The East Carolinian, January 26, 1982






Steve Martin:
Not Petering Out In
'Pennies From Heaven'
99
Basketball:
�Powerful 49ers Coming To Town
�Despite Record, Odom Is Confident
Pages 8, 9
Mt
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 34
Tuesday, January 26, 1982
Greenville,N.C.
10 Panes
WZMB To Broadcast
'Alternative Concept'
Top Of The Morning
Photo By CHRIS BENNETT
Students make their way into the busy entrance of Brew tier's D-VViit
By MIKE HUGHES
vsitlant Nr�i Kdilor
For all students who are tired of
listening to the same top-40 songs
day after day, an "alternative con-
cept" may be forthcoming.
WZMB, the ECU radio station
that has been plagued with technical
difficulties, licensing mixups and an
endless array of other problems,
ma be on the air as early as next
week, according to Sam Barwick,
the station's general manager.
"We're shooting for next week
Barwick said, "and barring new
developments, we should be able to
begin broadcasting then
According to Barwick, the snow
and ram storms last week caused
minor problems to the station's
antenna, which rests atop Tyler dor-
mitory. . .but alt that entails is
climbing up and realigning it, he
said
When the station begins broad-
casting, il will offer students an
"alternative concept" in listening,
Barwick said. WZMB will operate
from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. seven days a
week. The format will be approx-
imately 62 percent album-oriented
rock, 30 percent jazz and eight per-
cent classical.
"We have to present an alter-
native Barwick commented.
"Some students ma be angry that
we're not going top-40, but it would
be a waste of money to provide the-
Bee Gees and Sheena Fast on,
because you can listen to them on
WITN. . . .Our format will pro-
bably be a lot like WQDR's or
K94's
The station will also present two-
hour new wave shows twice each
week.
In addition to music, WZMB will
broadcast 40 minutes of news, eight
five-minute newscasts, per day.
On Sunday Mornings, the station
will air a program in cooperation
with the Lutheran Church group
SCAN. However, the show will be
non-denominational, and, accor-
ding to Barwick, it will focus on cur-
rent issues not dealing with religion.
Another talk show, a campus-
forum-type program, will begin
sometime after the station goes on
the air. In this program, current
issues will be put to students, who
will be encouraged to call in and
voice their opinions.
And, so as not to exclude sports
from the format, an intramural pro-
gram, with the latest in standings
and events, will air once a week.
According to Barwick, WZMB's
staff, which consists of tour paved
members and 28 volunteer an-
nouncers, is ready to begin broad-
casting.
The announcers, or DJ's, will
work approximately four hours per
week, or two shifts of two hours.
"In the future Barwick said,
"we would like to get two positions
available for students to get one-
hour of lab credit in speech. . . but
nothing has vet been seriously con-
�idered
Other than Barwick, the payed
staff consists of Lori Niven, news
director; Slater Burroughs, business
manager; Warren Baker, produc-
tion director and Elton Boney, pro-
gram director.
Halfway House Eases Difficult Transitions
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wnifr
"If your decision-making rights
arc taken away then your self-worth
is diminished � that's a real hard
thing stated Mary Beth Kiefer, the
president of the Prison Unit Ad-
rv Board in the North Carolina
Department of Correction. This
board is comprised of eight
volunteers who work with the
Greenville Treatment Facility for
Women.
The Treatment Facility, common-
ly referred to as a half-way house,
was established in 1977 to assist
residents m the often difficult tran-
sition back into society. There are
tour such facilities for women in
operation throughout the state.
Eight women live at the facility
under the supervision of unit
superintendant Shelby Teel and her
staff of four correctional officers
who rotate in around-the-clock
shifts. Teel says the women must
meet certain criteria to gain transfer
to the Greenville facility. Most
clients are within one year of parole
and have a reached a Level Four
grade (a level required for outside
program participation). The women
applying must also have good con-
duct records and must be screened
by Teel and other administrative
personnel.
"We operate as much as possible
like any normal household states
Teel. "Bringing them here in-
troduces them to a home-like en-
vironment
The facility is a private home,
where the women live as a familv.
They go to work or school in addi-
tion to doing the normal work
associated with a home, such as
cooking, cleaning and other chores.
The advisory board is a large part
of the overall work of the treatment
facility. According to a purpose
brochure from the North Carolina
Dept. of Correction, the advisory
board works "to provide assistance
in stimu'ating citizen and communi-
ty involvement and volunteerism at
prison facilities throughout the
state
"I'd like to have the women be
more prepared to re-enter society
through our educational programs
and othetr positive experiences
says Kiefer, who meets with the
board monthly to discuss new ideas
and programs.
"Operation Santa Claus was a re-
cent program set up by the board to
get Christmas presents donated for
the women. According to Kiefer,
tins provided "a home-like
Christmas" for the residents.
The advisory board tries to
stimulate community interest and
involvement with the treatment
facility. Many board members also
participate as community volunteers
and take the women out for com-
munity visits.
"We conduct educational and
leisure sessions, group counseling,
non-denominational religious ser-
vices, or just take the women out in-
to the community for a variety of
different activities Kiefer com-
ments. These activities might in-
clude a dinner in the volunteers
home, an educational lecture, "or
just a walk in the park
Kiefer was particularly excited
about the educational and leisure
sessions. "We bring in people to
give just one hour of their time to
share their expertise in their special-
ty field For example, Kiefer spoke
of a person "who was good at car
maintenance" and taught it to the
women.
At first, Kiefer says, many of the
volunteers feel apprehensive, but
later "they come back with such a
nice feeling. The whole experience is
so special, and they get a thank you
card from the women for their ef-
forts
Kiefer points out that "there has
to be a give and take; that's why a
thank you is so important Kiefer
hopes that all the volunteer's efforts
will help the women to improve
their self images they can once again
feel like "productive persons" in
society.
Volunteering at the treatment
facility is open to anyone interested,
according to Kiefer. "I'd like to see
men and women involved; anyone
who has an interest or a specialty
can be helpful
According to Kiefer, a need exists
See VOLUNTEERS, Page 3
Presto! Buc Covers
Are Now Binders
B TOM HALL
Sr� Editor
I he ECU Media Board expressed
its dissatisfaction with the cover of
the 1X1 Buccaneer in closed session
Thursday and unanimously voted to
ise the books' original covers as
book binders.
According to board chairman
arter Fox, the group also called for
a full report by WZMB general
manager Sam Barwick on his plans
;he format of the radio station.
1 he results of a board discussion of
charges made against East Caroli-
nian editor Paul Collins will not be
made public until Collins is released
From Pitt County Memorial
Hospital following emergency
urgery.
"The board recognizes its mistake
ni allowing the new covers to be
printed Fox said. The board inter-
viewed David Snapp, the designer of
the first cover, and will work with
him to convert the covers, according
to the board chairman.
New yearbook covers were
printed after Buccaneer editor Amy
Pickett threatened resignation if the
first covers � approved before she
assumed the position � were used.
Solid blue bindings replaced the
S000 covers already printed of a
mannequin and a 1957 Chevrolet.
Fox did not revea! the reason for
a report on the WZMB format, say-
ing the board will question Barwick
at its next meeting on Feb. 4.
Collins was admitted to the
hospital Sunday night, where doc-
tors performed an appendectomy.
According to Fox, the Media Board
discussed the accusation made in a
front-page story that Collins inten-
tionally damaged university proper-
ty. The story was not authorized by
the newspaper's editors.
In open session, the board ap-
proved budget transfers by the East
Carolinian, the Ebony Herald, The
Rebel and the Photo Lab. Tht
board asked that further requests
for the transfer of funds be printed
and distributed to all board
members.
Rudolph Alexander, director and
associate director of university
unions, said John Gardner of the
Division of Student Life was "quite
capable" in advising the campus
media in planning their 1982-1983
budgets. Former adviser Paul Breit-
man is now at Rutgers University.
The board approved an April 1
deadline for the budgets to be sub-
mitted.
NCSL Deliberates
Desegregation Plan
PHote �y DAVE WILLIAMS
Thomas Gilmore told the NCSL he favors a state two-year term.
By DIANE ANDERSON
SUff Writer
The Interim Council of the North
Carolina Student Legislature held at
East Carolina last weekend was
stated by many of the delegates to
be "the best conference we have had
in a long time said Gary Williams,
speaker of the ECU student
legislature and chairman of the
university's delegation to NCSL.
"1 think our delegation did a very
good job hosting it said Williams.
"Saturday there were 16 different
schools, and a lot of people had
never been to Greenville or ECU. It
gave them a better impression rather
than the negative view that many
people in the Piedmont area,
Raleigh and Chapel Hill have of
East Carolina
Among the resolutions adopted
by the conference was one submited
by the ECU legislation concerning
"The Consent Decree Issued to Set-
tle the Desegregation Controversy
Between UNC and the Department
of Education The consent decree
calls for "the University of North
Carolina to take a broad range of
steps to further racial integration of
all its campuses and to further
development of its Five historically
black campuses.
"It is a well thought-out and well-
planned document that is fair,
reasonable, realistic and workable.
It is not the ultimate solution said
Williams, prime supporter of the
resolution.
"It addresses the major problems
within the system Williams add-
ed. The document commits the
university to making efforts for
futher progressin terms of increas-
ing minority enrollment, upgrading
the facilities in the five 'black'
universities concerned and
"upgrading the academic pro-
grams he said.
The president of the ECU chapter
of the NAACP, Virginia Carlton,
spoke out against the consent
decree. "I don't really think it's go-
ing to work sht said. "Keep in
mind, the consent decree is another
form of integration
"1 don't think emphasis should
be put on trying to get students to
come to a black or white school. 1
know the problem black schools are
faced with in reference to money
Carlton continued. "I would like to
see the black schools funded. They
are not in reference to their pro-
grams
See RESOLUTION, Page 2
1
i
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I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 26, 1982
Announcements
NEW YORK
The East Carolina University
Student Union Travel Committee
is oilering a fantastic spring break
alternative at an unbeatable price
six days in New York City The
trip will run from March S thru
March 12 The cost of the trip is as
loiiows. Single occupancy -
IMIOO. Double occupancy �
� IIS 00, Triple occupancy �
�I5V 00, Quad ocupancy - $15.00
Included in the price are the
following roundtrip transports
lion via forty six passenger buses
and hotel accommodations ��' the
Hotel Edison. The registration
deadline is February 22 and reser
vations can be made at the Central
Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center.
ART SHOW
1 he Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan H to Feb 5, 1982
m the Greenville Museum of Art
An ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday. Jan. 72. 1M2 to the con
lerence room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center, ECU.
Cash prizes, provided by the Attic
and Jeffries Beer and Wine, Co
will fange from $10 for Honorable
Mentions to $100 tor Best in Show.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Freshman Honor Society will
hold a general meeting in room 212
Mendenhall Student Center on
Tuesday. Feb 2 at 5 p m Fund
raising and social activities will be
discussed All members are urged
to attend
ASSOCIATION FOR
COMPUTING
MACHINERY
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet this Thrusday, Jan 28 at 3 30
p.m. in room 221. Austin Building
Ms. Lorraine Bortz of the ECU Co
op office will speak on Cooperative
Education opportunities in Com
puter Science and other related
fields. Anyone mierested is invited
to attend
NASW
The Coastal District of the Na
tional Association of Social
Workers Association will hold a
meeting in Greenville on Jan 28 at
7 30 p m in the front section of the
Allied Health Auditorium Dr
John R Ball will be the featured
speaker Students, faculty,
members, and interested in
dWiduals are invited to attend
QUESTION?
Can you speak in tongues? What
good ts it? Any person who is born
again can speak in tongues any
lime they want, if they understand
the Bible, and believe it. (I Corin
thians 12 14) Come to our
fellowship and learn more about
this truth and other truths from
the Bible that are rarely taught to
day Thursday. Jan 28 at 8 p m
Mendenhall Student Center, room
242
REBEL ART
RECEPTION
The Rebel Art Show Awards
Reception will be held Tuesday at
7 30 m 'he Greenville Museum of
Art All ECU students, faculty,
staff and general public are in
vied
SOCIANTHCLUB
There will be a short meeting of
the Sociology Anthropology Club
on Wednesday. Jan 27 at 4 30 It
will be a short business meeting
Please make plans to attend The
meeting will be in Brewsfer D 302
COLLEGIATE 4-H
On February 4. Thursday, the
ECU Collegiate 4 H Club will meet
at 7 p m at the club advisor's ad
dress For more information and
location call Carrol Anne at
7S6 4287 or Ivey at 758 9535 All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity will
hold its 1912 Spring Formal
Smoker Thursday, 28 at 8 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Multi Purpose
Room at the Student Center. All
young men interested are invited
to attend
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
The sorors of the Eta Mu
Chapter will be having rush on
January 28 at 730 p.m in
Mendenhall Student Center. We
are inviting all interested young
ladies to attend. The elegance of
simplicity with the epitome of
class, that's Sigma
SWCS APPLICATIONS
The Department of Social Work
& Correctional Services will ac
cept applications from students in
tending to major in social work or
corrections through February 2
Students should contact the
Department Offices (312 Allied
Health Building) immediately to
obtain an application and make an
appointment for interviews
Deadline for the first interview is
February 1 To be eligible to app
ly. the student must have com
pleted at least one social work or
corrections course, and is ex
pected to have a minimum grade
point average of 2 5 Call 757 6961
(Mrs Joyner) for additional mfor
mation.
SCEC
The Student Council for Excep
tional Children, will have their se
cond meeting on Monday. Feb 1 at
4 m Sp 129 This will be a program
meeting, refreshments will be
served Please iom us
SGA SCREENINGS
There are several positions open
in the SGA Legislature The
Screenings committee will be ac
ceptmg applications for positions
in the Legislatuie Please call or
come by the SGA Office for mfor
mation and applications Applica
tions accepted until January 26
Resolution Discussed
GYMNASTICS ROOM
UTILIZATION
The gymnastics room located in
Memorial Gymnasium is open to
students, faculty and staff each
Mon � Thur. from 6:30 p.m. to �
p m. Members of the university
community are invited to utilize
the gymnastics equipment and ex
ercise area under the guidance of
qualified instructors during these
time periods
HANDBALLRACQUET
BALL
A challenge court system will be in
effect on court no. 2 from 8:15 p.m
to midnight on Tues Thurs. and
Sat. nights. A blackboard has been
provided on the observation deck
level to establish challenge posi
tions.
LACROSSE
There will be an organizational
meeting of the Lacrosse Club
Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 7 p.m The
meeting will be held in Brewster
room C 103 All those interested in
piaymg are to attend. If there are
any problems contact Clark Smith
at 355 6370. Don't miss it.
MODEL UNITED
NATIONS CLUB
There will be a meeting of the
Model UN Club at 4 on Tuesday.
Jan. 26. The meeting will be in
BC 105 All old members are en
couraged to attend and anyone
else who is interested are welcome
to attend
COMPUTER USER'S
GUIDE
Tne ECU Chapter of A C M has
just published a 65 page user's
guide lor the Burroughs computer
here at ECU It contains informa
lion useful to the beginner, as well
as more advanced faculty, staff,
or student users of the computer
Both batch (keypunch) and in
teractive (terminal) techniques
are covered They may be pur
chased for $3 m the Math depart
mental office
Continued From Page 1
"There is a stigma in
reference to black
schools. They are say-
ing they are not as
qualified she said.
After lengthy and
heated debate, the
resolution was approv-
ed by a three-vote
margin.
Another resolution
adopted at the con-
ference was in opposi-
tion lo ihe proposed
amendment to the N.C.
constitution extending
legislators' terms of of-
fice from two to four
years.
State Sen. Henson
Barnes, author of the
bill, stated to the
legislators, "It is an
issue thals time has
come. The facts are
there and we are going
to put it up and let the
people decide
Supporting the op-
posite view was
Thomas Gilmore,
former deputy
secretary for the
Department of Human
Resources. He favors
the two-year term to
prevent "full-time
politicians from mak-
ing their living being in
the general assembly
think we have bet-
ter laws, I think we
have better representa-
tion Gilmore said.
"There is no way that a
four-year term could
make a good legislator
better, but it could
make a bad legislator
worse
The resolution in op-
position to the four-
year term was adopted
by the conference
"overwhelmingly by a
voice vote according
;o Williams.
A resolution oppos-
ing the tobacco price
support program was
killed before it reached
the floor, being un-
favorably reported out
of committee.
A lengthy debate was
conducted about a
resolution supporting
strict enforcement and
penalties for drunk
driving in the state.
After several amend
ments were adopted
the resolution passed
by consent.
RUGBY
Rugby practice begins Tuesday.
Jan 26 for old did new players
Practices will be held from 4 to
6p m behind tlv Allied Health
Building Tuesdays through
Thursdays
SNOW SKI DEPOSITS
Deposits lor spring break skiing
at Sncwshoe. W V are due Jan 26
at 4 00 p m m Memorial Gym
Room 108 For more information
contact Mrs Jo Saunders at
757 6000 Memorial Gym 205
NOTICE
Students who CHANGED
THEIR ADDRESSES during
registration and drop add should
go to Whichard Buildilng. Room
100, and complete another form
The original forms were in
advertently destroyed during the
cleaning of the gym.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
nian in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. bur space is often
limited
The deadline for announcement
are 5 p.m. Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday. Jan 26. in
the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Dorm) The service
will be at 5 30 p r�. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, ne Rev Bill
Hadden, celebrating Supper ana
discussion after the service
FRISBEECLUB
ECU Fnsbee Disc Club proudly
presents N C State Freestyle
Champions Peter Laubert and Ed
Burt m a freestyle exhibition dur
ing half time of the basketball
game between the Pirates and the
University of Richmond 7 30 p m
Saturday. Jan 30
Club meetings will be held ever
Monday night at 8 p m . room 247
Mendenhall A wide range of ac
tivities are being discussed for the
spring semester Watch for the
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
April 17 and 18 at the Allied Health
Fields For more iformat.on call
Peter Laubert at 758 0375, Mike
Hill at 758 6043
PHI EPSILON KAPPA
A meeting will be held tor pro
spective new members on Mon
day. Feb 1 at 7 in Minges Col
,seum. room 145 New members
must be at least sophomores with
an intended maior of PHYE
NUTRITION AND
WEIGHT
There will be general nutrition
and weight reduction classes of
fered at the Student Health Center
for next five weeks (Jan 26 Feb
2,9,16.23) Call 757 6841 to enroll
tree of charge m the 9 10 a m or
10 11am class classes Individual
counselling for special diet pro
blems are available on these dates
from 8 9am by relerr' ol a
physician For more information,
-ontact the Student Health Centpr
INTER VARSITY
Christian Fellowship welcomes
everyone to their meetings every
Wednesday night at 7 30 in room
221 at Mendenhall This week
David Goehnng will lead the
discussion on "Understanding the
Charismatic Movement
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
Meets every Wednesday night at
953 East Tenth Streel Mass begins
at 5 p m and is followed by a
meeting and meal Plans for pic
nics. parties, retreats, and beach
weekends are made A great place
to meet and make lots of good
friends Come and find out what
we are all about
DEFENSE
Don't be a 98 pound weakling,
and let that beach bully push you
around this spring Sign up for a
Personal Defense Course offered
by the Dept of IM Rec Services
The classes are being offered on
Monday nights Irom 6 30 7 30 p m
in Memorial Gym, and from
7 30 8 30 p m m Slay Dorm The
super low cost of these classes is $5
for the entire eight week session
You can sign up m Room 204
Memorial Gym
You need no previous ex
perience 10 participate in these
classes You will learn to defend
yourself against an attacker, learn
to throw and take a punch, and
protect yourself against rape This
course is a fun way to increase
flexibility, increase strength, and
learn a very practical skill at the
samp time For additional mfor
mation. call Sue Stanley at
757 6064
FEELING A DRAFT
LATELY?
How should a Christian respond
to military service m a nuclear
age7 Would Jesus led a division of
soldiers into battle? if these ques
tions are difficult for you to
answer or you would iust like
more information we welcome ou
to view "Every Heart Beats
True a film strip about registra
tion and the draft
Come to Room 221 31 'he Library
Science Building on Thursday
evening. Jan 28 at 9 p m A brief
discussion will follow and informa
tion about registration, the draft
and counseling for ronscientious
obiectors will be available
Everyone is welcome and all Per
sonal information will be con
fidential Women are encouraged
to participate
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a major dur
mg change of maior week tor the
fall Semester, should report to
Minges Coliseum from 1:00 3 00
p m on Wednesday. Feb 10 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisit
for official admittance to the
physical education major pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the testis available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
CO-OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
fice. located m 313 Rawl Building
currently has job openings for
Summer and Fa.I 1982 with the
foiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore. MD,
Morth Carolina Internship Office
Raleigh, NC. Camp Day, NC in
stitute of Government Raleigh,
NC
For more information, contact
the Coop office m 313 Rawl
Building
FITNESS CLASSES
Get rid of those winter bulges
ind get ready to hit the beach
join the Fitness Classes offered
for students, faculty, staff, and
their families, sponsored by the
Dept of IM REC Services These
classes are designed to increase
flexibility, improve muscle tone,
increase cardiovascular fitness
and to hive a good time The cost
for the eight week session is $5 00
for the 1 time per week class.
$10 00 for the twice weekly classes
will begin the week of Feb 1
For times and places, call Sue
Stanley at 757 6064
WORKSHOPS
A variety of crafts workshops
nave been scheduled for Spring
Semester 1982 and will be
available for enrollment im
mediately Class space is limited
If you have any questions about
class curriculum, materials, or
fees please call 757 6611. ext 260
Following is a list of available
workshops.
floor loom weaving i
floor loom weaving m
photography
darkroom techniques
DRAWING
WOODWORKING
BASKETRY
POTTERY
WATERCOLOR
JEWELRY METALS
PPHA
Ihi' Preprofessional Health
Alliance (PPHAi will nave a
. this Thursday. Jan 28
Tins meeting will be held at 5 30
p m a1 The Afro American
Cultural Center All members and
inductees are urged to attend
The Preprofessional Health
Alnance also announces its Annual
induction Ceremony Fr.oay Jan
29 at Mencienhail Student I
7 30 p m
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
i
i
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
(.RUNMIIf
I WOlMMtKsfKOM
OXHORINT
III W 41k SI
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Have
Layaway
�Accepting any items of value for collateral
�All transactions confidential
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
ACROSS THE RIVER � Corner of N. Green ft Hwy. 33
(Pactolus Hwy.) 752 5759 Mon. Fri. 9 to 5 � Sat. I to 4
BICYCLES
GUNS
JEWELRY
STEREOS
MUSIC INSTRUMENTS
TOOLS
mwwww
1111
iro
Every Day
11:00-11:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Game
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
Every Doy - Buffet 11:00-2:002.79
Mon. & Tues. - Buffet 5:00-8:002.89
Wed. - "All You Con Eat" Spaghetti 5:00-8:002.25
Thurs. � Lasagne 5:00-8:00Two for $3.60
IIZZIIIXXXIIXIXIIIXXXXIIXIXIIIIIIIXXXIJ
The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St. I P.O. Box 59
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 756-8371
�Diagnostic Sets � Gloves
�Liftman Drs. Bags �Dissecting Kits
Stethoscopes � Blood Pressure
�Tuning Forks Equipment
Any Type of Product for
The Health Care Professional
WHY BUY RETAIL - WHEN YOU
CAN BUY FROM THE DISTRIBUTER
W
SiGN LANGUAGE
CLASS
The ECU Program tor Hearing
impaired Students and ECU Sign
Language Club announce a non
credit introductory 5.9"
Language class, beginning 6 30
p m Wednesday. Jan 20 n
Brewster B 203 on the ECU cam
pus The class �" be free to
Greenville students and adults
There i no registration required
and no age limit Students ma,
enroll for the class on Jan 20 V
and Feb 3 no students wii be ao
mitted to the class after that rjate
The class will begm at 6 30
week and meet lor approximately
two and one halt hours It will run
concurrent with the un.versity
spring semester schedule enng
April 28
For more information contact
the Program for Hearing im
paired Students .n Brewster A 114
or call 757 4729
ECGC
interested in sex a ' '
therapy? On January 26 .� �
be hosting a goes' speaker on
these subiects Election .
be held durinr -he firs' 15 mm
of the mee'mg so be prompt
meeting will begin a' 7 30 at M �
Newman Center Br.ric, �
and enioy some Stimulating con
versa'ion See you there'
HANDICAPPED
STUDENT SERVICES
The Ottice of Handicapped S'u
dent Services neeas r
drivers for the hand.capped van
Anyone interested who has the
afternoons free from 12 00 noon
until 6 00 p m should contact thf-
OMice of Handicapped Student
Services at 757 6799 or com- by
Whichard 212
BELLY DANCING
The Department of In'ramural
Recreational Services s offer,nq a
brand new course this semester
Belly Dancing1 This ancn"1' e�
otic art form will be offered Tues
day evenmgs from 6 30 7 3C p m
The class will be held in tne Dance
Room :n �empnai Gym sM-
Feb 2 and will continue I
weeks The COS' is J5 ' Of H �
session This is a beginners r 'ass
No experience 'S necessary D
be shy' Sign up m room 204
Memorial Gym for a fur-
will help �ou ge' ready tor c �
season For aadonal mtorma
tion. can Sue S'anK a- 757 6064
BANJO
A basic introdui ti - ,
banio will be t�
evenings from 6 30 r 45PI1
classes begm Februai �
on Apr 19
BEGINNING
BALLROOM DANCING
The basics anc
anopr.i
mg Tr �
9 thru An I 6
IMTERMEDIATP
BALLROOM DANCING
individual-
Rhurnbd D'Sf I
�� � � � �

8 00 9 00P
AED

tor Of
Countr Men lIH
the gw
s are mvit
P
I he has�arolinian
TI -
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by tr.
Subscription Ra't IM yi
The East Carolinian
are located in 'h Oo
Bui'dmg on mi campus
GreenvilK- N C

Telelb) 6J66
Application ti
class postage i ate is pndmq
Green-
l of r
or ab
I rtited
nj�re
pov. er
app j
ihe
arti
amendn
Vo
'intinul
w
c
J.A. Uniforms Shop
AM types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital
East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
NT0RY
TION
SALE!
Athletic Footwear
20 to
40 Off!
By Nike Converse
Brooks. New
Balance and other
famous makers
IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
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ATTENTION
BUSINESS MAJORS
SclfpOl of
USINCSS
east Carolina
Business shirts are now available in blue and
black in all sizes. If interested, please contact
Jeff Hales at 757-3484 or Tim Allen at
758-5473.
OP Sportswear
40 Off!
Long sleeve shirts Rugby
style shirts for men Knickers
and long sleeve blouses tor
women
Sweaters
30 Off! y
By Bolt and i
Boston Traders
Skiwear 40 Off
Jackets, Vests
and Bibs
For mei1 and women
by Oce.in Pacific
Pacific Trail Weather
Watchei md New
Spirit regularly
$45 951 i $90 J.
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40 Off!
The 'at � � a irm
ups for men and
women by Addas
Tiger Jog Joy
Loom Togs Winning
Ways Speedo and
others regularly $35 L,
and up New children s wa
small medium and iarqe rec
$29 00
Sizes and styles av iimned
ATTIC
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(next to Sears) 756-8341
10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Mi
?





I
1
I HI I S I CAROL 1MW
I t RN . ws;
nung
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ies,
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Pitt County Leader Pledges Support For ERA

B PATRICK
O'NEILL
Mali Wrilrr
First OJ Two Pans
Section One: Kquali-
t of rights under the
Ian shall not he denied
or abridged be the
I nited States or b any
Mate on account of sex.
Section Two: The
ongress shall have the
power to enforce. b
appropriate legislation,
the provisions of this
article.
Section Three: This
amendment shall take
effect two ears after
the date of ratification.
boe in the com-
ete text ol the Equal
Rights Amendment.
re commonlv known
as he ER . This
52-word amendment.
despite its shortness,
has become one of the
most contro ersial
issues of our time.
"It's the men who
dominate the state
legislature, and it's the
men who are voting
against ERA says
Mrs. Freddy Jacobson,
president of the Pitt
County chapter of the
Women's Political
Caucus. ' N o bod j
wants to share the
power
There are currently
fewer than 20 women
holding major political
offices in United States
Government, This in-
cludes almost 600 Con-
gressional and state
gubriatorial positions.
One of the 20 is New
York Congresswomen
Shirley Chisolm, who
will be lecturine at
ECU on Feb. 4.
"If the legislators
don't respond to the
iews of the people,
and their support of
ERA, then our goal is
to replace the
legislators says
Jacobson. Numerous
polls have indicated
oerwilling popular
support for the Equal
Rights Amendment,
and despite t he
unyielding support of
ERA b y G o e n o r
James Hunt, the North
Carolina State
Legislature has failed
to pass the amendment
on numerous occas-
sions.
At present, 35 states
hae approved the
ERA, and three more
states must be added
for the amendment to
be ratified. A recent
court decision has
declared that states that
hae recinded ERA can
be subtracted from the
35 and that the United
States Congress had to
fight to extend the
ratification deadline.
(It was extended for
three years in 1979.)
Jacobson claims that
the later decision "is
almost guaranteed to
be overruled, and
numerous w omen's
organizations have
petitioned the Supreme
Court to hear the case
as soon as possible
Despite these set-
backs. Jacobson and
the Women's Political
Caucus, continue to
work harder to see the
purpose of their move-
ment realized "to win
equal representation
for women in govern-
ment Adds Jacob-
son"Vomen earn only
59 cents for every
dollar a man earns, and
women make up to on-
ly five percent of cor-
porate and industry
management positions.
Women in the business
world are treated as
minorities
Section two of the
ERA is on the reasons
that Southern
legislatures are opppos-
ed to itThey claim
that it interferes with
states and the family"
notes Jacobson. "Yet
no Southern state has
initiated any equal
rights legislation on the
state level(13 other
states have passed an
equal rights amend-
ment.)
"Up till now, our
main concern has been
passage of the ERA.
and with that in mind
we have been suppor-
ting men who have
been supportive of
women's issues states
Jacobson. "Women
always steer away from
political things as being
non-feminine
"The status of
women is what we're all
about" continues
Jacobson. "We want to
get women actively in-
volved in the political
recess, by raising
funds, training them,
and ultimately getting
them to run for office.
We're going to concen-
trate on women can-
didates w ho support
women's issues � We
will not support a
women just because
she's a women
A recent Supreme
Court case has serious-
ly changed the status of
women married 10
military men. If divorc-
ed from their
husbands, the military
wives are not eligible
for a part of their
husbands' pension.
"Women were conv inc-
ed that they were pro-
tected legally.
e c o n o m i c a 11 y, and
emotionally Jacob-
son adds. "This deci-
sion adds 10 the
realistic assessment, by
the government, that
homemaking is not a
viable contribution to
society
In North Carolina,
legislation concerning
the equitable distribu-
tion of property was
passed "ultimately
leaving it up to a judge
(usually male) to make
this very important
division of property
decision Jacobson
called the state legisla-
tion "watered down"
and pointed out thai
some states "have
laws'that provide for
this equitable distribu-
tion.
On the national level,
the election of Ronald
Reagan has not been a
welcoming news event
for the women's move-
ment Reagan states
he's for equailitv. and
that seems to be the
beginning and ending
of his entire involve-
mentsays Jacobson.
SEXT: Freddy Jacob-
son talks about
women 's pro wini
political strength and
explains her support oJ
Affirmative Action.
Volunteers Help Prepare Women For Society
(Ontinued From Page 1 milled to be welcome to par-
, community -based ticipate
more . mmunity- volunteers. Kiefer can "The advisorv board is
: volunteers who set up interviews or verv helpful states
u ake the women out discuss other concerns Teel. "They help us
passes to go to a of prospective with material needs.
the library or volunteers over the programs, assistance in
some o
v w
ler activity, phone, and she says locating eommmunity
men are per- that ECU students are volunteers, recrutiing
Women's Preparedness
Controls Dorm TV Fire
Bv 1M V l)W l


d and
faults
tire
M

of tiie
re and
inding
thei
v
i ne kep
used a fan to blow
w ind a . Anotl ei
i � e department,
"The R.As (resident adviser)
fire prevention program helped a
lot Robbins commented.
Ruth Scott. Carre residence
director, said both ihe Greenville
Fire Department and R Pridgen
of the ECL maintenance depart-
ment complimented the women
their fast action.
"The girls were well-prepared.
The fire drills and :ne marshals
�Acre very important Scon added.
Scon alsv stressed that televisions
and other appliances should not be
on when no one is in a dor-
mitory room.
Robbins and her roommate were
able to -tav in their room.
other board members
and religious ac-
tivities
Teel notes that "the
job market got really
tight" and five of the
women are presently
out of work Three of
these women have just
been transfered here,
and one of them has
recently been laid off
"Right now we're ex-
periencing the same
crunch as anyone else
looking for a job.
Teel explains. Most
women "stav on the
job" after they're
released so those jobs
don't open up for the
new residents.
North Carolina has
over 1000 women in-
carcerated in its prison
systems. Due to the low
number of prisons for
women, many times a
woman inmate will be
located far away from
her family and friends.
Tins will con-
siderablycut down on
her contacts with the
outside world.
"Without family con-
tact main problems can
develop says Teel.
"There is a need for
more facilities (like
ours) in North
Carolina The other
treatment facilities for
women are located in
Charlotte. Winston-
Salem and Wilmington.
Being kept in an in-
stitution becomes the
environment a prisoner
is accustomed to. By
creating a home-like
env ironment. the
women are exposed to
the type of life they will
have to lead after
release.
"It takes them a
month or so just to ad-
just to cooking for
themselves notes
Teel. "The things we
take for granted they're
real nervous about
adds Kiefer. "They'll
get into a car and say
'Wow, it feels so dif-
ferent not to have a
counselor with me It's
like a parent over a
child
Even simple social
interaction with other
people can be a big
emotional strain.
Studies have been con-
ducted that prove that
half-way house type
programs reduce the
number of prisoners
who return to the
criminal life.
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ATNAUTILUS FITNESS IS OUR SPECIALTY
SOUTHS 6 1 ROCK NIGHTCLUB





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I
Qty Sort (Hwcatinim
Serving the East Carolina
community since 1925
Paul Collins, mmtmcw
Jimmy Dupree. -i j-L,rm
Ric Browning, iw�, u, m, Charles Chandler, sm mm
Fielding Miller, a� vfafl� Tom Hall, ,W1 ���,
Alison Bartel, aw mm, Steve Bachner. rii-niM.n. n ,��
Steve Moore, cmh �,� William Yelverton, .���
January 26, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Super Bowl XVI
Underdogs Give America Hope
It was America's "Super Sun-
day
That's right. Even though the
Dallas Cowboys, "America's
Team were not playing in Super
Bowl XVI, this past Sunday was
America's Day.
The game featured a pair of
teams, San Francisco and Cincin-
nati, who came from virtually
nowhere in just one season to play
in the game of games. Both clubs
were 6-10 during the 1980 season.
This year, though, the 49ers finish-
ed 13-3 and the Bengals 12-4 in the
regular campaign.
Both teams, then, were big
Cinderella stories. Both could be
categorized as underdogs despite the
fact that � for this year anyway �
they were the two best teams in the
league. It is the past that made them
such Cinderella sensations. Neither
has ever played in a Super Bowl.
Both had only dreamed of that.
The Bengals and 49ers brought a
fresh, new flavor to the Super Bowl.
The 49ers, 26-21 winners on Sun-
day, are the only team over the past
ten years to break the "Big Four
Power Syndrome What's that?
For nine years running either
Dallas, Miami, Pittsburgh or
Oakland won the NFL title game.
None of the league's 24 other teams
were able to win the championship
during that span.
All that changed, though, when
DOONESBURY
the 49ers and Bengals won their
respective conference titles just over
two weeks ago. The ultimate in
Cinderella sensations. Not one, but
TWO Cinderella stories were play-
ing in the biggest game in all of
football. America had TWO under-
dogs to pull for.
In today's society, the underdog
is everyone's favorite. With the
economy in constant disarray, with
nations constantly bickering with
other nations, with big business bur-
ning the little guy for all he's got,
the underdog is definitely a member
of the majority.
That majority (whether moral or
not) had a tough decision concern-
ing this Super Bowl. No, an under-
dog was not facing a big name. An
underdog was facing an underdog.
The nation rejoiced!
As it turned out, San Francisco fit
into the coveted glass slipper. The
49ers. are now just about
everybody's favorite Cinderella.
The names Montana, Clark,
Soloman, Wersching and Reynolds
are at near-legendary status just two
days after the big game.
Super Bowl XVI, we salute you.
You gave this country something it
badly needs � hope. Just think, if
the Bengals and 49ers can make it to
the Super Bowl, maybe some of us
little guys can make it to the top.
Maybe that glass slipper will fit one
of us someday.
by Garry Trudeau
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I'M AQMNST THE -REINSTATEMENT OF
THE SGA MPDICAL EhERGENCy LOAN FOND,
BECAUSE IT MAY BE USEt To PA1 FOK
BRAIN OPERATIONS ANP I'M MORALLY
OFPoSEO To PEOPLE HAVING FREE
Control over their own brains
Gi)cmcr
THE �VST
CAROLINIAN -92-
Reagan Follows Alger's Visions
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
In Ronald Reagan's idealized America,
self-reliance is the highest virtue. The ghet-
to youth who spurns dope to become a
classical composer, the backyard inventor
who upstages the smarty-pants scientist,
the patriotic veteran who starts his small
business without a government loan �
these are the heroes of Reagan's mythic
America. Coincidentally, 1982 marks the
150th birthday of a once hugely-popular
writer whose values were identical to those
of our 40th president. His name, still
synonymous with bootstrap capitalism,
was Horatio Alger, Jr.
Alger, a Harvard-educated Unitarian
minister, made his name by cranking out
more than 100 books with an identical
theme: the poor-but-proud boy goes from
poverty to prosperity by dint of hard work
and a little luck. Invariably honest, simple
and sincere, Alger's newsboys and
bootblacks made good as soon as they
decided to clean up their acts and go for
the gold.
The Alger formula vas wildly suc-
cessful. He sold a staggering 200 million
books of juvenile ficton on the way to
becoming the favorite author of YMCAs
and Sunday schools. Readers recognized
themselves in his stories. Alger was one of
the first to describe, in fairly realistic pro-
se, the degrading poverty that gripped
America's great cities.
Yet the truest source of Alger's appeal
was not his invocations of American reali-
ty, about American fantasy. Alger wrote
betyween 1860 and 1899, when this coun-
try was wracked by especially sharp divi-
sions of race, class and gender. His fic-
titious self-starters burned up the
sidewalks of New York even as real-life
corporations � the infamous trusts �
locked up the United States economy. In
life, the individual's chance of beating
those odds were slim; in Alger's morality
tales the hero always succeeded. Alger, the
ultimate pulp preacher, was read because
he offered hope of earthly salvation.
Alger's own success brought him fame
and money, most of which he gave away.
A kind, shy and generous man, Alger sup-
ported many penniless people and counted
friends among the youthful scufflers he
wrote about. He did most of his work in a
simple room in the Newsboys' Lodging
House, a Manhattan charitable institution.
A conservative man by nature, Alger did
make one foray into social activism. He
wrote and spoke against the padrone
system that brought Italian boys to
America as indentured musicians in the
service of men who often starved and beat
them. Alger himself was beaten for his ad-
vocacy and took to packing a pistol. But
his labor bore fruit when the state of New
York outlawed the most exploitative
aspects of the padrone system. For other
social ills, Alger had an unvarying and
unimaginative prescription: hire more
cops.
Alger's depictions of street life, while
realistic on the surface, were not
penetrating. He lacked the structural
analysis of American contemporaries such
as Eugene Debs and Henry George and the
literary depth of Mark Twain and Vvalt
Whitman. The limits of his vision became
apparent to Alger himself in his later years.
According to an early biographer, Herbert
R. Mayes, Alger longed to write a master-
piece for adults but never left his familiar
fantasy factory long enough to do so. As
he lay dying in 1899, Alger ordered all
copies of his books removed from his
room.
In sum, Alger's was a child's vision of
an adult world. He could not or would not
comprehend complexity. It is this view,
substantially unaltered, that Ronald
Reagan has invoked repeatedly in his first
year in office. Charity, volunteensm, rugg-
ed individualism and work, work, work �
the fundamentals of 19th century social
philosophy � are commended to modern
Americans as solutions for 20th centurv
problems by an electronic Horatio Alger.
Ronald Reagan's America has been
lifted verbatim from some very old books.
The most important thing to remember
about those books is that not even Horatio
Alger believed everything he wrote in
them.
Mendenhall's Future Uncertain
By CHARLES M. SUNK
This is the last in the sporadic series on
the puolic record of Rudolph Alexander,
associate dean of students and director of
Mendenhall Student Center. Having been
delayed for various reasons � including
the threat of lawsuit � it has admittedly
taken longer to cover this subject than was
originally planned.
Over the last two months, I have attemp-
ted through numerous examples, to raise
one central question: is Rudolph Alex-
ander, in his position as director of
Mendenhall Student Center and associate
dean of students, serving the best interests
of those whom he has hired to serve �
Editorial Analogy 'Misleading9
An analogy which appeared in your
January 21st editorial, which dealt with
the issue of Medical Loans at ECU was,
at best, dumb, and at worst, misleading.
It appeared in the following: "Ifthe
SGA decides that abortion is evil and
that students cannot use the fund for
such purposes, why shouldn't they (the
SGA, I assume) go one step further and
say that snorting cocaine is wrong and
therefore no one can use a medical to
have his nose cauterized? Where do you
draw the line?"
It is understandable how such an
analogy came to be made. Snorting co-
caine is pleasurable; having sex is
pleasurable. Having to have your nose
cauterized is an unfortunate conse-
quence of snorting cocaine; having to
get an abortion is an unfortunate conse-
quence of having sex. But the analogy is
bad � not only for the obvious reason
that to compare cocaine snorting (fun,
but frivolous) with sex (fun, but often �
hopefully � much more) is insensitive.
The analogy is bad because it doesn't
work. While no one would object to the
cure of cauterizing a nose, many would
object to the cure of aborting a pregnan-
cy. (Just as while some might object to
the practice of snorting cocaine, none let
us hope, would object to the act of sex-
ual intercourse.) Furthermore, nose-
cauterizing is often done for reasons
other than asctreatment for cocaine
over-indulgence, while abortions are, by
definition, acts which terminate
pregnancies. To, even hypothetically,
compare those that hold that abortions
should not be paid for out of student
funds, with those who would object to
the cauterizing of a nose, is a libelous at-
tempt to denigrate into absurdity the
heartfelt feelings of many people whose
opinions, apparently, are more carefully
thought out than your own.
Unfortunately, the issue of abortion is
plagued by insensitivity on both sides.
Feminists sift through scientific data and
choose to publicize those sources which
supprt their position, while "pro-life"
advocates cart out blood-curdling
photographs of abortions, hoping to
disgust an audience into forgetting that
what is physically disgusting is not
necessarily morally revolting.
As for myself, I support Lester's deci-
sion to veto the medical loan for the
same reason that 1 am against the pro-
posed constitutional amendment bann-
ing abortion. Abortion is a private deci-
sion and should be funded by private
means: either out of a woman's own
resources or by "charitable" organiza-
tions set up to meet this need. The
government should not come between a
woman and her doctor. Likewise, the
government � student or other wise �
should not come between a tax payer
and his or her conscience and force him
or her to pay for a procedure about
which he or she has moral misgivings.
AL AGATE
Graduate Student, English
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Buiding, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
namely ECU students?
I am reminded of Samuel Johnson's
rather cynical view that we are inclined to
belive those whom we do not know
because they have never deceived us. In-
deed, for those who have never worked at
Mendenhall Student Center or for those
who have never worked with Alexander,
there is no way of knowing what goes on at
Mendenhall Student Center. There is
deception, though we may not know it.
This, admittedly, seems far-fetched.
However, there are many at ECU as well as
those throughout the nation who know of
Alexander and of his reputation. For ex-
ample, on or around August 13, 1981,
Alexander received a letter from Max V.
West, member of the Board of Directors of
the National Entertainment and Campus
Activities Association (NECAA). NECAA
has a national membership somewhere bet-
ween 300 - 400 schools, and Mr. West, as a
member of the NECAA Board of Direc-
tors carries a position of clout within and
without the organization. In his letter to
Alexander, West expressed his objection to
Alexander's decision not to allow Assistant
Program Director Mary Ellen Norton to
attend the NECAA National Convention
in Chicago. In doing so, West also ques-
tioned Alexander's professional judge-
ment:
"Having been in the Southeast for
several years, I have heard through other
contacts of your somewhat negative feel-
ings towards NECAA. I feel ech profes-
sional has their own decision to make.
However, it is somewhat unfair to limit the
professional growth of others by not
allowing them to attend conferences due to
personal biases
It is worth noting that Mary Ellen Nor-
ton, the person whom the letter was writ-
ten, resigned her position as assistant pro-
gram director last month � less than six
months after arriving at ECU. Her resigna-
tion, was due in part, to questionable pro-
fessional judgements on the part of Alex-
ander that may have included the NECAA
incident.
Again, there is the critical queston to be
considered: is Alexander serving the best
interests of the ECU community, students
to be specific? In answering this question,
one has to weigh ALexandcr's record of
the last 20 years.
In fairness, Alexander has served this
university and its students well in the past.
Interviews with Alexander's staff prove
this fact; however, his past record in no
way justifies his actions of the last five
years. Once again, interviews with those
same staff members point out that Alex-
ander's record of accomplishments can not
cover for his present failures.
Judging everything in balance then,
Alesxander's record should be seen as one
of failure; one of poor professional discre-
tion and a record that no longer serves the
best interests of those whom he was
selected to serve some 20 years ago �
students. The Mendenhall staff departures
that I have previously cited point this out;
the numerous trips point this out; and un-
fortunately, the future at Mendenhall mav
also support this contention.
For example, the associate director and
business manager of Mendenhall Student
Center: this position was vacated (through
resignation) on December 1, 1981 and re-
mains vacant. It is a position that requires
a close working association with students,
and yet, as of last week there was no stu-
dent involvement in filling of the vacancy.
According to Mendenhall sources, there is
currently no selection committee set up
and there are no plans for one.
Additionally, this decision to limit, if
not prohibit involvement in the selection of
the new associate director was Alexander's
decision. When asked about this, Alex-
ander again had no comment. Was Alex-
ander's decision to prohibit involvement
by students in their best interest? All things
considered, I think not. Remember, even
the selection of the new Chancellor in-
cludes a student � a position that in no
way compares to the associate director's
position in the requirement of student
association.
As I said in my first column on this sub-
ject back in November, I arrived at ECU
several years ago expecting a complete
education . 1 have not been disappointed.
Alexander has taught me many a lesson �
though in retrospect, most are lessons that
1 might have preferred to avoid. I would
venture to guess that my successions in the
Student Union will also learn the same
lessons.
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THE EAST CAROL INIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 26, 1982
Page 5
Holiday Film
Brings Martin
Out Of Hiding
By RON BASK
�rilrr� Blot
HOLLYWOOD - This sugar
cube of a house, this white Bauhaus
fortress, guarded by automatic TV
cameras, is most definitely not the
home of a wild and crazy guy.
Do wild and crazy people live in
Beverly Hills, Calif.? One considers
this, while cooling one's heels out-
side the anonymous facade during
the moments before Steve Martin
makes his appearance, driving a
very unfashionable Honda Accord,
then disappearing behind an
automatically opening garage door.
When he appears at the front
door, Martin is outfitted in pewter
colors: thinning pewter hair, expen-
sive pewter shirt and slacks. He is a
boyish 35, conservative-looking and
upwardly mobile. In short, he does
not look at all ot of place either in
Beverly Hils or in this house.
"Maybe I'll get something to
drink he says, walking through
the foyer. "No. I need something to
eat. I've been running like crazy
He disappears into the kitchen at the
rear of the house.
Nothing quite prepares you for
the ambience here. It is less a home,
more an art gallery � stark, modern
and cold, in the style that a
municipality with a lot of money
would love to build as a local palace
of culture. The house breathes
restrained, expensive taste, but com-
fort has not been allowed in the
door. The creamy white walls are
adorned with pieces of American
art, each one highlighted by track
lighting.
One has heard that Steve Martin
the man bears little resemblance to
Steve Martin the comedian. But this
richly austere chapel for the celebra-
tion of American art lends a certain
dramatic impact to the difference.
Can anyone live here and possibly
be funny? Would the kids, who in
1978 got swept up by the Steve Mar-
tin craze, complete with the funny
rabbit ears and the "Excuuuuuuse
me" imitations, recognize the owner
of this place? Maybe not. But at the
moment that possibility does not
bother Martin the least. For the last
year the comedian has been under
wraps, anyway. No tours, not even
See STEVE, Page 6
Steve Martin and Bernadetle Peters trip the light fantastic with this AstaireRogers dance number from Pennies From Heaven.
Bowie Stars In Wednesday's 'Just A Gigolo'
ByJOHNWEYlER
Mafl Writer
The dying days of the German Weimar Republic � a
crumbling country, spiritually, politically and financial-
ly bankrupt, soon to slide into the horrors of Nazism:
This is the setting for a strange, rarely-seen little film,
starring the most unlikely pair of lovers in movie
history: David Bowie and Marlene Dietrich.
The film is Just a Gigolo and it plays this Wednesday
evening at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre. Admission is by student ID and activity
cards or MSC membership.
Following the film in room 244 of the student center,
Dr. Agnes Hostetler of the Foreign Language Depart-
ment will lead a short, informal discussion of Just a
Gigolo. Coffee and doughnuts w iil be served and any in-
terested students, faculty or staff are invited to attend.
The film is being sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee.
Just a Gigolo was directed by David Hemmings. an
artist best known for his performance in Michelangelo
Antonioni's 1966 classic Blow I p. Here he does double
duty as actor and director, overseeing an unusual, often
outrageous enterprise featuring not only a rock
superstar and a former Hollywood femme fatale bin
such actresses as Kim Novak and German-born Maria
Schell.
Cinema
Bowie is, of course, the sexually ambiguous surrealisi
musician whose other acting roles include an alien
creature in Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell To Earth
(1976) and a hideously-deformed Victorian fellow in the
mmmm
mmmmtmm
m
si age production of The F.lephant Man.
In Just a Gigolo, he portrays Paul von Prysgodski, a
Prussian officer who, failing to achieve success on the
battle field, docs so in the bedroom, becoming an escort
for wealthy, wicked, elderly women. One of those he en-
counters is played by Marlene Dietrich, who, though
missing from the screen for many years, was once one of
the reigning sex goddesses of the cinema.
Some critics, such as Village Voice's Andrew Sarris,
were somewhat cool to Just A Gigolo, but enthused
about the performances given by a fine cast:
"The campy associations of Just A Gigolo � Weimar
decadence, David Bowie's androgynousness, David
Hemmings's bizarre ambitiousness, Kim Novak's in-
domitable spirit, Maria Schell's idomitable spirit,
Marlene Dietrich's idomitable spirit, Sydne Rome's in-
explicable chutzpah � make it at least a mildly want-see
curiosity
"Obviously, the sole raison d'etre of the film is David
Bowie's very provacatively perverse persona, and the
faith of the filmmakers is not entirely misplaced. After I
had written off the lack of credibility in this hodgepodge
of a co-production, 1 grew increasingly attached to the
genuinely gentle charisma of Bowie's personality.
"The reluctance of the young Prussian officer he
plays to make it with sexually aggressive Weimar
women never becomes a nasty in-joke for the more in-
sistently misogynous sector of the gay sub-culture.
Bowie's charm in this situation arises from his lack of
�smug narcissism and pouty fastidiousness
Surprisingly, Bowie makes an ideal, if odd, match for
queen Marlene, the obsession of the late director Josef
Von Sternberg. He discovered the German actresss-
inger and starred her in several now-classic stylized
epics: The Blue Angel (1929), Morocco (1930), Blonde
Venus (1932) and others.
Says Molly Maskell in from Reverence to Rape.
"Marlene Dietrich, as the feminine principal accor-
ding to Josef Von Sternberg is even less a national ar-
chetype than Ciarbo. But she is also less of a sex object.
She is Sternberg's creation, his animal, and yet she ab-
sorbs so much of him into her that she is not an 'other'
as object, on the far side of the sexual gulf, but an an-
drogynous subject.
Spoleto Slated
Charleston, S.C. � The 1982 Spoleto Subscription
Series was announced today in a news conference with
Festival president John W. Kessler. Scheduled for May
21 - June 6, 1982, the Festival will be presenting its sixth
annual program of opera, dance, music, theatre, and
visual arts.
Six separate Subscription Series are being offered,
allowing patrons to purchase tickets to three, four, five
or six of the Gaillard Auditorium events, as well as two
series of Spoleto's popular Chamber Music Concerts.
"By subscribing now, people can save up to 25 per-
cent on ticket prices noted Kessler. "And they can
order tickets early for other Festival Events. Subscribers
get first choice for tickets both for subscription events
and other Festival Events. Advance copies of the 1982
Ticket and Information brochure will be mailed to
subscribers to enable them to purchase tickets three
weeks before they go on sale to the general public
Special ticket exchange privileges are available for
three of the Subscription Series. If subscribers are
unable to attend a scheduled performance on the A, B
or C Subscription Series at the Gaillard Municipal
Auditorium, they may exchange the tickets for available
tickets to another performance of that event.
"Out-of-towners will be particularly interested in
Series D, which offers three major events over a one-
weekend period stressed Kessler. "The deadline for
subscribing is January 16, 1982, so it is important to act
quickly
Subscription brochures have been mailed to everyone
on the Spoleto mailing list. Others who wish to receive a
free copy of the brochure may do so by contacting
Spoleto Festival USA, P.O. Box 704, Charleston, S.C.
29402 (803) 722-2764.
Black Arts Week
Chisholm Lecture Is Scheduled
i
� � �
1
m
1

Ostracized by society and an object of scorn in the tiny seaside village in which she lives, Sarah
Woodruff (Meryl Streep) is a lonely figure on the sea wall in this scene from The French lieutenant's
Woman, playing April 21 at Hendrix Theatre. Tomorrow rright, David Bowie stars in Just a Gigolo at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. Both films are sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee.
��:x;x:�:
� a ��� � � � �"0-��-�.
ft�SW:S�:SPSiro
Plans have been announced by East Carolina Univer-
sity for the Annual Black Arts Festival. The festival
which is under the sponsorship of the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee will begin on January 31 and
continue through February 6.
The first event will take place on Sunday, January 31,
at 5 p.m. It will feature a gospel concert with the ECU
Gospel Ensemble and the N.C. State University Gospel
Choir. The N.C. State University Gospel Choir has
toured throughout North Carolina and the Southeast.
Their selections will range from traditional spirituals to
the contemporary gospel sound. The program will be
held in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center,
and there is no admission charge.
On Monday, February 1, at 6:30 p.m a "soul food"
dinner will be held in the Multi-Purpose Room of the
Student Center. The dinner is being catered by Bell's
Plantation Restaurant and will feature such dishes as
chitterlings, ham hocks, collards, candied yams, corn-
bread, and sweet potato pie. Tickets for the dinner are
on sale at the Central Ticket Office and are priced at $4
each. Tickets must be purchased by January 26.
The festival continues on Tuesday at 8 p.m. with a
talent competition. The competition will be held in Hen-
drix Theatre and will feature music, drama, and dance.
Tickets are priced at $1 and will be on sale at the door
on the evening of the event.
The comedy of Redd Foxx comes to the movie screen
of Hendrix Theatre on Wednesday, at 8 p.m. when or-
man.Js That You? will be shown. This star studded
comedy centers on Redd Foxx who leases his wife to his
brother, and discovers that his son is having an inter-
racial gay relationship. In addition to Foxx, the film
stars Pearl Bailey, Dennis Dugan, Tamara Dobson and
Jayne Meadows. Admission will be by ECU ID and ac-
tivity cards or MSC membership.
U.S. Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm will speak in
Hendrix Theatre on Thursday at 8 p.m. One of the most
independent minded members of the United States Con-
gress and the Congressional Black Caucus, she means it
when she says "unbought and unbosscd She will be
speaking on the subject "America's Impoverished
Spirit Tickets for the lecture are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office and are priced at $2.50 for ECU students
$3.50 for faculty and staff, and $5 for the public. All
tickets sold at the door will be $5.
On Friday "An Ebony Revue" will be performed by
the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Neo-
Back Society's drama group. The performance will be
held in Auditorium 244 of the Student Center. Music
for the dance will be provided by a band to be announc-
ed. The dance will begin at 10 p.m. Tickets are priced at
$2 and will be on sale at the door.
For additional information concerning the week long
festival, contact the Program Office at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 213.
T

i
t






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26, 1982
Steve Martin Steps Back Into
Limelight For More Craziness
Continued From Page S
television, the medium that helped
make Martin a star.
"I'm doing one special this
year he says, coming back into the
living room, carrying a tuna fish
sandwich. "I wanted the audience
to forget a bit. You can overexpose
yourself. I've learned you can do
too much TV
Everything then has been in
readiness for the emergence of Steve
Martin, dramatic actor and dancing
star. No more The Jerk, his first
comedy movie that grossed more
than $100 million. This is serious
business � a $20 million MGM ex-
travaganza combining music and
drama called Pennies From Heaven
(which recently played an extended
holiday run at Greenville's Park
Theatre).
It is directed by Herbert Ross and
written by Dennis Potter, a British
dramatist, and everyone is at pains
to explain that this is not a remake
of the 1938 Bing Crosby movie. But
it is adapted from Potter's scripts
for a BBC-TV series. Whatever,
Pennies From Heaven is the biggest
challenge of Martin's career � and
perhaps the riskiest.
"1 had seen part of the BBC pro-
duction and was already in love with
it he says, munching on his sand-
wich. "I thought it was the greatest
thing ever. It didn't occur to me not
to do it. 1 had no doubts whatsoever
that I could pull if off. I knew I
wanted to do it no mattes what the
sacrifice. I didn't care about the
odds
Perhaps not, but nevertheless, he
hedged the bet a trifle. He wasn't
supposed to read for Ross, and Ross
was not supposed to listen; but he
read anyway, and Ross listened �
just to make sure both men liked
what they heard. Then he worked
out on weights and took 60 weeks of
tap-dancing lessons to get in shape
for the musical numbers. ("It was
like going into the ring with
Muhammad Ali he says.) He
leans back in his easy chair, finished
with the sandwich.
"This movie is so complex he
says. "To say what it's reality
about, maybe that should be left to
a college class But Martin isn't
about to do that.
"It takes place in the Depression
but it's not really about the Depres-
sion he says. "It's a very literary
work in some ways, a morality play
on a sophisticated level. It's about a
guy who is a victim of fate, always
fighting against impossible odds,
struggling against inner forces
Martin plays a sheet-music
salesman named Arthur Parker in
1934 Chicago. Arthur's philosophy
is simple: "I wanna live in a world
where the songs come true. Why
not? There must be someplace
where the songs are for real
For Martin fans, Pennies From
Heaven may be a little like waking
up to discover Jerry Lewis playing
the lead in a production of
Macbeth. It is not a world wherein
the performer, particularly when he
is a comedian, is allowed easily out
of his pigeon hole.
"If you haven't seen me on Satur-
day Night Live or in The Jerk, then
maybe you don't have any expecta-
tions at all Martin says. "A lot of
people haven't seen me, and how
many fans are really going to be
upset? Probably six. None of this
has been hard on me. It's hard for
the people saying, 'Steve, we've got
a business to run here When I
started out in show business, I did
what I wanted to do. If I start being
led around now, that's the road to
disaster
Curiously, he always wanted to
act in movies.
"I think I became a comedian
because it's the path of least
resistance he says. "If you're an
actor, yo" have to sit in someone's
office. II you're a comedian, you
can work. Actors either practice or
work. They can't break into it like
See MARTIN, Page 7
PRESENT
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Phone 752-3172
Located 1 mile past Hastings Ford
on 10th St. extension

Fish Nuggets
and
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Crab Cakes
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THURSDAY NIGHT � 7:00 P.M. FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT � 5, 7:45, 10:15 P.M. - HENDRIX fHEATRI
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
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Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
AOVERTISED IEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale m
each Kroger Savon, except as speaficai
ly noted in this aa If we do run out of an
item we will otter you your choice of a
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ting the same savings or a ramcheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
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within 30 days
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COSMITIC A
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you can in comedy
Martin was born in
Waco. Texas, but his
f a m i I y moved t o
Southern California
when he was 5. His
father was a sometime
actoi who made his liv-
ing as a real estate
broker. He remembers
watching Laurel and
Hardy on TV as a kid,
and hking them much
more than Charlie
Chaplin, although later
he came 10 appreciate
Chaplin. And he loved
Jerry Lewis.
At age 10 he was
working at Disneyland,
and by the time he turn-
ed 21, he had left his
theatrical major at
UCLA to write for
television � The
Smothers Brothers
Comedy Hour � and
later for Sonny and
Cher, Pat Paulsen,
Glen Campbell and
John Denver.
"1 always wanted to
do this (performing),
from the age of 3 he
savs. "1 had a close
friend, and we were
always doing crazy
things in school. A lot
of people, particularly
my parents, wanted me
to do something else,
and at one time I
thought of philosophy
and teaching. But I
couldn't look back in
10 years and say 1
didn't go into show
business
It was not easy. He
kicked around for
years, first as the clean-
cut polyester comedian,
then the long-haired,
doped-up hipster open-
ing for rock groups. He
cleaned up his act in
Aspen. Colo then
went on the road again,
swearing he wouldn't
open for another rock
group.
In 1976, he finally at-
tracted national atten-
tion with a one-hour
Home Box Office
special and his first
guest shot on Saturday
Sight Live. By then he
was wearing the vanilla
ice cream suits, and had
perfected the absurdist
blend of innocent
nonsense and
showbusiness shtick
that was soon to
become a national rage.
Martin didn't tell jokes
about politicians or his
mother-in-law; he
made fun of perform-
ing and of the kind of
overly sincere nitwit
that hosts shows a
media-wise TV au-
dience loved to see
satirized.
"Yes, I'm a wild
and craaaaaazy guy
he would announce.
"The kind of guy who
might like to do
anything. at
anytimeto drink
champagne at 3 a.m. or
maybeat 4 p.meat
like a chipmunkor
evenwear two socks
on one foot
He was never angry
or controversial, but he
had a knack for coming
off the wall to puncture
self-importance and
fashionable artifice.
"I'm on drugs he
said during his act.
"You know what I'm
talking about. 1 like to
get small. It's very
dangerous for kids
because they get realllly
small. I know 1
shouldn't get small
when I'm driving, but 1
was driving around the
other day and a cop
pulls me over and says,
'Hey, are you small?' 1
say, 'No, I'm tall He
says, I'm gonna have to
measure you They
give you a little test
with a balloon. If you
can get inside it, they
know your're small
Of his success, Mar-
tin says: "I just felt I
knew how to be funny.
I've been doing comedy
for a long time, since 1
was 16. "
would like
to remind
the students
of ECU to
Support those
who advertiser
in The East Carolinian
Current urKterqroduote pre-
medical itudenti rnoy no� ton-
pert to. �e�eeal hundred Air
force jcholor�hip� TKe�e
icholarih.pi ore to be o�ocded�
to ��ude�t, accepted into
medical �cnool, o, rrethmen or
a- tne beginning ot their
lopliomort year The schotor
ih.p pro'ide, tor turtion boo�
lob tee, ond equipment plus o
SS30 monthly ollowante In
.eitiaate rhu tmonool alter
native to ttie h.ah toil ot
medicol education
Contoct
I r IIHIIH
HKlltrMtt
KU Kl HIM.
Suite GL I 1 lOONovoho Dr
Rale.gh N C 27689
Phone Collect 919 755-41 M
ABORTIONS
l 24 week terminations
App't's. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1 800-321 0575
WE
SEW
S LEATHER
COATS

'�'�'
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
X 113 GRANDE AVE. �
� 758-1228 S
� - .itu
3D �"�����������"� � ere. � � ���'�K
Blood Drive
Room 244
Mendenhall
Student Center
10-4 Wed. &Thurs.
Jan. 27 & 28
Sponsored by Circle K
THE GREAT "X" INFLATION FIGHTER
Super Perms
Super Cuts i
Offer
good
with
coupon
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM U U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SIIS 00 Pregnancy Test, fertli
Control. �nd Problem
Pregnancy Countttinf. For tur
rtter information call U2-OU3
(Toll Free Number
�00 221-2SM) between � A.M.
and 5PM weekday,
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
� 17 Weil Morgan St
Raleign, N C
!The"Sro77,x"
'�& The Great "X" Cut
I -�& Otter etiective thn,
;20��
OFF
EACH
Otter etiective thru I
February �th
,i 10-9 DAILY
I 756-8694
�JP�C3HYi0nS
PRECISION HAIRCUTTERS
wmmmmmmmmmg
fejJRT'
Kings Productions Auditions
East Carolina University
A J Fletcher Recital Hall
Tues. Feb 2. 4-7 pm
Carowlnds
Midway Music Hail
Sun . Jan 31 12-4 p m
Productions feature professionally
designed scenery costumes staging
and choreography m fully eguipped theatres and outdoor stage
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists � Technicians
Variety Performers � $180-250week
One found trip a� (are w � pd to rww pertomen :����' ' I ��
7SO miles to the park
Contact Live Snows Carowmds Bo�?40S6 Charlotte NC 2822
or Kings Productions
Enterra-nmen, Dept 1932 Hrghiand Ave Cncnn. OH 452t?
104 Red Bonks Rd.
(behind Shoney's)
756-6000
, � ���-�IL 'I, lVte, TI i

Every Tuesday is E.C.U. Night
$1.00 with ID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00 p.m.
Show your ID
Friday or Saturday
Nights and you will be admitted for
just $2.00 including Skate Rental
Sportsworld has times set aside for
Private Party's.
Party Beverages are
welcome.
m
i
Contact us for further
details.
mmm
mmsmm
mmm&m&m
I
'
t





THt EAST CAROM Nl AN
Sports
Wolfpack Fights
Off Pesky Pirates
BvHRI ESCHANDI ER
KM 1 IGH N v State's 14th
ked Wolfpack bounced bask
n an upset loss earlier in the
week with a hard (ought 63 53 win
1 .in: i arolina Saturday night.
I he Pack, which had fell to Duke
last Wednesday, had no easy lime of
wit 1 ht Pirates, who themselves
yii � to come back after con
secutive upset losses ti1 I N(
V i ngi �n Md Campbell.
Pirates, who fell to 6-9.
nd it haul to get inside against
State's vaunted one defense, vet
: in long bombs tune and again
- � the game close in the first
I ven so, he Hues never led.
II centei Al Mack was the
iding scorer, tallying 18 in
shooting performance.
Mack - showing, the best ol his
1I careei. miffed the Statt tans,
' m oul as the
� �ould "cheer" for each
iched the ball. The taetie
� I well as an intimidating
�f the year, but tailed
s I nda
Sta . upped its record to
a quick 14-6 lead
. � ead to send he Pirates
heir heads down. I his
ugh. 1C I battled
iwing three straight
by Tl ni Brown, came to
�ints of the Pack, al
24 22. with just over seven minutes
remaining in the opening h II
State point guard Sidney 1 owe
opened things up, though, with a
jumper and two consecutive steals
that he converted into layups. I owe
then assisted fellow guard Derrick
Whittenburg on a lav up thai put
State up bv ten, 34 24.
Behind Mack's three buckets, the
Pirates battled to within seven,
9 32, be!ore the half.
I wo straight buckets bv guard
Bruce Peartree dnd Mack brought
the Pirates to within three, al 39-36,
at the outset oi the second period.
I he Bucs never got that close
again, though they did narrow the
margin to six on several occasions.
likewise, the Wolfpack never
really put the game oul of reach un-
til late when they built a 1? pom:
advantage before winning bv 10.
following the contest, ECl head
coach Dave Odom said he was pro-
ud of his club's performance.
"Our players followed the game
plan as close as they could he
said "We were able to find some
holes in State's one, and 1 think we
did a good job defensively 1 hey on-
ly got 15 shots off then half-court
offense. Anv time you U that,
you're in good shape.
"But we are disappointed because
we came here to win. I think our
players expected to win; I know 1
did
What mav have done the Pirates
in was what kept them in the game
early outside shooting. The Bucs
made 55.2 percent of their first-half
field goals, but had that figure fall
to 28 percent in the second period.
I he Wolfpack shot well all night,
finishing at 60.5 percent.
State coach Jim Valvano had high
praises for ECU'S early shooting
prowess.
"We scouted Fast (arolina he
said, "and the report was that they
didn't shotit very well. But that was
the best shooting performance
against us all year. In the second
half, we placed more half-court like
we'd being doing all year and held
them down some
State was led by guard Derrick
Whittenburg's 13 points. Forward
rhurl Bailee added 12 and center
Chuck Nevnt 10 in the Wolfpack
win.
The Pirates return home this week
to attempt to break their three-game
losing string against a pair of for-
midable toes. I INC Charlotte, off
to a great 13-3 start, is the opponent
Wednesday night. On Saturday,
E-South rival Richmond comes
to Minges Coliseum.
V I I
� . � 1 A

r 0
� 13
� � �
' ' 41 V !
H-
11J21 � :
Eyeing The Ball
Last Carolina's Charles Green (at left)
battles V.C. State forward Waller
Dinky' Proctor for possession oj the
basketball in Saturday night's name in
Raleigh. Both Green and Proctor are
first-year players for their respective
teams that have All-America
backgrounds. Green, a junior, was a
junior college A-A last year, while Proc-
tor, a freshman, made several high school
A-A squads a year ago. (Photo By Ken
Martin)
Denkler,
Lady Bucs
Win Big
Beating The Odds
ECU center Al Mack avoids Sta
Nevitt, to score two oj his is j l
Wolfpack Saturday night. (Photo B Ken Via
W INSTON SA1 1
Denkh i
point and pi
bound I
( an ilina win
women'
I) � I
victory. D
career rebi �un I
and scored I
.
In mically. D
nun
The I a
1 :
SIX'
V
E(
-
t !
! l) . Page 9
Charlotte Winning Big gain
Forty-Niners Are Battling Back
B CHARLES HANOI IH
Sp.irl. dilnf
The 49ers are bac ?
No, not the newly-crowned Supei
Bow! champion San Francisco
49ers. Instead, the I N( Charh
49er basketball team.
Oh, you remember. Five years
ago UNCC stole the hearts ol all
Americans by going to the Final
lour of the Nv Champions!
Tournament. Cedric "Cornbrc
Maxwell, now with the Boston
Celtics, led the 49ers to the national
semi-finals. There, I NC( lost to
eventual national champ Marquette
on a last-second bucket.
Since that time things in (. hai lotte
have been rather quiet But, alas,
things seem to be rolling agan
I NCC. The 49ers are 13-3 and have
beaten such teams as South
Alabama. Perm State. Holy c ross,
and Southern Mississippi.
UNCC will have its sights set on
14-3 Wednesday night when the club
comes to Greenville's Minges c "1
iseum to take on a struggling East
Carolina team.
Tip-off time isp.m. I hat time
was changed from the original 7:30
p.m. start to accomodate W B 1 .
which will televise the game live
back to the Charlotte area
The secret to the 4sei success,
says head coach Mike Pratt, has
been leadership, togetherness and
maturity.
"We've matured a great deal
from last year Pratt said. "We're
getting excellent plav from oui
seniors. We're playing very well
together. The guys really appeal at
'That'
: ' v

.i
3-1 ii
hav e six cru
mail ;
poii
lip.
I
qua
Mat I H

bounds pet a
a enj
the ECl
ges on W
, B
Pirates
1

men
t "6 ,
(85-81)i I 67)
strength for I NC
. I � �
ranks eighth ; v H
percent accurac ?' from u ity
sii ipe
Ihe 49 � ire I
nation's op -
Bobby Potts He is 20.4
points pei game, rankini
22nd
nationally.
Senioi guai d Phil ai d
team's scoring leadei las;
Gametime
Changed
: .
t. aro. n's-
with I N(


time.
1i instead
date WBTV,
sing

II t Mil I H s XSillSI
I oul He. ord
ll.rr.ll
I 1
6 V
James Madison Takes Hold Of First
'
I Ml- �M K S s( HI III I I
u1 �n 2
. Md ��.�
. � M�( �
s.l J.n M
Itrnmrson -rn.rC.aror
I s VW IK stUs! I IS
-
M) I ii.l 11
R
-1 (i. '
- Ma 60, O
.� : n A ilmingiofi W
THERE Wl Rl rWO big win
ners in the E( AC South last week
� James Madison and William &
Mary.
JMU's Dukes picked up a big win
and now lead the conference with a
4-1 mark. The club is 13-3 overall.
William and Mary got back into
the league race with a pair of upsets,
handing Richmond its first con
ference loss last Wednesday by an
impressive 70-47 score. Ihe Indians
got by Old Dominion 60-59 in over-
time on Saturday.
The two wins, both coming in
Wilhamsburg, evened the Indians'
conference mark at 2-2.
Indian freshman Keith Cieplicki
played key roles in both of his
team's wins He scored 23 points in
the win over Richmond and 15 in
the victory overMM
James Madison got its fourth
league win by downing ODU on
Wednesday, 60-48 I inton Townes
�0�C
ECAC-South Report
Dukes Defeat Monarch, 60-4H
Indians Have A Big M A
Five I eague Games I oom 1 head
scored 17 points and grabbed eight
rebounds to pace the Dukes.
ODE and Madison were (he twe
pie season favorites to win the con
ference championship. The Monar
chs have fallen upon hard limes,
though. I ast mghi (Monday) the
club lost a non-conference game at
home to Duquense, 79-75. The loss
dropped ODU to 7-8 overall.
TWO TEAMS are tied with
James Madison in the loss column
in conference standings. East
Carolina is 2-1 and Navy 1-1.
No one can be counted out ot the
league race yet, as no club is more
than one game apart from any other
team in the loss column.
FIVE LEAGUE GAMES loom
ahead in this the biggest week thus
far this season in the ECAC-South.
On Wednesday night, George
Mason travels to Old Dominion and
James Madison goes to Navy.
Boih game m: ciutial. I ither
Mason or ODl will suffei a thud
league loss and neithet wants that.
Only two teams, one of them I C I ,
will b� left with only one loss al
JMl and Navy do battle
On Saturday the league race will
shape up even more. Georj e Mason
navels to Madison. William and
Maiv goes to Saw .ad Richmond
navels to Greenville to play 1l
NONtt NI I Rl c I action this
week is scarce, but tough Only
three games w ill be played oul ol the
league, but all ol them are against
highly -respected opponents.
ECU hosts iciuv mated I NC
c 'hai lotte on W ednesday I tic 4sei s
are 13 l and pushing foi a post
season bid
Also on Wednesday, Atlantic
Coast Co n ference me m b e r
Mat viand will plav at William and
Mar
big in
iv when
monwealth plav s at O
1 M v RO! IN
actly been burning it up this -
Despite the fact that the I
currently second in the h v
South with a 2-1
c oach D.ic t )dom club is i
several categories
1 he league has a combint
wmnmg percentage in mes
1 he worst overall mark is E( i
6-9. Old Dominion has the onl
other losing record in the league,
standing at 7 8
I he Iv v South has a wjn.
ning percentage against outside
competition. Again, the Pirate
last in this category ECl is 4-8 out
of the league, standing as the only
1AC-South team without a winn
ing record in non-conference games





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26, 1982
Odom Is Confident
After Slow Buc Start
B IHAR1KS(HANI)LKR
p�'K lllliir
I ast Carolina basketball coach
Dave Odom does not want his
phone ringing off the hook, but he
is glad foi one call he did not expect.
"It made me think Odom said
ai a special pi ess conference Mon-
day. "There was a ereat deal of
validity in w he said
Who is "he"? Well, Odom
� imsclf does not know Vhe
onymous call came to Odom's
home plume last Friday night. I he
ilk! identified himsell onl as an
i (, l senior He went on to tell
Odom what he thought mighi help
she Pirates regroup aftei a 6 start,
which includes a current three-game
wi streak
I he callei told Odom he thought
Pirates had "the makings tor a
it team the coach said. 1 he
went on to sav that he was
confident 1 I could regroup and
tgc a good season.
� 1 hen Odom said, "lie told
me, '� oach, 1 just wish you'd be a
more positive about youi
. ces. Instead ol sa ing
icthing tike vu could use a little
1 think you could show more
fidence. I think it you talk a lit-
nger, some ot your plaers
be more confident
t idom said the advice from the
nymous callei is something that
he has thought long and hard about.
�'1 really appreciated his con-
said the thud-year Pirate
�1 don't want to be swamped
. dls. hut 1 am ver sen-
� tnle's needs. I think tins
person is maybe representative of
more than just himself. His call
showed a great deal of courage and
concern
The call and Odom's new line of
thought prompted, at least in part,
the head coach to call his first press
conference of the season. The
reason for meeting the press, Odom
said, was simple.
"In light of our present overall
record, 1 felt a responsibility to the
team, the students and fans of East
Carolina University to underline
and state my personal commitment
to the games that lie ahead
I wo very tough games loom
ahead for the Pirates. On Wednes-
day night, a rejuvinated UNC-
C luulotte team comes to Greenville.
The 49ers ate 13-3. On Saturday,
Richmond will play in Minges Col-
iseum. The Spiders have upset such
powets as Wake Forest and South
Carolina.
"To the caller and the many
others who feel with a 6-9 record
that the season will not be what we
hoped Odom said. "I say that I
am full) confident things for our
team will take a favorable turn this
week
Odom pointed to the fact that the
Pirates are 2-i in the ECAC-South.
No team in the conference has fewer
losses. Though he admitted the
league record was cause for op-
timism, Odom said it is now-or-
never time for the Pirates.
�'It's time to stand up now and be
counted If we're going to do it.
now is itie time. We cannot start an
latei than right now
Classifieds
FOR SALE
Lady Pirates Bury Wake
( tintinued Vrom Page X
j to 10-7 ! he 1 ad Pirates are
Atlantic c oast C on-
cams.
n io Denklet and tones.
1 i t players scoring in doubk
t 1 illion Han with 13,
I istei with 12 and Darlene
� 11.
Ii L, rill :huled
ke placed two women in dou-
Ba bat a Buv hat �n scor-
. i 10.
I he ECU
an impi essiv i K; aui
Georgia lech Sunday afternoon.
Defense was the key for the I ad
Bucs in that one, as they held
Georgia lech to but 17 points over
the game's firs! 25 minutes.
Denklet scored 23 and Jones 20 to
pace the win on "Super Sunday
EC! is in action again this Friday
when the team travels west to Boone
to face Appalachian State.
I � I !�"
- " I- I �
ho: mi m- u2i-ii
M KI MiKlsl 52l 1 . .
I
1111 v i s : u. - 5:
. v. ,� I � I
OUR DOWNTOWN STORE
THE COLLEGE SHOP
222 East Fifth Street Downtown Greenville
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS
50 off and Less
On Seasonal Fashions
Cash, Master Charge or Visa Only
V
Wachovia
Let's Discuss
Career
Opportunities
January 27,1982
By: Three Wachovia Staff Members
Topic: Sharing Career Opportunities
Location: Rawl Business School
Room 205
Time: 10:00 a.m. Finance Class
Co-Sponsored by
�eta SCappa Alptja
pague,
win
i side
s are
8 out
e miK
winn
tames
Banking
JFratmtitrj
We will have a meeting Thursday, Jan. 28 -
5 p.m. - Mendenhall 221
Speaker: Larry Mallard, City Executive, NCNB
A Real Battle
ECUs Morris Hargrove (right) goes
up against N.C. State's Lorenzo
diaries late in Saturday night's
Pirate-Wolf pack contest. Charles
was called for a foul on the play.
Hargrove converted the two follow-
ing free throws, contributing to his
game total of 13 points. The Bucs
lost, though, 63-53. (Photo By Ken
Martin)
��73 V� Superbeetie SI.800 or
best oiler Call Lev. 7 48 7634 or
lit mi
WATERBEDS DON T pay retail
lor your heated waterbed buy
direct trom mqt and save Buy a
complete M quality pine wood
heated wateibed with 15 yr war
ranty tor as low as S189 (Queen)
H�� (Kinql Layaway avail Call
David tor appointment 748 7408
�40RDICA SKI boots brand new
.lie II medium S7J call 758 837 1
FOR RENT
,40 PER MONTH 3 blocks trom
ampus Roomate Needed. 150
Jeposit and one third utilities
'57 3038
DNE BEDROOM unlurnished
ipartment lor sublease 709
Johnson St Apt D !� blocks trom
ECU 5200 a month rent plus 5200
deposit 7 month sublease Call
�I9 237 1989 alter 6pm
J BEDROOM I-bath apt torrent
PETS OK stove and relnq cen
trai heal and an and spacious
closets One mile trom ECU
available Feb 1st Only 5160 a
month Call 742 J8H after 4
ROOMATE NEEDED beqmnmq
Feb I 5100 mo plus utilities Male
or Female no preterence Call
me 752 7337
FEMALE ROOMATE needed
Georqetowne Apt Across trom
campus Furnished 573 monthly
Call 758 4695
A FEMAlE roomate needed
b.qmninq March I 3 bedrooms.
187 month plus one third utilities
CAII 748 8398 Eastbrook
FEMALE ROOMATE needed �
I per month plus � utilities Private
bedroom 3 mile from campus.
Call 757 0795.
TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
larqe house with younq couple �n
Lake Ellsworth, Greenville. Con
venient to hospital and University.
5120 per month plus '� utilities
Deposit required. Call 75 W
alter 5 30 pm
ROOMATE NEEDED Tar River
Apt 580 a month one third
utilities within easy walking
distance ol campus. Washer,
dryer, dishwasher, disposal.
microwave, etc Call 757 743
HELP
WANTED
HEAVY METAL band on the edge
ot success. All we need is a hot
vocalist, Male or Female to put us
over Call Paul (744 MN1 or Ale�
(I 474 47621
BABYSITTERS NEEDED
weekniqhts and weekends Own
Transportation Call 756 3123 or
7 56 2684
EARN EXTRA cash Commission
aqents trom ECU dormitories
Shiyer Shoe Repair. 822 Dickinson
Ave 758 6879 (Day) 757 4977
(Niqhl)
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's onqmal personalned
art service Have a cartoon donw
os yoursell or a loved one a uni
que qilt idea! 510 lor 8nl0. b'w or
color Call 757 5775
TYPING TERM. thesis,
resumes, dissertations, etc. Pro
lessional quality at Lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn- anytime
7SJ-47JJ
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST; For
term research. thei� papers ar
tides tor publication, disserta
tions, etc Reasonable Rates Call
757 1171 alter 4 pm
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 1734
HAIRCUTS SI by prolessionaHy
licensed Cosmetologist Appoint
ments available Tuesday and
Thursday evenings on4y. Call
Marlena at the Clip Joint 758 M)7.
PERSONALS
WANTED SAN FRANCISCO
4�'ers Pepsi Cap Negotiable
757 6153 work and 355 232 home
POPE: We all knew you had to go
When you went behind the dump
ster in the snow
Now that you had a chance to think
Why then did you use McDonald's
link
P SQUARE Or should I say
pleasantly pleasant, lip quencher
etc. I'm sure thinking about you a
lot these days Love Ya, The FOX
WIN A Pmbaii Machine Fir��
Place Priie in the "Gang Shaw"
given by S't Ep Little Sisters. It
will be at Papa Kati Jan 79 at
1:1. Call ?S-7�I7 tor more ml
Can you kiss all night
Can you eat alt night
How lar can you go
Can ya do it all night
FOUND: LADIES Gold Serpen
tine Bracelet between corners el
1st and led St on Meade St Can
tact LuAnn Jordan 757 311 Found
Mon. Jan If. S:M pm
STAIN WOMEN Oh what a night
w had at Hosemans Palace Once
on tht M-Tram one thing led to
another, the quarter beer, the
bloody mattress, and the mormnq
alter II Mike only knew what you
were up to. The Guys on the
Caboose
RIDERS
RIDE TO CHARLOT7ESVILLE.
Virginia Weekend ol February 17.
Leave anytime. Will Pay tor Gas
Call Debbie 752 717
Place your
CLASSIFIED AD
with
THE
EAST CAROLINIAN
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
and Dry Cleaners
Cleanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8a.m10 p.m.
7 days a week
WOLVERINE
TOUGH OUTSIDE PURE
COMFORT INSIDE
The spirit if ihc bean lurk in every r�i of �hCe fcwtt And
sure l.H.ied Vhram- vnlo take vu �herc the acium is a fuwtctKom
fan Our M sm. tally iinnrd psktrt iv Mnmprr. mure wwff-rewsiaw
than unhide Men. p.Um �breiihev" � lv �� - Waif
air And the deer iu�'� invik �ill urnuiid yur font m amtvm
evcrv icp
J.P. Davenport
& Sons, Inc.
Phone 752-6930
Hwy.264 E.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shgbaigfAn prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-Mcduire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
Dine
With Us
Marathon
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food. Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.55
Now delivering
l FREE
II Conveniently
Ml Located Across From ECU
Phone 752-0326 at 506 Evans St.
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
"The Family Steak House"
MONDAY - mr 1�
CHOPPED STEAK
TUESDAY� S19�
BEEF TIPS
WEDNESDAY� Iff!
CUBED STEAK �
THURSDAY� �f�f
STEAK SANDWICH l
FRIDAY � $7f
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
SATURDAY � s�
BARBECUE RIBS $2
SUNDAY � .t99
STEAK ON A STICK $19'
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T





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26, 1982
- �� "
W'
Harris Wins
At VMI Meet
Pr�oto By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU'S record setting 200 freestyle relay team: (L-R) Nan
George, Nancy James, Jennifer Jayes and Moria McHugh.
Bucs Win Showdown
By THOMAS BRAME
Staff Writer
East Carolina won the showdown
but still was not able to keep rival
North Carolina from leaving Green-
ville with the big spoils last Thurs-
day night.
Thursday's double dual meet
featured a matchup in the women's
200-yard freestyle relay between
UNC's top-ranked foursome and
ECU's fourth-ranked team.
The Lady Pirates pulled off an
upset in that one, coming in with a
time of 1:40.34, a new varsity
record. The Heels finished at
1:42.40.
UNC dominated the rest of the
meet, though, defeating the Lady
Bucs 71-33. The outmanned ECU
men fared little better, falling 81-32.
Sally Reinhardt, though over-
shadowed by the 200 relay win, was
impressive in destroying the varsity
record in the 1,000-yard freestyle by
12 seconds.
"The meet was a good experience
for our girls, to swim against a team
of UNC's caliber said assistant
coach Molly Delozier. "We had
some good individual times
The powerful Lady Tar Heels
finished last season ranked third in
the nation.
The ECU men won only three
events against UNC. Gregor Wray
won the 1,000 freestyle, while Stan
Williams took the 100 freestyle for
the Pirates. In diving, Scott Eagle
won the one-meter event.
One freshman record was broken
in the 200 backstroke, Joakin
Svensson coming in with a time of
1:57.84.
"The kids did a super job said
ECU head coach Ray Scharf, "but
we lost to a better team. We don't
have the personnel Carolina has
As if the Tar Heels were not
enough, Monday night N.C. State
and Virginia Tech invaded Minges
Natatorium.
The Pirates' next meet will be in
Boone against Appalachian State
this Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
By CYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
Staff Writer
The East Carollina
men's track team com-
peted in a meet this past
Saturday at Virginia
Military Institution
(VMI), placing first in
the 55-meter race and
second in four events.
Clint Harris, who
doubles as a Pirate
football player, placed
first in the 55-meter
race with a time of
6:43.
Michael Goins, a
freshman who was ad-
mitted to ECU just this
semester, placed second
in the same event with a
time of 6:44.
ECU's Tim Cephus
placed second in the
400-meter event, even
after injuring his leg
(tendon) on his first
step in the race.
Cephus had a time of
50:19, only three-tenths
of a second behind the
winning time of 49:89.
The ECU track team
also competed in the
500-meter and one-mile
relay events, placing se-
cond in both.
The mile relay four-
some of Carlton
Frazier, Terry Ford,
Keith Clarke and
Shaun Laney combined
for a time of 3:22.0
VMI placed first with
a time of 3:19, much
slower than their
previous time of
3:12.67 at East Ten-
nessee State.
The VMI track,
known to runners as a
"slow track" may have
caused times to be
slower.
The men's track
team will travel to Ohio
State on January 29,
and head coach Bill
Carson said it is still
looking forward to
breaking a time of
3:15.0 in the mile relay.
"We have been
plagued with injuries
on top of this bad
weather Carson said,
"but Ohio State has a
fast track so we should
see better times in all
the events
Carson added that
the team would run the
same events as in the
VMI meet, with the
possibility of including
the 200-meter race.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.173
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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