 'n Beans

16-Oz
Can
BAGGED
COtMITICS
IraAMANCIj
a
n





.
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 2,1982
Put a LFPINC bumper sticker
on your ear and you eould win
i up to
1000
in FREE
groceries
Hundreds of winners weekly!
Details at Food Town Stores.
USDA Grade A Holly Farms
4 lb�. - S.ift
Hid - lirjt Ctlibralt
20 lb. Bi US 1
Hostess Hams Iceberg Lettuce White Potatoes
TETLEY
24 FAMILY SIZI
TEA BAGS
99
24 C�. - Faarily Size
Tetley
Tea Bags
Why Pay '1.49
J99
1.5 Liter - Cheeie Bloic, French ColeMiari,
Ziefaadel, Bur�M�V Chablis. Rom Rhine
Inglenook Navelle
1.S Liter - 3er�n�e'y Ckebiit Rhiae,
Rote, Ory Red, Pry White
Taylor California
Cellars
4100
7.25 Ox. -FtodTeeM
Macaroni & Cheese
Why Pay 2 61
$4,39
48 Oaaee
Food Town Oil
Way Pay '1.87
389
1 Lb. - Mar�ariae Qaartert
Shedd's Spread
Way Pay 39 Eael
32 Oaaee
Duke's Mayonnaise
Why Pay'1.35
489.
6 er 6.5 Oz. - TaatTaaa 8 Chicken Beef 8 Liver
Turkey 8 Oiblets Cat Foee!
Purina 100
Why Pay 33 Each
Why Pay 3.83
Liquid Wisk wm Tater Boy
$f79
49 Oz. - With Sefteaer
Fab Detergent
WhyPay �39
Way Pay '2.09
99
32 Oanea
Del Monte
Catsup
Why Pay M.19
99
Large
Jeno's
Pizza
Why Pay M 29
$4,19
42 Oaaee
Bake Rite
Shortening
Prices good at Greenville Food Town Store only
f
!
.





Title
The East Carolinian, March 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.183
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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